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(SeattlePI)   What does Starbucks sell in other countries? Subby presumes it's still overpriced, shiatty-tasting coffee, only with different names   (blog.seattlepi.com) divider line 66
    More: Interesting, Starbucks, lemons  
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1947 clicks; posted to Geek » on 17 Aug 2012 at 11:50 AM (2 years ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2012-08-17 08:41:03 AM  
One latte royale, please
 
2012-08-17 08:44:02 AM  
I don't really know why everyone bags on Starbucks. At least their coffee is drinkable. Dunkin' Donuts coffee is not. Yech.
 
2012-08-17 08:45:29 AM  

SurfaceTension: One latte royale, please


Do they put mayonnaise in it?
 
2012-08-17 09:41:31 AM  

Lando Lincoln: I don't really know why everyone bags on Starbucks. At least their coffee is drinkable. Dunkin' Donuts coffee is not. Yech.


I'm just about convinced that DD coffee is worth a damn only in the NE - no idea why that is.
 
2012-08-17 10:36:36 AM  

SurfaceTension: One latte royale, please



They have those at Japanese Starbucks but if you order one Kazuo Kiriyama will try to kill you.
 
2012-08-17 10:38:51 AM  

ThatGuyGreg: Lando Lincoln: I don't really know why everyone bags on Starbucks. At least their coffee is drinkable. Dunkin' Donuts coffee is not. Yech.

I'm just about convinced that DD coffee is worth a damn only in the NE - no idea why that is.


DD coffee used to be very good, then they found some cheaper source of beans and figured no one would notice.
 
2012-08-17 11:02:27 AM  
"delicious-looking wafer cookie," really?!

They're Dutch "stroopwaffels," basically wafers with caramel in between the two wafers, and seriously amazing.

/the only Starbucks in Amsterdam are in areas frequented by tourists
//always amazed how the line goes out the door when the local cafes have so much better coffee
//coffeeshop is something else altogether of course
 
2012-08-17 11:47:57 AM  

Lando Lincoln: I don't really know why everyone bags on Starbucks.



If you're a former Sonics fan, you have a very good reason.

/DIAF, Howard Schultz.
 
2012-08-17 11:53:10 AM  
In Italy the sizes are called "small", "medium", and "large".
 
2012-08-17 11:58:17 AM  

Andromeda: "delicious-looking wafer cookie," really?!

They're Dutch "stroopwaffels," basically wafers with caramel in between the two wafers, and seriously amazing.

/the only Starbucks in Amsterdam are in areas frequented by tourists
//always amazed how the line goes out the door when the local cafes have so much better coffee
//coffeeshop is something else altogether of course


did you know Trader Joe's sells them? only in the mini size though :( Too small to sit over your cup of tea/coffee as appropriate.
 
2012-08-17 12:00:33 PM  

Ambitwistor: In Italy the sizes are called "small", "medium", and "large".


I wondered about that.
/ and if you're serious
 
2012-08-17 12:03:46 PM  
In other countries Starbucks sells coffee in two varieties, black and decaf, for a dime with free refills in a plain, white porcelain mug.
 
2012-08-17 12:03:56 PM  

Ambitwistor: In Italy the sizes are called "small", "medium", and "large".


This. I came.
 
2012-08-17 12:07:41 PM  

starsrift: Ambitwistor: In Italy the sizes are called "small", "medium", and "large".

I wondered about that.
/ and if you're serious


Not serious. In fact, Italy doesn't have Starbucks.
 
2012-08-17 12:08:03 PM  

Lando Lincoln: I don't really know why everyone bags on Starbucks. At least their coffee is drinkable. Dunkin' Donuts coffee is not. Yech.


Whatever. My vote for worst restaurant franchise coffee goes to Panera. You get your choice of light roasted crap or dark roasted crap. All over extracted and watered down.
 
2012-08-17 12:08:56 PM  
Could be worse...
www.lowdownonline.com

/Yeah, I'll have a large double-double of lukewarm poop water please.
//Lives in Buffalo and am always amazed at how every Tim Horton's I pass is always filled to capacity.
///Starbucks is good, if you like their specialty drinks.
 
2012-08-17 12:11:35 PM  
I've had the red bean scones in Shanghai at the Starbucks that's on the river, right behind the Shangri-la hotel. I like them. During the Dragon Boat Festival, they also have mango dragon boat dumplings. Yummy.
 
2012-08-17 12:12:04 PM  

The_Sponge: Lando Lincoln: I don't really know why everyone bags on Starbucks.


If you're a former Sonics fan, you have a very good reason.

/DIAF, Howard Schultz.


This.
 
2012-08-17 12:13:53 PM  
Who the hell drinks Starbucks in Paris? I've never once had a bad coffee in France in a cafe.
 
2012-08-17 12:21:16 PM  
Starbucks in Dublin is pretty much indistinguishable from Starbucks in the US.
 
2012-08-17 12:22:24 PM  
Local roasteries please. It's like the microbreweries of the coffee world
a0.twimg.com
www.fratellocoffee.com
 
2012-08-17 12:26:45 PM  
I have been lucky to be able to travel the globe pretty extensively in my life...I had a personal guideline that I never ate in any restaurant that came from the USA (you'd be surprised how many Pizza Huts and McDonalds are all over the place). However, I loved just going into them or checking the posted menus to see what oddities they had. I would sometimes break the rule if the dish was weird enough. (Squid and Quail's Egg pizza with a yellow curry sauce is surprisingly delicious)

I knew many fellow travellers who were the exact opposite...they sought to ONLY eat at USA-based chains and hated the idea of foreign food. I never understood that.
 
2012-08-17 12:29:39 PM  
I only drink Starbucks when I'm out of town b/c I work about a block from a place where the guy roasts his own beans in the back and I'm there everyday.

But, one thing we can all thank Starbucks for (and those of you here old enough to remember would agree) is that they introduced espresso and espresso drinks to mainstream America. If you didn't live in NYC, LA, Chicago, Boston, etc. you were relegated to brown hot water swill. Now, you can order cappuccino, espresso, latte, etc. practically anywhere. Sure, some places have better than others, but at least it's there now. Not too long ago your choices were regular or decaf.

So, hat's off to Starbucks, because without them I wouldn't be able to get a great double espresso somewhere else...like I'm about to do this moment.
 
2012-08-17 12:36:11 PM  
I don't think there coffee is overpriced, it's like $2 for a large, which is at most a quarter more than you would pay at a fast food place. I also don't think it's shiatty-tasting, again compared to the competition which is most fast food places or gas stations. I don't really have any "local coffee roasters/shops" or anything like that, so when I'm not drinking coffee made at home, Starbucks is my go-to for a quick cup of decent coffee at a reasonable price.
 
2012-08-17 12:47:21 PM  

Optimus Primate:
I knew many fellow travellers who were the exact opposite...they sought to ONLY eat at USA-based chains and hated the idea of foreign food. I never understood that.


I have in-laws visiting from Thailand. 3 of the 5 nights they've stayed with us they've eaten at Thai restuarants and the 4th was an asian buffet. They also spent the entire time shopping at Wal-mart, TJMaxx and Target without visiting a single museum, park or cultural site. It's somewhat infuriating to me, but on the other hand comforting that the US doesn't have a monopoly on boorish tourists.
 
2012-08-17 12:47:25 PM  

Optimus Primate:

I knew many fellow travellers who were the exact opposite...they sought to ONLY eat at USA-based chains and hated the idea of foreign food. I never understood that.


I don't travel with people like that. "You came 7,000 miles to this exotic locale and you want to eat at Burger King?" In fact, now that I think about it, I don't even associate with people like that.
 
2012-08-17 12:50:16 PM  

EvilEgg: ThatGuyGreg: Lando Lincoln: I don't really know why everyone bags on Starbucks. At least their coffee is drinkable. Dunkin' Donuts coffee is not. Yech.

I'm just about convinced that DD coffee is worth a damn only in the NE - no idea why that is.

DD coffee used to be very good, then they found some cheaper source of beans and figured no one would notice.


Bought a medium black this morning from Starbucks. It was terrible. I contemplated getting gas station coffee instead.
 
2012-08-17 01:06:00 PM  
I remember visiting Paris, and being surrounded by these beautiful tiny bistros and street coffee shops. They were always bustling with locals sitting at streetside tables, drinking espressos, cappuccinos, etc and cigarette in hand. Decors, awnings, tables all looked like they were meticulously picked out by the owners. It all looked Parisian and authentic.

Then smack dab in the middle of it all is a Starbucks. None of the locals were going in there, it was full of American tourists, and by comparison it looked so manufactured, like a big box store of coffee shops.

In America, Starbucks is very good at making it feel like your neighborhood's hangout place despite being one of the largest corporations in the world, but in a place like Paris, it just screams "bullshiat!"
 
2012-08-17 01:27:04 PM  
Being AARP-grade Old, I can tell you that coffee while traveling through the Great Flyover used to be a really iffy proposition. Just thinking about the HoJo or diner coffee that was sitting on a "Bunn-o-matic" slowly turning into pure tannic acid for several hours is making me gag a little.

Starbucks is not in the same league with coffee served at an Italian cafe or French bistro, but it is drinkable.

Hey, Banana, I actually did have coffee at that Starbucks in Paris. My travel companion was homesick. Strangely, it was better than the 'bucks here in the states, but I preferred the small cafe next to the Cathedral of St. Germaine.
 
2012-08-17 01:29:17 PM  

The Banana Thug: I remember visiting Paris, and being surrounded by these beautiful tiny bistros and street coffee shops. They were always bustling with locals sitting at streetside tables, drinking espressos, cappuccinos, etc and cigarette in hand. Decors, awnings, tables all looked like they were meticulously picked out by the owners. It all looked Parisian and authentic.

Then smack dab in the middle of it all is a Starbucks. None of the locals were going in there, it was full of American tourists, and by comparison it looked so manufactured, like a big box store of coffee shops.

In America, Starbucks is very good at making it feel like your neighborhood's hangout place despite being one of the largest corporations in the world, but in a place like Paris, it just screams "bullshiat!"


That's the point of Starbucks: to create an environment that would otherwise not exist. It becomes excessive in Europe. Here, in Bumf*ck, USA, it's a welcome
 
2012-08-17 01:31:31 PM  
There is no hate more white-hot intense than the hate of Starbucks. I love Starbucks. It's expensive so I don't get it often. I also love McDonald's coffee. One of the best kinds you can get. I can drink Dunkin Donuts coffee but it seems weak to me, and one thing is for sure, their donuts are terrible. Unless you like stale donuts that have a weird aftertaste.

Me, I go by what tastes good, instead of whargarrbl. Nearly everyone I've known who claims Starbucks coffee tastes "shiatty" launch straight into their rant about losers who go there with their laptops "cause'n they want you tuh think that they's ritin' a novel an' think they're smarter'n'you."

Uh huh--you hate the coffee. Got it.
 
2012-08-17 01:37:15 PM  
I hate starbucks. Their coffee is delicious. Wife buys coffee grounds there, I make it and drink it, and don't have to actually go to Starbucks. I win.
 
2012-08-17 02:13:30 PM  

thyocyan: Optimus Primate:
I knew many fellow travellers who were the exact opposite...they sought to ONLY eat at USA-based chains and hated the idea of foreign food. I never understood that.

I have in-laws visiting from Thailand. 3 of the 5 nights they've stayed with us they've eaten at Thai restuarants and the 4th was an asian buffet. They also spent the entire time shopping at Wal-mart, TJMaxx and Target without visiting a single museum, park or cultural site. It's somewhat infuriating to me, but on the other hand comforting that the US doesn't have a monopoly on boorish tourists.


On one trip to Munich I was a chaperone for a group of high school students. After four or five days of good, authentic German food, they wanted a little taste of home. In the middle of the city we found a Burger King and went there for lunch. They were advertising a limited-time Western Meal consisting of a burger with BBQ sauce, fries, and a Bud Light.

Yes, in the middle of the farking Bier capital of the world they were selling Bud Light.

yeah, CSB
 
2012-08-17 02:17:02 PM  

The Banana Thug: I remember visiting Paris, and being surrounded by these beautiful tiny bistros and street coffee shops. They were always bustling with locals sitting at streetside tables, drinking espressos, cappuccinos, etc and cigarette in hand. Decors, awnings, tables all looked like they were meticulously picked out by the owners. It all looked Parisian and authentic.

Then smack dab in the middle of it all is a Starbucks. None of the locals were going in there, it was full of American tourists, and by comparison it looked so manufactured, like a big box store of coffee shops.

In America, Starbucks is very good at making it feel like your neighborhood's hangout place despite being one of the largest corporations in the world, but in a place like Paris, it just screams "bullshiat!"


Same thing with Vienna (Austria). Right smack in the city that helped define "cafe culture" was a Starbucks that stuck out like a sore thumb. Of course there were a lot of tourists there and not all American.
 
2012-08-17 02:19:32 PM  

Rent Party: Optimus Primate:

I knew many fellow travellers who were the exact opposite...they sought to ONLY eat at USA-based chains and hated the idea of foreign food. I never understood that.

I don't travel with people like that. "You came 7,000 miles to this exotic locale and you want to eat at Burger King?" In fact, now that I think about it, I don't even associate with people like that.


Normally, I wouldn't bother with that type of person either. My job was military-related, and that crowd tends to skew further towards the xenophobic on average.
 
2012-08-17 02:23:27 PM  
 
2012-08-17 02:38:40 PM  
Hmm. When I was in Taiwan and China, Starbucks had the exact same shiat they have here.
 
2012-08-17 02:39:15 PM  

The All-Powerful Atheismo: Hmm. When I was in Taiwan and China, Starbucks had the exact same shiat they have here.


Subway too.

Exact. farking. Same. Menu.
 
2012-08-17 02:47:40 PM  

farkeruk: Who the hell drinks Starbucks in Paris? I've never once had a bad coffee in France in a cafe.


congrats on being in the minority. unless you are ordering espresso.

most coffee in french cafes comes from Metro (sort of like Sysco), as does most of the creme brulee for that matter. the coffee usually tastes burnt and/or watered down.

the worst part of going to a Parisian cafe? the cost. 3 to 4 euros on average for a cafe creme, of about 6oz-8oz in size. you also cannot get your coffee to go for the most part, no iced coffee, no flavors, and different roasting varieties are rare. Starbucks is kicking ass in Paris, and not just with tourists.

/my solution? finding a great, independent coffee roaster, and making my own.
 
2012-08-17 02:50:12 PM  
Went to a Starbucks in Lisbon a while back, mostly because it's the only place in Lisbon that has air conditioning.

Funny thing is, Starbucks in Spain and Portugal is operated by a Mexican company (VIPS) and, well, you can tell. They don't trust you with ANYTHING there, nor do they trust their employees. Everything is centrally managed from the bathroom access to the wifi passwords.
 
2012-08-17 02:55:20 PM  

MrEricSir: Went to a Starbucks in Lisbon a while back, mostly because it's the only place in Lisbon that has air conditioning.

Funny thing is, Starbucks in Spain and Portugal is operated by a Mexican company (VIPS) and, well, you can tell. They don't trust you with ANYTHING there, nor do they trust their employees. Everything is centrally managed from the bathroom access to the wifi passwords.


First World Problems.
 
2012-08-17 02:56:10 PM  

The All-Powerful Atheismo: The All-Powerful Atheismo: Hmm. When I was in Taiwan and China, Starbucks had the exact same shiat they have here.

Subway too.

Exact. farking. Same. Menu.


Was the american cheese any good?
 
2012-08-17 02:57:01 PM  

Katie98_KT: Andromeda: "delicious-looking wafer cookie," really?!

They're Dutch "stroopwaffels," basically wafers with caramel in between the two wafers, and seriously amazing.

/the only Starbucks in Amsterdam are in areas frequented by tourists
//always amazed how the line goes out the door when the local cafes have so much better coffee
//coffeeshop is something else altogether of course

did you know Trader Joe's sells them? only in the mini size though :( Too small to sit over your cup of tea/coffee as appropriate.


You can get either at World Market!!!! Yumyumyum...
 
2012-08-17 02:57:03 PM  

beantowndog: The All-Powerful Atheismo: The All-Powerful Atheismo: Hmm. When I was in Taiwan and China, Starbucks had the exact same shiat they have here.

Subway too.

Exact. farking. Same. Menu.

Was the american cheese any good?


I don't know. I didn't eat there; I just peaked inside at the one right next to the Great Wall.
 
2012-08-17 03:00:40 PM  

The All-Powerful Atheismo: The All-Powerful Atheismo: Hmm. When I was in Taiwan and China, Starbucks had the exact same shiat they have here.

Subway too.

Exact. farking. Same. Menu.


there is nothing more frustrating that going out with a bunch of Europeans for lunch in Paris, and hearing them say "let's go to Subway"
 
2012-08-17 03:18:53 PM  

MrEricSir: Went to a Starbucks in Lisbon a while back, mostly because it's the only place in Lisbon that has air conditioning.

Funny thing is, Starbucks in Spain and Portugal is operated by a Mexican company (VIPS) and, well, you can tell. They don't trust you with ANYTHING there, nor do they trust their employees. Everything is centrally managed from the bathroom access to the wifi passwords.


As a barista in a rather well-known book shop's pseudo-Starbucks, I can tell you we aren't allowed a tip jar because corporate is afraid we'd use it to launder money out of the till. They recently changed the tip policy from "you can take it if offered but don't solicit" to "if someone offers, refuse, and if they insist you have to put it in the register never to be seen again". Trust isn't a strong word for a fair amount of companies.
 
2012-08-17 03:19:22 PM  

dumbobruni: there is nothing more frustrating that going out with a bunch of Europeans for lunch in Paris, and hearing them say "let's go to Subway"


Allons à la métro?
 
2012-08-17 04:04:24 PM  

dumbobruni: there is nothing more frustrating that going out with a bunch of Europeans for lunch in Paris, and hearing them say "let's go to Subway"



At least that's not as bad as the commercial where a family takes their uncle (visiting from Italy) to Olive Garden.
 
2012-08-17 04:17:55 PM  

Rent Party: Optimus Primate:

I knew many fellow travellers who were the exact opposite...they sought to ONLY eat at USA-based chains and hated the idea of foreign food. I never understood that.

I don't travel with people like that. "You came 7,000 miles to this exotic locale and you want to eat at Burger King?" In fact, now that I think about it, I don't even associate with people like that.


After two weaks in Budapest, I would have killed for some good ol' American food, like a burrito.
 
2012-08-17 04:21:05 PM  

OgreMagi: Rent Party: Optimus Primate:

I knew many fellow travellers who were the exact opposite...they sought to ONLY eat at USA-based chains and hated the idea of foreign food. I never understood that.

I don't travel with people like that. "You came 7,000 miles to this exotic locale and you want to eat at Burger King?" In fact, now that I think about it, I don't even associate with people like that.

After two weaks weeks in Budapest, I would have killed for some good ol' American food, like a burrito.


Spelling fail.
 
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