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(Discover)   First color 360-degree pic from Mars rover reveals it's apparently a disciple of Jesus   (blogs.discovermagazine.com) divider line 82
    More: Cool, Mars rovers, dust devils, Martian surface, viewing angles, basalts, oxides, Jet Propulsion Laboratory  
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14098 clicks; posted to Geek » on 09 Aug 2012 at 4:29 PM (2 years ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2012-08-09 04:01:58 PM
I'm pretty sure I saw a Coca-Cola can off in the corner of that picture.
 
2012-08-09 04:09:38 PM
Should I be ashamed that I don't get this headline?
 
2012-08-09 04:10:39 PM
I don't get the headline.
 
2012-08-09 04:14:50 PM

Lucky LaRue: Should I be ashamed that I don't get this headline?


AdolfOliverPanties: I don't get the headline.



I think it was a reference to the "halo" illusion in the photo

/just a wild-ass guess, though
//silly me: I thought they brought in J.J. Abramson
 
2012-08-09 04:19:01 PM
That photo has been tampered with. IN the foreground, right between two shadows of the rover that are sticking up, is a rectangular pattern of the photo that has been obviously inserted in. What are they covering up?

You can only see it in the blown-up version.
 
2012-08-09 04:23:01 PM

AdolfOliverPanties: That photo has been tampered with. IN the foreground, right between two shadows of the rover that are sticking up, is a rectangular pattern of the photo that has been obviously inserted in. What are they covering up?

You can only see it in the blown-up version.


It's a panorama, which means a bunch of stitched-together photos. They don't always stitch together perfectly.
 
2012-08-09 04:29:26 PM
Take a closer look. You can see the lines where they stitched everything else together throughout the entire picture. Nowhere else is it this sloppy and obvious.

This plate is an obvious attempt to cover up something they don't want us seeing. I've no doubt that eagle-eyed viewers will find the exact same square somewhere else in the shot, therefore finding the source from where they so sloppily cloned a portion of the Martian landscape.


/or not
 
2012-08-09 04:34:45 PM

AdolfOliverPanties: Take a closer look. You can see the lines where they stitched everything else together throughout the entire picture. Nowhere else is it this sloppy and obvious.

This plate is an obvious attempt to cover up something they don't want us seeing. I've no doubt that eagle-eyed viewers will find the exact same square somewhere else in the shot, therefore finding the source from where they so sloppily cloned a portion of the Martian landscape.


/or not


There are actually many tiles there. That region of the panorama is composed of many shots, which have to be goemetrically corrected to be spliced together. The irregularities come from the fact that the shots don't like up perfectly. Just below that, you can see several other irregular tiles as well. It's nothing special.
 
2012-08-09 04:35:24 PM
Wait second....

img824.imageshack.us

I recognize that shadow!

2.bp.blogspot.com
 
2012-08-09 04:36:54 PM
It must be about the heiligenschein.
 
2012-08-09 04:37:32 PM
If you look carefully, you can see a ghost child in the window and a munchkin hanging himself in a tree in the distance.
 
2012-08-09 04:37:54 PM

DeltaPunch: Wait second....

[img824.imageshack.us image 531x426]

I recognize that shadow!

[2.bp.blogspot.com image 400x286]


I came to say exactly this. I'm so glad I'm not the only one.
 
2012-08-09 04:42:08 PM
There goes your science is better than chick-fil-a meme!
 
2012-08-09 04:43:51 PM
I can't find the black guy.
 
2012-08-09 04:54:47 PM
I see Val Kilmer way off in the distance
 
2012-08-09 04:54:52 PM
I doubt it, subby. That yard looks awfully unkempt.
 
2012-08-09 04:58:30 PM

usrid0: I can't find the black guy.


Me neither, but it would be cool if NASA would make one with some hidden artifacts in it from Apollo or Shuttle missions. Or maybe that might be too much for the tin foil hat types.
 
2012-08-09 05:00:50 PM

dejavoodoo64: usrid0: I can't find the black guy.

Me neither, but it would be cool if NASA would make one with some hidden artifacts in it from Apollo or Shuttle missions. Or maybe that might be too much for the tin foil hat types.


I would love to see them release just one shot with Exif info containing some GPS coordinates from out in the middle of the Mohave.
 
2012-08-09 05:03:24 PM

doyner: I doubt it, subby. That yard looks awfully unkempt.


Well, it has been a very dry summer.
 
2012-08-09 05:03:42 PM
Look! Dirt!
 
2012-08-09 05:05:50 PM
The Red Planet is coated with Brucci rouge. More like the Shameless Hussy Planet!

*does drag queeny finger wave snap*
 
2012-08-09 05:06:30 PM

AdolfOliverPanties: Take a closer look. You can see the lines where they stitched everything else together throughout the entire picture. Nowhere else is it this sloppy and obvious.

This plate is an obvious attempt to cover up something they don't want us seeing. I've no doubt that eagle-eyed viewers will find the exact same square somewhere else in the shot, therefore finding the source from where they so sloppily cloned a portion of the Martian landscape.


/or not


If you look closely at the bottom left hand corner, you'll notice they have blacked out a section. What are they hiding?
 
2012-08-09 05:12:27 PM

max_pooper: AdolfOliverPanties: Take a closer look. You can see the lines where they stitched everything else together throughout the entire picture. Nowhere else is it this sloppy and obvious.

This plate is an obvious attempt to cover up something they don't want us seeing. I've no doubt that eagle-eyed viewers will find the exact same square somewhere else in the shot, therefore finding the source from where they so sloppily cloned a portion of the Martian landscape.


/or not

If you look closely at the bottom left hand corner, you'll notice they have blacked out a section. What are they hiding?


Yep. Obvious sings of redaction. I blame Cheney.
 
2012-08-09 05:13:13 PM

dejavoodoo64: Me neither, but it would be cool if NASA would make one with some hidden artifacts in it from Apollo or Shuttle missions. Or maybe that might be too much for the tin foil hat types.


Ohhhh what I wouldn't give to be able to work on NASA's image/video processing team. I'd do some kung-fu steganography the likes of which would put Richard D. James to shame.
 
2012-08-09 05:22:04 PM
desmond.imageshack.us
 
2012-08-09 05:23:56 PM
I don't care if it rains or freezes,
Long as I have my plastic Jesus
Sitting on the dashboard of my car
Comes in colors, Pink and Pleasant,
Glows in the dark, cause it's iridescent
Take it with you when you're travelling far

Get yourself a Sweet Madonna
Dressed in rhinestones sitting on a
Pedestal of abalone shell
Goin' ninety, I'm ain't scary
'Cause I've got my Virgin Mary
Assuring me that I won't go to Hell

Get yourself a Sweet Madonna
Dressed in rhinestones sitting on a
Pedestal of abalone shell
Goin' ninety, I'm ain't scary
'Cause I've got my Virgin Mary
Assuring me that I won't go to Hell


Plastic Jesus - Cool Hand Luke version.

Link
 
2012-08-09 05:25:52 PM
How much do you think those little rocks on the ground are worth?
 
2012-08-09 05:36:23 PM

burber: I see Val Kilmer way off in the distance


the.honoluluadvertiser.com

Nah, he said he hates this planet, stole the batteries from Amy and left on some Russian piece of junk.
 
2012-08-09 05:45:22 PM
Basalt shaker

payload.cargocollective.com
 
2012-08-09 05:50:50 PM
insidepulse.com + youoffendmeyouoffendmyfamily.com

=

blogs.discovermagazine.com

This means something.
 
2012-08-09 05:52:38 PM
i still cant see this farking halo
 
2012-08-09 05:54:16 PM
Random question. Let's say we could pump a bunch of O2 and other gasses into the Martian atmosphere. Assuming we could get the partial pressure of O2 up to about 0.2 atmospheres, how high would the total pressure have to be before humans could survive?
 
2012-08-09 06:00:36 PM

Fish in a Barrel: Random question. Let's say we could pump a bunch of O2 and other gasses into the Martian atmosphere. Assuming we could get the partial pressure of O2 up to about 0.2 atmospheres, how high would the total pressure have to be before humans could survive?


Wouldn't matter... a new atmosphere would get ripped away just like the last one.
 
2012-08-09 06:07:44 PM

sinanju: Fish in a Barrel: Random question. Let's say we could pump a bunch of O2 and other gasses into the Martian atmosphere. Assuming we could get the partial pressure of O2 up to about 0.2 atmospheres, how high would the total pressure have to be before humans could survive?

Wouldn't matter... a new atmosphere would get ripped away just like the last one.


Yeah, and the radiation would be really nasty, and a host of other problems. But that's not what I'm asking; dont' be a party-pooper. ;-)

Could you live on pure O2 at 0.2atm pressure, or would you need, say another 0.3atm of gases to breathe? I've tried looking it up, but all the numbers I can find for minimum survivable pressure assume an Earth-like mix of gases.
 
2012-08-09 06:09:53 PM

sinanju: Fish in a Barrel: Random question. Let's say we could pump a bunch of O2 and other gasses into the Martian atmosphere. Assuming we could get the partial pressure of O2 up to about 0.2 atmospheres, how high would the total pressure have to be before humans could survive?

Wouldn't matter... a new atmosphere would get ripped away just like the last one.


Depends on if we could replenish the lost atmosphere fast enough to offset the difference. Alternatively, we could build a super magneto-tron to supplement the weak magnetosphere and prevent the solar wind from blowing it away.
 
2012-08-09 06:16:27 PM

Fish in a Barrel: sinanju: Fish in a Barrel: Random question. Let's say we could pump a bunch of O2 and other gasses into the Martian atmosphere. Assuming we could get the partial pressure of O2 up to about 0.2 atmospheres, how high would the total pressure have to be before humans could survive?

Wouldn't matter... a new atmosphere would get ripped away just like the last one.

Yeah, and the radiation would be really nasty, and a host of other problems. But that's not what I'm asking; dont' be a party-pooper. ;-)

Could you live on pure O2 at 0.2atm pressure, or would you need, say another 0.3atm of gases to breathe? I've tried looking it up, but all the numbers I can find for minimum survivable pressure assume an Earth-like mix of gases.


Maybe...? The top of Everest is 0.33 atm.

You might not have to wear a pressure suit, but I'm pretty sure you'd need supplemental O2 masks.
 
2012-08-09 06:25:15 PM

r00tdenied: sinanju: Fish in a Barrel: Random question. Let's say we could pump a bunch of O2 and other gasses into the Martian atmosphere. Assuming we could get the partial pressure of O2 up to about 0.2 atmospheres, how high would the total pressure have to be before humans could survive?

Wouldn't matter... a new atmosphere would get ripped away just like the last one.

Depends on if we could replenish the lost atmosphere fast enough to offset the difference. Alternatively, we could build a super magneto-tron to supplement the weak magnetosphere and prevent the solar wind from blowing it away.


I've been thinking about this solution for a while now. We could build an absolutely massive satellite magnet and park it in front of mars to bend it out of the way or maybe bury a couple in mars itself at the poles possibly, but would it be more or less feasible to build dozens of smaller magnets(obviously they would still have to be pretty massive) and park them at various spots around mars and help bend the radiation out of the way that way?

I am not even sure how much energy you would need to shield a planet of that size.

How well do we even understand it at this point? I'm sure somebody is interested using the AMS experiment on the space station to conduct tests on electromagnets in space and radiation shielding. I think there is also a proposed experiment to study the gaps in our own electromagnetic field.
 
2012-08-09 06:44:05 PM

ZER0T0THEC0RE: r00tdenied: sinanju: Fish in a Barrel: Random question. Let's say we could pump a bunch of O2 and other gasses into the Martian atmosphere. Assuming we could get the partial pressure of O2 up to about 0.2 atmospheres, how high would the total pressure have to be before humans could survive?

Wouldn't matter... a new atmosphere would get ripped away just like the last one.

Depends on if we could replenish the lost atmosphere fast enough to offset the difference. Alternatively, we could build a super magneto-tron to supplement the weak magnetosphere and prevent the solar wind from blowing it away.

I've been thinking about this solution for a while now. We could build an absolutely massive satellite magnet and park it in front of mars to bend it out of the way or maybe bury a couple in mars itself at the poles possibly, but would it be more or less feasible to build dozens of smaller magnets(obviously they would still have to be pretty massive) and park them at various spots around mars and help bend the radiation out of the way that way?

I am not even sure how much energy you would need to shield a planet of that size.

How well do we even understand it at this point? I'm sure somebody is interested using the AMS experiment on the space station to conduct tests on electromagnets in space and radiation shielding. I think there is also a proposed experiment to study the gaps in our own electromagnetic field.


www.reallifecomics.com
 
2012-08-09 06:53:54 PM

Fish in a Barrel: Random question. Let's say we could pump a bunch of O2 and other gasses into the Martian atmosphere. Assuming we could get the partial pressure of O2 up to about 0.2 atmospheres, how high would the total pressure have to be before humans could survive?


Depends, we actually need (or rather our bodies operate better with) air to breathe, which has trace amounts of oddities like Argon, Xeon and in it as well as Nitrogen and obviously CO2 plus some others.

You could possibly lash up some sort of back mounted compressor feeding a face mask.

So "possible in theory, with my schoolboy knowledge of atmospherics".
 
2012-08-09 07:00:20 PM

sinanju: Fish in a Barrel: Random question. Let's say we could pump a bunch of O2 and other gasses into the Martian atmosphere. Assuming we could get the partial pressure of O2 up to about 0.2 atmospheres, how high would the total pressure have to be before humans could survive?

Wouldn't matter... a new atmosphere would get ripped away just like the last one.


On a geologic timescale, that would be a problem. But humans could live there for a few thousand years before there was any noticeable loss in surface pressure (the loss due to solar wind is slow, otherwise Mars would already be a vacuum). Which would hopefully be a long enough time period to engineer a more permanent solution to the magnetosphere problem.

Fortunately, engineering an oxygen atmosphere would create an ozone layer, which combined with the thicker atmosphere, would give comparable radiation protection to Earth's extreme polar regions. As a stopgap measure, you could ensure all colony structures had their own artificial magnetic fields, and living areas were underground.
 
2012-08-09 07:04:08 PM

BafflerMeal: Fish in a Barrel: sinanju: Fish in a Barrel: Random question. Let's say we could pump a bunch of O2 and other gasses into the Martian atmosphere. Assuming we could get the partial pressure of O2 up to about 0.2 atmospheres, how high would the total pressure have to be before humans could survive?

Wouldn't matter... a new atmosphere would get ripped away just like the last one.

Yeah, and the radiation would be really nasty, and a host of other problems. But that's not what I'm asking; dont' be a party-pooper. ;-)

Could you live on pure O2 at 0.2atm pressure, or would you need, say another 0.3atm of gases to breathe? I've tried looking it up, but all the numbers I can find for minimum survivable pressure assume an Earth-like mix of gases.

Maybe...? The top of Everest is 0.33 atm.

You might not have to wear a pressure suit, but I'm pretty sure you'd need supplemental O2 masks.


What if we massively nuke the planet? Cloud up the atmosphere, and generate a bunch of heat to thaw the water trapped in the ground?
 
2012-08-09 07:14:14 PM

AdolfOliverPanties: Take a closer look. You can see the lines where they stitched everything else together throughout the entire picture. Nowhere else is it this sloppy and obvious.

This plate is an obvious attempt to cover up something they don't want us seeing. I've no doubt that eagle-eyed viewers will find the exact same square somewhere else in the shot, therefore finding the source from where they so sloppily cloned a portion of the Martian landscape.


/or not


www.nebulagirl.com
 
2012-08-09 07:38:36 PM

Girion47: What if we massively nuke the planet? Cloud up the atmosphere, and generate a bunch of heat to thaw the water trapped in the ground?


Probably just joking, but that'd be a horrendously bad idea. Martian dust is 10 times finer than talcum powder. It's more like fine silt than dust. If you set off enough nuclear weapons to cover the planet in clouds, you'd generate millions of tons of radioactive dust that would go everywhere and get absorbed into everything. Colonization or even research would be basically impossible for centuries.

If you could build a fleet of Mars-Venus cycler spacecraft, you could always just slurp up excess CO2 from the Venusian atmosphere, freeze it into huge bricks of dry ice, and bomb Mars with them until you had transferred enough gases to create not one, but two Earthlike planets. Mars ends up with a little more atmosphere than it needs (though, given the low gravity, you'd likely need excess mass to get the atmospheric pressure up to something habitable) and Venus breaks out of its runaway greenhouse effect and starts cooling.

After that, the water in the soil and polar caps would melt and you could seed Mars with algae to convert CO2 to oxygen. Venus would take a bit more chemical finagling to remove all the sulfur from the environment, but there's plenty of hydrogen and oxygen there to turn into water.
 
2012-08-09 08:01:33 PM

Cthulhu_is_my_homeboy: Girion47: What if we massively nuke the planet? Cloud up the atmosphere, and generate a bunch of heat to thaw the water trapped in the ground?

Probably just joking, but that'd be a horrendously bad idea. Martian dust is 10 times finer than talcum powder. It's more like fine silt than dust. If you set off enough nuclear weapons to cover the planet in clouds, you'd generate millions of tons of radioactive dust that would go everywhere and get absorbed into everything. Colonization or even research would be basically impossible for centuries.

If you could build a fleet of Mars-Venus cycler spacecraft, you could always just slurp up excess CO2 from the Venusian atmosphere, freeze it into huge bricks of dry ice, and bomb Mars with them until you had transferred enough gases to create not one, but two Earthlike planets. Mars ends up with a little more atmosphere than it needs (though, given the low gravity, you'd likely need excess mass to get the atmospheric pressure up to something habitable) and Venus breaks out of its runaway greenhouse effect and starts cooling.

After that, the water in the soil and polar caps would melt and you could seed Mars with algae to convert CO2 to oxygen. Venus would take a bit more chemical finagling to remove all the sulfur from the environment, but there's plenty of hydrogen and oxygen there to turn into water.


Was kind of joking. Have you ever read the Mars trilogy by Kim Stanley Robinson? His idea for primary atmospheric change was to set up an automated factory on Phobos, that would hollow out the moon, create a carbon nanotube space elevator to Mons Olympus and little windmills that would be placed all over the planet, all they did was power a heating coil that was open to the atmosphere, the effect would be to slow the winds slightly, and emit a TON of heat in order to warm up the atmosphere enough that the water bound in the ground would start vaporizing and creating a thicker atmosphere.
 
2012-08-09 08:06:49 PM
s12.postimage.org
 
2012-08-09 08:12:32 PM

Girion47: Cthulhu_is_my_homeboy: Girion47: What if we massively nuke the planet? Cloud up the atmosphere, and generate a bunch of heat to thaw the water trapped in the ground?

Probably just joking, but that'd be a horrendously bad idea. Martian dust is 10 times finer than talcum powder. It's more like fine silt than dust. If you set off enough nuclear weapons to cover the planet in clouds, you'd generate millions of tons of radioactive dust that would go everywhere and get absorbed into everything. Colonization or even research would be basically impossible for centuries.

If you could build a fleet of Mars-Venus cycler spacecraft, you could always just slurp up excess CO2 from the Venusian atmosphere, freeze it into huge bricks of dry ice, and bomb Mars with them until you had transferred enough gases to create not one, but two Earthlike planets. Mars ends up with a little more atmosphere than it needs (though, given the low gravity, you'd likely need excess mass to get the atmospheric pressure up to something habitable) and Venus breaks out of its runaway greenhouse effect and starts cooling.

After that, the water in the soil and polar caps would melt and you could seed Mars with algae to convert CO2 to oxygen. Venus would take a bit more chemical finagling to remove all the sulfur from the environment, but there's plenty of hydrogen and oxygen there to turn into water.

Was kind of joking. Have you ever read the Mars trilogy by Kim Stanley Robinson? His idea for primary atmospheric change was to set up an automated factory on Phobos, that would hollow out the moon, create a carbon nanotube space elevator to Mons Olympus and little windmills that would be placed all over the planet, all they did was power a heating coil that was open to the atmosphere, the effect would be to slow the winds slightly, and emit a TON of heat in order to warm up the atmosphere enough that the water bound in the ground would start vaporizing and creating a thicker atmosphere.


How long would that take? Since Mars lacks a magnetosphere, if that sort of terraforming took more than a few centuries, you'd probably lose atmosphere to solar wind as quickly as you could create it. I think importing atmosphere from Venus to Mars would have the same problem.

I have to wonder if it might be more efficient to just build a giant dome over the surface of Mars, so that you wouldn't need to build up the atmosphere to more height than you actually need, and you wouldn't need to worry about losing atmosphere to solar wind.
 
2012-08-09 08:14:34 PM

r00tdenied: sinanju: Fish in a Barrel: Random question. Let's say we could pump a bunch of O2 and other gasses into the Martian atmosphere. Assuming we could get the partial pressure of O2 up to about 0.2 atmospheres, how high would the total pressure have to be before humans could survive?

Wouldn't matter... a new atmosphere would get ripped away just like the last one.

Depends on if we could replenish the lost atmosphere fast enough to offset the difference. Alternatively, we could build a super magneto-tron to supplement the weak magnetosphere and prevent the solar wind from blowing it away.


Or just heat the core until it melts.

We can do that, right?
 
2012-08-09 08:40:53 PM

Fish in a Barrel: Random question. Let's say we could pump a bunch of O2 and other gasses into the Martian atmosphere. Assuming we could get the partial pressure of O2 up to about 0.2 atmospheres, how high would the total pressure have to be before humans could survive?


A spacesuit provides 3 psi O2 though you can get by with 1.3 psi O2 which is comparable to how much O2 you get in an airliner.
 
2012-08-09 08:42:19 PM

dualplains: r00tdenied: sinanju: Fish in a Barrel: Random question. Let's say we could pump a bunch of O2 and other gasses into the Martian atmosphere. Assuming we could get the partial pressure of O2 up to about 0.2 atmospheres, how high would the total pressure have to be before humans could survive?

Wouldn't matter... a new atmosphere would get ripped away just like the last one.

Depends on if we could replenish the lost atmosphere fast enough to offset the difference. Alternatively, we could build a super magneto-tron to supplement the weak magnetosphere and prevent the solar wind from blowing it away.

Or just heat the core until it melts.

We can do that, right?


We'll need Hillary Swank and Aaron Eckhard.
 
2012-08-09 08:46:36 PM

Nem Wan: Fish in a Barrel: Random question. Let's say we could pump a bunch of O2 and other gasses into the Martian atmosphere. Assuming we could get the partial pressure of O2 up to about 0.2 atmospheres, how high would the total pressure have to be before humans could survive?

A spacesuit provides 3 psi O2 though you can get by with 1.3 psi O2 which is comparable to how much O2 you get in an airliner.


Do you really need a full space suit? I'd think you'd be able to get by with some sort of full body elastic suit that would provide pressure to your skin without being as complicated as suit, with a breathing unit for oxygen.
 
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