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(Politico)   Papa John's will cost more because of "Obamacare"   (politico.com) divider line 629
    More: Stupid, Papa John, obamacare, John Schnatter  
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6300 clicks; posted to Politics » on 07 Aug 2012 at 5:56 PM (2 years ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2012-08-07 08:12:48 PM

Shaggy_C: Psh, give me a break. The guy making your pizza is likely a high school dropout who smokes cigarettes and marijuana, doesn't wash his hands out of the bathroom, and is probably carrying around more than a couple different STDs in his crusty, unwashed nether regions. Health insurance don't fix minimum wage lifestyles.



You pretty much described all food workers in America
 
2012-08-07 08:13:31 PM

Debeo Summa Credo: Why would this be surprising? You raise costs for any industry, they're going to try to pass the costs along to customers.

This nuance is lost to those who think Obamacare is a)free or b) free to anyone but the rich but fark them. To the extent businesses' costs increase, and they will, to some extent, prices will rise and supply will diminish, costing everyone.

The benefit of health care reform might be worth it, but it ain't free. And only a farking douchebag would support obamacare and then complain when businesses acknowledge that they'll try to pass the cost on to the customer. If its worth it, pay your extra fifteen cents a shiatty pizza and be happy.



So the huge increase in health care costs since 1980 have been the fault of what?

Let me guess, "over-regulation"
 
2012-08-07 08:14:59 PM
surely it would be much better for the uninsured to get sick and go to the hospital like i did. cost of viral meningitis and a week in the hospital: $28,000, but hey, i got off work for a week.....but didn't get paid for that either
 
2012-08-07 08:16:23 PM

12349876: Lsherm: propasaurus: "Our best estimate is that the Obamacare will cost 11 to 14 cents per pizza..."

OK, raise your pizza prices by 11¢ so your employees can have coverage. Or, raise your prices by a couple bucks so you can make more profit per pie, blame 'Obamacare' for high prices and watch more customers go to Pizza Hut.

What color is the sky in your world? Why do you think Pizza Hut isn't going to raise their prices, too? Are they exempt from Obamacare?

They may choose to not raise the price, and the increase in customers that ditch Papa John's would overcome the extra cost.

And assuming this Papa John's guy is a good businessman, the price is ALREADY where the maximum revenue is. So his choices if costs were to raise due to Obamacare are 1) convince the customer to pay more 2) take a hit in profits 3) get out of the business. Keep in mind 1) is not guaranteed to work.


Seriously, why are people still falling for the "pass the cost on" threat? He's already maximizing profits. If he fiddles with the price, he reduces his profits, no matter what.
 
2012-08-07 08:16:43 PM

WhyteRaven74: You make it sound as if such corporations are something recent. They're nothing of the sort.


True - but there were far fewer "large" corporations 50 years ago, so the "shareholders first" philosophy hadn't infiltrated every last part of the American ethos.
 
2012-08-07 08:17:04 PM

relcec: cargill is massive. 100 something billion in revenue.


Yep. Then there's Mars, Simplot and Fark favorites Koch Industries.
 
2012-08-07 08:17:30 PM

relcec: Rapmaster2000: relcec: Rapmaster2000: dericwater: KyngNothing: Papa John's, rephrased.

We COULD give our employees insurance now, but that would cost us almost $.12 per pizza (I wonder what ingredient that compares to...), and our employees just AREN'T worth that much to us...

THIS^^^^

Starbucks offer full healthcare to their workers, even the part-timers. And a cup of coffee makes much less revenue than a whole pizza pie.

There's a few models to viewing labor. One is that labor is strictly a cost and labor cannot make you money. This is why the service at Wal-Mart blows. There's another model which says labor skillfully employed can be a way to make money. This is the Whole Paycheck/Nordstrom model. Papa John's is purely in the former. Make it cheap and they'll come because it's cheap.

I wonder how often Papa John shops at Wal-Mart?

that's not walmarts model. that's not nordstroms model either.

I'm all ears. You don't have to snark.

I wasn't snarking. I just don't think they either view labor in that way.
I don't think the service at walmart blows. I think that it is a function of most people not looking for someone to help them which cat litter or soup or $2.00 black socks to pick. then again I go to a very nice walmart on anderson lane.

nordstom is famous for the originating the customer is always right mantra and the deal about taking returns for merchandise they don't sell (I've also seen that at petsmart btw, or maybe it was petco), but I haven't noticed any difference in customer service there compared to other semi-luxury retailers and I'd be shocked if they paid anything other than market wages. I don't think they actually put a premium on labor.

I think they both compete on price and selection at this point in their respective brick and mortar categories. I think they both view labor as a cost, and if they can cut cost without hurting sales they will do it. you could be right though.


Viewing labor as a way to make money was something I read a few months ago and it really stuck with me because it's anti to the prevailing view that labor is always a cost.

So if the excellent service at Nordstrom gets the customer to spend more than he/she was planning to spend then I'd say that's a way that labor higher labor costs actually made the company money in that particular transaction. I know they've gotten me to spend way more on a ties than I would like to, but when the guy puts the whole outfit together for you and it looks awesome then it's hard to say no. If I was just picking out my own stuff I wouldn't have spent as much because it wouldn't have looked that good.

So of course labor is going to be a cost on the balance sheet, but what's it doing on the cash flow statement? Probably nothing at Wal-Mart, but probably something at Nordstrom. Lord knows how much they used to get an ex of mine to spend on jeans there.
 
2012-08-07 08:18:16 PM
So of course labor is going to be a cost on the balance sheet,

Damnit. Income statement.
 
2012-08-07 08:20:33 PM

Shaggy_C: so the "shareholders first" philosophy hadn't infiltrated every last part of the American ethos.


Fifty years ago it didn't exist. Fifty years ago corporations weren't cranking out earnings estimates. Their shares weren't judged by earnings per share. Earnings were nice, but hardly the only thing you'd judge a company on and some investors didn't even worry about earnings instead focusing on things like revenue growth, how much debt they had, how much equity they had and all sorts of other factors, including employee turnover.
 
2012-08-07 08:21:23 PM
FYI, Papa John's is not alone is saying this.

Caterpillar, the world's largest construction machinery manufacturer by sales said it would increase its insurance costs by at least 20 percent, or more than $100 million, just in the first year of the health-care overhaul program.

"We can ill-afford cost increases that place us at a disadvantage versus our global competitors," said the letter signed by Gregory Folley, vice president and chief human resources officer of Caterpillar. "We are disappointed that efforts at reform have not addressed the cost concerns we've raised throughout the year."

A letter to President Barack Obama and members of Congress signed by more than 130 economists predicted the legislation would discourage companies from hiring more workers and would cause reduced hours and wages for those already employed."

Farm equipment maker Deere & Co expects after-tax expenses to rise by $150 million this year as a result of the healthcare reform law President Barack Obama signed

Verizon says it current pays $4 billion annually towards health care plans for nearly 900,000 employees, retirees, and their families. Its hundreds of thousands of unionized employees, though, pay nothing towards their health care premiums. The company estimates the "Cadillac tax" will add about $200 million to those annual costs.

McDonald's estimates that each restaurant will incur between $10,000 and $30,000 in added annual costs. The Affordable Care Act could cost McDonald's and its franchisees more than $400 million a year in additional health-care expenses, Chief Financial Officer Peter Bensen said on Monday.

CEO Tilman J. Fertitta of Landry's Inc., the Houston-based operator of more than 400 restaurant, hotel and casino properties, isn't so sure. "It's just going to be a lot more expensive for people to eat out," Fertitta said. "It's going to be more expensive for people to buy groceries at the grocery store."

White Castle System Inc. began offering health coverage when Calvin Coolidge was president. In upholding the core of President Barack Obama's healthcare overhaul, justices still left U.S. businesses wondering what they will have to spend to comply, said Jamie Richardson, vice president of Columbus, Ohio-based White Castle.

Peter Saleh, a restaurant analyst at Telsey Advisory Group, expects sit-down diners at restaurants like The Olive Garden, owned by Darden Restaurants (DRI), and The Cheesecake Factory (CAKE), which own a greater proportion of their locations than some fast food chains, to eventually pay at least 2% more to eat there.

The list goes on and on. Without a doubt, ACA means increased operating costs for American businesses. And an increase in operating costs means either a reduction in hiring or an increase in prices. So whether we get unemployment or inflation, it will have a negative effect on the economy at a time when it is already struggling.

So you can go on and on about how their pizza sucks (it does) and how it's just fat cat whining or it's all political lies, or whatever you need to tell yourself, but at the end of the day, ACA will not reduce the cost of healthcare itself, nor will it reduce the rising cost of insurance, and it will have a dampening effect on the economy.
 
2012-08-07 08:21:42 PM

you are a puppet: Pincy: Thrag: They don't realize healthy employees are more productive employees?

They don't care. Their business model is set up for low-skilled employees with high turnover rates. They aren't creating career opportunities here. They are making pizza as cheaply as possible. The expect that most employees won't be there for the long haul.

Aren't their employees all teenagers who would be covered on their parents plans anyway? Like the two teenage girls who I presume were on their break smoking on the curb out front a few months ago, and when I walked by they stopped talking to each other and stared at me quietly with lust in their eyes? "Yep, still got it", I thought to myself as I began to look up age of consent laws on my phone.


Sure, some of them are, and some of them aren't. With Obamacare I suppose you could say this about anyone up to 26 years of age. But all that's doing is passing health care costs onto the parents or the parent's employer.

I guess I'm confused. Is business supposed to provide health insurance for its employees or not? I always kind of thought that that was the implicit agreement in our economy. I always here people say "get a job" when someone complains that they can't afford to go to the doctor because they don't have insurance. It seems to me that the "get a job" advice assumes that the job will provide you with insurance. But maybe I'm wrong.
 
2012-08-07 08:21:53 PM

you are a puppet: consider this: kronicfeld: I miss Little Caesar's.

[media.tumblr.com image 395x338]

Woo Obamacare

[media.tumblr.com image 324x337]

WOO


media.tumblr.com
 
2012-08-07 08:21:54 PM
farking 11 cents? What were you smoking when you decided it was totally ok to go ahead and say something so farking stupid?

"Well, yer za gonna cost more. Like, a quarter or something. And all of our employees will actually have health insurance. For a farking QUARTER. Can you believe what big government is doing?"
 
2012-08-07 08:22:30 PM
Am I the only one who sees making junk food more expensive and health care cheaper as a win/win?
 
2012-08-07 08:22:37 PM

Shaggy_C: Dog Welder: Back in the olden days (like, 30 or 40 years ago) if you asked a CEO who the most important person in their organization was, they would almost invariably answer "the customer." This would be followed by "our employees."

Nowadays, the answer is almost always "the shareholder." Customers are seen as nothing but a nuisance to take money from and employees are nothing but leeches who can be easily replaced.

In the olden days, you wouldn't ask a CEO, you would ask the owner of the corporation. And, while he was telling you about how much he cared about the "customer" he'd secretly be pulling all kinds of borderline illegal accounting shenanigans that would never see the light of day since it was a private corporation. Now that we have publicly held corporations, the process has been democratized. The public both gets to buy in to the company and become a part owner and we also get to see the books revealed publicly every single quarter. Say what you want about the olden days but the American consumer is much more informed today both as a customer of the corporation and as an owner.


I know, right? I mean it's not like we had publicly traded companies 30 or 40 years ago. Oh, wait...

You should read this and look at just how dumb you are...
Link
 
2012-08-07 08:23:48 PM

Rapmaster2000: Lord knows how much they used to get an ex of mine to spend on jeans there.


It's what pretty much killed Tower Records and why they could never push aside small record stores. They were never willing to pay to have employees who really new their stuff and could recommend stuff, tell someone what album some song was on and so on. Meanwhile the small stores were staffed with people who knew that stuff and could offer service Tower never could. So even if Tower records was three blocks away, people kept coming in through the door to spend money. Then there's the whole pricing issue. When a local retailer has better prices than a national chain on the same item, the chain may not be doing it right.
 
2012-08-07 08:23:48 PM

Gyrfalcon: grimlock1972: " in order to protect our shareholders best interests," Schnatter vowed."

That right there is the biggest problem with America , big business is far to beholden to shareholders.

We need more Main street thinking and less Wall street thinking.

Putting Customers first will in the long run make more of a profit.

Big business wouldn't exist without shareholders. That's the whole point of a company going public. Normally, it works very well, since the more people who buy in, the more capital a business has to work with.

My next question here is, since this guy is the "CEO and founder", what percentage of stock does he hold, and how much of these endangered profits are going straight into his pocket. If it's a privately-held corporation and he's the sole shareholder...well...his protests suddenly become very interesting, to say the least.


I got no problem with going public unless pleasing the shareholders take precedent over customer satisfaction.
Both can be accomplished with out one suffering.
 
2012-08-07 08:24:10 PM

BojanglesPaladin: The list goes on and on.



Making up shiat does go on and on. Instead of copy and paste, how about you actually link to their proof?
 
2012-08-07 08:25:13 PM

BojanglesPaladin: Caterpillar, the world's largest construction machinery manufacturer by sales said it would increase its insurance costs by at least 20 percent, or more than $100 million, just in the first year of the health-care overhaul program.



I just fact checked one of those

Guess what?

http://www.thestreet.com/story/11099504/1/caterpillar-beats-raises-gu i dance.html

In addition, $90 million of the improvement was due to the absence of a tax charge from the first quarter of 2010 related to enactment of U.S. health care legislation.

Oops! Sounds like you buy into bullshiat scare tactic propaganda
 
2012-08-07 08:25:14 PM

Pincy: you are a puppet: Pincy: Thrag: They don't realize healthy employees are more productive employees?

They don't care. Their business model is set up for low-skilled employees with high turnover rates. They aren't creating career opportunities here. They are making pizza as cheaply as possible. The expect that most employees won't be there for the long haul.

Aren't their employees all teenagers who would be covered on their parents plans anyway? Like the two teenage girls who I presume were on their break smoking on the curb out front a few months ago, and when I walked by they stopped talking to each other and stared at me quietly with lust in their eyes? "Yep, still got it", I thought to myself as I began to look up age of consent laws on my phone.

Sure, some of them are, and some of them aren't. With Obamacare I suppose you could say this about anyone up to 26 years of age. But all that's doing is passing health care costs onto the parents or the parent's employer.

I guess I'm confused. Is business supposed to provide health insurance for its employees or not? I always kind of thought that that was the implicit agreement in our economy. I always here people say "get a job" when someone complains that they can't afford to go to the doctor because they don't have insurance. It seems to me that the "get a job" advice assumes that the job will provide you with insurance. But maybe I'm wrong.


Corporations offered health insurance because they get a tax break and its a competitive advantage. But there was no law or requirement that forced them to offer health insurance or retirement plans.
 
2012-08-07 08:25:25 PM
A local and very good pizza place delivers to my house. I already pay them about $10 more per pizza because they make good pizza.

Now I'll feel even more smug as I do it knowing Papa John is an a**.
 
2012-08-07 08:25:37 PM

Happy Hours: Is there any delivery pizza chain that doesn't suck?

WTF? Everyone hates on every single major pizza delivery service. It's pizza and they bring it to your door, It's not a gourmet meal and you aren't going to eat it in a nice restaurant where they refill your water glass every 5 minutes.


Late to the thread, but I thought I'd address this. Papa John's uses mealy cheese, their sauce is too sweet, and the crust tastes stale. I'd ten times rather eat a Pizza Hut or Domino's pizza than a Papa John's. And I'm not a pizza snob; I prefer Pizza Hut marginally over Domino's, but I wouldn't turn either down.
 
2012-08-07 08:26:48 PM

TFerWannaBe: Dog Welder: Debeo Summa Credo: lacrossestar83: Oh well. It's not like they have real (Chicago style) pizza

I don't understand this argument - they're two different foods. No reason to compare.

But i have to say after spending several days in Chicago a little while ago I have to say real Chicago-style pizza is pretty awesome.

Lou Malnatti's sausage pizza is the best. They don't put little crumbled up bits of sausage on the pizza. They put a HUGE FRICKIN' SAUSAGE PATTY on the pizza. It's rather amazing.

Malnati's main ingredient is Win. I've been there a few times with a friend and I'm glad I have to travel to eat there - if they were local to me I'd get really, really fat.


If it makes you feel better, they'll over night ship frozen pizzas to you. It might cost, but you'll still have Lou Malnati's.
 
2012-08-07 08:26:57 PM

BojanglesPaladin: So whether we get unemployment or inflation, it will have a negative effect on the economy at a time when it is already struggling.


For most of those price increases will be trivial. Also, perhaps the should have been taking care of their employees in the first place, like you know, actual first world businesses. Also there's always option of just eating the cost.
 
2012-08-07 08:27:30 PM

Debeo Summa Credo: lacrossestar83: Oh well. It's not like they have real (Chicago style) pizza

I don't understand this argument - they're two different foods. No reason to compare.

But i have to say after spending several days in Chicago a little while ago I have to say real Chicago-style pizza is pretty awesome.


You went to Lou Malnati's, didn't you? That place converted me.
 
2012-08-07 08:27:36 PM

Happy Hours: MaudlinMutantMollusk: Your pizza is more crappy than even that other asshats cardboard pizza

Is there any delivery pizza chain that doesn't suck?

WTF? Everyone hates on every single major pizza delivery service. It's pizza and they bring it to your door, It's not a gourmet meal and you aren't going to eat it in a nice restaurant where they refill your water glass every 5 minutes.


Well, we got a Wings, Things, 'n More (or something to that effect) near me. They deliver. Their pizza sucks, but their WINGS...Oh, by Sanguine their WINGS...and their absolutely HUEG onion rings... *drool*
 
2012-08-07 08:28:39 PM

BojanglesPaladin: And an increase in operating costs means either a reduction in hiring or an increase in prices.


Yes, surely those are the only two choices. I do enjoy how in your mind a reduction in profit is not even a possibility. Nope, it is only the false choice of increase in prices or reduction in hiring. No other outcomes are even conceivable.
 
2012-08-07 08:29:17 PM

WhyteRaven74: Rapmaster2000: Lord knows how much they used to get an ex of mine to spend on jeans there.

It's what pretty much killed Tower Records and why they could never push aside small record stores. They were never willing to pay to have employees who really new their stuff and could recommend stuff, tell someone what album some song was on and so on. Meanwhile the small stores were staffed with people who knew that stuff and could offer service Tower never could. So even if Tower records was three blocks away, people kept coming in through the door to spend money. Then there's the whole pricing issue. When a local retailer has better prices than a national chain on the same item, the chain may not be doing it right.


The local place always had a hot, cool chick working there too. What was up with that? Sometimes she would wear leather pants and my adolescent jeans would almost explode.

Anyway, it's not really pay per individual that goes into the equation but the amount of labor you staff at one time. I've read that Trader Joe's runs their labor this way. I think this is the secret of Chick-Fil-A's much loved service as well. I don't think McDonald's has the staffing levels to have people walking around the store and asking you how your meal was. They're too busy running back to the freezer for another case of fries.
 
2012-08-07 08:29:42 PM

intelligent comment below: BojanglesPaladin: Caterpillar, the world's largest construction machinery manufacturer by sales said it would increase its insurance costs by at least 20 percent, or more than $100 million, just in the first year of the health-care overhaul program.


I just fact checked one of those

Guess what?

http://www.thestreet.com/story/11099504/1/caterpillar-beats-raises-gu i dance.html

In addition, $90 million of the improvement was due to the absence of a tax charge from the first quarter of 2010 related to enactment of U.S. health care legislation.

Oops! Sounds like you buy into bullshiat scare tactic propaganda


Should also add that Caterpillar is raking in "record profits," giving their Board of Directors huge bonuses and raises, and simultaneously trying to destroy all of their unions and bust the wages of their employees downward. I wouldn't trust these greedy sacks of crap with anything that they say.
 
2012-08-07 08:30:31 PM

BojanglesPaladin: FYI, Papa John's is not alone is saying this.


Business's fight tooth and nail against any new laws, rules, or regulations. I expect them to biatch about the PPACA. Guess what - they are frequently wrong. Basically all you are doing is parroting right wing talking points. If you have something substantial to add to the debate - I'm all for it. So far you haven't added any.

/work for a health insurance company - have many opinions on the PPACA - for and against
 
2012-08-07 08:30:55 PM
And the amount of money we're throwing away because of taxes to take care of people using the ER as a first-line of health care defense will drop.

I really don't get why this is such a hard concept to grasp - we can either pay a moderate amount to cover everyone the right way, or we can pay an exorbitant amount to cover everyone using the ER as their only option.
 
2012-08-07 08:32:00 PM
 
2012-08-07 08:34:02 PM
Does this also mean that they will be dropping the cost of the pizza when their insurance carrier's Medical Loss Ratio kicks in, and they get a refund on their over paid premiums? Individuals are starting to see checks coming in, so I have to assume that employers with group plans are also seeing refunds.
 
2012-08-07 08:34:53 PM

Rapmaster2000: They're too busy running back to the freezer for another case of fries.


Funny you mention that, but McDonald's is actually particular about staffing levels. It may not be Chick-Fil-A but they do insist it is sufficient. What's funny is their previous CEO would once a week go to a local McDonald's put on a uniform and work a shift, putting together Big Macs, working the drive through, whatever there was to do. His feeling was that he couldn't run McDonald's well unless he actually not only saw how things worked at various locations, but experienced it himself. It can't be said that this a bad management idea.
 
2012-08-07 08:35:32 PM

gingerjet: BojanglesPaladin: FYI, Papa John's is not alone is saying this.

Business's fight tooth and nail against any new laws, rules, or regulations. I expect them to biatch about the PPACA. Guess what - they are frequently wrong. Basically all you are doing is parroting right wing talking points. If you have something substantial to add to the debate - I'm all for it. So far you haven't added any.

/work for a health insurance company - have many opinions on the PPACA - for and against


The larger a business is the more entrenched its procedures are and the harder they are to change. They'll adapt, but like everything they'd rather not take on any unpredictability or changes. That's really what this is about. The momentary adaptations open them to attacks by competitors.

Meanwhile, Komatsu and Kubota are pumping out equipment just fine in socialist Japan. Deere and Cat will get over it.
 
2012-08-07 08:36:03 PM

gingerjet: Businesses fight tooth and nail against any new laws, rules, or regulations.


Surely that can't be true? I thought everyone remembered how excited the automakers were to offer airbags on vehicles.
 
2012-08-07 08:36:51 PM
FTFA: "If Obamacare is in fact not repealed, we will find tactics to shallow out any Obamacare costs and core strategies to pass that cost onto consumers in order to protect our shareholders best interests," Schnatter vowed." (bolding mine)

Here is what is wrong with America today. The only people who matter anymore are the precious share holders. Customers, employees, and product all bow down before the almighty shareholder. It should be your farking CUSTOMER you care about, and your PRODUCT you believe in that will make money for the SHAREHOLDER. NOT THE OTHER WAY AROUND.

And congratulations Papa John's, you've just made my ban list.
 
2012-08-07 08:37:29 PM
Every time I get a pizza from then, delivery takes somewhere between 1-2 hours. fark Papa John's. If it did taste good, it's all cold and terrible by the time I get it.
 
2012-08-07 08:38:11 PM

BojanglesPaladin: Without a doubt, ACA means increased operating costs for American businesses. And an increase in operating costs means either a reduction in hiring or an increase in prices. So whether we get unemployment or inflation, it will have a negative effect on the economy at a time when it is already struggling.


You're oh-so-conveniently leaving out the benefits of a healthier workforce, both to the business and society in general. I'm sure you simply forgot.
 
2012-08-07 08:38:30 PM
We should punish him by raising his taxes. Surely he won't pass that cost along, too.
 
2012-08-07 08:39:49 PM

paygun: We should punish him by raising his taxes. Surely he won't pass that cost along, too.


We should fear job creators (peace be upon them) and their ability to pass the cost of business onto the customer, and always tailor our laws to reflect their almighty power.

Buy Depends.
 
2012-08-07 08:42:10 PM

theorellior: I thought everyone remembered how excited the automakers were to offer airbags on vehicles.


Actually there were a few manufacturers who offered them before they were mandatory. Just as there were those who offered seat belts before they were mandatory.

paygun: Surely he won't pass that cost along, too.


If he tried to pass along paying an extra $10,000 to $20,000 in taxes, he'd deserve to be tarred and feathered.
 
2012-08-07 08:42:26 PM

Sgt Otter: I'm wondering if they factored in the increased productivity, due to less people taking less sick days due to increased access to preventative / early treatment, in their numbers.


No, that is one thing I am absolutely sure of.
 
2012-08-07 08:42:31 PM

gingerjet: Pincy: you are a puppet: Pincy: Thrag: They don't realize healthy employees are more productive employees?

They don't care. Their business model is set up for low-skilled employees with high turnover rates. They aren't creating career opportunities here. They are making pizza as cheaply as possible. The expect that most employees won't be there for the long haul.

Aren't their employees all teenagers who would be covered on their parents plans anyway? Like the two teenage girls who I presume were on their break smoking on the curb out front a few months ago, and when I walked by they stopped talking to each other and stared at me quietly with lust in their eyes? "Yep, still got it", I thought to myself as I began to look up age of consent laws on my phone.

Sure, some of them are, and some of them aren't. With Obamacare I suppose you could say this about anyone up to 26 years of age. But all that's doing is passing health care costs onto the parents or the parent's employer.

I guess I'm confused. Is business supposed to provide health insurance for its employees or not? I always kind of thought that that was the implicit agreement in our economy. I always here people say "get a job" when someone complains that they can't afford to go to the doctor because they don't have insurance. It seems to me that the "get a job" advice assumes that the job will provide you with insurance. But maybe I'm wrong.

Corporations offered health insurance because they get a tax break and its a competitive advantage. But there was no law or requirement that forced them to offer health insurance or retirement plans.


Ya, I know there was never a law requiring them to offer health insurance and I understand they get tax breaks, but yet many businesses do not provide health insurance for the majority of their employees. I'm not talking about what the legal requirements are, I'm talking about an implied social contract. At least it seemed to me that at one time there was an implied contract that business would provide health insurance. I realize today that this doesn't really exist anymore, but I think a lot of people have used this assumption to support their own political agendas. Such as people who oppose Obamacare and UHC. Their argument seems to be that we don't need to change the system because the system is fine as it is with the implication being that everyone should be able to get a job with health insurance benefits because that's what business does, it provides its employees health insurance.
 
2012-08-07 08:43:00 PM
Papa Johns blows....right along the lines of Pizza Hut and Dominoes. There is some thing wrong with the cheese....and they all have nasty sauce.
 
2012-08-07 08:44:00 PM

Jaws_Victim: FTFA: "If Obamacare is in fact not repealed, we will find tactics to shallow out any Obamacare costs and core strategies to pass that cost onto consumers in order to protect our shareholders best interests," Schnatter vowed." (bolding mine)

Here is what is wrong with America today. The only people who matter anymore are the precious share holders. Customers, employees, and product all bow down before the almighty shareholder. It should be your farking CUSTOMER you care about, and your PRODUCT you believe in that will make money for the SHAREHOLDER. NOT THE OTHER WAY AROUND.

And congratulations Papa John's, you've just made my ban list.


Did he mention that he himself ownes 30% of those shares? One third of this benefit is to himself alone? Fark that turdbag!
 
2012-08-07 08:48:09 PM

CPennypacker: Do they really think people will buy less of their shiatty pizzas because of a 15 cent price increase? If you dropped 15 cents on the ground would you even stop to pick it up?

And if this is all it would cost, why the fark aren't they already doing it? Jesus!


Because the shareholders would scream bloody murder that that 15 cents wasn't going to them.
 
2012-08-07 08:49:23 PM

Surool: Jaws_Victim: FTFA: "If Obamacare is in fact not repealed, we will find tactics to shallow out any Obamacare costs and core strategies to pass that cost onto consumers in order to protect our shareholders best interests," Schnatter vowed." (bolding mine)

Here is what is wrong with America today. The only people who matter anymore are the precious share holders. Customers, employees, and product all bow down before the almighty shareholder. It should be your farking CUSTOMER you care about, and your PRODUCT you believe in that will make money for the SHAREHOLDER. NOT THE OTHER WAY AROUND.

And congratulations Papa John's, you've just made my ban list.

Did he mention that he himself ownes 30% of those shares? One third of this benefit is to himself alone? Fark that turdbag!


I cannot wait for the French Revolution 2: Die Harder
 
2012-08-07 08:54:19 PM

sparkeyjames: Because the shareholders would scream bloody murder that that 15 cents wasn't going to them.


Considering Papa John's doesn't pay a dividend, there's nothing going to them in the first place.
 
2012-08-07 08:54:28 PM
ITT: "Hey remember when we talked about all that money businesses would save? LOL! You mean you believed that!? So what if most of the non-liberals said we were full of it. We now admit that it's going to cost businesses money and that's fine!"
 
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