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(Network World)   Kickstarter crowd fails to fund how-to book about Kickstarter-style crowdfunding   (networkworld.com) divider line 22
    More: Ironic, Kickstarter, guides  
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1093 clicks; posted to Geek » on 11 Aug 2012 at 10:42 AM (2 years ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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Skr
2012-08-11 10:43:43 AM  
Damn elitists trying to keep all of the good insider secrets to themselves.
 
2012-08-11 10:49:22 AM  
Kickstarter is a joke. Donate $100 and get the same thing the $5 donater got, PLUS a keychain? Count me in!
 
2012-08-11 11:04:32 AM  

duffblue: Kickstarter is a joke. Donate $100 and get the same thing the $5 donater got, PLUS a keychain? Count me in! Get 8.5 million in funding for your project, scrap project and suffer "bad reputation" on kickstarter.


FTFY

/Or spend less than 2 million in development
//and 2 million in initial stock
///Send out "gifts"
//???
/profit
 
2012-08-11 11:13:03 AM  
Meta..
 
2012-08-11 11:34:33 AM  
Pretty good sign the book sucked.
 
2012-08-11 11:35:22 AM  
That's because I put all of my kickstarter money toward comic books graphic novels and food trucks.
 
2012-08-11 11:36:37 AM  
As a person who raised 10k on kickstarter, I'm getting a kick out of this.

/the secret is pretty simple: have a product that people get excited about and then tell as many people as you reasonably can without being annoying. If you have something cool you don't have to work too hard past that.
 
2012-08-11 11:43:00 AM  
Couldn't he just do an ebook.
 
2012-08-11 11:58:41 AM  
FFS, can't he just write the damned book then sell it to a publisher afterwards? You know, like people have done for the entire century.

This lazy dumbass just wants risk-free money. Glad people saw through it to the scam that it is.
 
2012-08-11 12:08:41 PM  
imgs.xkcd.com
 
2012-08-11 12:45:21 PM  
My kickstarter idea is funding a girl-girl scene featuring Kate Upton and Sophia Vergara. Who's in?
 
2012-08-11 01:54:48 PM  

DrowningLessons: As a person who raised 10k on kickstarter, I'm getting a kick out of this.

/the secret is pretty simple: have a product that people get excited about and then tell as many people as you reasonably can without being annoying. If you have something cool you don't have to work too hard past that.


Miniatures gaming is cleaning up on Kickstarter...for the reason you mentioned. Ive backed 2 of them. Only thing that sucks is waiting for production. The one Im backing right now ends in Sept, estimated delivery is May 2013. They are at $124,000+ from an original goal of $20,000...with 28 days to go.
 
2012-08-11 02:01:10 PM  
static.guim.co.uk

hotlinked
 
2012-08-11 02:28:17 PM  

Sultan Of Herf: DrowningLessons: As a person who raised 10k on kickstarter, I'm getting a kick out of this.

/the secret is pretty simple: have a product that people get excited about and then tell as many people as you reasonably can without being annoying. If you have something cool you don't have to work too hard past that.

Miniatures gaming is cleaning up on Kickstarter...for the reason you mentioned. Ive backed 2 of them. Only thing that sucks is waiting for production. The one Im backing right now ends in Sept, estimated delivery is May 2013. They are at $124,000+ from an original goal of $20,000...with 28 days to go.


It's weird, right? Because when you back a kickstarter or an indigogo, you're time-table of perception is way off. Because normally with a product like you mentioned, you wouldn't even hear about it until it was released or close to released, but since your money is what's funding everything, from design to actual production, it seems sooooo long ... and it isn't really, just that part of the timetable is normally hidden to consumers.

But I like it. You get to see something from absolute 0 all the way to 100, and follow along the way. Especially if the team working on a thing is good at regular and entertaining updates, people will be satisfied with hearing about the progress, status and ultimate result. So what you get is essential indie minded people willing to wait for something that's unique to their interests.

I love the internet, it's so democratic. Kickstarter is a great way to bypass other systems. You're gonna end up with miniatures that you endorsed, instead of begrudgingly bought because it was the best option, and I'm going to end up with a professional quality show with an indie sensibility that's going to be nationally distributed and appear on Xbox live, etc., without having to go through a studio that would tell me what do to. Love it.
 
2012-08-11 03:55:03 PM  
The idea writing a book telling people how to game the kickstarter system to get their project funded would result in loads more crap projects.

This book would be the equivalent the book telling everyone to go use the same five drop shippers to build eBay stores. Just filled the thing with utter crap.
 
2012-08-11 08:40:03 PM  

DrowningLessons: Sultan Of Herf: DrowningLessons: As a person who raised 10k on kickstarter, I'm getting a kick out of this.

/the secret is pretty simple: have a product that people get excited about and then tell as many people as you reasonably can without being annoying. If you have something cool you don't have to work too hard past that.

Miniatures gaming is cleaning up on Kickstarter...for the reason you mentioned. Ive backed 2 of them. Only thing that sucks is waiting for production. The one Im backing right now ends in Sept, estimated delivery is May 2013. They are at $124,000+ from an original goal of $20,000...with 28 days to go.

It's weird, right? Because when you back a kickstarter or an indigogo, you're time-table of perception is way off. Because normally with a product like you mentioned, you wouldn't even hear about it until it was released or close to released, but since your money is what's funding everything, from design to actual production, it seems sooooo long ... and it isn't really, just that part of the timetable is normally hidden to consumers.

But I like it. You get to see something from absolute 0 all the way to 100, and follow along the way. Especially if the team working on a thing is good at regular and entertaining updates, people will be satisfied with hearing about the progress, status and ultimate result. So what you get is essential indie minded people willing to wait for something that's unique to their interests.

I love the internet, it's so democratic. Kickstarter is a great way to bypass other systems. You're gonna end up with miniatures that you endorsed, instead of begrudgingly bought because it was the best option, and I'm going to end up with a professional quality show with an indie sensibility that's going to be nationally distributed and appear on Xbox live, etc., without having to go through a studio that would tell me what do to. Love it.


Its terribly addictive. Like being in on the first day somethings released, but better. I think the best part is the ones that put contributors names in books, rulebooks, etc. The stretch goals make it exciting to follow, since you start getting whats essentially free stuff just for other people getting on board.
 
2012-08-11 09:06:19 PM  

DrowningLessons: You get to see something from absolute 0 all the way to 100, and follow along the way.


I backed the "ultimate clicky pen" and I received at least 18 updates from the guy along every step of the way from ordering the individual parts to machining them and final assembly. Pretty cool, I was invested in the project all the way .
 
2012-08-11 09:20:44 PM  
I thought it was a pretty good idea: research the process of crowdfunding by trying it out firsthand. I bet he'll try it again later on during the process of writing this book...applying the techniques and examples he'd learned during his research.

And research really does cost money. His idea was that he'd use the crowdsourced funds the same way he'd have used a publisher's advance...as seed money for getting the book together, and also to cover the income he'd lose during the X hours a week he'd spend writing the book instead of doing something pays by the week.

I tend not to fund Kickstarter campaigns unless the creator already has some skin in the game. "There's this novel I've been thinking about writing. If I get me a pile of money up front, then I shall deign to write it" -- no. "I've been working on this novel every morning for a year, while holding down a fulltime job. The manuscript is complete. Turning it into a saleable product will require $4000 to hire an editor, a designer, and a marketing person..." sure.

It's the same reason why I don't usually fund hardware projects. Unless the video shows off a working, successful prototype that functions as advertised, I worry that I'll be giving these people $85 for a hunk of fabric and metal that looks like a folding Bluetooth speaker dock but can't function like one. Hey, how were they to know that wrapping the center unit in decorative copper mesh would block all incoming radio signals?

The real reason for Kickstarter is to encourage creators. The smart thing is to decide that you're putting your money in just to show support for a good idea. You have to be OK with the idea that you'll never get anything useful back.
 
2012-08-11 10:40:13 PM  

Pentaxian: My kickstarter idea is funding a girl-girl scene featuring Kate Upton and Sophia Vergara. Who's in?


This is a trick question -- they are both in
 
2012-08-12 01:29:32 AM  
What a wacky F*cking world we live in
 
2012-08-12 03:22:26 AM  

lelio: DrowningLessons: You get to see something from absolute 0 all the way to 100, and follow along the way.

I backed the "ultimate clicky pen" and I received at least 18 updates from the guy along every step of the way from ordering the individual parts to machining them and final assembly. Pretty cool, I was invested in the project all the way .


I backed Ukiyo-e Heroes and am just enjoying all the stretch goals being met (including one that led to me upping my pledge). I'm getting an update every few days and it's not even the end of the pledge period yet. But then this was a case of where a lot of the work was done well in advance of the KS-launch. Same with me backing Amanda Palmer's album.

Kickstarter is an amazing platform if you have an interesting product. The problem is this book just wasn't that friggen interesting.
 
2012-08-12 10:56:48 PM  
The problem with Kickstarter is that there are too many iAccessory projects. How many different types of stands, cases, cables, and amplifiers do you need?

The worse project right now is the "supercar garage". Some douche with a Lamborghini wants people to contribute $250k to help modify the car in exchange for video. Lame. Go to the gym in 26 minutes and ask your other Lambo-owning friends. Currently at an amazing $101 of $250k. Claims at the bottom that they can make a 200mpg hydrogen supercar when no one else can. Good thing only 2 idjits have fallen for this scam.
http://www.kickstarter.com/projects/supercargarage/supercar-garagetm- s tage-one?ref=live
 
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