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(Soccerly)   Tips on how to stay safe in the cloud. Not using the cloud in the first place is amazingly absent   (technolog.msnbc.msn.com ) divider line 29
    More: Obvious, icloud, cloud storage, Google Search, Steve Wozniak, automated system, draw backs, Lifehacker, clouds  
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1351 clicks; posted to Geek » on 07 Aug 2012 at 3:59 PM (3 years ago)   |   Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



29 Comments   (+0 »)
   
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2012-08-07 01:11:46 PM  
Use a cloud-condom?

cloud.graphicleftovers.com
 
2012-08-07 01:29:20 PM  
♫ Hey, you, stay out of my cloud...♫
 
2012-08-07 01:57:37 PM  

MaudlinMutantMollusk: ♫ Hey, you, stay out of my cloud...♫


Holy synchronicity, that song was no-shiat playing on the Muzak when I read that.
 
2012-08-07 02:28:08 PM  
Well there really is no SLA (service level agreement) given by cloud providers. I use Mozy for personal files that I don't want people to access and they provide an SLA and the company is owned by the same company that stores big bank/government data and owns RSA which is a security company. I think they know what they're doing..

Digital assets purchased by Apple, or Amazon, or whoever are a different story entirely. They call it "cloud" but it's not really cloud at all it's simply a re-purchase of the same digital asset you already own. For books, movies, songs, etc. this system works out just fine.

Putting anything of importance on an infrastructure that's ran by web companies or consumer hardware companies just isn't a wise choice.

Woz may be a genius but he gets what he deserves by relying on people who really have no idea what they're doing. It's like expecting the same quality of service from MagicJack as you would get an ATT or Verizon.
 
2012-08-07 04:04:37 PM  
"Avoiding lightning" also surprisingly absent.
 
2012-08-07 04:06:35 PM  
The Cloud is more secure, better backed up and still cheaper/safer than keeping your "mission-critical" ex-gf nudes at home. Even the worst-run IT organization has better practices than you do when it comes to keeping your data secure.

Nobody freaked out about storing their data "on the ground" every time they lost a hard drive, had their laptop stolen or got turned in to the cops by Geek Squad. The problem is not your lack of trust in the Cloud, it's your abundance of trust in yourselves.
 
2012-08-07 04:27:06 PM  
Stay inside the plane? Have parachute?
 
2012-08-07 04:34:05 PM  
Stay safe in cloud? Hmmmm. Screw that! Lets see. Save unencrypted data to cloud. Have that data have all the key words that secretive government agencies scan for. Make it in some form that you need to link all the data in different accounts to see the answer.

/Step 4: be sure to drink your ovaltine
 
2012-08-07 04:34:55 PM  

mccallcl: The Cloud is more secure, better backed up and still cheaper/safer than keeping your "mission-critical" ex-gf nudes at home. Even the worst-run IT organization has better practices than you do when it comes to keeping your data secure.

Nobody freaked out about storing their data "on the ground" every time they lost a hard drive, had their laptop stolen or got turned in to the cops by Geek Squad. The problem is not your lack of trust in the Cloud, it's your abundance of trust in yourselves.


This is fairly accurate, but omits the problem of Clouds being valuable/worthwhile targets for advanced hacking. Additionally, losing your data to hardware malfunction is far less damaging then outright theft.
 
2012-08-07 04:35:53 PM  

mccallcl: The Cloud is more secure, better backed up and still cheaper/safer than keeping your "mission-critical" ex-gf nudes at home. Even the worst-run IT organization has better practices than you do when it comes to keeping your data secure.

Nobody freaked out about storing their data "on the ground" every time they lost a hard drive, had their laptop stolen or got turned in to the cops by Geek Squad. The problem is not your lack of trust in the Cloud, it's your abundance of trust in yourselves.


Uh huh. So what ad agency are you with? Pays well?
 
2012-08-07 04:43:55 PM  
mccallcl : The Cloud is more secure, better backed up and still cheaper/safer than keeping your "mission-critical" ex-gf nudes at home. Even the worst-run IT organization has better practices than you do when it comes to keeping your data secure.

I'm sorry, but I can't hear you over the sound of how RAID I am.

// Given the dozens of high profile sites/companies that have been hacked in the past decade, I think I'll put a little more trust into my own personal methods of securing data, than trusting some 3rd party entity. I think you fail to estimate just how bad the worst-run IT organization can be.
 
2012-08-07 05:33:35 PM  

mccallcl: The Cloud is more secure, better backed up and still cheaper/safer than keeping your "mission-critical" ex-gf nudes at home. Even the worst-run IT organization has better practices than you do when it comes to keeping your data secure.

Nobody freaked out about storing their data "on the ground" every time they lost a hard drive, had their laptop stolen or got turned in to the cops by Geek Squad. The problem is not your lack of trust in the Cloud, it's your abundance of trust in yourselves.


Hey, whore. How's the whoring?

Cloud is a farking stupid idea and without some really badass SLA's breaks all sorts of HIPAA and other confidentiality rules.
 
2012-08-07 05:38:02 PM  

notShryke: This is fairly accurate, but omits the problem of Clouds being valuable/worthwhile targets for advanced hacking. Additionally, losing your data to hardware malfunction is far less damaging then outright theft.


It omits all the downsides of storing your info in the Cloud, including the worthwhile-target aspect. The theft aspect is obviously also applicable in storing your own stuff at home, or especially on your phone.

Ned Stark: Uh huh. So what ad agency are you with? Pays well?


I'm with KnowsWhatMyLifeIsLike & AssessesAccurately. It pays exactly "reality".
 
2012-08-07 05:50:36 PM  
I keep my life's savings in a car I keep parked at the long-term airport parking, I trust their security is better then hiding it under my bed.

/This is what cloud enthusiasts actually believe.
 
2012-08-07 05:58:59 PM  

socodog: Hey, whore. How's the whoring?

Cloud is a farking stupid idea and without some really badass SLA's breaks all sorts of HIPAA and other confidentiality rules.


That's a lot of bullshiat in one sentence! Nothing you're saying there is correct. I don't have the time to teach you why, but you may want to actually read the HIPAA guidelines or find out what an SLA is firsthand. Perhaps you can read one of the ones you've gotten from a vendor.
 
2012-08-07 06:26:15 PM  
fools-gold.org
 
2012-08-07 06:28:54 PM  
correct horse staple battery
 
2012-08-07 06:35:19 PM  
"Keep your accounts as separate as possible - if you can avoid daisy-chaining things, do so. Send password reset instructions to your mobile device. Send them to a very trusted friend's mobile device. Send them to your mom."

I find it funny that his suggestion is the total opposite of what many websites are going to - like Photobucket wanting you to log in with your Facebook credentials which, in turn, wants your Yahoo credentials.

Security is a gentle balance between ease-of-use and actual effectiveness. Tip the scales one way or the other and you're hosed because people are inherently stupid and will either trust that nothing will go wrong if you make the 'lock' easier to use, or will 'tape the lock open' if you make the 'lock' more secure, much like pulling the childproof measures off of a cigarette lighter.
 
2012-08-07 06:50:27 PM  
xynix: It's like expecting the same quality of service from MagicJack as you would get an ATT or Verizon.

MagicJack . . . is worse than AT&T and Verizon? Really? I could believe yes and I could believe no. I don't have much experience with Verizon, but AT&T is, uh, crap.


mccallcl: Nobody freaked out about storing their data "on the ground" every time they lost a hard drive, had their laptop stolen or got turned in to the cops by Geek Squad.

Wat. In my experience, everyone freaked out about exactly that at all of those times. (Well, I don't know anyone who got busted by the Geek Squad, except in the sense of being scammed.) They just didn't use the phrase "on the ground".
 
2012-08-07 08:21:02 PM  
Every time I hear: "upload it to the cloud", my brain hears: "Upload it to the clown". I picture the speaker box at the drive-up window for a Jack-in-the-box restaurant.
 
2012-08-07 10:01:14 PM  
Its not so much hackers or security I worry about. More like the possibilty that someday, The RIAA and their ilk are going to manage to get some srot of 'Internet Licensing Act' that requires providers to check their users files for any copyright violations, and report them. I'm not a tinfoil hat type, but I know they'd do it if they could and would rather not take the chance of getting busted or fined for owning a Beatles song I downloaded instead of buying.
 
2012-08-07 10:01:22 PM  
Klewd become a squeeer shape.
 
2012-08-07 10:34:04 PM  
So, the cloud suffers from the exact same issues as traditional offsite remote access systems then.

I'm betting this will be followed by 20+ "To the Cloud!" style articles in various trade mags just to keep the clueless CIO's who control the purse strings on message.

Said it before, I'll say it again: The Cloud is not the panacea to all that ails you.
 
2012-08-08 01:30:02 AM  
I love using cloud service like Dropbox for simple sh*t (photos, text documents). But when it comes to serious heavy lifting (for ex., my 700GB FLAC collection) it's just not practical. For starters, it takes 19 years to upload it and once it's finally there your ISP sends you a data usage warning (the second warning can result in termination). Not sure how the cloud and bandwidth caps will ever co-exist for users like me.

Also, recovery from disaster, especially with USB 3.0) is a matter of hours, not days.

/one external drive in my apartment, synced weekly
//another one at friend's house across town, synced irregularly, but is still good insurance against home break-in, fire, etc
///large HDDs aren't going anywhere
 
2012-08-08 10:32:57 AM  
I thought we supposed to take a drink every time we hear "the cloud".
 
2012-08-08 10:50:48 AM  
Woz had a problem with his calendar, and gasp, weak passwords are weak.
 
2012-08-08 01:35:03 PM  

Old enough to know better: Its not so much hackers or security I worry about. More like the possibilty that someday, The RIAA and their ilk are going to manage to get some srot of 'Internet Licensing Act' that requires providers to check their users files for any copyright violations, and report them. I'm not a tinfoil hat type, but I know they'd do it if they could and would rather not take the chance of getting busted or fined for owning a Beatles song I downloaded instead of buying.


It's already, kinda, happening. I threw a video up of a Ubisoft game (Anno 2070), it's just me walking through the main menu and explaining the options, what they do and how they're used in various facets of the game (the levelling system, unlocks, how the multiplayer + 'Ark persistence' works).

*BAM* instant (C) flagged just on the visual regardless of the replaced audio.

But under fair use laws what I did is above board, for once it's a Lets Play episode that can legitimately be called "educational" but it's up to me to prove it's legit. Shouldn't it be up to Ubisoft to to prove it's not legit?

This is my greatest worry about the way things are going, in small increments (and in different areas of the law) we're slowly moving away from "innocent until proven guilty" to "guilty until proven innocent" and it's not a change I like or approve of.
 
2012-08-08 02:05:04 PM  

mccallcl: The Cloud is more secure, better backed up and still cheaper/safer than keeping your "mission-critical" ex-gf nudes at home. Even the worst-run IT organization has better practices than you do when it comes to keeping your data secure.

Nobody freaked out about storing their data "on the ground" every time they lost a hard drive, had their laptop stolen or got turned in to the cops by Geek Squad. The problem is not your lack of trust in the Cloud, it's your abundance of trust in yourselves.


Bullshiat.

The cloud give the illusion of security and then only if you are ignorant.

You want relatively secure, you need offline and offsite.

How many hacks have to make the news before companies see this ?
 
2012-08-08 02:31:46 PM  

mitEj:
The cloud give the illusion of security and then only if you are ignorant.


Like the people controlling the purse strings of most IT departments you mean?
 
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