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(Sun Sentinel)   CDC urges baby boomers to get tested for Hepatitis C, as they would have had the most contact with Pamela Anderson   (sun-sentinel.com) divider line 36
    More: PSA, hepatitis C, liver cancers, baby boomers, cirrhosis  
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2255 clicks; posted to Main » on 17 Aug 2012 at 10:08 AM (2 years ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2012-08-17 10:13:17 AM
It's tool time
 
2012-08-17 10:17:03 AM
The Pam Andersen/HepC thing was a while ago, but this made me LOL. Good job, subby.
 
2012-08-17 10:18:07 AM
Makes a lot of sense and this should have been mandated a long time ago as part of normal blood work. Most other industrial countries have been doing that for years.
 
2012-08-17 10:19:41 AM
i47.tinypic.com

As a medical fact, it's incredibly difficult to detect jaundice in asians.
 
2012-08-17 10:21:24 AM
Quiet! The sooner we get rid of them the better!
 
2012-08-17 10:42:37 AM
Hep C is why I won't even touch a girl with tattoos.
 
2012-08-17 10:42:38 AM
Not surprising. I know a shiat ton of people in that age group that have it, including several family members. Just about all former IV drug users in that age group seem to have it, and a lot of who have never used have it. My cousin recently died at almost 60 yrs old from complications from liver cancer and hep c, and he was never a user.

I get really paranoid that I've somehow picked it up due to all the people I've been around, even though I'm really careful to avoid any type possible blood contact.

I wonder why he presence is so high in that specific age group anyway. I never looked into it.
 
2012-08-17 10:46:58 AM
And I'll say the same thing I say every damned time this story has been posted:

1) Why should baby boomers who have never received a blood transfusion, had an organ transplant nor were IV drug users who shared needles be tested?

2) If the CDC wants all boomers to be tested, even if they haven't done any of the above listed things, who will pay for the tests?
 
2012-08-17 10:52:38 AM
Very old news is the very best news.
 
2012-08-17 10:57:21 AM
As a combat medic w/ +HepA serology thanks to RVN, I am getting a kick out of
 
2012-08-17 11:02:06 AM

Bathia_Mapes: 1) Why should baby boomers who have never received a blood transfusion, had an organ transplant nor were IV drug users who shared needles be tested?


You can still pick it up if you share a razor or toothbrush with someone, have intercourse with someone, worked at a hospital or were hospitalized somewhere with poor sanitary practices, got a tattoo, ever had blood contact with someone during a fight or any other time, and a lot of other situations I can think of.

I know plenty of people that have it that never had a transplant or were IV drug users.

How do you know everyone you farked over the last 40 years was never an IV drug user, got a tattoo, had a transplant, etc.? How do you know the guy you were dating whose razor you decided to conveniently use wasn't exposed at some point, through any of the means you mentioned.
People still aren't that meticulous with their partners, and they were much less so during those generations. There was a lot of room for fluid swapping to happen during the 60s and 70s for a lot of people. 
And yes IV drug use was VERY prevalent, and for those that didn't engage in it that doesn't mean they didn't come into close contact with those that did.
 
2012-08-17 12:10:42 PM
2.bp.blogspot.com
"Fark you Howard, I'm dying"
 
2012-08-17 12:17:07 PM

Ihaveanevilparrot: Bathia_Mapes: 1) Why should baby boomers who have never received a blood transfusion, had an organ transplant nor were IV drug users who shared needles be tested?

You can still pick it up if you share a razor or toothbrush with someone, have intercourse with someone, worked at a hospital or were hospitalized somewhere with poor sanitary practices, got a tattoo, ever had blood contact with someone during a fight or any other time, and a lot of other situations I can think of.

I know plenty of people that have it that never had a transplant or were IV drug users.

How do you know everyone you farked over the last 40 years was never an IV drug user, got a tattoo, had a transplant, etc.? How do you know the guy you were dating whose razor you decided to conveniently use wasn't exposed at some point, through any of the means you mentioned.
People still aren't that meticulous with their partners, and they were much less so during those generations. There was a lot of room for fluid swapping to happen during the 60s and 70s for a lot of people. 
And yes IV drug use was VERY prevalent, and for those that didn't engage in it that doesn't mean they didn't come into close contact with those that did.


This. You only have to look at the Hepatitis C outbreak at Exeter Hospital in New Hampshire to know that it spreads like wildfire, and all it takes is one dickhead to kick it off. They're still widening the search for the infected, and it might have never happened if they'd properly screened one man before hiring him.
 
2012-08-17 12:18:39 PM
It's hip, see, to get Hep C. Can you dig it, man?
 
2012-08-17 12:19:48 PM

Bathia_Mapes: And I'll say the same thing I say every damned time this story has been posted:

1) Why should baby boomers who have never received a blood transfusion, had an organ transplant nor were IV drug users who shared needles be tested?

2) If the CDC wants all boomers to be tested, even if they haven't done any of the above listed things, who will pay for the tests?


The CDC of course, silly!
Have a problem with that, contact your elected official
 
2012-08-17 12:54:19 PM
And you all swallow this hook line and sunker?

Is it really HepC they want checked? 'Cause I so much trust the system.

Last time I was involved in a wide net serum collection, it's agenda was far from what was advertised.
 
2012-08-17 12:55:32 PM
There is no B3 bomber!
 
2012-08-17 01:07:52 PM
This sounds like a great idea. The kind of liver damage that a Hep C infection causes is very hard to detect until it's reached an advanced and very hard-to-treat stage. The early symptoms of liver failure sound just like getting old (fatigue, mainly) and it's not until you've got advanced liver failure that noticeable symptoms emerge (jaundice, fluid retention in abdomen, foul breath). At that point, the only real treatment option is liver transplant, which is extremely expensive and the waiting list for livers is long. Further, you can do living donor liver transplants, which means you now have two people that will require lifelong medical monitoring.

Much better to catch this risk factor early, especially since we have several decent treatment options to cure the infection, and some great new ones coming down the pipeline in the next few years. The more people we catch and cure, the more money we'll save on health care.
 
2012-08-17 01:13:27 PM
Looks like another "EVERYBODY PANIC" story. I've lead a quiet life, as have my friends and formers. No, I'm not getting tested.
 
2012-08-17 01:14:56 PM
What the article didn't tell you is that the military vaccinated its members for decades with air guns that caused cross contamination, so everyone who served between 1945 and 1970 may be infected. Vietnam vets have the highest rate of hep c infection.
 
2012-08-17 01:22:59 PM
And it's still extremely rare to get Hep C sexually.
 
2012-08-17 01:25:55 PM

Contents Under Pressure: Looks like another "EVERYBODY PANIC" story. I've lead a quiet life, as have my friends and formers. No, I'm not getting tested.


Neither am I. It's ridiculous. The people I've seen who have Hep-C were either intravenous drug abusers or farked everyone they came across (usually in the ass or took it there) who'd get naked with them. I've not done that, so the chance of my being infected is extremely low.
 
2012-08-17 01:43:43 PM
Ugh- I should proofread more carefully; US military stopped using the jet air injectors about 1980, not 1970. Anyway- the way it worked, the guns allowed a miniscule amount of blood to backwash into the machine; if it was not cleaned out after each use, you could have transfer into the next guy you used it on. As the idea was to have quick inoculations, you can guess how often the line stopped, so that they could take the gun apart and clean it.

My uncle was diagnosed with Hep C two years ago; he's pretty sure he got it from the vaccination gun. (Many of the guys he served with have it, too.) The reason the CDC is concerned is that all these vets walking around with it, have looked healthy for the last couple few decades. It was invisible Hep C. But now they're getting old and suddenly their livers aren't doing so well. It's like a big ticking bomb just about to go off- Vet boomer livers will start hitting their expiration date.
 
2012-08-17 01:47:00 PM

UnrepentantApostate: This sounds like a great idea. The kind of liver damage that a Hep C infection causes is very hard to detect until it's reached an advanced and very hard-to-treat stage. The early symptoms of liver failure sound just like getting old (fatigue, mainly) and it's not until you've got advanced liver failure that noticeable symptoms emerge (jaundice, fluid retention in abdomen, foul breath). At that point, the only real treatment option is liver transplant, which is extremely expensive and the waiting list for livers is long. Further, you can do living donor liver transplants, which means you now have two people that will require lifelong medical monitoring.

Much better to catch this risk factor early, especially since we have several decent treatment options to cure the infection, and some great new ones coming down the pipeline in the next few years. The more people we catch and cure, the more money we'll save on health care.


Yes, there is VERY PROFITABLE treatment in the pipeline.
This mass testing would seem to be groundwork for instant PROFIT.
But, then, I am a paranoid delusionist.
 
2012-08-17 01:51:59 PM
www.sololistas.net
 
2012-08-17 02:38:16 PM

abfalter: [www.sololistas.net image 850x1286]


That's HUGE!
 
2012-08-17 03:11:40 PM
3 page clicks for that shiat? Really?
 
2012-08-17 03:39:01 PM

Nmissi: Ugh- I should proofread more carefully; US military stopped using the jet air injectors about 1980, not 1970. Anyway- the way it worked, the guns allowed a miniscule amount of blood to backwash into the machine; if it was not cleaned out after each use, you could have transfer into the next guy you used it on. As the idea was to have quick inoculations, you can guess how often the line stopped, so that they could take the gun apart and clean it.

My uncle was diagnosed with Hep C two years ago; he's pretty sure he got it from the vaccination gun. (Many of the guys he served with have it, too.) The reason the CDC is concerned is that all these vets walking around with it, have looked healthy for the last couple few decades. It was invisible Hep C. But now they're getting old and suddenly their livers aren't doing so well. It's like a big ticking bomb just about to go off- Vet boomer livers will start hitting their expiration date.


Yeah, those air injectors turned out not to be a very good idea after all. But I don't think that they were responsible for spreading Hep C. Studies on vets do not show an increased incidence of infection over the background population. The CDC recommended that the use of them stop primarily because of HIV, not Hep C. Hep C was only discovered in 1989. Before, people who presented with viral hepatitis, but not seropositive for Hep A or Hep B were diagnosed with non-A/non-B viral hepatitis. It is generally believed that Hep C is a relatively recent mutation of A or B. The military discontinued use of them in the 1980s, but use of the devices continued in civilian medicine until 2003.

Personally, I hated those damned things. I thought they were much more painful than a needle. As a medic, I hated to use them because they were clumsy and awkward. If a patient flinched of tightened the muscle being injected at the wrong time, they could suffer a pretty nasty cut.
 
2012-08-17 05:22:34 PM

Nmissi: Ugh- I should proofread more carefully; US military stopped using the jet air injectors about 1980, not 1970.


Try 1997. They were still in use when I went through boot camp in 1989. But I also received Hep inoculations due to my MOS, so win-win?
 
2012-08-17 05:31:50 PM

Ihaveanevilparrot: Bathia_Mapes: 1) Why should baby boomers who have never received a blood transfusion, had an organ transplant nor were IV drug users who shared needles be tested?

You can still pick it up if you share a razor or toothbrush with someone, have intercourse with someone, worked at a hospital or were hospitalized somewhere with poor sanitary practices, got a tattoo, ever had blood contact with someone during a fight or any other time, and a lot of other situations I can think of.

I know plenty of people that have it that never had a transplant or were IV drug users.

How do you know everyone you farked over the last 40 years was never an IV drug user, got a tattoo, had a transplant, etc.? How do you know the guy you were dating whose razor you decided to conveniently use wasn't exposed at some point, through any of the means you mentioned.
People still aren't that meticulous with their partners, and they were much less so during those generations. There was a lot of room for fluid swapping to happen during the 60s and 70s for a lot of people. 
And yes IV drug use was VERY prevalent, and for those that didn't engage in it that doesn't mean they didn't come into close contact with those that did.


Add to that people who pay attention to their own medical history, but just can't find a record of blood transfusions. Someone I know had HepC at an early age*, like 3 or 4, but only got a blood transfusion years after that diagnosis. Neither parent had it. No organs transplanted, and unless there was a warped nurse shooting them up with H they weren't using IV drugs. Could have been a sloppy inoculation or blood draw by a nurse who had HepC, or it could be something that was never entered into their medical record.

Point being, you can know just about everything that happened to you, and still miss that one incident that got you infected. If they hadn't had an acute attack at age 3, they still wouldn't know.

*was viral non-A non-B at the time.
 
2012-08-17 10:11:59 PM
Im very fortunate because my dad has hep c and he and I shared razors for a few years when I first started shaving. This was in 1994 and the ignorance then from the docs was shocking. His doc told him numerous times it was only contagious via needles. He has had it since he
 
2012-08-17 11:54:34 PM

hogans: You only have to look at the Hepatitis C outbreak at Exeter Hospital in New Hampshire to know that it spreads like wildfire,


holy crap that's horrible. all the buck passing is beyond contemptible.
 
2012-08-18 12:07:21 AM
My GF is 50 and has liver damage. She's been tested for Hep C numerous times, all negative. The doctor repeatedly asks her about alcohol consumption, but she is a very light drinker (I've seen her nurse a tequila rose for an entire evening).

I've come to the conclusion that her liver goes out and parties all night without her.
 
2012-08-18 12:55:45 AM
Danny Bonaduce beat you to that joke at 6 AM Pacific Time this morning.
 
2012-08-18 01:42:27 AM
After reading the headline, my reaction was to ask "how many people still remember who Pamela Anderson is"? I have now read the comments and it looks a lot of people remember her.
 
2012-08-18 12:35:26 PM

Good Behavior Day: My GF is 50 and has liver damage. She's been tested for Hep C numerous times, all negative. The doctor repeatedly asks her about alcohol consumption, but she is a very light drinker (I've seen her nurse a tequila rose for an entire evening).

I've come to the conclusion that her liver goes out and parties all night without her.


I recommend being convinced that the Docs don't fully understand what they are dealing with.
45 years practicing medicine has led down this same path many times.
There are pieces missing to this puzzle.

/remember when Chlamydia was unknown and misdiagnosed as Super Clap(Gonorrhea)
 
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