If you can read this, either the style sheet didn't load or you have an older browser that doesn't support style sheets. Try clearing your browser cache and refreshing the page.

(Travel and Leisure)   Alaskan Airlines: Our techs are so good, they write notes on minor tears on the wing   (travelandleisure.com) divider line 95
    More: Scary, Alaska Airlines, technicians, major airline  
•       •       •

10970 clicks; posted to Main » on 08 Aug 2012 at 10:23 PM (1 year ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



95 Comments   (+0 »)
   
View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest

Archived thread

First | « | 1 | 2 | » | Last | Show all
 
2012-08-08 11:19:32 PM
Not to be a stickler, but Subby was slightly off.....it's Alaska Airlines, not Alaskan Airlines.

/Not to be confused with Alaskan Brewing.
//Which makes some good beers.
 
2012-08-08 11:21:04 PM

The_Sponge: Not to be a stickler, but Subby was slightly off.....it's Alaska Airlines, not Alaskan Airlines.

/Not to be confused with Alaskan Brewing.
//Which makes some good beers.


Love me some Amber.
 
2012-08-08 11:31:10 PM

SuperT: having worked for an airline, your average flying public has no idea.

That note? usually that is just a circle in red or black on the ac. aircraft bodies have so many little dents and scrapes and such, yards of speed tape and deferred maintenance.


I have a friend who worked as a CAD guy for a company here in the SF Bay Area who specialized in repairing and re-heat-treating the turbine fan assemblies in commercial jet engines after they'd get damaged due to ingestion of foreign objects or simple fatigue...

We'd be out somewhere, and a commercial jet would fly over... he'd point and laugh, and just say he had no clue how the hell it was staying up there. Not in an 'I do not understand basic flight physics' way, but in a 'I have no idea why those engines have not exploded yet' way.

Needless to say he hates to fly... i just figure if it's my time to go, I'm going fast enough that the last thing to go through my mind on impact will be the tray table.
 
2012-08-08 11:44:28 PM

moike: We'd be out somewhere, and a commercial jet would fly over... he'd point and laugh, and just say he had no clue how the hell it was staying up there. Not in an 'I do not understand basic flight physics' way, but in a 'I have no idea why those engines have not exploded yet' way.

Needless to say he hates to fly... i just figure if it's my time to go, I'm going fast enough that the last thing to go through my mind on impact will be the tray table.


The amount of shiat that commercial jets are built to take is just amazing. Multiple times per day, some minimum wage flunkies hit it with catering trucks and baggage loaders. They have to be able to go from 120 degrees to -60 degrees in 20 minutes, and have nothing crack. 500,000lbs of plane slamming into the ground on tires barely bigger than you'd find on a big rig.

The more you actually thing about it, the less comfortable it becomes.
 
2012-08-08 11:45:37 PM

KStDrew: The_Sponge: If it's not Boeing, I'm not going.

Actually, their fleet consists of Boeing and Bombardier aircraft. Mostly Boeing.


As a non-rev with AA, I'm getting a kick out of these replies.
 
2012-08-08 11:53:58 PM

clear_prop: The more you actually thing about it, the less comfortable it becomes.



That's why I work in finance at Boeing instead of engineering.


89 Stick-Up Kid: As a non-rev with AA, I'm getting a kick out of these replies.



Nice! So you work for Alaska?
 
2012-08-09 12:24:41 AM

AverageAmericanGuy: They serve good coffee on the flights, so that makes up for it.


Coffee? Every time I've flown Alaska they've served complimentary beer. Helps with the pressurization/depressurization issues.

/first world inner ear problems
 
2012-08-09 12:27:28 AM

TheUtoid: AverageAmericanGuy: They serve good coffee on the flights, so that makes up for it.

Coffee? Every time I've flown Alaska they've served complimentary beer. Helps with the pressurization/depressurization issues.

/first world inner ear problems



Do you only fly on their old Horizon planes? (Bombardiers.)

Horizon used to give out free beer or wine on their routes, but when I've flown on Alaska on one of their 737s, I never received a free beer in coach.
 
2012-08-09 12:27:36 AM

TheUtoid: AverageAmericanGuy: They serve good coffee on the flights, so that makes up for it.

Coffee? Every time I've flown Alaska they've served complimentary beer. Helps with the pressurization/depressurization issues.


Beer? Like some eastern Washington bumpkin?
 
2012-08-09 12:31:00 AM
Tear? Since when do tears have perfect arcs? That was clearly a manmade cut. And a tiny one at that.

Noobs.
 
2012-08-09 01:01:15 AM

JericoPaladin: Kind of like posting a comment in some code that you know needs to be cleaned up... if it works similarly on planes during inspections (which seems to be the case according to some posters), then this is not a big deal.


About 30 years ago in my east coast town a steel light pole fell in a storm and karate-chopped my Vega Kammback, taking out the windshield and crushing in the roof.  Not surprisingly, the 8-year old station wagon was a total loss. Turned out that the base of the heavy pole, which could have been a half-century old, had rusted from many years of road salt, rain and snow, finally succumbing to particularly high winds one night.

This type of pole was ubiquitous, with thousands of them bearing faded dark green paint to be found throughout the city.  After tilting alternately at the city government and the local utility whilst they each pointed their fingers at the other I finally just settled through my own insurer and gave the matter no further thought. 

That is, until a few months later, when I began to notice what I thought was a new tagger in the area. The word "HOLE" began to appear, written with what I guessed was a white liquid shoe polish applicator on random light poles in my bustling university neighborhood.  The big block letters were scrawled vertically down dozens of the poles over the period of just a day or two. It seemed gritty and primal - quite apart from the stylistic, often brightly-colored graffiti I was used to seeing. I imagined a brooding, angry, rebellious artist, intent on shocking our urbane urban sensibilities, eschewing the typical flowery style of the 80's street artists for his simple, no-frills, and decidedly vulgar message.

For month or so I wondered if I
might catch a glimpse of Hole in the act of splashing his social statement at eye level for all to see. Admittedly, I was somewhat disappointed when I learned, through a brief mention in a "man on the street" feature in the city's alternative rag, that it was simply a misguided utility employee who had been tasked with inspecting the steel light poles and marking those found to be rusted through.

/Allstate let me keep the car and I later sold it to a guy for $450.
 
2012-08-09 01:05:29 AM

halB: Tear? Since when do tears have perfect arcs? That was clearly a manmade cut. And a tiny one at that.

Noobs.


Agreed. They probably cut out a frayed bit of damage to stop propagation. It's a solution I'd accept to get out of the bush but an FAA inspection would result in all sorts of butt hurt.

The rubbed off numbers are probably for the original incident report.
 
2012-08-09 01:05:52 AM
Note should have read:

"You should see the OTHER wing!"
 
2012-08-09 01:08:02 AM
Hey, at least their pilots aren't drunk, amirite? What's up? *high five*
 
2012-08-09 01:16:18 AM

reubendaley: ...
might catch a glimpse of Hole in the act of splashing his social statement at eye level for all to see. Admittedly, I was somewhat disappointed when I learned, through a brief mention in a "man on the street" feature in the city's alternative rag, that ...


All that because you recalled some story about "inspections"? Really? How f'n bored are you? shiat; how bored am I to of read and now biatched about it.

/grabbing another beer.
 
2012-08-09 01:27:51 AM

clear_prop: moike: We'd be out somewhere, and a commercial jet would fly over... he'd point and laugh, and just say he had no clue how the hell it was staying up there. Not in an 'I do not understand basic flight physics' way, but in a 'I have no idea why those engines have not exploded yet' way.

Needless to say he hates to fly... i just figure if it's my time to go, I'm going fast enough that the last thing to go through my mind on impact will be the tray table.

The amount of shiat that commercial jets are built to take is just amazing. Multiple times per day, some minimum wage flunkies hit it with catering trucks and baggage loaders. They have to be able to go from 120 degrees to -60 degrees in 20 minutes, and have nothing crack. 500,000lbs of plane slamming into the ground on tires barely bigger than you'd find on a big rig.

The more you actually thing about it, the less comfortable it becomes.


Here's a good one: modern jet engines are designed to run hotter than the melting points of the materials used to make them. You get better fuel efficiency without sacrificing power that way.

No, I'm not joking.

Of course, the parts have are designed to maintain a boundary layer of air to keep them cool, so there's no risk in doing so.

Oh, and did I mention that if one blade on that turbine has a small defect, it can get loose and shred the whole engine? Don't worry though, the cowlings are designed to be just thick enough that it all shoots out of the back rather than shooting out from the centrifugal force and punching through the cabin. You know, like props sometimes do:

www.starshipmodeler.info

The exit wound, as it were:

www.starshipmodeler.info


Have a nice flight!
 
2012-08-09 01:38:05 AM
P: Something loose in cockpit.
S: Something tightened in cockpit.

P: DME volume unbelievably loud.
S: DME volume set to more believable level.

P: Flight attendant cold at altitude.
S: Ground checks OK.
 
2012-08-09 01:39:57 AM
P: auto-land very rough
S: auto-land not installed on this aircraft.
 
2012-08-09 01:51:46 AM
P: Right engine missing.
S: Right engine found on right wing after brief search.
 
2012-08-09 02:06:59 AM
I picked the wrong week to stop sniffing glue.
 
2012-08-09 02:14:22 AM

cptjeff: clear_prop: moike: We'd be out somewhere, and a commercial jet would fly over... he'd point and laugh, and just say he had no clue how the hell it was staying up there. Not in an 'I do not understand basic flight physics' way, but in a 'I have no idea why those engines have not exploded yet' way.

Needless to say he hates to fly... i just figure if it's my time to go, I'm going fast enough that the last thing to go through my mind on impact will be the tray table.

The amount of shiat that commercial jets are built to take is just amazing. Multiple times per day, some minimum wage flunkies hit it with catering trucks and baggage loaders. They have to be able to go from 120 degrees to -60 degrees in 20 minutes, and have nothing crack. 500,000lbs of plane slamming into the ground on tires barely bigger than you'd find on a big rig.

The more you actually thing about it, the less comfortable it becomes.

Here's a good one: modern jet engines are designed to run hotter than the melting points of the materials used to make them. You get better fuel efficiency without sacrificing power that way.

No, I'm not joking.

Of course, the parts have are designed to maintain a boundary layer of air to keep them cool, so there's no risk in doing so.

Oh, and did I mention that if one blade on that turbine has a small defect, it can get loose and shred the whole engine? Don't worry though, the cowlings are designed to be just thick enough that it all shoots out of the back rather than shooting out from the centrifugal force and punching through the cabin. You know, like props sometimes do:

[www.starshipmodeler.info image 591x402]

The exit wound, as it were:

[www.starshipmodeler.info image 393x534]


Have a nice flight!


You know the Herkeypig aka flying sewer pipe is damned near indestructable. Loud, shaky, cold and miserable to fly in though. Jump seats suck but it was the only way to get from USCGAS Kodiak to Elmendorf.
 
2012-08-09 04:29:11 AM

italie:
Sometimes defects are more cosmetic than unsafe. No sense in taking a bird out of service early when something is perfectly fine to leave for the next extended maintenance check. Contrary to what some think, most aircraft mechanics do NOT want to be the one who sent you to an early grave.


Yeah, you don't WANT to... but you will anyway.
 
2012-08-09 04:31:59 AM

clear_prop: LesserEvil: Any pictures?

No?

[boardingarea.com image 540x449]

From this Link


Uh, IANAP, but even I can tell that's not a "tear in the wing." It's a chip out of the trailing edge of the wing, whatever that's called. And even I know that that's not going to cause major problems in flight, provided there's nothing else interrupting the airflow.
 
2012-08-09 07:24:12 AM
P: Dead bugs on windshield.
S: Live bugs on order
 
2012-08-09 08:15:48 AM
encrypted-tbn2.google.com

I was a little hungry
 
2012-08-09 09:35:37 AM

Harry Freakstorm: [encrypted-tbn2.google.com image 124x100]

I was a little hungry


IT AIN'T VENDELL VILKIE!
 
2012-08-09 10:33:40 AM
Hope none of you ever get to fly in a military aircraft. Unless it's a fighter the only thing holding most of them together is the tape.
 
2012-08-09 10:35:13 AM
www.prairiestateoutdoors.com

We know about this
 
2012-08-09 10:44:31 AM
static.seekingalpha.com

There's something on the wing!

/Come on, really you guys?
 
2012-08-09 10:49:05 AM

clear_prop: moike: We'd be out somewhere, and a commercial jet would fly over... he'd point and laugh, and just say he had no clue how the hell it was staying up there. Not in an 'I do not understand basic flight physics' way, but in a 'I have no idea why those engines have not exploded yet' way.

Needless to say he hates to fly... i just figure if it's my time to go, I'm going fast enough that the last thing to go through my mind on impact will be the tray table.

The amount of shiat that commercial jets are built to take is just amazing. Multiple times per day, some minimum wage flunkies hit it with catering trucks and baggage loaders. They have to be able to go from 120 degrees to -60 degrees in 20 minutes, and have nothing crack. 500,000lbs of plane slamming into the ground on tires barely bigger than you'd find on a big rig.

The more you actually thing about it, the less comfortable it becomes.


I once heard that a Boeing 747 is built to withstand the stress of doing several full loops. Not that a commercial airline pilot would do that. "Uuuuhhhhhhhhh.....this is your cap'n speaking......uuuuhhhhh...prepare your tray tables for some...uuuhhhh....loopty loops. Thank you."
 
2012-08-09 02:53:26 PM

Bruxellensis: I once heard that a Boeing 747 is built to withstand the stress of doing several full loops. Not that a commercial airline pilot would do that. "Uuuuhhhhhhhhh.....this is your cap'n speaking......uuuuhhhhh...prepare your tray tables for some...uuuhhhh....loopty loops. Thank you."


The 707 prototype was rolled intentionally as a PR stunt.

The 747 has been rolled accidentally and landed safely. China Airlines Flight 6

Looping a commercial jet would be a challenge due to the altitude and speeds needed.

A loop is wings level and pull the nose up and over. A roll is nose pointed straight ahead and the wings rotate around the direction of flight.
 
2012-08-09 03:19:40 PM

clear_prop: Bruxellensis: I once heard that a Boeing 747 is built to withstand the stress of doing several full loops. Not that a commercial airline pilot would do that. "Uuuuhhhhhhhhh.....this is your cap'n speaking......uuuuhhhhh...prepare your tray tables for some...uuuhhhh....loopty loops. Thank you."

The 707 prototype was rolled intentionally as a PR stunt.

The 747 has been rolled accidentally and landed safely. China Airlines Flight 6

Looping a commercial jet would be a challenge due to the altitude and speeds needed.

A loop is wings level and pull the nose up and over. A roll is nose pointed straight ahead and the wings rotate around the direction of flight.


I know the difference. That's just what I heard - that they can withstand the stresses of a loop. Never heard about the roll, but I imagine that wouldn't be as stressful for the aircraft.

Also kind of neat: if you watch a large plane land, you can see the wings move down a bit when the landing gear has touched ground, since the load has transferred to the wheels instead of the wings.
 
2012-08-09 04:03:57 PM

clear_prop: Bruxellensis: I once heard that a Boeing 747 is built to withstand the stress of doing several full loops. Not that a commercial airline pilot would do that. "Uuuuhhhhhhhhh.....this is your cap'n speaking......uuuuhhhhh...prepare your tray tables for some...uuuhhhh....loopty loops. Thank you."

The 707 prototype was rolled intentionally as a PR stunt.

The 747 has been rolled accidentally and landed safely. China Airlines Flight 6

Looping a commercial jet would be a challenge due to the altitude and speeds needed.

A loop is wings level and pull the nose up and over. A roll is nose pointed straight ahead and the wings rotate around the direction of flight.


One of my uncles flies 737s and says he's always wanted to pull a 1g barrel roll at night and see if any passengers notice.

(according to him the aircraft is more than capable of the maneuver, but in reality he'd never intentionally place the passengers in danger of course)
 
2012-08-09 04:43:19 PM

The_Sponge: clear_prop: The more you actually thing about it, the less comfortable it becomes.


That's why I work in finance at Boeing instead of engineering.


89 Stick-Up Kid: As a non-rev with AA, I'm getting a kick out of these replies.


Nice! So you work for Alaska?


My girlfriend is a FA. I just take advantage of the perks like Peter Griffin.
 
2012-08-09 04:53:02 PM

89 Stick-Up Kid: My girlfriend is a FA. I just take advantage of the perks like Peter Griffin.


Taking advantage of Peter Griffin doesn't sound like a perk, but hey, no judgments.
 
2012-08-09 04:55:03 PM

Gleeman: One of my uncles flies 737s and says he's always wanted to pull a 1g barrel roll at night and see if any passengers notice.

(according to him the aircraft is more than capable of the maneuver, but in reality he'd never intentionally place the passengers in danger of course)


A 1G barrel roll is what they did with the 707. Since you pull 1G all the way around, the plane doesn't know it is upside down. Of course, doing it perfect the first time is the challenge.

It is rumored that EVERY Boeing plane has been barrel rolled as part of flight testing, but I've never seen anything verifiable.
 
2012-08-09 05:22:49 PM

89 Stick-Up Kid: My girlfriend is a FA. I just take advantage of the perks like Peter Griffin.



Ah...gotcha. I have a friend who works in their lounge at Seatac.
 
2012-08-09 06:09:57 PM

clear_prop: Gleeman: One of my uncles flies 737s and says he's always wanted to pull a 1g barrel roll at night and see if any passengers notice.

(according to him the aircraft is more than capable of the maneuver, but in reality he'd never intentionally place the passengers in danger of course)

A 1G barrel roll is what they did with the 707. Since you pull 1G all the way around, the plane doesn't know it is upside down. Of course, doing it perfect the first time is the challenge.

It is rumored that EVERY Boeing plane has been barrel rolled as part of flight testing, but I've never seen anything verifiable.


Not sure about specific aerobatics but I watched a documentary on building the 777 and they pretty much do everything they can to try and trash the test aircraft(s). Operate on a gravel runway at max gross weight, intentionally slam the plane onto a paved runway hard enough to pop a few tires, pull g-limit maneuvers, etc.
 
2012-08-09 06:16:58 PM

The_Sponge: 89 Stick-Up Kid: My girlfriend is a FA. I just take advantage of the perks like Peter Griffin.


Ah...gotcha. I have a friend who works in their lounge at Seatac.


On a side note...I don't remember why or how long, but you're the only person on my favorites list. I think we agreed on something years ago.
 
2012-08-09 06:17:12 PM

Gleeman: Not sure about specific aerobatics but I watched a documentary on building the 777 and they pretty much do everything they can to try and trash the test aircraft(s). Operate on a gravel runway at max gross weight, intentionally slam the plane onto a paved runway hard enough to pop a few tires, pull g-limit maneuvers, etc.


Check youtube for the RTO and V-unstick tests.

RTO is rejected take off. At max weight, with brakes 100% worn out, get up to flying speed and then slam on the brakes and NOT use the thrust reversers. The brakes glow red hot and then white hot, all the tires deflate and then catch fire. The plane has to sit there with the wheels on fire for five minutes to simulate how long it would take CFR to get there.

The V-unstick test is over rotating on takeoff and dragging the tail down the runway until enough speed to takeoff.
 
2012-08-09 06:29:21 PM

89 Stick-Up Kid: On a side note...I don't remember why or how long, but you're the only person on my favorites list. I think we agreed on something years ago.



Cigars?
Firearms?
Politics?
Seahawks?
Hatred for OKC?
 
2012-08-09 06:48:24 PM
P: Aircraft handles funny.
S: Aircraft warned to: straighten up, fly right, and be serious.

P: Friction locks cause throttle levers to stick.
S: That's what friction locks are for.

P: Evidence of leak on right main landing gear.
S: Evidence removed.
 
2012-08-09 07:18:30 PM

The_Sponge: 89 Stick-Up Kid: On a side note...I don't remember why or how long, but you're the only person on my favorites list. I think we agreed on something years ago.


Cigars?
Firearms?
Politics?
Seahawks?
Hatred for OKC?


LOL any of those would work.
 
2012-08-09 09:16:38 PM
 
2012-08-09 10:54:38 PM
737, Imma let you finish, but the 757 is the greatest plane of ALL TIME.

//gall darned airborne Clydesdale
 
Displayed 45 of 95 comments

First | « | 1 | 2 | » | Last | Show all

View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest


This thread is archived, and closed to new comments.

Continue Farking
Submit a Link »






Report