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(Rolling Stone)   Need something to read? Choose from these twenty-five awesome rock and roll memoirs   (rollingstone.com) divider line 71
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3844 clicks; posted to Entertainment » on 16 Aug 2012 at 3:23 AM (2 years ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2012-08-16 04:29:19 AM
I've always wanted to read DLR's "Crazy From The Heat". For the debauchery.
 
2012-08-16 05:26:45 AM
Some of those sound interesting. I was never a fan of Black Flag, but for some reason I think Henry Rollins book might be good.

For some reason, I haven't had much success with biographies of rock stars. I did read No One Here Gets Out Alive (Jim Morrison), but get stuck halfway through Long Time Gone (David Crosby) each time I try and Bob Dylan's Chronicles just seemed boring when I tried to read it.

And the idea of reading a book about David Bowie's life seems interesting, but with a quote like "I have absolutely no recollections of this party at all" probably sums up the most interesting parts. I'm guessing you could summarize it by saying I wore a lot of weird clothes, worked with some interesting musicians and did a lot of blow. I can't remember the rest. In fact, that could probably be the biography for a lot of musicians in the '70s.
 
2012-08-16 05:30:52 AM
List needs Poison Heart, Surviving the Ramones by Dee Dee.
 
2012-08-16 05:49:48 AM
Meh...

www.madnessmag.com
1.bp.blogspot.com

And I never laughed so hard from a book as some parts of this

images.word-power.co.uk
 
2012-08-16 06:00:57 AM
Neither of them are memoirs, but I spent a couple of weeks a few summers ago reading Lords of Chaos and Our Band Could Be Your Life. Fantastic reads.

Our Band Could Be Your Life is worth it just for the insane Butthole Surfers stories.
 
2012-08-16 06:07:42 AM
If entire memoir doesn't consist of sentence "Can't remember a thing", I'm not reading it
 
2012-08-16 06:31:26 AM
Mrs 'saur has really been enjoying _Big Man_ - Clarence Clemons' bio.
 
2012-08-16 07:43:16 AM
Three really good unsung behind the scenes bios (and I don't really care for the Doors or the Grateful Dead, the first two are just really great peeks behind the scenes)-

Wonderland Aveneue by Danny Sugar
He was some dumb kid that lucked into a friendship with Jim Morrison. He eventually went on to manage Iggy Pop and Ray Manzarek. It's told from the otherside of barely surviving drug addiction.

Living With The Dead by Rock Scully
This guy was at GROUND ZERO for the west coast 60s rock and roll movement. He started out as a show promoter and eventually moved into managing the Grateful Dead.

See a Little Light: The Trail of Rage and Melody by Bob Mould
This is more about his post-Husker Du life where he wends his way as a gay male navigating the ever-changing landscape of the rock industry. You read his thoughts on banging dudes and inventing modern Alt college rock with his band Sugar and his solo music.
 
2012-08-16 07:43:39 AM
List fails with the inclusion of Steven Tyler's suckfest of a book. Completely, totally, utterly unreadable.
 
2012-08-16 07:43:59 AM

Happy Hours: Some of those sound interesting. I was never a fan of Black Flag, but for some reason I think Henry Rollins book might be good.


It is until you realize that he is such a whiney biatch.
 
2012-08-16 07:47:59 AM
FTFA:

"The former Johnny Rotten has all the dirt about how the Sex Pistols pissed off the world. But he's also got poignant details about his hardscrabble youth in London's Irish-immigrant squalor, raised by a mother even more badass than he was. He also shares his deep hatred for religion, the Queen, the other Sex Pistols, hippies, rich people, racists, sexists, the English political system, Malcolm McLaren and of course, Pink Floyd. "A lot of people feel the Sex Pistols were just negative," he says. "I agree, and what the fark is wrong with that? Sometimes the absolute most positive thing you can be in a boring society is completely negative." 

If you think he really hated the Queen or Pink Floyd, then you dont get it.
 
2012-08-16 07:55:32 AM

Happy Hours: Some of those sound interesting. I was never a fan of Black Flag, but for some reason I think Henry Rollins book might be good.


I like a lot of punk and hardcore, but I hate Black Flag. The book, however, is amazing.

...and for old time's sake.
 
2012-08-16 07:56:45 AM

Jumpin Jbot: Neither of them are memoirs, but I spent a couple of weeks a few summers ago reading Lords of Chaos and Our Band Could Be Your Life. Fantastic reads.

Our Band Could Be Your Life is worth it just for the insane Butthole Surfers stories.


That made me giggle. Thanks.
 
2012-08-16 07:58:04 AM
Not a memoir, but also worth a read:

upload.wikimedia.org 

(hot like your moms)
 
2012-08-16 07:59:08 AM

Jumpin Jbot: Neither of them are memoirs, but I spent a couple of weeks a few summers ago reading Lords of Chaos and Our Band Could Be Your Life. Fantastic reads.

Our Band Could Be Your Life is worth it just for the insane Butthole Surfers stories.


Dammit, sorry, but yes: the Butthole Surfers chapter is almost unbelievably crazy.
 
2012-08-16 08:05:59 AM
"Get in the Van" (Henry Rollins/Black Flag years) was a quite good read. And if you ever have the chance to see Rollins do a spoken word tour, drop everything and go.

I'll definately have to look into the Butthole Surfers stories
 
2012-08-16 08:20:34 AM

Happy Hours: I was never a fan of Black Flag, but for some reason I think Henry Rollins book might be good.


Why you should read Henry Rollins.
 
2012-08-16 08:22:23 AM
loved "get in the van"

+1 on "our band could be your life," though.

keith's book was great. downloaded the audio book from itunes. about a third is read by johnny depp, which is a bit weird. the rest is read by a keith sound-alike who's pretty great.
 
2012-08-16 08:56:15 AM
That 'review' of Keith's book is funny, considering how full of half remembered truths, old crap he used to tell interviewers to throw them off the trail, and just plain hate is in there. The classic example being the old saw on how, when The Stones went to Chess Studios for the first time, Muddy Waters was freaking doing a paint job on the place! Wyman, who was there, and who actually remembers everything, has repeatedly called him out on that time and time again.
 
2012-08-16 08:56:18 AM

Jumpin Jbot: Neither of them are memoirs, but I spent a couple of weeks a few summers ago reading Lords of Chaos and Our Band Could Be Your Life. Fantastic reads.

Our Band Could Be Your Life is worth it just for the insane Butthole Surfers stories.



Lords of Chaos is awesome
 
2012-08-16 09:06:06 AM
The Keith Richards and Bob Dylan ones are great.

Ronnie Wood's book is decent, and Phil Lesh's is fun, if you're into that sort of thing.
 
2012-08-16 09:15:34 AM

NashMcNash: Phil Lesh's is fun


Are you talking about the one he released a few years ago? How much does he talk about his own compositions and how he views the Dead? I am really interested in him with regards to his work in atonal /20th century stuff that he does and collaborates on.
 
2012-08-16 09:15:53 AM
 
2012-08-16 09:17:47 AM

Glenford: Deslided


Huh, only picked up 3 of them. Weird.
 
2012-08-16 09:33:26 AM
Rudy Sarzo's "Off the Rails" is a surprisingly decent account of his time with Ozzy and Randy Rhodes.
 
2012-08-16 09:34:36 AM
swampland.com

3.bp.blogspot.com

images.bookstore.ipgbook.com

ecx.images-amazon.com
 
2012-08-16 09:43:02 AM
Al Kooper - Backstage Passes and Backstabbing Bastards. Kooper was a hanger-on, but he's got some great stories, especially from the 1970s.

Levon Helm's memoirs (This Wheel's on Fire) is worth a read

Hammer of the Gods is still a classic, even if it's not all true. I don't know if anyone will ever be able to tell the "true" story of Led Zeppelin.
 
2012-08-16 09:47:35 AM
photo.goodreads.com
 
2012-08-16 09:53:52 AM

cygnusx13: I've always wanted to read DLR's "Crazy From The Heat". For the debauchery.


It's one of the best books I've ever read. It's not really all that nuts; there are some good party stories (one really funny one with Ozzy), but mostly it's a good memoir from one of this planet's most interesting people. Dave, for all his ego and partying, is as smart as anyone in entertainment. The book is worth it just for the chapter "Business 101." He lays out exactly how artists who sell a ton of records end up broke.

The Van Halen feud stuff is of course dated, but there's really not much of it in the book. most of it is about his life.
 
2012-08-16 10:00:48 AM
Salewicz's book on Joe really messed me up. Strummer was/is my rock hero, but man, he was a majorly flawed dude. Was kind of depressing actually.

DLR's book was a fun read, pretty much what you'd expect. No deep thoughts there, no angst, just a dude having the time of his life.

Andy Summer's book One Train Later was a great read.

Don Felder's book was good too, he really takes a blowtorch to Henley and Frey.

I have Keith's book, havent gotten into it yet.
 
2012-08-16 10:02:48 AM
One of my favorites:

ebooks-imgs.connect.com

I would highly recommend Rollins' book even if you don't care for his music
 
2012-08-16 10:10:45 AM
Scar Tissue sucked. Anthony Kiedis' biography is so self-involved, even for a biography.
 
2012-08-16 10:31:58 AM
Meh. I haven't read a one of these. List fails without "Fleetwood" by Mick Fleetwood.
 
2012-08-16 10:35:42 AM
Get in the Van, from what I remember, was basically Rollins' journal from his life on the road. It mostly consisted of: we played the show, then I got in a fight, then we crashed on someone's floor, I was hungry, I really hated everyone because they hated me, then we drove to the next town. Rinse, repeat.

Rotten's book was ok if you go into knowing he thinks of himself as the unquestionable, righteous fountain of truth.
 
2012-08-16 10:45:12 AM
www.allaboutjazz.com

While not rock and roll, he lived a pretty rock and roll life. It's one of the most entertaining books I've ever read and reread repeatedly.

/really enjoying the comments here, am definitely going to pick up our band could be your life.
 
2012-08-16 10:52:38 AM
www.elvis-history-blog.com
 
2012-08-16 10:59:58 AM
www.americanrockscene.com

Enjoyed this one, plus Duff gets major points for his book tour being a cross between a poetry reading and MTV's "Unplugged".
 
2012-08-16 11:04:21 AM
List fails without Billion Dollar Baby by Alice Cooper.
 
2012-08-16 11:11:41 AM
"The Real Frank Zappa Book," by Zappa and Ochigrosso. Amazing history, stories, and insight.
 
2012-08-16 11:20:03 AM
Gotta give a shoutout for Jerry Leiber and Mike Stoller 's Hound Dog.
 
2012-08-16 11:52:34 AM
2.bp.blogspot.com

Quite recommend this one by the man who "discovered" the Stones as their first manager/producer. "The Loog" is just a naturally keen, charming, funny storyteller. Pretty good insights into the kids he first discovered before they grew into the marketing personnas they invented ... Mick - timid, vain, cerebral, preppie. Brian Jones - cruel, mean spirited bully. Keefy - quiet, awkward, introvert. Good insights into the music and fashion of the early 60's London scene before they invaded American Pop Music, when "Peace & Love" and "Flower Power" was at it's infancy becaues it became an ugly cliche in the later 60s. It's interesting how DIY "The Biz" was at the time.
 
2012-08-16 11:53:32 AM
kink by dave davies
living the blues by fito de la parra
the dirt by m. crue.
 
2012-08-16 11:57:33 AM
"The Dirt" by Motley Crue and "Take It Like A Man" by Boy George were so good, I've read them both twice.
 
2012-08-16 12:04:36 PM
Excellent read - his ego is palpable and amusing

ecx.images-amazon.com
 
2012-08-16 12:22:08 PM
upload.wikimedia.org
 
2012-08-16 12:24:13 PM
"Stairway To Heaven-Led Zeppelin Uncensored" by Richard Cole is pretty good.
 
2012-08-16 12:38:57 PM
"Touching From a Distance", written by Deborah Curtis, is a good one.

i50.tinypic.com
 
2012-08-16 12:51:46 PM

SockMonkeyHolocaust: NashMcNash: Phil Lesh's is fun

Are you talking about the one he released a few years ago? How much does he talk about his own compositions and how he views the Dead? I am really interested in him with regards to his work in atonal /20th century stuff that he does and collaborates on.


2005 I believe. A lot about the early years of the Dead. He talks a lot about drugs and getting clean. He doesn't hit too much on stuff he's done outside the Dead, but he does talk a lot about gear. I'm an audio engineer, so the stuff about Owsley Stanley and the "Wall of Sound" stage design is really interesting to me.
 
2012-08-16 12:58:07 PM
"Life" by Keith Richards is everything you hope it will be. Bonus: recipes.
 
2012-08-16 12:59:55 PM

NashMcNash: The Keith Richards and Bob Dylan ones are great.

Ronnie Wood's book is decent, and Phil Lesh's is fun, if you're into that sort of thing.


Agree on Keith and Bob but read Phil's three months ago and didn't finish it.
He had nothing to say; it was just his life. That's not an insult, either.

I was expecting more insight into him and the band and it wasn't there.
 
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