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(CNBC)   Michael Phelps, the most decorated Olympian in history? Not so fast   (cnbc.com) divider line 14
    More: Stupid, U.S. Olympic Committee, Annie Leibovitz, Olympic Charter, Louis Vuitton  
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6314 clicks; posted to Sports » on 17 Aug 2012 at 3:23 AM (2 years ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2012-08-17 06:12:27 PM  
1 votes:

ZoSo_the_Crowe: I meant the previous Olympics themselves, not the athletic performances, seemed to do just fine without rule 40.


That's because they had amateur clauses.

Amateurism, by the way, was purely a classist thing, not a commercialism thing. There's a story behind that:

The ancient Greeks' interpretation of professionalism was different than ours. They saw a professional as someone performing for money, not someone performing for pride, heart, or the passion of the game. To them, professionals were scorned -- people chasing something much lower (money) than the lofty ideal of human perfection. In addition, it was reasoned that professionals could not be trusted. Like mercenaries, they held no loyalties and no convictions. They traversed to where the money was. Thus, amateurs only were permitted, to preserve the purity and sanctity of the Games.

In the modern era, professionalism and amatuerism was wrapped around a more practical and somewhat sleazier angle: It was to preserve the delicate social order of snobbish Victorian society. Invented in the mid-19th century for the emerging field sports of association football and Rugby, amateurism was classism, pure and simple. It was a way to prevent the upper classes from mingling -- much less competing -- with commoners, and the Olympics, the bastion of amateurism, reflected such aristocratic bias in making things habitually difficult for the working class to participate. The modern Olympic definition of amateurism, vaguely defined and of British origin (not Greek), slowly began crumbling as the skill level of the Games and the standard for achievement escalated over the course of the 20th century into a full-time commitment, and communist countries, who acknowledged no distinction in such an outmoded concept, held a gross advantage over capitalist ones.

With the breaking down of the amateur/professional barriers in the last 20 years and the transforming of the Olympics into a "best against the best, bar none" affair, the whole controversy over amateurism has now become a sponsorship/commercialism thing. Despite the fact that the modern Olympics is one of the most commercial properties in the world.
2012-08-17 06:10:27 PM  
1 votes:

Ishkur: How many people would tune into the 100m Finals if Usain Bolt wasn't competing.


The mainstream wouldn't know who he is without the Olympics.
2012-08-17 03:57:19 PM  
1 votes:

ZoSo_the_Crowe: Rule 40 is a HORRIBLE rule.

An example why:

John is your typical Olympic athlete. He's not particularly famous nor is he expected to medal. He's young enough that he could compete again in 4 years and possibly improve enough to medal then.

John is not wealthy and does not come from a wealthy family. He pays for training and medical bills resulting from training with sponsorship money.

The Olympics represent John's best opportunity for the next four years to get his name out to people. Even though he is not particularly famous, he's going to be watched by untold millions of people. This makes him very attractive to sponsors. Get enough sponsorships for the Olympics and that might pay for the next four years of training and medical bills.

Rule 40, however, puts a serious damper on the motivation for people to sponsor Olympic athletes. The majority of these athletes fund their training through sponsorship money. They are in the Olympics because of sponsors. Rule 40 directly threatens the ability of athletes to train for the Olympics and will likely result in a decrease of athletic quality at the Olympics.


Rule 40 is an OK rule.

To make a successful Olympics that John can use to get known and his face to become well known needs billions of £/$'s to build state of the art stadiums, venues and housing. No country could possible afford to spend that amount of money when it could be spent on education, healthcare or infrastructure. So an outside money source is needed and the only one avliable are sponsors. To get the most money out of sponsors you need exclusive sponsorship deals.

So the choice is either a two bit half arsed olympics that isn't going to get Johns face on ceral boxes or rule 40 that will allow John to become a well known star.
2012-08-17 03:41:19 PM  
1 votes:
Rule 40 is a HORRIBLE rule.

An example why:

John is your typical Olympic athlete. He's not particularly famous nor is he expected to medal. He's young enough that he could compete again in 4 years and possibly improve enough to medal then.

John is not wealthy and does not come from a wealthy family. He pays for training and medical bills resulting from training with sponsorship money.

The Olympics represent John's best opportunity for the next four years to get his name out to people. Even though he is not particularly famous, he's going to be watched by untold millions of people. This makes him very attractive to sponsors. Get enough sponsorships for the Olympics and that might pay for the next four years of training and medical bills.

Rule 40, however, puts a serious damper on the motivation for people to sponsor Olympic athletes. The majority of these athletes fund their training through sponsorship money. They are in the Olympics because of sponsors. Rule 40 directly threatens the ability of athletes to train for the Olympics and will likely result in a decrease of athletic quality at the Olympics.
2012-08-17 02:00:02 PM  
1 votes:

THX 1138: GGracie: Subby is sad, sad loser who likes to bring others down to his moldy basement life.

Michael Phelps is an amazing athlete. Nothing will ever change that.

Some of us don't receive personal validation by watching somebody we'll never meet swim faster than someone else we'll never meet, just because they happen to be born in the same geopolitical region as us.


It's not all just about his athletic ability ;-) I will never meet him... don't even care that he's from this country. He is a great athlete... But sweet Jesus does he look good in a Speedo!
I played Water Polo in high school on a team that was mostly male. I could have played any sport I wanted, but when I found out that I could be on a team, in the water, with those gorgeous bodies... DAMN STRAIGHT I played Water Polo ;-)
2012-08-17 09:25:24 AM  
1 votes:
Fark the IOC. Corporate corruption at its absolute worst.
2012-08-17 07:11:59 AM  
1 votes:
CSB time! I worked for possibly the worst start-up company of all time. The stories of stupidity are legendary. The founder of the company made an obscene fortune in the late 90s boom, and got out right before the bubble popped. For some reason, because of this tremendous luck, he was convinced he was both the smartest business man in the world, as well as the most important. He was, in reality, a complete boob who hemorrhaged money with every decision.

Anyhow, he tasked his secretary with coming up with a new logo to outline the core principles of this new company: Fun, Hard Work, Creativity, and a few other words I forget. When she failed to come up with anything he liked, he did it himself. He copied the Olympic rings logo, and wrote one of his core principles inside each of the rings. He splashed this logo all over the web site, publications, etc. Sure enough a month later we get a cease and desist notice from the Olympic Committee's attorneys. He actually called them up and when the receptionist answered barked, "This is [name]. What's the meaning of this?" When he spoke to the lawyers he suggested they should be excited to have his brand and name associated with the Olympics for free. Long story short he got sued and had to scrap his new logo.

Sorry, that was a long story but it's good therapy for me to write it. That was such a horrible place to work.
2012-08-17 06:08:26 AM  
1 votes:
Uhm, if no company PAID for the placement of the picture in some place with visibility, then it is not an ad.

The prohibition is against APPEARING IN ADS.
2012-08-17 03:43:49 AM  
1 votes:

I sound fat: I heard on olympic coverage somewhere that the olympics is the second most valuable brand in the world.


And the first most valuable brand?

userserve-ak.last.fm
2012-08-16 10:59:07 PM  
1 votes:
Subby is sad, sad loser who likes to bring others down to his moldy basement life.

Michael Phelps is an amazing athlete. Nothing will ever change that.
2012-08-16 10:45:28 PM  
1 votes:
Keep your things off my rings.
2012-08-16 10:09:22 PM  
1 votes:
I hope they don't do anything. It's not his fault someone leaked the photos early.
2012-08-16 09:50:39 PM  
1 votes:
Yes, because we all know when sponsors release advertisements impacts the outcomes of contests that already occurred. *eyeroll*
MBK [TotalFark]
2012-08-16 09:06:48 PM  
1 votes:
fark the IOC.
 
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