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(CNN)   Texas has executed a man with an IQ of 61. That's retarded   (cnn.com) divider line 421
    More: Sad, A Texas, Texas Department of Criminal Justice, final statement, lethal injections, murderers, retards  
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11876 clicks; posted to Main » on 08 Aug 2012 at 1:03 AM (2 years ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2012-08-08 08:05:54 AM
You don't exterminating other sub-human creatures that kill or maim people.
Our brains are what make us people.
An individual with an IQ of 61 is not a real "person" but rather a monkey made of human meat.
Executing a retard doesn't exactly count as killing a person, it is more like having a dangerous dog put down.
 
2012-08-08 08:09:19 AM

TheWhoppah: You don't MIND exterminating other sub-human creatures that kill or maim people.


FTFM
 
2012-08-08 08:09:21 AM
Everything everyone saying up thread is absolutely true. Don't ever think of moving to Texas. Especially if you are from the West Coast. There are absolutely no redeeming qualities about Texas. I understand if you have been unemployed for two years, Texas will dangle a job in front of you and just as you are about to call UHaul and load up all you belongings remember this thread and don't take the bait!!! Stay firmly attached to the government teet of whatever state or basement you currently inhabit and don't think twice about moving to Texas!!!

Sincerely,

Texas
 
2012-08-08 08:13:54 AM

GibbyTheMole: slayer199

Meh, IQ of 61 or not, I'm not in favor of the death penalty as a punishment for a number of reasons.

1. Putting one innocent person to death negates the death penalty (right now at a 140, but that doesn't help someone like Cameron Todd Willingham. You can't undo the death penalty.
2. It costs more than life in prison.
3. It has no effect as a deterrent.

So while people may yammer on that so and so deserved it...and there are people that DO deserve it, it's just not worth the cost both financially and as a society.

Yep... I am in total agreement with you.


Don't also forget that it is wrong and uncivilized!

Any prison sentence should be prisoner + cage. That's it!
 
2012-08-08 08:14:02 AM
Realistically he wasn't much use to society anyways and no odds of becoming more than a rabid dog. We put down rabid dogs with less hand wringing than this. He was given better than he deserves.

We expend more effort breeding farm animals than we do humans and then act like the failures like this are worth anything. What a waste of effort.
 
2012-08-08 08:14:12 AM

MythDragon: Neither does life in prison.


Yes, but of the two options, Life in Prison doesn't include the significant possibility of executing an innocent man. Capitol punishment- no matter how good the trial process is- does.

The whole deterrent argument is about comparison, really. And whether or not the added risk comes with any reward- in this case additional deterrent (for those still living, considering committing similar crimes) over and above Life in Prison.

Most studies on the matter suggest this isn't the case.


So that leaves the Death Penalty without much real purpose. It costs more to execute a man than it does to keep him in prison indefinitely, and the "deterrent effect" of capitol punishment is no more significant than that of life in prison. Add that to the negated risk of taking an innocent man's life and it's not hard to see which is the better option here.

The only real reason Capitol Punishment seems to have for existing is Vengeance- as evidenced by every time some asks a question like this:

GreenSun: Question 2: Same as above, except that one of the victims this time is your family member, friend, or a loved one.


...which really is completely unrelated to the issue of Justice, or even effective enforcement of the Law.
 
2012-08-08 08:16:49 AM
"The death penalty costs more than life imprisonment"

Thats just because everyone is doing it wrong. Here in Virginia, we dont fark around, we fry you dead faster than any other state in the union. We also have the lowest amount of successful appeals.

Suck it, Texas.
 
2012-08-08 08:18:47 AM
www.iqtestforfree.net
 
2012-08-08 08:20:12 AM

OnlyM3: GAT_00

Why the fark did we ever let this worthless state join?
You're right. Lets all vote Democrat, because one of their politicians would never rush to his home state where he is Governor in order to execute a mental incompetent man, just to score points in an election race.

[farm3.static.flickr.com image 353x500]
Wellll except for that one.


// ohhh that's right, it's only wrong when people you don't hero worship do it. Continue with your sucking up, don't let facts get in your way.



Nice try but Rector wasn't retarded when he killed a man, and then shot another cop in the back. He shot himself in the head after that, giving himself major brain damage.

When he killed a man over $3.00 he was a normal cold-blooded killer, and he got everything he deserved.
 
2012-08-08 08:21:04 AM

Alonjar: We also have the lowest amount of successful appeals.


Just because they aren't successful doesn't mean they don't cost you. Considering the re-attempt rate of a successful appeal is 0, I'd actually think successful appeals cost you less.
 
2012-08-08 08:29:54 AM
Why the fark should we allow the stupid and mean to go on living? The opinion of a lot of people is retarded, not just that man.
 
2012-08-08 08:30:25 AM

slayer199: [...]
1. Putting one innocent person to death negates the death penalty (right now at a 140, but that doesn't help someone like Cameron Todd Willingham. You can't undo the death penalty.
2. It costs more than life in prison.
3. It has no effect as a deterrent.
[...]




1. If 0.1 percent of children have a bad reaction to a vaccination does that negate the value of the vaccination? In modern times, the actual number of people executed in Texas later proven innocent is zero. Willingham was never proven innocent as some activists would have you believe. Yes they did find some legitimate issues with some of the evidence but the overwhelming majority of evidence still says he was guilty.

2. The death penalty does not cost more than life in prison. The actual execution is cheap. The money is spent on the expert investigation to make sure we kill the correct person and the endless appeals to make sure we followed due process. The only way we spend less money sending people to prison for life is by being less sure that the correct guy is in prison for life. In other words, the only way you save money is by accepting a higher error rate.

3. Each execution prevents up to 18 additional murders. There was a case last year in Chicago where the killer's last google search was "Does Illinois have the death penalty?" The answer was no so his ex-girlfriend died. Also, Marvin Wilson, the executed guy from TFA, will NEVER EVER KILL ANYONE ever again! He is 100% deterred. Permanently.
 
2012-08-08 08:32:53 AM
He wasn't smart enough to realize or at least appreciate that openly retaliating against his rat would not be so clever as the cops would be on to him. But as practicable as spouse-icide What a stupid crime as the rat was abducted in public.

Most of the rest of the world has figured out why state murder is wrong. If one looks at a map of where this is still practiced, one feels less inclined to argue, and more inclined to TTT.
 
2012-08-08 08:33:38 AM

Tomji: Why the fark should we allow the stupid and mean to go on living?


Probably because both of those descriptors are awfully subjective.
 
2012-08-08 08:37:42 AM
That guy who was executed for the supposed arson murder of his little kids was convicted solely upon the testimony of a counterfeit expert. Most believe he was innocent. There's one.
 
2012-08-08 08:39:26 AM

SkunkWerks: Alonjar: We also have the lowest amount of successful appeals.

Just because they aren't successful doesn't mean they don't cost you. Considering the re-attempt rate of a successful appeal is 0, I'd actually think successful appeals cost you less.


The expense is in the appeals, not in the execution itself. People who cite expense as a reason to abandon the death penalty are satisfied to leave innocent people in prison for life. Many of these same people will say that life without parole is a fate worse than death.

In other words: death penalty activist don't care how many innocent people suffer a fate worse than death, as long as their human meat continues to live. Death penalty opponents are like those people that didn't want to unplug Teri Shaivo. They care so much about executed the retarded because they are themselves very nearly brain dead.
 
2012-08-08 08:45:01 AM
Thank god thats over.... kept him alive WAY too long..

And isn't 61 about normal for his people?
 
2012-08-08 08:46:01 AM

Icetech3: Thank god thats over.... kept him alive WAY too long..

And isn't 61 about normal for his people?


EDIT: I meant Texans, not coloreds... im trying to not be too racist today.. people are touchy...
 
2012-08-08 08:46:06 AM
This man's IQ may help explain the actions he took, but his IQ does not absolve him. There are plenty of people with low IQ who aren't committing crimes and to say he is exempt just because of that doesn't follow.

The issue here is the death penalty itself which is a statistically flawed in its application and as a method of punishment has the glaring problem of it can not be undone if a mistake is made. If it is crueler than life in prison without parole well that is another debate.
 
2012-08-08 08:47:08 AM

signaljammer: That guy who was executed for the supposed arson murder of his little kids was convicted solely upon the testimony of a counterfeit expert. Most believe he was innocent. There's one.


False. The expert hired by the Innocence Project and mis-quoted by that yellow-journalism article in the New Yorker only ever examined the photographs entered as evidence during the trial. He did not talk to the original investigators or any of the witnesses and he did not even say that the fire was not arson. He said that the burn patterns explained by "A" could have also been caused by "B" and that the patterns explained by "C" could also be caused by "D." That's it. Most people believe he was innocent because of the huge media coverage. You have been duped by activists with an agenda. They never explained the four empty bottles of charcoal lighter fluid found right outside the front door of Willingham's home.
 
2012-08-08 08:47:31 AM
No Jimmy Szaragosa?

www.wearysloth.com
 
2012-08-08 08:47:51 AM

Tomji: Why the fark should we allow the stupid and mean to go on living?


Because that's what keeps this site fun.
 
2012-08-08 08:52:04 AM
i50.tinypic.com
 
2012-08-08 08:54:06 AM
i2.cdn.turner.com

/R.I.P. Jay Z
 
2012-08-08 08:55:02 AM
What was his Fark handle?

can't believe I'm the first

don't believe that Wilson was retarded for the purposes of the law

still would have commuted his sentence to LWOP
 
2012-08-08 08:57:03 AM

tirob: What was his Fark handle?

can't believe I'm the first

don't believe that Wilson was retarded for the purposes of the law

still would have commuted his sentence to LWOP


Leave without pay? He wasn't a cop!!!
 
2012-08-08 08:58:06 AM

TheWhoppah: The expense is in the appeals, not in the execution itself.


I know. I said that. However since you can't have one without the other, pretty much...

TheWhoppah: Many of these same people will say that life without parole is a fate worse than death.


Ask the dead about that sometime.
 
2012-08-08 09:03:08 AM
61? One less Obama supporter.
 
2012-08-08 09:09:56 AM

Ringo48: Did they count to potato before injecting him?


I giggled like a school girl after reading this. I am embarrassed.
 
2012-08-08 09:10:00 AM

signaljammer: That guy who was executed for the supposed arson murder of his little kids was convicted solely upon the testimony of a counterfeit expert. Most believe he was innocent. There's one.


If you're talking about Cameron Todd Willingham, no, he was not convicted *solely* on the testimony of the controversial arson expert.

Link

Part of the evidence used to convict him was eyewitness testimony that he was able to *scream* "my babies is in there and I can't get them out!" immediately after he said he spent a good bit of time--at least a minute and probably two--in a house that was full of smoke.

still would have commuted his sentence to life
 
2012-08-08 09:10:31 AM
So... if you have a IQ of 150+ it's execution for any offense?

sliding scale for IQ and punishment?
 
2012-08-08 09:10:34 AM
I've said it before and I'll say it again:

God didn't institute the death penalty for murder just as an act of justice, but also to protect the murderers from the evil, unforgiving, vengeful assholes left behind who think that their unrepentant hate and bitterness can be justified. Death sends the murderer to face the only truly good judge there is, and spares them from the horrors of having to live in the prisons of this world.
 
2012-08-08 09:13:57 AM

brianbankerus: beantowndog: In other states 61 would be rather low.

Oh snap!

Texas. Oh Texas. You make Mississippi look like Rhode Island.


I've spent quality time in Texas, Mississippi, and Rhode Island; I do believe you owe Mississippi an apology for comparing it to the shiattiest shiat hole in America outside of Detroit.
 
2012-08-08 09:15:19 AM

thespindrifter: I've said it before and I'll say it again:

God didn't institute the death penalty for murder just as an act of justice, but also to protect the murderers from the evil, unforgiving, vengeful assholes left behind who think that their unrepentant hate and bitterness can be justified. Death sends the murderer to face the only truly good judge there is, and spares them from the horrors of having to live in the prisons of this world.


Thanks for injecting your superstitions into public policy.
 
2012-08-08 09:16:01 AM
If you're smart enough to pull a trigger, you're smart enough for the death penalty.
 
2012-08-08 09:18:16 AM

slayer199: Meh, IQ of 61 or not, I'm not in favor of the death penalty as a punishment for a number of reasons.

1. Putting one innocent person to death negates the death penalty (right now at a 140, but that doesn't help someone like Cameron Todd Willingham. You can't undo the death penalty.
2. It costs more than life in prison.
3. It has no effect as a deterrent.


(3) is debatable and crucial to (1). It's also contextual.

States like Texas are probably true to (3), because the threat of execution comes with the job: you walk into a Texas man's house to rob him at night, you probably gonna get shot in the face. Florida's Stand Your Ground law is cute on paper, but in Texas they take that shiat seriously.

On the other hand, there are other states more northward with completely different cultures where the death penalty is basically the only real threat to life. Self defense doesn't happen, much less "justifiable homicide" or whatever you want to call it. Some have shown measurable increases in murder rates when banning capital punishment; others have not.

One state (an EXTREME case) made capital punishment illegal for 4 years, because in the first 2 the murder rate QUADRUPLED and they realized they really need execution as a deterrent. In that case, executing even a couple dozen innocent men would only lead to a tough argument: when you go from about 60 murders in the state to 288, do you complain about 20 guys that shouldn't have been sent to the chair or about the 228 that shouldn't have been murdered trying to walk home from the theater?

The First Oath of all Orders of the Knights Radiant says: Life before death, strength before weakness, journey before destination. Following this, they wouldn't take one innocent life to save ten; but I don't see how that makes sense. You either take the blood of one man on your own hands or you condemn ten men to death so you can show everyone how clean your hands are. Do those ten men care that you don't have any blood or bits of human flesh under your nails?
 
2012-08-08 09:22:33 AM

Firethorn: Benevolent Misanthrope: How exactly?

Some years in death row + execution Vs 20-30 years if note more in prison.

Well, the math varies, I agree with some of it, disagree with others. Different estimates use different numbers.

Cost increases for death penalty:
1. The trial costs more. I've seen figures like $1-2.5M more.
2. Incarceration - DP prison cells cost more; many studies use average prison costs, never mind that many murderers that would otherwise get the DP would need to be placed in Max, which also has increased costs
3. Automatic appeals. These cost money as well, they typically go before the supreme court, while a standard LiP sentence won't. Another million or so down this way.

Personally, If I was (wrongly) accused of murder, I'm not sure that I wouldn't want it to be a DP case, just due to the extra effort involved - Evidence that I'm innocent is more likely to be found due to the extra rigor.


If the Death Penalty were converted to life without parole, the anti-DP advocates who pour their heart and soul into these cases aren't magically going to go away. They will be just as opposed to life without parole, and will force the state to spend just as much defending those cases.
 
2012-08-08 09:23:00 AM

EatCritAndDie: You know he took a bunch of IQ tests, right?

And that he scored a lot better on all but one?

When told how to think, you folks sure spread your legs quick...

/not a texan


It's all they have.
 
2012-08-08 09:24:13 AM
those are not the reasons people want the death penalty. They may argue cost, deterrent, or collateral deaths, that's the playing field we're on.

The reason people support the death penalty is catharsis. Kill the monster.

You hear this argument presented in the form of "what if it was YOUR mother who was raped and killed."

You're trying to argue an emotional response on rational, cost/benefit grounds.


slayer199: Meh, IQ of 61 or not, I'm not in favor of the death penalty as a punishment for a number of reasons.

1. Putting one innocent person to death negates the death penalty (right now at a 140, but that doesn't help someone like Cameron Todd Willingham. You can't undo the death penalty.
2. It costs more than life in prison.
3. It has no effect as a deterrent.

So while people may yammer on that so and so deserved it...and there are people that DO deserve it, it's just not worth the cost both financially and as a society.

 
2012-08-08 09:24:24 AM

StreetlightInTheGhetto: rocky_howard: slayer199: Meh, IQ of 61 or not, I'm not in favor of the death penalty as a punishment for a number of reasons.

1. Putting one innocent person to death negates the death penalty (right now at a 140, but that doesn't help someone like Cameron Todd Willingham. You can't undo the death penalty.
2. It costs more than life in prison.
3. It has no effect as a deterrent.

So while people may yammer on that so and so deserved it...and there are people that DO deserve it, it's just not worth the cost both financially and as a society.

How exactly?

Some years in death row + execution Vs 20-30 years if note more in prison.

Seriously, I want to know.

And I know many people spend more than a decade imprisoned before being killed. Like this guy. Which I find dumb.


Oh, I missed the fun part at the end: People spend more than a decade in prison before being killed because of the APPEALS PROCESS to apparently ensure that we DON'T execute innocent people.

We still do, mind you.

Fun historical fact: that's one of the main reasons why Michigan does not have the death penalty:



In 1828, Patrick Fitzpatrick was hanged after being declared guilty for the rape and murder of an innkeeper's daughter. In 1835, Fitzpatrick's former roommate confessed to the murder on his deathbed, proving that Fitzpatrick had been executed for a murder in which he was innocent.

Also, this:



Michigan became the first English-speaking territory in the world to abolish capital punishment in 1847. Treason remained a crime punishable by the death penalty in Michigan despite the 1847 abolition, but no one was ever executed under that law. In 1962 a constitutional convention passed a proposal to abolish the death penalty for all crimes in Michigan by a 108 to 3 vote.

/proud of that history


Just wanted to point out that little bit up there in bold.
 
2012-08-08 09:29:11 AM

Icetech3: Icetech3: Thank god thats over.... kept him alive WAY too long..

And isn't 61 about normal for his people?

EDIT: I meant Texans, not coloreds... im trying to not be too racist today.. people are touchy...


Have you spent any real quality time in any majority African-American neighborhoods lately? The slave masters weren't busy breeding for intelligence, and it shows. The African peoples as a whole may be on the same level as any other typical "race" in the human genome, but the longer I spend living and working among Black Americans, the more I wonder how the hell anyone can deny the sad, simple fact that their Bell Curve seems skewed in the wrong direction. I don't care how much nutrition you give them, how much money and economic advantages in the form of quotas and "EEE" you give them, they still wind up being the majority of the criminals and murderers for a reason. In my city alone, one with one of the highest murder rates in the nation, the kill ratio is 95% Black-on-Black murders. Chances are pretty good that when you see a crime reported, you already know who they will likely be.

My only regret is that we don't send more bankers and lawyers to join them in Prison Hell, because that would be real justice: having a high IQ doesn't mean you won't be a criminal, it just seems to mean that you're better at not getting caught, or getting away with it when you do. However, even if we actually did put all of JP Morgan-Chase-BOA-Wells Fargo in prison, it still would skew Black, and that's the one statistic that never changes no matter how hard anyone tries to fight against it.

All that being said, I really do think that the death penalty in America has been racially imbalanced for far too long, and there needs to be proof beyond reasonable doubt before any human is subjected to any kind of State-sanctioned termination, much less life imprisonment. Botany Bay was cruel in many ways, with so much injustice in the sentencing that I wouldn't even know where to start, but at least for those who survived the trip, it was a chance at a new beginning; our so-called "Corrections" system does nothing of the kind in the way of correcting people any more, or offering even a glimmer of a hope of a new beginning.

Kids who fark up and get life are getting a raw deal, because people really can change. I offer up the example of Jack "Murph the Surf" Murphy, who went from being on death row, to becoming a fully-pardoned preacher who goes back into prison almost every weekend of his own volition, to try and rescue the lost souls of America who may otherwise never have any kind of hope again, and yes, even the stupid Black ones.
 
2012-08-08 09:35:29 AM
My friend and his girlfriend were robbed and murdered on their way home from a concert last year. The perpetrators were found driving his car with his cell phone, and they had used it to text his family saying "I'm okay don't worry about me." My emotion was overwhelming and I wanted them to get the death penalty (which they are facing). However, is that really justice? They're 20 and 21 years old, obviously have nothing but evil in them. Is killing them really going to solve anything? Let them rot in prison and think about what they've done. That is far more a punishment than letting them take the easy way out and just stop existing.
 
2012-08-08 09:36:31 AM

StreetlightInTheGhetto: slayer199: Meh, IQ of 61 or not, I'm not in favor of the death penalty as a punishment for a number of reasons.

1. Putting one innocent person to death negates the death penalty (right now at a 140, but that doesn't help someone like Cameron Todd Willingham. You can't undo the death penalty.
2. It costs more than life in prison.
3. It has no effect as a deterrent.

So while people may yammer on that so and so deserved it...and there are people that DO deserve it, it's just not worth the cost both financially and as a society.

And we're done here.

Kind of.

So I interviewed for a job that involved a lot of public outreach, and they asked me if I had any Letters to the Editor published. When I was, oh, 12 or so I think, my state briefly flirted with bringing in the death penalty even though we were one of if not the first to ban it. So I wrote the local paper and said that it's not something Jesus would have supported. Since I have a unique last name, the next day I got a guy quoting bible verses to me over the phone telling me I was a horrible, horrible person, and Jesus was SO TOTALLY FOR the Death Penalty. Being 12, I didn't just slam the phone down like I should have, although I didn't bother picking up the phone unless it was someone I knew calling for awhile.

Yes, Jesus. Totally death penalty.

/for all I disagree with now, having become an adult, with the Catholic Church I was raised in, at least they were consistently pro life.
//First political stance I remember my suburban Catholic church taking was fighting that possible death penalty reinstatement


Except when, y'know, they supported fascist Spain and similar governments in the 30's.

Also the church doesn't deny communion if you publically support the death penalty, unlike abortion rights.
 
2012-08-08 09:37:48 AM

thespindrifter: and there needs to be proof beyond reasonable doubt before any human is subjected to any kind of State-sanctioned termination


That's already the legal standard, yet the inequities still exist.
 
2012-08-08 09:37:56 AM

Cataholic: If the Death Penalty were converted to life without parole, the anti-DP advocates who pour their heart and soul into these cases aren't magically going to go away. They will be just as opposed to life without parole, and will force the state to spend just as much defending those cases.


No, I have no issue with Life without Parole.

jimmyjackfunk: was this the same one where the basis for giving the death penalty was based on Lennie Smalls from "Of Mice and Men"?

slayer199: Meh, IQ of 61 or not, I'm not in favor of the death penalty as a punishment for a number of reasons.

1. Putting one innocent person to death negates the death penalty (right now at a 140, but that doesn't help someone like Cameron Todd Willingham. You can't undo the death penalty.
2. It costs more than life in prison.
3. It has no effect as a deterrent.

So while people may yammer on that so and so deserved it...and there are people that DO deserve it, it's just not worth the cost both financially and as a society.

I will give you that and raise you Joyce Gilchrist


Wonderful, she falsified evidence leading to the execution of 11 people. I'll add that to my list of reasons. Thanks for the link.
 
2012-08-08 09:37:57 AM

Strongbeerrules: I guess this is why the Italian Mafia never amounted to anything down there.


And yet the mexican mafia is doing great there.
 
2012-08-08 09:38:56 AM

Aerox: rocky_howard:
How exactly?

Some years in death row + execution Vs 20-30 years if note more in prison.

Seriously, I want to know.

So, before you even start getting into appeals, the cost of a death penalty trial is almost a million dollars more than a regular trial. You have to bring in a lot more jurors. You have to make sure they're death qualified. If it's a State with bifurcated guilt/punishment phases, you have two full jury selections to do along with two separate evidence presentations and deliberation phases. The prosecution has to put on more evidence, hire more witnesses, present psychological evaluations, etc. Prosecutors have to be paid, as do public defenders. Yes, they're getting paid anyway, but tying them up in these long, complicated cases means other things get pushed back and the system jams up. Every extra day that courtroom is open, the judges, bailiffs, court reporters, court personnel, and jurors have to be paid. It adds up pretty quickly.

If someone gets convicted, he's now on death row. For most states, death row means solitary confinement, which is more expensive. It also means more guards, and psychiatric visits and evaluations. Generally speaking, it costs roughly between $40k-$60k a year to house a regular, non-death row prisoner, and something closer to 90k-100k a year to house a death row prisoner.

And then you start getting into the appeals which means more court time and costs, but by this point it's already more expensive. The appeals process is not the thing making the death penalty more expensive.There's this ridiculous misconception that the death penalty only costs more money because prisoners are allowed to appeal, and there's a push to remove apellate rights, which is insane. Court and prison costs alone make it not worth having executions, if you're looking at it from a purely economic perspective.

This also doesn't even consider the failed prosecutions where the government goes through all the expense and hassle of a ca ...


So what you're saying is...

Regular
Trial = Let's assume 1M - x since it's your statement. Therefore, this trial is "free."
40 years at 40K (the low end of your scale) =
Total = 1.6M

Death Penalty
Trial = 1M
10 years at 100K (the high end of your scale) = 1M
Total = 2M

The answer seems easy enough, place a cap on the number of years a prisoner has to run the course of appeals and live on death row.
 
2012-08-08 09:40:26 AM

IXI Jim IXI: accelerus: For all the hate Texas is getting -- how many people would love to have the retarded murderer put up in a half way house paid for with your money, living on your block?

I'd pay for it in a second if they moved them to George W Bush's block...


So then the answer is that you wouldn't want them on your block. Check.
 
2012-08-08 09:42:23 AM

shower_in_my_socks: accelerus: For all the hate Texas is getting -- how many people would love to have the retarded murderer put up in a half way house paid for with your money, living on your block?


Because if you don't kill him, you must set him free, right? Have you ever heard the term "life in prison without parole"? Why do we need to take a completely defenseless person out of a hole he could never escape from and kill him in cold blood? What purpose does it serve beyond barbaric blood lust and revenge?


I guess it depends on whether or not you'd rather be dead or spend the rest of your life in a cage fighting off prison rape for the next 50yrs.
 
2012-08-08 09:43:23 AM

doyner: thespindrifter: I've said it before and I'll say it again:

God didn't institute the death penalty for murder just as an act of justice, but also to protect the murderers from the evil, unforgiving, vengeful assholes left behind who think that their unrepentant hate and bitterness can be justified. Death sends the murderer to face the only truly good judge there is, and spares them from the horrors of having to live in the prisons of this world.

Thanks for injecting your superstitions into public policy.


Spent much time in prisons lately? Ever study the history of "corrections" over the course of the past 6,000+ years of recorded human history? I have done both, and let me tell you, even if you don't believe in God or gods or whatever, there can be no denying that in so many cases, death is almost preferable to having to spend the rest of your life as a tortured soul haunted by the cruelty of "good" people. Men and women commit suicide in prison for a reason, and it isn't just because we make it a living hell. Some times the self-release from the guilt is the only real peace these people will ever have. My thing is, we better be real sure the person is guilty before we pass that on to them by Government Decree.

I would offer to you that your slur against my beliefs aside, most people of faith at least in theory believe in forgiveness and redemption; you sure as hell can't say the same for a godless State, and pretty much every religion-free government that has ever existed has been rather heavy-handed on the death penalty, mass imprisonments for petty offenses, and general disregard for human rights. *Atheists have been responsible for the bulk of all mass murder in the 20th and 21st centuries, and before you drag out that tired old lie about religions causing wars and crusades and other bullshiat to that effect, a close examination of history can only attribute approximately 7 - 11% of all known wars to actual religious causes, meaning that the other nine out of ten wars were directly attributable to human greed and other natural, secular evils of Men.

(*See " Encyclopedia of Wars - 3 Volume of Set (Fact on File Library of World History) by Phillips & Axlerod" for statistical, factual numbers of the reasons for war. Fun fact-- the bulk of resource wars had more to do with access to, and control of, the salt trade, than almost any other factor.)
 
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