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(LA Times)   13-year old homeschooled boy builds a metal detector, finds 2-lb meteorite estimated to be 10,000 years old   (latimes.com) divider line 71
    More: Spiffy, University of New Mexico, space rocks, Rio Rancho, Institute of Meteoritics  
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3975 clicks; posted to Geek » on 13 Aug 2012 at 4:53 PM (2 years ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2012-08-13 04:29:41 PM  
Depends on how much the meteorite is worth
 
2012-08-13 04:56:53 PM  
Headline is missing obligatory "...; will never be socially well-adjusted"

/good for the kid
 
2012-08-13 04:57:24 PM  

The Stealth Hippopotamus: Depends on how much the meteorite is worth


Let me call my friend, who is an expert in meteorites, and I'll see what we come up with...
 
2012-08-13 04:58:44 PM  

grinding_journalist: Headline is missing obligatory "...; will never be socially well-adjusted"



they scrubbed it. It ended with something like "is well ahead of schedule for a lifetime of virginity" but it was taken out.

/submitter
 
2012-08-13 05:04:39 PM  
is well ahead of schedule for a lifetime of virginity" but it was taken out.
But may well be a rich virgin !
 
2012-08-13 05:06:05 PM  
13-year old homeschooled boy builds a metal detector, finds 2-lb meteorite estimated to be 10,000 6000 years old

FTFY
 
2012-08-13 05:06:16 PM  
24.media.tumblr.com

Seriously, this is the whole point of science. Find out new stuff. Explore the world around you.

Now for the obligatory "Great kid! Don't get c*cky."
 
2012-08-13 05:10:53 PM  

rickythepenguin: grinding_journalist: Headline is missing obligatory "...; will never be socially well-adjusted"


they scrubbed it. It ended with something like "is well ahead of schedule for a lifetime of virginity" but it was taken out.

/submitter


So I guess this proves the theory that the only job homeschoolers can get is being unpaid Mods on a snarky news site. I weep for America.
 
2012-08-13 05:16:49 PM  
B-b-but Fark assured me that every homeschool kid is nothing but a stupid, ignorant, ill adjusted Jebus freak, who isn't even allowed to think about science.

/good for the kid
//I wonder if this will change any of the prejudiced asshats minds about homeschooling?
///right, I got it, welcome to Fark.
 
2012-08-13 05:19:13 PM  

devildog123: B-b-but Fark assured me that every homeschool kid is nothing but a stupid, ignorant, ill adjusted Jebus freak, who isn't even allowed to think about science.

/good for the kid
//I wonder if this will change any of the prejudiced asshats minds about homeschooling?
///right, I got it, welcome to Fark.


You're acting like a homeschooled kid on the debate team.

Nice bit of masterdebation there Poindexter. Give yourself an A+ and make sure to give mumsy a shiny new apple.
 
2012-08-13 05:26:17 PM  
Hey! Parents! Don't rely on school for your kids' socialization! Duh!
 
2012-08-13 05:27:28 PM  
cache.gizmodo.com

Maybe Meteor Man needs a sidekick
 
2012-08-13 05:31:09 PM  
i.imgur.com
 
2012-08-13 05:32:35 PM  
Clearly lacking in socialization.
 
2012-08-13 05:35:12 PM  
"...estimates had been on the ground for about 10,000 years" does not mean "estimated to be 10,000 years old", dumbassmitter.
 
2012-08-13 05:37:19 PM  
"But to find a meteorite on a hike using a homemade metal detector - not to mention being only 13 - is frankly quite extraordinary. But this kid is really bright. He's home-schooled and he's going to make a great scientist someday."

It takes a bit more to be a scientist than tripping over a rock.

Nevertheless, it's cool this kid has an interest in something beyond mindless teen pop culture.

/just bitter I never tripped over a rock like this
 
2012-08-13 05:39:19 PM  
Albuquerque suburb of Rio Rancho. Lolz. No one in either area likes that description.
 
2012-08-13 05:40:46 PM  
I'm sure his mom is very proud;

i939.photobucket.com
 
2012-08-13 05:41:40 PM  
What he was looking for:

i169.photobucket.com
 
2012-08-13 05:41:49 PM  
I think this will be enough to eventually score him a hot, if toothy, wife.

i217.photobucket.com
 
2012-08-13 05:44:16 PM  
"I've turned over every single rock in our backyard several times,"

After years of searching and several thousand misses, he finally found his first.


Subby fail. His grandpa built the metal detector. TFA paints a picture of a kid who doesn't do anything but kick around the scrub all day. What classes do you have this semester? Uh, metal detector XIII.
 
2012-08-13 05:44:45 PM  
i169.photobucket.com
 
2012-08-13 05:46:33 PM  
HAY GUYZE! HAS ANYONE POSTED THIS YET?

i217.photobucket.com
 
2012-08-13 05:51:25 PM  
Did his mom give him an F for suggesting there are objects more than 6,000 years old?
 
2012-08-13 05:56:55 PM  

The Stealth Hippopotamus: Depends on how much the meteorite is worth


Serious question... itsn't it illegal to sell space stuff?
 
2012-08-13 06:09:29 PM  

Dear Jerk: "I've turned over every single rock in our backyard several times,"

After years of searching and several thousand misses, he finally found his first.

Subby fail. His grandpa built the metal detector. TFA paints a picture of a kid who doesn't do anything but kick around the scrub all day. What classes do you have this semester? Uh, metal detector XIII.


That was my thought. And the parents won't disclose the location where he found the meteor, likely so he isn't charged with theft from someone's private property since his own backyard yielded nothing after demonstrating the definition of insanity with "turned over every single rock in our backyard several times."

Odds are pretty good the metal detector has a name and is the kid's best friend.
 
2012-08-13 06:13:18 PM  
in New Mexico?

He might want to stick around his home - lord knows what he'll find out in the deserts around ABQ..

gas masks used in meth production, several dead bodies, etc..

//No matter what, the methylamine keeps flowing... We are just getting started
 
2012-08-13 06:21:30 PM  

s1ugg0: Seriously, this is the whole point of science.


F*ck yeah! I have that shirt. I wear it when I karaoke.

Oooh! That reminds me of a CSB. It's long, but it ends with 4 cops surrounding me while I sit on a curb, pestering me with questions until one of them asks me "Is that what you do?" pointing at the shirt. I laugh and say "Yeah buddy. I "do" science."
 
2012-08-13 06:30:45 PM  
"But when he found the meteorite last year at a location the family does not want to disclose, he said, he knew he had something special."

Maybe the kid "found" it on private property and his parents don't want the landowners coming after it?

Is it legal to collect meteorites in state or national parks?
 
2012-08-13 06:30:45 PM  
s1gg0
Seriously, this is the whole point of science. Find out new stuff. Explore the world around you.

It's hard to bring the snark after a post like this.
 
2012-08-13 06:34:03 PM  
Unpossible. Everybody knows the earth was formed 5,700 years ago. He just testing our faith. Those home schooled kids these days.
 
2012-08-13 06:37:21 PM  
I missed a day on Fark once, I guess. Who's the hot b&w broad?
 
2012-08-13 06:42:54 PM  

GardenWeasel: 13-year old homeschooled boy builds a metal detector, finds 2-lb meteorite estimated to be 10,000 6000 years old

FTFY


Glad you did, or I would've. Not sure why homeschooled = creationist to me, there's got to be a few that aren't right creationists right?
 
2012-08-13 06:49:16 PM  
Hmm - correction of 10,000 to 6000 - CHECK.
Homeschool girl with preternaturally white teeth - CHECK.

*leaves happy*
 
2012-08-13 06:57:57 PM  
First thing I thought of was this:

-Voice of John Candy

It all started when I found
the green meteorite.
I had read that
smaller ones like this -
- burn up in the atmosphere.
But for some reason this one did not.
I stuck it in my rock collection
and forgot about it.
I experimented with electricity
and with a storm coming, -
- I figured I would hit jackpot.
I just needed a little juice.
 
2012-08-13 07:06:35 PM  

downstairs: The Stealth Hippopotamus: Depends on how much the meteorite is worth

Serious question... itsn't it illegal to sell space stuff?


Only if it has the NASA and/or JPL stamp on it
 
2012-08-13 07:12:03 PM  

Vlad_the_Inaner:


Department of Meteors
 
2012-08-13 07:23:00 PM  

downstairs: The Stealth Hippopotamus: Depends on how much the meteorite is worth

Serious question... itsn't it illegal to sell space stuff?


seelorq: Is it legal to collect meteorites in state or national parks?


The best answer to this is "It depends on where it was collected, and what sort of space stuff we're talking about".

In general national parks do not allow gathering of meteorites (much as gathering other rocks is not allowed, or for that matter how non-renewable resources are generally not allowed to be removed from national parks) nor do most other federal lands; legally, all meteorites found on federal lands (including BLM lands, national parks and national forests) are considered to be the property of the Smithsonian Institution (more info here; the court case establishing the concept the Smithsonian owns meteorites found on federal lands is here).

The one exception is that apparently some National Forest lands do allow very limited meteorite gathering under permit for personal, hobby, educational and noncommercial use and meteorites gathered under permit may not be sold--basically, they're considered legally to be "on loan" from the federal government (more info here.

In regards to states...laws differ from state to state in regards to meteorites found in state parks and other state lands (such as wildlife management areas). In general--following established case law noting that meteorites generally are considered to belong to the owner of the surface property the meteorite lands on--the state would technically be the owner, and most state parks have similar regs to federal lands; many states ban meteorite hunting on state lands altogether, whilst some allow with a permit for educational or personal use with selling prohibited. Some states even consider meteorites found to be the property of a state natural history museum--the best advice I can give is "check carefully with the state parks department or, if on non-park state lands, the Department of Fish and Wildlife or whatever state agency manages that land".

(Of note, the court that established that in general meteorites that fall on public lands are the property of the managing government (the one in 1980 that I mentioned) in fact involved a meteorite that fell in a California state park. Suffice it to say that it is now in the care of a state natural history museum rather than being sold at auction.)

Even in the case of private property the law regarding gathering meteorites can be tricky, much less who owns them (basically, if you find a meteorite on someone else's property, make sure you have it in writing that you have permission to gather meteorites on their land and that they are giving or selling you any meteorites you find--technically meteorites belong to the person whose land they fall on).

That said--as long as meteorites fall on private property in the US, the legal owner of the meteorite can sell them for as much as the market will bring. Many places selling rocks (up to and including the Smithsonian Institution itself) do have legally sold meteorite bits and meteorite-origin hematite sold to them by private rockhound gatherers, and there are people who apparently do make decent money off of finding and selling meteorites (and giving the property owners where the meteorites were found a good chunk of the profits).

I will also note that meteorites are about the only bit of "space stuff" legal to sell in the US; moon rock sales are illegal (considered property of the US government as they were gathered in the Apollo missions) as are sales of bits of spacecraft (considered to be the property of the government who sent them up--and if someone ever sells chunks of spacecraft from the present "private spaceflight" era, presumably these would be considered property of the companies that sent them up--the laws re ownership of "space junk" haven't really been tested with non-government-owned spacecraft yet).

Also, I will note my statement ONLY legally holds water for the US. There are some countries (Argentina, Peru and Chile among them) who consider all meteorites and fossils in their countries to be covered under their country's national antiquities act and thus consider them as the property of the government or the national museum; you can only go rockhounding for meteorites under permit, and any meteorites you find must be turned over to the national museum (you'll be compensated, yes, but it is technically government property).
 
2012-08-13 07:27:29 PM  

Tainted1: downstairs: The Stealth Hippopotamus: Depends on how much the meteorite is worth

Serious question... itsn't it illegal to sell space stuff?

Only if it has the NASA and/or JPL stamp on it


It is, however, illegal to take stuff from someone else's property, or from most federal or state lands. (I don't know where all those pretty rocks around my backyard pond came from).
 
2012-08-13 07:38:49 PM  

Funzo: Dear Jerk: "I've turned over every single rock in our backyard several times,"

After years of searching and several thousand misses, he finally found his first.

Subby fail. His grandpa built the metal detector. TFA paints a picture of a kid who doesn't do anything but kick around the scrub all day. What classes do you have this semester? Uh, metal detector XIII.

That was my thought. And the parents won't disclose the location where he found the meteor, likely so he isn't charged with theft from someone's private property since his own backyard yielded nothing after demonstrating the definition of insanity with "turned over every single rock in our backyard several times."

Odds are pretty good the metal detector has a name and is the kid's best friend.


Bolded for emphasis.

As noted, if he found it on someone else's property and did not get it in writing that the property owner is transferring all ownership to the meteorite to the kid...yes, he very much could get in trouble for theft from the property of another (as noted in my last post, legally the owner of a meteorite is the person who owns the surface property that the meteorite lands on).

And that's just on private property. If he found it on public lands, not only could it be theft but possibly overt felony violation of antiquities laws and Gods only knows what else (up to and including charges of destruction of federal property and attempts to sell stolen federal property, if he happened to gather that meteorite from federal lands; even gathering meteorites from most federal lands is a major no-no, and selling meteorites from federal lands is ALWAYS a big no-no). And no, they aren't going to particularly care that the kid is an intelligent example of the wonders of "unschooling", either.

(And yes, there is a small risk that he could have found the meteorite on federal lands; Petroglyph National Monument is pretty much right on the south side of Rio Rancho. At least he didn't have to worry about the chance he went rockhounding on First Nations land--more often than not, tribal governments prohibit ANY rockhounding and have First Amendment arguments to back that up with.)
 
2012-08-13 07:41:40 PM  
Funny, the only parents I knew that homeschooled did so to keep their kids away from creationist BS. They're the exception.
 
2012-08-13 07:45:55 PM  
7.mshcdn.com
 
2012-08-13 07:46:31 PM  

towatchoverme: I'm sure his mom is very proud;


steveGswine: What he was looking for:


FirstNationalBastard: I think this will be enough to eventually score him a hot, if toothy, wife.


jst3p: [i169.photobucket.com image 422x532]


FirstNationalBastard: HAY GUYZE! HAS ANYONE POSTED THIS YET?


Shut up, my phone rang while I was previewing.

/and where else was this thread gonna go, anyway
 
2012-08-13 08:07:22 PM  
i470.photobucket.com

Rock on science dude!

/homeschooler
//science rules
 
2012-08-13 09:03:06 PM  

robohobo: I missed a day on Fark once, I guess. Who's the hot b&w broad?


A guy with handle "tmim16" posted on a thread that not all home schooled kids were socially maladjusted. To prove it he posted a couple of pictures of his wife. A lot of farkers were telling him he was crazy to post pics of his wife on Fark but he insisted his wife would not have a problem with it (proving himself a socially maladjusted individual).

Here are a couple of more I saved from the era:

img594.imageshack.us

img215.imageshack.us
 
2012-08-13 09:10:52 PM  

Tainted1: downstairs: The Stealth Hippopotamus: Depends on how much the meteorite is worth

Serious question... itsn't it illegal to sell space stuff?

Only if it has the NASA and/or JPL stamp on it


What if it's stamped in Morse code?
 
2012-08-13 09:21:38 PM  
Good for him in discovering the meteorite. a BPO Metal Detector is VERY easy to make. with either the parts from an old transisitor radio. or a $25.00 shopping spree to radio shack. If you know how to solder and read a VERY basic schematic you can bang one out ina day, that can pick up a coin 6" in the ground. 10lbs of ore? yeah, it would see that to about 2 fricken feet easy. If your interested the plans are all over the internet. Just look up Beat Pulse Oscillator Metal Detector


Not sure why they mentioned homeschooling. Is this for the same reason why when someone metally retarded does something good, it makes all the local channels?
 
2012-08-13 09:50:54 PM  
www.indielondon.co.uk

Go on...
 
2012-08-13 10:04:29 PM  
Zylvia_Bandersnatch

Tainted1: downstairs: The Stealth Hippopotamus: Depends on how much the meteorite is worth

Serious question... itsn't it illegal to sell space stuff?

Only if it has the NASA and/or JPL stamp on it

What if it's stamped in Morse code?


Morse Code is obsolete, and no longer used on Earth.
 
2012-08-13 10:05:13 PM  

ArcadianRefugee: "...estimates had been on the ground for about 10,000 years" does not mean "estimated to be 10,000 years old", dumbassmitter.


Well, yeah, but "estimated to be 4.6 billion years old", like the rest of the solar system, doesn't mean much to the people of the land, the common clay of the new west.

And if you're adding critical thought, then why not shift it back to 13.7 billion years, when all matter was created? It's an utterly useless definition for colloquial language, as by that definition everything is as old as the universe itself.

downstairs: The Stealth Hippopotamus: Depends on how much the meteorite is worth

Serious question... itsn't it illegal to sell space stuff?


By what definition are heavier elements not "space stuff"?

Everything is "space stuff", produced by chemical reactions in stars, before they shoot their cosmic load over all the galaxies.

Therefore Obama is Earthican president for life and something something about American politics.
 
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