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(Science Daily)   Scientists discover first evidence of a missing planet, devoured by its red giant star. Still no sign of tiny baby-sized rocket   (sciencedaily.com) divider line 16
    More: Obvious, planets, red giants, astronomy and astrophysics, Hobby-Eberly Telescope, rogue planets, Planetary System, interstellar space, extrasolar planets  
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1614 clicks; posted to Geek » on 21 Aug 2012 at 10:05 AM (1 year ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2012-08-21 10:28:38 AM
Om nom nom nom
 
2012-08-21 10:29:18 AM
Chilling article. All that remains of a planet, maybe an inhabited planet, is a trace of lithium in the spectrum of a star.
It's a sort of spectral tombstone, I suppose.
 
2012-08-21 10:32:55 AM
So is the Earth going to get swallowed up or not when the Sun expands? I've heard it both ways. I demand to know 5-billion-years-from-now-specifics.
 
2012-08-21 11:00:42 AM

"Oh, crap! The planetary survey report is due in ten minutes, but we stayed up all night drinking! What are we going to do?"
"Relax, I've got this."

REPORT ON THE NON-^EXISTENCE OF A PLANET IN SYSTEM BD+48 740
 
2012-08-21 11:05:17 AM
The Earth seems to be a bit marginal, so it may not be certain for some time what will happen to it five billion years from now or so. We might end up one of those red-hot ember planets that circle their star almost darting into the flames, so to speak., or we might end up a trace of Lithium, slowly vanishing in a red giant's slow burn.

Mercury and Venus are expected to be swallowed up, Mars ought to survive, making a possible future refuge for humans should we survive so long as to see the Sun super-heat the Earth, which is infinitisimally probable. The Moons of Saturn and Jupiter might provide refuge for life which is likely to survive us, if only in microbial form.

All water will have vanished from the Earth's surface in about one billion years according to scientists. The water will be cracked into hydrogen and oxygen and gradually the hydrogen will leak into space from whence it came in some form or other. The oxygen ought to oxydize the surface making it red like Mars, although some of it will leak into space as well.

It's a sad ending, but at least we'll have our dignity. That and maybe a few gold plaques on the Moon and bits of space debris.

I think we should put a giant gold plaque on the Moon and another on Mars reading: "We came, we saw, we littered."

I have my name on a couple of disks on Mars and space probes. They add these to interest the public in space projects at the low cost of a few grams of payload (maybe a few thousand dollars worth, maybe less).

It's sort of an opportunity to personalize the space probes your tax dollars (if you are American, Canadian, or possibly European) paid for. Perhaps they will be all that is left of me and mine in a few thousand years, let alone a few billion. All that work on my genealogy, to be one of a few thousad or million distant cousins whose names survive us all. Seems kind of pointless in the very long run, but as John Maynard Keynes observed, "in the long run, we are all dead".
 
2012-08-21 11:07:36 AM
fandommenacepodcast.files.wordpress.com
/not amused
 
2012-08-21 11:14:34 AM

semiotix: "Oh, crap! The planetary survey report is due in ten minutes, but we stayed up all night drinking! What are we going to do?"
"Relax, I've got this."

REPORT ON THE NON-^EXISTENCE OF A PLANET IN SYSTEM BD+48 740


Non-existent planets are like un-birthdays. There are so many more of them, it makes sense to celebrate them rather than the other. 364 unbirthdays a year to one birthday (365 in leap years).

It is recommened that you celebrate with a very small cupcake rather than the whole hog birthday monstrosity though. You can severely limit the number of your unbirthdays if you celebrate them too hard. It's not the birthdays that get you. It's the unbirthdays.
 
2012-08-21 11:49:55 AM

brantgoose: The Earth seems to be a bit marginal, so it may not be certain for some time what will happen to it five billion years from now or so. We might end up one of those red-hot ember planets that circle their star almost darting into the flames, so to speak., or we might end up a trace of Lithium, slowly vanishing in a red giant's slow burn.

Mercury and Venus are expected to be swallowed up, Mars ought to survive, making a possible future refuge for humans should we survive so long as to see the Sun super-heat the Earth, which is infinitisimally probable. The Moons of Saturn and Jupiter might provide refuge for life which is likely to survive us, if only in microbial form.

All water will have vanished from the Earth's surface in about one billion years according to scientists. The water will be cracked into hydrogen and oxygen and gradually the hydrogen will leak into space from whence it came in some form or other. The oxygen ought to oxydize the surface making it red like Mars, although some of it will leak into space as well.

It's a sad ending, but at least we'll have our dignity. That and maybe a few gold plaques on the Moon and bits of space debris.

I think we should put a giant gold plaque on the Moon and another on Mars reading: "We came, we saw, we littered."

I have my name on a couple of disks on Mars and space probes. They add these to interest the public in space projects at the low cost of a few grams of payload (maybe a few thousand dollars worth, maybe less).

It's sort of an opportunity to personalize the space probes your tax dollars (if you are American, Canadian, or possibly European) paid for. Perhaps they will be all that is left of me and mine in a few thousand years, let alone a few billion. All that work on my genealogy, to be one of a few thousad or million distant cousins whose names survive us all. Seems kind of pointless in the very long run, but as John Maynard Keynes observed, "in the long run, we are all dead".


We have the voyage space probes also. They should survive for a while.
 
2012-08-21 12:23:58 PM
Now we know the fate of Kataan

wadeintheriver.org
"Let me play you the song of my people."
 
2012-08-21 12:43:37 PM
This is Ceti Alpha V!
 
2012-08-21 01:55:51 PM

brantgoose: I have my name on a couple of disks on Mars and space probes. They add these to interest the public in space projects at the low cost of a few grams of payload (maybe a few thousand dollars worth, maybe less).


How do you sign up for this?
 
2012-08-21 02:32:05 PM
Kharak is burning...
 
2012-08-21 03:13:48 PM
all your planets are belong to us
 
2012-08-21 05:27:15 PM
Love the Batman reference, subby.
 
2012-08-22 10:00:07 AM
Back a couple of billion years or so there were about 120 planets, they routinely collided with each other; some results of the collisions were asteroid belts, but the Earth is a product of two planets colliding resulting in one left. Well, at least according to the latest geophysical research.
 
2012-08-22 12:13:53 PM

brantgoose: It's sort of an opportunity to personalize the space probes your tax dollars (if you are American, Canadian, or possibly European) paid for. Perhaps they will be all that is left of me and mine in a few thousand years, let alone a few billion. All that work on my genealogy, to be one of a few thousad or million distant cousins whose names survive us all. Seems kind of pointless in the very long run, but as John Maynard Keynes observed, "in the long run, we are all dead".


I heard of that guy. Aside from his work in economics, his theories on the mechanics of orbital insertion physics are intriguing. Morose, but still intriguing.

I prefer another guy who simply said, "The nitrogen in our DNA, the calcium in our teeth, the iron in our blood, the carbon in our apple pies were made in the interiors of collapsing stars. We are made of starstuff." It gives us the tiniest feeling of connectedness to everything. Plus he's tied just a tad to the Voyager probes, which will hopefully outlast the death of our solar system.
 
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