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(Slate)   How eating bacon is good for the environment   (slate.com) divider line 38
    More: Interesting, wild pigs, invasive species, Bush family, industrial waste, environments, BBQ, vacation house  
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6542 clicks; posted to Main » on 13 Aug 2012 at 11:36 AM (1 year ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2012-08-13 11:37:33 AM
F*ck the environment. How eating bacon is good for my taste buds
 
2012-08-13 11:38:09 AM
rlv.zcache.com
/obligatory
 
2012-08-13 11:38:49 AM
No explanation needed. In my heart, I always knew it was a good thing to eat bacon.
 
2012-08-13 11:39:56 AM
Bacon is good for the environment -- my environment.
 
2012-08-13 11:40:10 AM
The environment in my mouth.
 
2012-08-13 11:40:20 AM
I'm cooking a pork tenderloin sous vide tonight for dinner, so I'm getting a kick out of some of these posts.
 
2012-08-13 11:41:45 AM
I can't imagine that wild swine would work as well for streaky bacon. Wouldn't the meat be too lean?
 
2012-08-13 11:43:13 AM
I was on my feet and running full-tilt into the herd, my hand reaching for the knife that never left my belt....

In my haste I had forgotten not only my shoes but also my knife, which was still lying on the cutting board in the kitchen with the vegetables I'd been chopping for dinner.



Ok, I am calling bullshiat on this story. I know plenty of people that carry knifes because they are blue collar type workers and a knife can always come in handy on just about every job site. You might be shocked to know that every single one of these people also has silverware in the kitchen and would not use their work knife to cut up vegetables.
 
2012-08-13 11:43:50 AM
Right.... maybe if it's bacon from Enviropig.

I've heard all the meat from wild hogs will taste like garbage, or whatever else that hog was eating, not the corn fed goodness our domesticated pigs taste like. The dilemma of eating wild omnivores.

Hunting them is better than banning the more obscure breeds though, like they did in Michigan.
 
2012-08-13 11:43:50 AM

FTFA:

Pigs are as intelligent as domestic dogs and are capable of seeking out human affection.


IMPOSSIBLE, I've never even had a cop shake my hand when I offered it. I call BS
 
2012-08-13 11:45:58 AM
Running into pack of pigs sounds really stupid without a large gun.
 
2012-08-13 11:47:10 AM
My parents live on a very small farm and that's where I get all of my meat except for chicken. Every time I visit, I take a cooler and it's loaded up with steaks, hamburger, and roasts from their grass-fed steers. Now they've just started raising pigs. My pig, who has been named Bacon, will be turned into bacon, ribs, pork chops, etc this January.

I get meat that tastes better than what is sold in stores, the animals have been treated ethically and butchered in a way so that there's very little waste, and the environmental impact of the way my parents raise their animals is low. Still, I guess killing and eating an iguana or spearing a lionfish makes for a more interesting story than mine.
 
2012-08-13 11:47:53 AM
Knows what pigs can do:

farm9.staticflickr.com
 
2012-08-13 11:48:33 AM
The author makes a very good point. The calorie density of a wild pig is very high and one assumes even if you are a vegetarian you can't argue the effectiveness of this strategy on the environment. Ultimately vegetarianism's environmental impact is a function of the feed efficiency of the animal. X pounds of input to create y pounds of output. Since X is always greater than Y then eating meat is more burdensome on the environment. But here we effectively change that equation to X=0. Similarly with fish. He noted the lion fish but in the US we have the common carp brought here on purpose over 100 years ago (no not that new fangled silver/Asian carp). It pretty much has ruined most natural lakes in the US and was brought here specifically because it makes cheap and bountiful protein. Many countries eat it. There is actually commercial carp fishing but it's not enough to make a difference. A restaurant campaign or a bounty or something should be placed on them.

Cool California hipster restaurant "Wild Boar Testicles".
 
2012-08-13 11:51:01 AM
"F*ck BACON"
/That's Right. I said it.
//rule 34 bacon....I'd actually fusck a slab of bacon.
 
2012-08-13 11:52:20 AM
Swine invaders are now overrunning the land within a short drive of Washington, D.C.
i492.photobucket.com
 
2012-08-13 11:53:15 AM

Thisbymaster: Running into pack of pigs sounds really stupid without a large gun.


Or at least one of these.
 
2012-08-13 11:53:18 AM
I love pork and I have killed literally hundreds of wild pigs. They are not good tasting by any means.
 
2012-08-13 11:54:30 AM
I understand they are moving up through Illinois. I'll start hunting them when they reach my hunting land. Hopefully the state will retain the loose regulations on them as they have on coyotes.
 
2012-08-13 11:54:37 AM
2.bp.blogspot.com
 
2012-08-13 11:56:23 AM

cgraves67: I understand they are moving up through Illinois. I'll start hunting them when they reach my hunting land. Hopefully the state will retain the loose regulations on them as they have on coyotes.


They have already arrived in city hall in Chicago.
 
2012-08-13 11:57:46 AM

meat0918: Right.... maybe if it's bacon from Enviropig.

I've heard all the meat from wild hogs will taste like garbage, or whatever else that hog was eating, not the corn fed goodness our domesticated pigs taste like. The dilemma of eating wild omnivores.

Hunting them is better than banning the more obscure breeds though, like they did in Michigan.


Diet can affect the taste to a certain degree. Generally, a pig is a pig, boars are a little more lean and tougher than sows. I have shot and eaten wild pigs that were fatter than domestic. If they have a good food source, there is not much of a difference.
 
2012-08-13 11:57:57 AM
i761.photobucket.com
 
2012-08-13 12:00:48 PM

cgraves67: I understand they are moving up through Illinois. I'll start hunting them when they reach my hunting land. Hopefully the state will retain the loose regulations on them as they have on coyotes.


If they wanted to get rid of them, they'd put a bounty on them.

Make it enough that hunting them is potentially profitable, but not so much that it encourages people to kill domestic/farm pigs for the bounty (because they'd get more from selling the meat).

Making the laws similar to sport hunting regulations is only going to encourage the spread of the species, which is the ultimate goal of sport hunting regulations. Go back to a government bounty, I say!
 
2012-08-13 12:15:21 PM
Edward Bernays is the reason we eat bacon for breakfast.

Google it, because it is delicious.
 
2012-08-13 12:18:55 PM
www.mugs4coffee.com

Don't forget these pigs as well
 
2012-08-13 12:25:37 PM

brandent: Ultimately vegetarianism's environmental impact is a function of the feed efficiency of the animal. X pounds of input to create y pounds of output. Since X is always greater than Y then eating meat is more burdensome on the environment.


You're leaving out cellulose digestion. There's an awful lot of stuff out there that we can't eat unless it's been turned into an animal first.
 
2012-08-13 12:46:32 PM

JesseL: brandent: Ultimately vegetarianism's environmental impact is a function of the feed efficiency of the animal. X pounds of input to create y pounds of output. Since X is always greater than Y then eating meat is more burdensome on the environment.

You're leaving out cellulose digestion. There's an awful lot of stuff out there that we can't eat unless it's been turned into an animal first.


Yes but is always X>>Y even when considering this. No machine is 100% efficient. Animals move, they lose heat, they reproduce. All require great quantities of energy that is consumed and lost. Even considering the cellulose argument there is a definite efficiency argument to vegetarianism. All one needs to do is look at carrying capacities of predator/prey relationships in the food chain.

/not a vegetarian.
//bacon is awesome
 
2012-08-13 01:02:02 PM

brandent: JesseL: brandent: Ultimately vegetarianism's environmental impact is a function of the feed efficiency of the animal. X pounds of input to create y pounds of output. Since X is always greater than Y then eating meat is more burdensome on the environment.

You're leaving out cellulose digestion. There's an awful lot of stuff out there that we can't eat unless it's been turned into an animal first.

Yes but is always X>>Y even when considering this. No machine is 100% efficient. Animals move, they lose heat, they reproduce. All require great quantities of energy that is consumed and lost. Even considering the cellulose argument there is a definite efficiency argument to vegetarianism. All one needs to do is look at carrying capacities of predator/prey relationships in the food chain.

/not a vegetarian.
//bacon is awesome


btw the feed efficiency of a pig is approximately 3. i.e. 3 pounds of feed (mostly corn)=1 pound of pig. And that's only the butchers without any breeding stock considered in the total equation. Ultimately this is what is driving corn prices. The ethanol argument is only a small piece. Same with the drought. The really big story is the hogs in China. China's growth in hogs last year was greater than the total production of Iowa. That's considering that if Iowa were a country it would be the third largest producer. When the economic level of a country gets to the point where people can afford meat regularly....they choose meat. This consumes resources at prodigious rates. Most corn is fed to animals historically (before ethanol). Now something like 25% of the US production is ethanol but one must understand that half of that is left over as distiller's grain and therefore ultimately only a 12.5% impact on feed stock. Export to China is a major driver.

Interesting USDA Link Link It only talks about domestic use though.
 
2012-08-13 02:07:18 PM

JesseL: brandent: Ultimately vegetarianism's environmental impact is a function of the feed efficiency of the animal. X pounds of input to create y pounds of output. Since X is always greater than Y then eating meat is more burdensome on the environment.

You're leaving out cellulose digestion. There's an awful lot of stuff out there that we can't eat unless it's been turned into an animal first.


Which is why grass-fed beef is an environmentally friendly food. Sadly, most American beef is grain-fed.
 
2012-08-13 02:28:03 PM
As someone who regularly feasts on wild boar, there really isn't much bacon to be had from them.
 
2012-08-13 05:01:31 PM
Domestic pigs are affectionate and like to nuzzle humans. They are known to even pathetically nuzzle their killers, if they happen to get loose and need to be redirected to the death belt, just before they're slaughtered in the abattoirs. I'd be as likely to eat pork as I would my bulldog, that is: not very. Fark bacon, for sure. It's not even healthy.
 
2012-08-13 06:18:44 PM

farkplug: Domestic pigs are affectionate and like to nuzzle humans. They are known to even pathetically nuzzle their killers, if they happen to get loose and need to be redirected to the death belt, just before they're slaughtered in the abattoirs. I'd be as likely to eat pork as I would my bulldog, that is: not very. Fark bacon, for sure. It's not even healthy.


How do you know that's not just a clever ploy developed in order to avoid being slaughtered. Maybe they're playing your ass.
 
2012-08-13 07:20:15 PM
The one wild pig I ate was a fat farker who seemed to have eaten only acorns all of its life. Made for yummy meat. Took two rounds to the head to drop it. From an 1884 Springfield trapdoor .45-70 sniper cannon.
First shot just stunned it long enough to reload. It stood still so I could shoot again. That is not a small gun! I wouldn't hunt those beasts with anything less than a repeating .30-06 and a .44 on my hip. Those things are just plain dangerous.
I suggest you tell all of the Rednecks in Georgia and New Jersey that you CAN'T hunt them and that they taste horrible. Say it with a New York accent and there will be a massacre.
 
2012-08-13 07:31:30 PM
Bacon has always been good.
 
2012-08-13 08:29:15 PM

rhinoguy: I wouldn't hunt those beasts with anything less than a repeating .30-06 and a .44 on my hip. Those things are just plain dangerous.


Some people hunt them with traditional archery gear.

The real men use flint or obsidian arrowheads.
 
2012-08-13 08:35:39 PM

dittybopper: rhinoguy: I wouldn't hunt those beasts with anything less than a repeating .30-06 and a .44 on my hip. Those things are just plain dangerous.

Some people hunt them with traditional archery gear.

The real men use flint or obsidian arrowheads.


Agreed.

I prefer obsidian, if you can find it...

;)
 
2012-08-13 09:54:15 PM

Indubitably: dittybopper: rhinoguy: I wouldn't hunt those beasts with anything less than a repeating .30-06 and a .44 on my hip. Those things are just plain dangerous.

Some people hunt them with traditional archery gear.

The real men use flint or obsidian arrowheads.

Agreed.

I prefer obsidian, if you can find it...

;)


You can buy it from Three Rivers Archery. I've gotten some from there.

I just got a dozen shafts. I'm making up some arrows for hunting season. Six of them will have 125 grain field points for practice, another 3 or 4 will get either Wensel Woodsmans or Zwickey Eskimos, and the balance will get points I knapped myself, probably from Dacite, which is a nice, tough stone. My goal is to eventually go completely primitive, and only use knapped heads, but I'm making up the others as "insurance" this year.
 
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