Do you have adblock enabled?
 
If you can read this, either the style sheet didn't load or you have an older browser that doesn't support style sheets. Try clearing your browser cache and refreshing the page.

(CBC)   Not news: dog finds bones. Fark: dog finds 300 million-year-old fossil   (cbc.ca ) divider line
    More: Spiffy, fossils, dogs, extinct animals, Permian, P.E.I., terrestrial animal, dragonflies, Northumberland  
•       •       •

2134 clicks; posted to Geek » on 16 Aug 2012 at 7:00 PM (3 years ago)   |   Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



24 Comments   (+0 »)
View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest

Archived thread
 
2012-08-16 04:03:57 PM  
dog named Kitty

Betcha he named his little boy "Sue" as well.

What did they call the fossil?

Superstar

Jesus Christ!
 
2012-08-16 05:05:02 PM  
Good Dog!
 
2012-08-16 05:20:06 PM  

ManateeGag: Good Dog!


No kidding.

Give the dog a bone.
 
2012-08-16 05:50:20 PM  
"While out walking along Nova Scotia's fossil-rich Northumberland shore, Patrick Keating, his family, and their dog, Kitty, found a fossilized rib cage, backbone and partial sail. "

If the dog ran into the undergrowth and returned with a fossil in its mouth, I'd be impressed.

This is just about a family that found a fossil. A dog happened to be with them.
 
2012-08-16 06:21:58 PM  
I feel like this premise happened on Futurama or The Simpsons or some other cartoon, but I can't place it for the life of me...
 
2012-08-16 06:48:21 PM  
UltraFark: The Devil seen nearby;giggling
 
2012-08-16 07:19:28 PM  
Shadow? Is that you?
 
2012-08-16 07:27:55 PM  

Indolent: ManateeGag: Good Dog!

No kidding.

Give the dog a bone.


It's knick-knack
 
2012-08-16 07:45:00 PM  
Make that 'A nick-nack'

/long day after I had to take my dog to the vet

//a double Irish whiskey also sought for questioning by local authorities
 
2012-08-16 08:55:40 PM  
My dog finds a dinosaur bone I'm going to let her chew on it. Just a little. She earned it.
 
2012-08-16 09:16:45 PM  
The cat faced is unimpressed.
 
2012-08-16 10:32:59 PM  

quatchi: dog named Kitty

Betcha he named his little boy "Sue" as well.

What did they call the fossil?

Superstar

Jesus Christ!


What now?.
 
2012-08-16 11:44:26 PM  

DeltaPunch: I feel like this premise happened on Futurama or The Simpsons or some other cartoon, but I can't place it for the life of me...


One of the ones mentioned on tvtropes.org?
 
2012-08-17 12:09:28 AM  
One time the neighbor's dog found my bone.
 
2012-08-17 12:17:33 AM  
The reptile fossil

Calling a synapsid a "reptile" is farking retarded. The state of science journalism is terrible, but the state of vanilla journalism that talks about science is a different level of awful.
 
2012-08-17 12:39:21 AM  

Jon Snow: The reptile fossil

Calling a synapsid a "reptile" is farking retarded. The state of science journalism is terrible, but the state of vanilla journalism that talks about science is a different level of awful.


It's probably a temnospondyl anyway, not a synapsid. Though I'm curious, if it were a non-mammalian synapsid, what would you call it besides "reptile"... besides Superstar?

/If I find a T rex this coming week in the Hell Creek fm, I'm naming it "buttons".
 
2012-08-17 01:08:10 AM  
Dinodork: It's probably a temnospondyl anyway, not a synapsid.

~300 mya. Sail backed. In Nova Scotia? I doubt it.

Not to mention that TFA hints strongly at it being a synapsid. From the caption:

The fossil comes from a branch of reptiles described as mammal-like as they are thought to be the ancient ancestors of modern mammal species.

From TFA:

The fossil comes from a branch of reptiles described as mammal-like as they are thought to be the ancient ancestors of modern mammal species.

Though I'm curious, if it were a non-mammalian synapsid, what would you call it besides "reptile".

Synapsids that aren't mammals? Proto-mammals or pre-mammals.

It doesn't do anyone any farking favors, conceptually (for the lay reader) or cladistically (for a sci audience) to refer to synapsids as "reptiles".

/If I find a T rex this coming week in the Hell Creek fm, I'm naming it "buttons".

Feel free to do that, but please don't call it a "lizard", which is about on par with this article's fail. ;)
 
2012-08-17 04:02:13 AM  

Jon Snow: Feel free to do that, but please don't call it a "lizard"


That would be terrible.
 
2012-08-17 07:21:02 AM  
Was it the inter-costal clavicle?
 
2012-08-17 11:06:39 AM  
Weird, I have a dog named Kitty (short for Kittiwan, the Northern Ontario hamlet I got her from) and I used to live in Nova Scotia.

/all my dog ever finds is dead fish, and then liberally coats herself in the decomposing carcass juices.
 
2012-08-17 06:28:13 PM  

Dinodork: Jon Snow: The reptile fossil

Calling a synapsid a "reptile" is farking retarded. The state of science journalism is terrible, but the state of vanilla journalism that talks about science is a different level of awful.

It's probably a temnospondyl anyway, not a synapsid. Though I'm curious, if it were a non-mammalian synapsid, what would you call it besides "reptile"... besides Superstar?

/If I find a T rex this coming week in the Hell Creek fm, I'm naming it "buttons".


...Depends on what level of "distance" there is from mammals proper; if it's a non-mammaliform and not a therapsid per se, there are other names and other generic terms that work (like "spenacodont", which covers critters like Dimetrodon that are pre-therapsid synapsids)--again, this is assuming it's a synapsid at all, and what kind of synapsid we're dealing with if it is a synapsid. :D

To make things even more complex--one can argue that all living amniotes can be defined as reptiles of a sort in the cladistic sense--we're realising "Reptilia" in the traditional sense is horribly paraphyletic (two major classes, birds and mammals, are traditionally excluded even though we know pretty damn well at this point that birds are dinosaurian bats and should be sunk all the way down the hell into the Theropoda) and it's probably better in scientific terms to refer to synapsids and sauropsids.

(Now, the REALLY interesting thing is where the hell turtles fit in; we still can't figure out whether they're originally diapsids or whether they may well constitute a third major branch of "critters what derived from egg-laying scalybutts". Some genetic studies point towards the former, but we don't have enough "proto-turtle" remains to know for sure.)
 
2012-08-17 06:36:10 PM  

Jon Snow: Dinodork: It's probably a temnospondyl anyway, not a synapsid.

~300 mya. Sail backed. In Nova Scotia? I doubt it.

Not to mention that TFA hints strongly at it being a synapsid. From the caption:

The fossil comes from a branch of reptiles described as mammal-like as they are thought to be the ancient ancestors of modern mammal species.

From TFA:

The fossil comes from a branch of reptiles described as mammal-like as they are thought to be the ancient ancestors of modern mammal species.


I think Dinodork's concern that we could be dealing with a non-synapsid is partly due to the fact that fin-backed temnospondyl amphibians ARE documented from the Carboniferous to the Permian--specifically Platyhystrix comes to mind, though it's mostly known from Permian remains in Texas).

If it did turn out to be a dissorophid temnospondyl instead of a spenacodont or edaphosaur, that would be especially neat (particularly as parts of eastern Canada are known for some pretty impressive temnospondyl and proto-temnospondyl remains)--either way, it's still neat. :D
 
2012-08-17 08:12:53 PM  
From the DML this week, there was this analysis:

"As far as I can tell, "Superstar" is no synapsid because:

1/ The lateral view of the skull shows no obvious temporal fenestra where it should be. 2/ The jugal is not trifid but has a wide posterior process, as in many non-fenestrated tetrapods.
3/ The quadratojugal is very large compared to that of other early amniotes.
4/ The surface of these bones has been badly eroded but parts of the original ornamentation (made of pits and grooves) can be seen on the quadratojugal and squamosal.
5/ To check: the bone located in the orbit is probably part of a sclerotic ring (unknown in synapsids).

... and the most interesting feature:

6/ There is what I interprete as a temporal notch, in the dorsoposterior corner of the skull.

In fact, this skull is incredibly similar to that of *Dendrerpeton acadianum* (see Holmes et al., 1998: figs: 1, 3-4). I mean, look at the general shape and the relationships between the bones !

The postcranium, however, might belong to a synapsid but the vertebrae are too small on the picture (in the showcase) to figure out their structure. Please remember that such wide, flat ribs are known in *Ichthyostega* and in several temnospondyls such as *Eryops*. I see nothing on the pectoral girdle precluding its assignment to either temnospondyls or synapsids. A good picture of the clavicles and interclavicle, if they are present, would help a lot, as they show a deep ornamentation in temnospondyls. The neural spines, if they belong indeed to a synapsid, retained the elongated blade-like morphology seen in *Sphenacodon*, *Ctenospondylus*, or *Ctenorhachis*.

I read that the skull was found later that the skeleton, but the question is: were they associated or not ?"

It casts serious doubt on the synapsid assignment. The museum in NS can't really be at fault because, well, the dearth of vertebrate remains from the province means they're working outside their area of expertise. From the limited amphibian work I've done (Lyssorophids, metoposaurs and working with casts of Paracyclotosaurus) I think that point #4 is especially telling.
 
2012-08-18 12:10:49 AM  

Dinodork: It casts serious doubt on the synapsid assignment.


I saw that after our conversation, and I would agree. I was basing my first take largely on the museum's characterization of the find as being a synapsid, and the dearth of sail-backed amphibians + footprints of sail-backed synapsids in that area, rather than on any identification based on the fossils themselves (way out of my area!). I'm much more familiar with paleoclimate and general paleoecology than I am with paleontology, especially at that level of detail.

The point 5 re: feature of the sclerotic ring that is found in amphibians like Dendrerpeton but not in synapsids sounds like a deal breaker.

I spoke way too soon, and rightfully have been caught out because of it.
 
Displayed 24 of 24 comments

View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest


This thread is archived, and closed to new comments.

Continue Farking
Submit a Link »
On Twitter






In Other Media


  1. Links are submitted by members of the Fark community.

  2. When community members submit a link, they also write a custom headline for the story.

  3. Other Farkers comment on the links. This is the number of comments. Click here to read them.

  4. Click here to submit a link.

Report