Do you have adblock enabled?
If you can read this, either the style sheet didn't load or you have an older browser that doesn't support style sheets. Try clearing your browser cache and refreshing the page.

(MSNBC)   Tech tools ease parental worry over their teen drivers. Common sense and good parenting not available for comment   (msnbc.msn.com) divider line 53
    More: Stupid, teen drivers, common sense, aggressive driving, public roads  
•       •       •

3232 clicks; posted to Main » on 19 Aug 2012 at 1:25 PM (3 years ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



53 Comments   (+0 »)
   
View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest

Archived thread

First | « | 1 | 2 | » | Last | Show all
 
2012-08-19 10:39:23 AM  
Granted, these devices were not around when I began driving, but even if they were, my parents had a money saving plan that was just as effective:

1. This car is ours, and you have the privilege of driving it
2. Bring it back undamaged and full of fuel, or your ass is grass
3. Tickets are on you, and you'll be donating your earned allowance to cover the extra insurance
 
2012-08-19 01:29:29 PM  
Parents who need to purchase this need to re-evaluate the way they parent. This is nothing more than helicopter parenting at its very worst.
 
2012-08-19 01:29:42 PM  
How many parents will install those devices and then shut them down after the first few annoying texts?
 
2012-08-19 01:30:28 PM  
TFA: The TiwiFamily driving aid can tell the driver when they're speeding, not wearing their seat belt, or even driving too aggressively.

They should attach these to every truck sold along with a device that shrinks penis size a little bit for each infraction.
 
2012-08-19 01:31:21 PM  
Aside from the video games, being a kid sucks now.

No freedom. No trust. No privacy. No future.
 
2012-08-19 01:33:19 PM  
FTFA: "...a broad range of high-tech parent stand-ins is available.."

Kinda gives me the heebie jeebies, really. Just parent your farking kids.

/Poorly written article too
 
2012-08-19 01:34:48 PM  

AcneVulgaris: Aside from the video games, being a kid sucks now.

No freedom. No trust. No privacy. No future.


This. Getting my license was a freedom for me. My parents allowed me to go out more, stay out later, and generally, be more free. Yes, there were consequences for breaking a law (for instance going to Juvi Court to pay a speeding fine), but my parents never had to nanny me for me. I think parents that install these should give their kids the same thing in return. How funny would it be to see mommy and daddy breaking all these rules on a minute by minute basis during their morning commutes?

It's just stupid. If you can't trust your kid, why have them in the first place?
 
2012-08-19 01:37:57 PM  
And ater showing parents how to install and operate these things. Thay'll just turn them off.
 
2012-08-19 01:39:35 PM  
If I was my parents raising me, I would have totally put something like this in my car. Fortunately for me, this kind of technology wasn't available in '95.

Hang all the belt onions you want and lament the decline of teenage freedom, but I'm not letting a 16 year old with a couple months experience pilot a one ton battering ram around without some supervision just because I was able to.

/run on sentence ran on.
 
2012-08-19 01:44:29 PM  

stuffy: And ater showing parents how to install and operate these things. Thay'll just turn them off.


An alert goes out when it is turned off.

In general I don't see out as a bad thing. At least the recording of texting while driving. Kids text while driving and it is very dangerous. This us a way for parents to make sure their kids don't.


The same rules that applied 20 years ago don't today.
 
2012-08-19 01:45:07 PM  
STUPID!
 
2012-08-19 01:45:26 PM  
Something about how I was so much better than lazy, stupid, spoiled kids today. Now back to watching my lawn...
 
2012-08-19 01:46:06 PM  

seadoo2006: AcneVulgaris: Aside from the video games, being a kid sucks now.

No freedom. No trust. No privacy. No future.

This. Getting my license was a freedom for me. My parents allowed me to go out more, stay out later, and generally, be more free. Yes, there were consequences for breaking a law (for instance going to Juvi Court to pay a speeding fine), but my parents never had to nanny me for me. I think parents that install these should give their kids the same thing in return. How funny would it be to see mommy and daddy breaking all these rules on a minute by minute basis during their morning commutes?

It's just stupid. If you can't trust your kid, why have them in the first place?


Tax write offs?
 
2012-08-19 01:47:37 PM  

Hiro Nakamura: If I was my parents raising me, I would have totally put something like this in my car. Fortunately for me, this kind of technology wasn't available in '95.

Hang all the belt onions you want and lament the decline of teenage freedom, but I'm not letting a 16 year old with a couple months experience pilot a one ton battering ram around without some supervision just because I was able to.

/run on sentence ran on.


Don't have children.
 
2012-08-19 01:52:40 PM  
Quaker

Too late. I think I'm doing a pretty decent job. Thankfully I have about 4 more years before we have to deal with this particular issue.
 
2012-08-19 01:57:35 PM  

seadoo2006: Parents who need to purchase this need to re-evaluate the way they parent. This is nothing more than helicopter parenting at its very worst.


My parents were decent parents.

I still drove like a typical 16 year old boy.

You need to STFU and GFY.

/will probably do something similar when my kids are driving, and we're good parents


Hiro Nakamura: If I was my parents raising me, I would have totally put something like this in my car. Fortunately for me, this kind of technology wasn't available in '95.

Hang all the belt onions you want and lament the decline of teenage freedom, but I'm not letting a 16 year old with a couple months experience pilot a one ton battering ram around without some supervision just because I was able to.

/run on sentence ran on.


THIS. EXACTLY.
 
2012-08-19 01:59:23 PM  

Hiro Nakamura: Quaker

Too late. I think I'm doing a pretty decent job. Thankfully I have about 4 more years before we have to deal with this particular issue.


How can it be too late when they just barely entered their teens? You can call it a job well done when they're in their 20s and no longer in your basement.
 
2012-08-19 02:01:30 PM  
I'd chip my kids with a GPS unit but only in case they go missing. the spyware and GPS apps on their cell phones would be strictly for the lulz.
 
2012-08-19 02:06:52 PM  

Hiro Nakamura: Hang all the belt onions you want and lament the decline of teenage freedom, but I'm not letting a 16 year old with a couple months experience pilot a one ton battering ram around without some supervision just because I was able to.


I think every state is at least 6 months for a permit now, some a lot longer, and lots of other restrictions depending on the state like driving at night and how many young passengers you can have.
 
2012-08-19 02:12:18 PM  
My dad knew I was going to drive like a typical 16 year old would, so they bought me my first car, which was a 1978 Volkswagen Rabbit that cost them $600. He took it to a mechanic buddy of his, put new rubber on it, gave it a tune up, made sure it was running well and safe, then brought it home. When he pulled it in to the driveway he told me that I could speed all I want, burn the tires as much as I want and go as fast as I want. He also told me that from now on, I had to pay for insurance, gas, tires and any other mechanical issues the car might run in to. I also had to pay for any tickets I got, and that each ticket would result in me losing the car for a month, and that I would have to take the bus wherever I went because they were no longer my chauffeurs and I was not allowed to drive their vehicles. As a result of that simple talk, I never got a ticket, took good care of the car, and actually improved my grades because it made my insurance cheaper.

That's the exact same thing I'm going to do for my kid when he turns 16. I might do something along the lines of disabling text to the phone while driving - not because I don't trust him, but because already at age 12 he's getting about 2 dozen texts a day from his friends and I don't even want there to be a temptation of a distraction. I honestly don't think his friends even know how to talk on a phone (don't get me started on that) so I'm not too worried about him talking and driving.

Now, my wife's car? Yeah - totally getting one of these for her....
 
2012-08-19 02:30:24 PM  
The My Little Pony Killer

Too late to not have kids, and doing well so far based on most people's standards. Well behaved (at least in public), well-mannered, and do well in school. They have their flaws but as long as the grades stay up and I don't get visits from te police dept, we're cool.

12349876

I know but 6 months is just enough to build confidence without the experience to back it up.
 
2012-08-19 02:32:03 PM  

Your Average Witty Fark User: seadoo2006: Parents who need to purchase this need to re-evaluate the way they parent. This is nothing more than helicopter parenting at its very worst.

My parents were decent parents.

I still drove like a typical 16 year old boy.

You need to STFU and GFY.

/will probably do something similar when my kids are driving, and we're good parents


Hiro Nakamura: If I was my parents raising me, I would have totally put something like this in my car. Fortunately for me, this kind of technology wasn't available in '95.

Hang all the belt onions you want and lament the decline of teenage freedom, but I'm not letting a 16 year old with a couple months experience pilot a one ton battering ram around without some supervision just because I was able to.

/run on sentence ran on.

THIS. EXACTLY.


Where do you expect your children to learn maturity if they're never afforded the opportunity to really demonstrate it?
This all reminds me of some study I read via Fark some months ago wherein they compared the rate of maturity and the overall value systems of children from the U.S. with those of children from some Amazon tribe. These were kids who by the age of three were handed machetes and told to go clear the undergrowth from the perimeter of the village. The study's findings were that these kids matured much faster than children in America, and had much stronger community-oriented values, including things like going to significant lengths to help out a neighbor when there was no immediate anticipated benefit for them personally.
We spend our kids' entire youth reinforcing the idea that they aren't responsible enough to be trusted with anything really significant, like using a machete or operating a car unsupervised, and then we expect them to just somehow be responsible out of thin air. So they grow up feeling infantilzed and, thus, looking for ways to prove to themselves that they aren't. Until eventually, they come upon an idea that will make them feel like an adult and which no one will question them for because it's a decision that seems to be considered infallible- have a kid of their own. Because that's what adults do and everyone will pat you on the back for it. So they create a brand new human being to try and solve their own emotional problems, which causes them to infantilize their children, and the cycle continues. 

The more someone needs to insist that they are/would be a good parent, the more this tends to be the case.
 
2012-08-19 02:44:56 PM  
Call me old fashioned, but if you feel the need to put these devices in the vehicle your snowflake drives, then perhaps said snowflake shouldn't be driving.
 
2012-08-19 02:51:46 PM  

FilmBELOH20: I might do something along the lines of disabling text to the phone while driving - not because I don't trust him, but because already at age 12 he's getting about 2 dozen texts a day from his friends and I don't even want there to be a temptation of a distraction.


I'm pretty sure that's the definition of mistrust.

Otherwise, I liked your post. Your dad sounds like he totally gets it.
 
2012-08-19 02:57:59 PM  
my parents were not well educated, well off or mentally well. my siblings and i learned a lesson in responsibility by having to get jobs and pay for our own shiat. this started real early in life. if you wanted anything beyond a set of new school clothes & what Santa brought you that year, you got the hell out and made it happen. you bought your own car. and your own insurance policy, gasoline and maintenance. when you have to bust your arse to earn something you don't treat it like crap.
 
2012-08-19 03:04:55 PM  
A simple truth. Teenagers are farking morons. The more teenagers you gather in one place, the greater the stupidity. It's a basic law of the universe. That's why you never want to let your teen drive the SUV. They can pack too many friends into it and you end up with a collective IQ of potato.

A friend is at the point of thinking about getting his teenage daughter a car. I convinced him to get a used Miata. He'll be the "coolest dad EVAH! (for about 10 minutes), and limits the passengers to a single person. Any two seater car will do, but used Miatas are cheap reliable.
 
2012-08-19 03:09:11 PM  

shtychkn: stuffy: And ater showing parents how to install and operate these things. Thay'll just turn them off.

An alert goes out when it is turned off.

In general I don't see out as a bad thing. At least the recording of texting while driving. Kids text while driving and it is very dangerous. This us a way for parents to make sure their kids don't.


The same rules that applied 20 years ago don't today.


Right. Now if we can come up with a way to keep the parents from texting/yakking on their cell phones while driving.
 
2012-08-19 03:26:16 PM  
Every kid is different. Same upbringing, different kids.

I have one kid with an insanely good self motivated work ethic. Earned a full scholarship to a fine college. ($160,000 value) She got my car whenever she wanted it.

The other kid, a different person entirely. She rarely gets to use my car because I don't trust her with it. She gets to learn about maturity the hard way at this point. She can pay for her own car, insurance, gas, and maintenance costs if she ever earns enough. Had her chance, muffed it.
 
2012-08-19 03:27:19 PM  

OgreMagi: A friend is at the point of thinking about getting his teenage daughter a car. I convinced him to get a used Miata. He'll be the "coolest dad EVAH! (for about 10 minutes), and limits the passengers to a single person. Any two seater car will do, but used Miatas are cheap reliable.


Not long out of my teens, I had a Fiat X1/9. 2 seater, same size as a Miata. Squeezed 4 people in it one evening.
 
2012-08-19 03:33:39 PM  

YouPeopleAreCrazy: OgreMagi: A friend is at the point of thinking about getting his teenage daughter a car. I convinced him to get a used Miata. He'll be the "coolest dad EVAH! (for about 10 minutes), and limits the passengers to a single person. Any two seater car will do, but used Miatas are cheap reliable.

Not long out of my teens, I had a Fiat X1/9. 2 seater, same size as a Miata. Squeezed 4 people in it one evening.


True, but seat belt laws make that illegal these days.  Yes, teens will try to do it anyway, but when the kid gets a ticket and you take the car away for nice long period for doing something so stupid, the message might penetrate that hormone infused teen brain.
 
2012-08-19 03:36:01 PM  

Quaker: FilmBELOH20: I might do something along the lines of disabling text to the phone while driving - not because I don't trust him, but because already at age 12 he's getting about 2 dozen texts a day from his friends and I don't even want there to be a temptation of a distraction.

I'm pretty sure that's the definition of mistrust.

Otherwise, I liked your post. Your dad sounds like he totally gets it.


Not really, I totally trust him to make good decisions, and as long as he doesn't do something between now and then to change that, I'll let him have a lot of freedom to screw up as a teenager and hopefully turn him in to a good adult. The thing about texting is that it's second nature for him (and me, and my wife) to instantly reach for the phone when it goes off. I'll admit that I've read texts while driving, and been tempted to respond to them. The difference is that I've got 27 years of driving experience, and I don't get near the quantity of texts that the kid does.
 
2012-08-19 03:37:22 PM  

OgreMagi: True, but seat belt laws make that illegal these days


My youngest daughters first crash (pre-license!) was in her then boyfriends dads Miata.
Totaled it.
 
2012-08-19 03:39:57 PM  

FilmBELOH20: Quaker: FilmBELOH20: I might do something along the lines of disabling text to the phone while driving - not because I don't trust him, but because already at age 12 he's getting about 2 dozen texts a day from his friends and I don't even want there to be a temptation of a distraction.

I'm pretty sure that's the definition of mistrust.

Otherwise, I liked your post. Your dad sounds like he totally gets it.

Not really, I totally trust him to make good decisions, and as long as he doesn't do something between now and then to change that, I'll let him have a lot of freedom to screw up as a teenager and hopefully turn him in to a good adult. The thing about texting is that it's second nature for him (and me, and my wife) to instantly reach for the phone when it goes off. I'll admit that I've read texts while driving, and been tempted to respond to them. The difference is that I've got 27 years of driving experience, and I don't get near the quantity of texts that the kid does.


Gee...I wonder where he learned that from? 

/don't do that
 
2012-08-19 04:07:47 PM  
I started driving a 66' Ford 3/4 ton 4 speed at the age of 14 in my parents fields, as well as various tractors. Most children today have zero experience behind the wheel of a car until after they get their learners permit. I know, I know. Kids these days blah blah blah. Say what you will about me but that's part of a fundamental shift in driving instruction, and I'm only 31.
 
2012-08-19 04:18:26 PM  

Quaker: Your Average Witty Fark User: seadoo2006: Parents who need to purchase this need to re-evaluate the way they parent. This is nothing more than helicopter parenting at its very worst.

My parents were decent parents.

I still drove like a typical 16 year old boy.

You need to STFU and GFY.

/will probably do something similar when my kids are driving, and we're good parents


Hiro Nakamura: If I was my parents raising me, I would have totally put something like this in my car. Fortunately for me, this kind of technology wasn't available in '95.

Hang all the belt onions you want and lament the decline of teenage freedom, but I'm not letting a 16 year old with a couple months experience pilot a one ton battering ram around without some supervision just because I was able to.

/run on sentence ran on.

THIS. EXACTLY.

Where do you expect your children to learn maturity if they're never afforded the opportunity to really demonstrate it?
This all reminds me of some study I read via Fark some months ago wherein they compared the rate of maturity and the overall value systems of children from the U.S. with those of children from some Amazon tribe. These were kids who by the age of three were handed machetes and told to go clear the undergrowth from the perimeter of the village. The study's findings were that these kids matured much faster than children in America, and had much stronger community-oriented values, including things like going to significant lengths to help out a neighbor when there was no immediate anticipated benefit for them personally.
We spend our kids' entire youth reinforcing the idea that they aren't responsible enough to be trusted with anything really significant, like using a machete or operating a car unsupervised, and then we expect them to just somehow be responsible out of thin air. So they grow up feeling infantilzed and, thus, looking for ways to prove to themselves that they aren't. Until eventually, they come upon an idea that will make the ...


Maturity is them telling me they were at such and such place, and the device agrees. Maturity is telling me they didn't speed excessively or that they were belted in- and the device agrees. Do this for a few months, and I'll drop it.

I don't question your parenting skills, I don't need you questioning mine.
 
2012-08-19 04:33:42 PM  

Your Average Witty Fark User: Quaker: Your Average Witty Fark User: seadoo2006: Parents who need to purchase this need to re-evaluate the way they parent. This is nothing more than helicopter parenting at its very worst.

My parents were decent parents.

I still drove like a typical 16 year old boy.

You need to STFU and GFY.

/will probably do something similar when my kids are driving, and we're good parents


Hiro Nakamura: If I was my parents raising me, I would have totally put something like this in my car. Fortunately for me, this kind of technology wasn't available in '95.

Hang all the belt onions you want and lament the decline of teenage freedom, but I'm not letting a 16 year old with a couple months experience pilot a one ton battering ram around without some supervision just because I was able to.

/run on sentence ran on.

THIS. EXACTLY.

Where do you expect your children to learn maturity if they're never afforded the opportunity to really demonstrate it?
This all reminds me of some study I read via Fark some months ago wherein they compared the rate of maturity and the overall value systems of children from the U.S. with those of children from some Amazon tribe. These were kids who by the age of three were handed machetes and told to go clear the undergrowth from the perimeter of the village. The study's findings were that these kids matured much faster than children in America, and had much stronger community-oriented values, including things like going to significant lengths to help out a neighbor when there was no immediate anticipated benefit for them personally.
We spend our kids' entire youth reinforcing the idea that they aren't responsible enough to be trusted with anything really significant, like using a machete or operating a car unsupervised, and then we expect them to just somehow be responsible out of thin air. So they grow up feeling infantilzed and, thus, looking for ways to prove to themselves that they aren't. Until eventually, they come upon an idea that will ...


This is the definition of why youth in America suck ... their parents. I knew kids whose parents were like you ... sure, they turned out fine, but after trying to make it in the real world for 6 months, they've all ended up back at home, unable to cope with the real world.

When you BABY your kids, even to the point of babying them with a car, you end up with babies as offspring for the rest of their lives. Simply put, you are crippling your kids. By 10 years of age, I was riding my bike around Cleveland, exploring, living life as a kid, playing stickball. By 16, I had my license and I had the trust of my parents. Did I crash a car? Of course, but it was a learning experience. I had to pay to fix it, had to own up to screwing up, and had to figure it out for myself. Did I get a ticket or two? Of course, but after a trip to Juvi Court and a pretty expensive fine and a state-issued suspension, yeah, I learned.

It truly makes me sad that parents are so unwilling to let their kids figure out life by learning through mistakes. You absolutely, unequivocally, ruin your kids esteem and self worth by doing this to them.

You are a helicopter parent. Just own up to it and accept that fact. You are the same parent that in 4 years when they get a "D" on their research paper in Pysch 204, will be calling the professor demanding why. It's a sad, sorry state we're in and you are part of the problem.
 
2012-08-19 04:40:18 PM  
People are so used to the government and such doing this shiat that they think it's OK.
 
2012-08-19 04:55:00 PM  

YouPeopleAreCrazy: OgreMagi: A friend is at the point of thinking about getting his teenage daughter a car. I convinced him to get a used Miata. He'll be the "coolest dad EVAH! (for about 10 minutes), and limits the passengers to a single person. Any two seater car will do, but used Miatas are cheap reliable.

Not long out of my teens, I had a Fiat X1/9. 2 seater, same size as a Miata. Squeezed 4 people in it one evening.


I did that with a Fiat 850 (a truly interesting experience).
 
2012-08-19 04:56:11 PM  
Don't spare the rod.
Put down the remote control.
Teach your children well.

All this becomes unnecessary.
 
2012-08-19 04:58:42 PM  

Another Government Employee: YouPeopleAreCrazy: OgreMagi: A friend is at the point of thinking about getting his teenage daughter a car. I convinced him to get a used Miata. He'll be the "coolest dad EVAH! (for about 10 minutes), and limits the passengers to a single person. Any two seater car will do, but used Miatas are cheap reliable.

Not long out of my teens, I had a Fiat X1/9. 2 seater, same size as a Miata. Squeezed 4 people in it one evening.

I did that with a Fiat 850 (a truly interesting experience).


My parents shoved 8 of us into our Civic ... my brother and I in the trunk, haha ... you new-age Gen Y parents are way too soft ...
 
2012-08-19 05:12:41 PM  
Seriously, if you think this is a good idea, don't have kids. Just get a dog. Or better yet, a tomagotchi or something.
 
2012-08-19 05:35:42 PM  

Dow Jones and the Temple of Doom: Seriously, if you think this is a good idea, don't have kids. Just get a dog. Or better yet, a tomagotchi or something.


The week after you buy this crap the cars will drive themselves and your little crotch rebels won't be able to use them as weapons.
You betcha
 
2012-08-19 05:43:05 PM  

The My Little Pony Killer: Hiro Nakamura: Quaker

Too late. I think I'm doing a pretty decent job. Thankfully I have about 4 more years before we have to deal with this particular issue.

How can it be too late when they just barely entered their teens? You can call it a job well done when they're in their 20s and no longer in your basement.


Reading comprehension fail.
 
2012-08-19 05:52:57 PM  
Here is how my parents handled it.

1) These are my cars, you may use them if you have a reason and ask. Joyriding around with your friends is not a reason
2) Yes you may indeed get a job and purchase your own. But as you know we require you to put 80% of everything you own into the bank for college.
3) If you get a ticket you will be required to turn in your license which you will be free to apply for again when you are 18.

Yea, I never got a ticket.
 
2012-08-19 05:53:49 PM  
I wouldn't let my kid drive at all, except then he'd get a ride with your idiot kids. So I'll get something like this, and if he doesn't like it, he can walk.

This sort of thing is also going to start showing up in fleet vehicles when the insurance companies hike the rates of companies that won't install them. In 10 years, half the Farkers on this thread will have some kind of monitor like these in their plumber's vans or whatnot.
 
2012-08-19 06:34:52 PM  
Everything that used to be fun is now illegal.

/No kids
//Could hear myself saying "I'm not angry son, just disappointed" a lot if I did have one
///Although God would probably pull a Louie CK on me and curse me with two girls
 
2012-08-19 06:41:20 PM  
11 college students in a (~10 year old) 1980 SAAB 900.

Hey- at least we had a designated driver.
 
2012-08-19 11:31:15 PM  
"Everyone who raises their kids their way instead of my way is an idiot, and is contributing to the downfall of society."

"Oh, yeah? Fark you, basement-dweller."

"Fark YOU, fascist."

Does that about cover it?
 
2012-08-19 11:51:10 PM  

AcneVulgaris: Aside from the video games, being a kid sucks now.

No freedom. No trust. No privacy. No future.


I'm a Gen-Yer and I had all of that along side the video games. Not all Boomer/Xers are overbearing parents.
 
2012-08-20 12:23:13 AM  

Your Average Witty Fark User: Maturity is them telling me they were at such and such place, and the device agrees. Maturity is telling me they didn't speed excessively or that they were belted in- and the device agrees. Do this for a few months, and I'll drop it.

I don't question your parenting skills, I don't need you questioning mine.


What's mature about not lying when there's an electronic device monitoring their every move? Maturity is telling the truth when you have the ability to lie. If you take away their ability to lie, they don't have a chance to develop real maturity, they just learn that they have to be extra careful about lying to you.
Second, more people should question the parenting skills of others, because "don't tell me how to raise my children" is the de facto response of bad parents everywhere. It's how damaged people raise damaged kids generation after generation, because no one is telling them that what they're doing is wrong. If you don't want to hear outside ideas about parenting in order to have as many different perspectives as possible and, thus, possibly become a better parent, then you're too self-important to be raising kids to begin with.
 
Displayed 50 of 53 comments

First | « | 1 | 2 | » | Last | Show all

View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest


This thread is archived, and closed to new comments.

Continue Farking
Submit a Link »
Advertisement
On Twitter






In Other Media


  1. Links are submitted by members of the Fark community.

  2. When community members submit a link, they also write a custom headline for the story.

  3. Other Farkers comment on the links. This is the number of comments. Click here to read them.

  4. Click here to submit a link.

Report