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(Space.com)   How about a Hoverbike while you're waiting on that flying car?   (space.com) divider line 4
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5248 clicks; posted to Geek » on 21 Aug 2012 at 3:00 AM (2 years ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2012-08-21 03:05:33 PM
1 votes:

namatad: Link


Thank you for linking. I'd not been to Space.com in a bit and apparently, now, they have their head so far up facebook's ass the page won't even load. I like blocking aggressive scripts like those of facebook.
2012-08-21 09:01:51 AM
1 votes:

way south: He's a scam artist with a working flight test article.
Moller's financial issues aside, Can we both agree that is a flying car?


In it's current incarnation, it can do little more than hover. It's been that way for at least 10 years now, if not more. In fact, I don't believe it has flown since 2003, and every time it was flown it was tethered.

They sit there on the shelf because Moller hasn't demonstrated that he's got a controllable aircraft that can successfully transition from hover, to level flight, and then back to hover. Then we have the reliability issues: In essence, that's a 4 engine aircraft, and because it has little lift generating ability beyond engine thrust, if you lose an engine you're toast.

Then we have fuel consumption. Each engine is rated at about .4 lbs of fuel consumption per horsepower hour. He's got 4 180 horsepower engines on the M400. That means that it will consume ((180*4) * .4) = 288 lbs of gas, or around 46 gallons an hour. He claims a range of 750 miles. At a cruising speed of 305 mph, it will use a minimum of 113 gallons of gas, plus you'll need a half hour reserve, which is another 23 gallons, so you're looking at 136 gallons full up, which is going to weigh about 850 lbs.

According to Moller's specifications for the M400, the max gross weight of the vehicle is 2,400 lbs, and the "max net payload" is 750 lbs. Assuming that doesn't include the fuel, that would mean the vehicle empty weight is around 2,400 - 750 = 1,650 - 850 = 800 lbs. The engines he's using get 1.5 HP per installed lb, so the engines and ancillary stuff like mounts and wiring will account for 480 lbs of that, leaving an empty airframe weight of 320 lbs.

That just doesn't seem right, not for an aircraft with a max speed of 360 mph. For example, my father's plane has an empty airframe weight (minus engine) about half that, and it's only rated for a single passenger with a Vne of 100 MPH IAS.

I can't see where Moller is going to triple the capacity and more than triple the airspeed by only doubling the weight. I'm not an aeronautical engineer, but something just doesn't seem right there.
2012-08-21 07:03:00 AM
1 votes:

way south: DjangoStonereaver: Looks like a sexed up Piasecki Airgeep.

Note: this is not necessarily a bad thing.

Not as much as this looks like it.

[dl.dropbox.com image 600x450]

The flying car thing is still very much alive.
Some were/are even more promising in their performance.

[dl.dropbox.com image 500x426]

Question is why aren't they hitting the market even tho the technology has been getting better.
The FAA has licenses ready to issue and people keep saying they want them... and they just sit there on the shelf.


I'd never heard of the Israeli Air Jeep, but that second thing is the Moller Skycar, which has been
5-10 years away from commercial release for the last 15 years, so citing a scam artist who's been
the subject of an SEC investigation doesn't bolster the case for personal flying vehicles.
2012-08-21 03:04:47 AM
1 votes:

namatad: Link


Funny how every photo of it is either flat on the ground, or about a foot off the ground with at least four tethers to keep it straight.
 
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