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(Some Guy)   Lets see if you all can complain about sci-fi movies more than this guy does   (dedoimedo.com) divider line 209
    More: Amusing, science fiction film, particle beams, grenade launcher, airborne lasers, Planet Earth, Chinese immigrants, English, alien races  
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8219 clicks; posted to Geek » on 11 Aug 2012 at 11:56 AM (2 years ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2012-08-12 12:47:50 PM

Zombalupagus: I think that would have looked just fine on film!


Here's the thing: that requires thought and creativity. These tropes that the author calls out? It's less that they're bad and more that they're lazy. The visual language of science fiction was established back in the 30s. It got a few updates as effects technology got better. The dial of "glittery" vs. "gritty" has swung around a few times. But basically, sci-fi is doing the same thing it's been doing when it comes to cinema. There's no real innovation in the visual language of science fiction. At best, it'll steal the visual language from other genres (the wire-work in the Matrix, for example).
 
2012-08-12 03:08:08 PM
FTFA: "It would be like asking your children, assuming you've made a mistake and created some"

That's stupid.
 
2012-08-12 03:35:11 PM
t3knomanser: Zombalupagus: I think that would have looked just fine on film!

Here's the thing: that requires thought and creativity. These tropes that the author calls out? It's less that they're bad and more that they're lazy. The visual language of science fiction was established back in the 30s. It got a few updates as effects technology got better. The dial of "glittery" vs. "gritty" has swung around a few times. But basically, sci-fi is doing the same thing it's been doing when it comes to cinema. There's no real innovation in the visual language of science fiction. At best, it'll steal the visual language from other genres (the wire-work in the Matrix, for example).


And the matrix stole it from Asian cinema and kung fu.

There's really not much new, if at all. There's just how successful and creatively someone uses something.

For the Enterprise vs the Reliant it was almost a breaking of the 4th wall joke, since the technology and motion capture of models for science fiction was quite limited. You didn't get shows about space really playing with the idea of 3 axis until CGI made it more practical.
 
2012-08-12 05:33:11 PM
That reminds me, I had a friend that complained because C3P0s lips didn't move.
 
2012-08-12 09:03:35 PM

TyrantII: You didn't get shows about space really playing with the idea of 3 axis until CGI made it more practical.


You never saw The Empire Strikes Back?
 
2012-08-12 10:01:39 PM

Mugato: TyrantII: You didn't get shows about space really playing with the idea of 3 axis until CGI made it more practical.

You never saw The Empire Strikes Back?


I did, whilst the model work is exceptionally good you can it's a model sat on a stand being moved or that the model is stationary and the camera moving around it to give the illusion of simultaneous multi-axis movement.

The eye popper was really the opening of season 3 (or 4) of Voyager (of all things) when the new CGI model does move fluidly through all axis whilst rotating then warps away. They never showed that level of manuverability in the show again though.
 
2012-08-12 10:11:09 PM

Vaneshi: I did, whilst the model work is exceptionally good you can it's a model sat on a stand being moved or that the model is stationary and the camera moving around it to give the illusion of simultaneous multi-axis movement.


I know how it's done but the shot of the Falcon taking a nose dive while running from the Star Destroyers making them almost crash into each other was a decent use of the third axis.
 
2012-08-13 03:14:04 PM

The A.I.S.B.: 3:add sighting devices and different firing modes. sufficiently advanced technology can cover the rest. although a pistol type weapon would be harder to aim, and an auto aim feature would either require very oddly shaped weapons (a turret on a stick), some kind of harness, or cybernetic or biological implants.


I don't really care enough to address any of the other points made in the article, but this just caught my eye because I have some experience with it. A directed energy weapon with a phased-array interface could have its beam direction changed without any moving parts. We already use this technology in slotted waveguide antennas to achieve highly directional communications links without the need for parabolic reflectors. It wouldn't be hard at all to imagine a scaled down weaponized version that could lock on to a target and focus the weapon's energy on that point.
 
2012-08-13 06:37:14 PM

StrangeQ: The A.I.S.B.: 3:add sighting devices and different firing modes. sufficiently advanced technology can cover the rest. although a pistol type weapon would be harder to aim, and an auto aim feature would either require very oddly shaped weapons (a turret on a stick), some kind of harness, or cybernetic or biological implants.

I don't really care enough to address any of the other points made in the article, but this just caught my eye because I have some experience with it. A directed energy weapon with a phased-array interface could have its beam direction changed without any moving parts. We already use this technology in slotted waveguide antennas to achieve highly directional communications links without the need for parabolic reflectors. It wouldn't be hard at all to imagine a scaled down weaponized version that could lock on to a target and focus the weapon's energy on that point.


I concurr. Especially for the Halo universe as it is directly discussed in the books and taken from our own science(portrayed by the covenant weapons that track, ships and plasma pistol). Magnetic fields directing the flow of whatever energy particles, or as in our use, keeping such particles away from the surfaces of the hadron collider(IIRC of course).

My most consistant gripe about the article, why do everything need some in depth explanation. Sure, some rought theory is nice for the things that we are not able to directly deduce(IE fictional weapons similar to conventional ones - a rifle that fires projectiles), but do we need a ten minute lecture every time we see a piece of science fiction technology that doesn't exist today?

No, the story and characters are still more important, too much geek and no one will watch the crapfest that it's bound to become.
 
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