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(WTOP)   Woman tries to steal infant from hospital by putting it in a tote bag, is caught when she crosses the baby detector line. In other news, hospitals have a baby detector line   (wtop.com ) divider line
    More: Dumbass, Garden Grove, Jeff Nightengale, woman tries  
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9400 clicks; posted to Main » on 07 Aug 2012 at 9:44 AM (4 years ago)   |   Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2012-08-07 08:34:52 AM  
Absolutely they do, because people try to steal babies. The littlebopper was kept in the NICU after he was dropped off at the hospital anonymously hours after his birth not because it was medically necessary, but because public access was controlled to a much greater degree than in the normal maternity ward. An unattached, unclaimed baby would have been "easy pickin's", had it been known about. That was in addition to the standard alarm at the door if you tried to leave with a newborn that hadn't been discharged, because a person familiar with the procedures could have just cut off the ID ankle-bracelet.

BTW, on this topic, my public service announcement: Ladies, if you are pregnant and scared and for whatever reason you don't think abortion is for you, but you know you can't take care of the child, consider leaving the child anonymously under your state's "Safe Haven" or "Baby Moses" law. All 50 states have some form of it, where you can leave a child anonymously without being prosecuted for child abandonment, or worse. Not only will you be saving a life and protecting your future, you just might make a childless couple very happy.
 
2012-08-07 08:59:01 AM  

dittybopper: Absolutely they do, because people try to steal babies. The littlebopper was kept in the NICU after he was dropped off at the hospital anonymously hours after his birth not because it was medically necessary, but because public access was controlled to a much greater degree than in the normal maternity ward. An unattached, unclaimed baby would have been "easy pickin's", had it been known about. That was in addition to the standard alarm at the door if you tried to leave with a newborn that hadn't been discharged, because a person familiar with the procedures could have just cut off the ID ankle-bracelet.

BTW, on this topic, my public service announcement: Ladies, if you are pregnant and scared and for whatever reason you don't think abortion is for you, but you know you can't take care of the child, consider leaving the child anonymously under your state's "Safe Haven" or "Baby Moses" law. All 50 states have some form of it, where you can leave a child anonymously without being prosecuted for child abandonment, or worse. Not only will you be saving a life and protecting your future, you just might make a childless couple very happy.


i1265.photobucket.com

I mean that from the bottom of my heart.
 
2012-08-07 09:05:53 AM  

DjangoStonereaver: dittybopper: Absolutely they do, because people try to steal babies. The littlebopper was kept in the NICU after he was dropped off at the hospital anonymously hours after his birth not because it was medically necessary, but because public access was controlled to a much greater degree than in the normal maternity ward. An unattached, unclaimed baby would have been "easy pickin's", had it been known about. That was in addition to the standard alarm at the door if you tried to leave with a newborn that hadn't been discharged, because a person familiar with the procedures could have just cut off the ID ankle-bracelet.

BTW, on this topic, my public service announcement: Ladies, if you are pregnant and scared and for whatever reason you don't think abortion is for you, but you know you can't take care of the child, consider leaving the child anonymously under your state's "Safe Haven" or "Baby Moses" law. All 50 states have some form of it, where you can leave a child anonymously without being prosecuted for child abandonment, or worse. Not only will you be saving a life and protecting your future, you just might make a childless couple very happy.

[i1265.photobucket.com image 501x525]

I mean that from the bottom of my heart.


Ditto.
 
2012-08-07 09:21:30 AM  
I'm not awesome. The birth parents of the littlebopper, who cared enough to make sure he was safe, are awesome. The distaffbopper and I are just *LUCKY*.
 
2012-08-07 09:47:08 AM  

dittybopper: I'm not awesome. The birth parents of the littlebopper, who cared enough to make sure he was safe, are awesome. The distaffbopper and I are just *LUCKY*.


bless you all. dittybopper is my Farker of the Day.
 
2012-08-07 09:47:25 AM  
I find it odd that people still don't know there are rfid sensors on the baby's tag. All it would take though is to block the sensor by putting the baby in a container that can block that signal.
 
2012-08-07 09:48:19 AM  

dittybopper: I'm not awesome. The birth parents of the littlebopper, who cared enough to make sure he was safe, are awesome. The distaffbopper and I are just *LUCKY*.


Wow, you almost caused my first fark-related tear there. Good for you, seriously.

Oh, and subby, I don't think its news to anybody who has had children in the last couple decades that hospitals have a "baby detector line".
 
DGS [TotalFark]
2012-08-07 09:48:33 AM  
The hospital we went to had something similar, yep. Of course, they completely failed in other aspects of security, so I don't intend to return to them in the future if we have additional kids.
 
2012-08-07 09:49:07 AM  

TNel: I find it odd that people still don't know there are rfid sensors on the baby's tag. All it would take though is to block the sensor by putting the baby in a container that can block that signal.


Or you know, cut the bracelet off.
 
2012-08-07 09:49:12 AM  
When my kid was born, they had all kinds of RFID's and barcodes for him and my wife and myself. The nurses were very alert to check bracelets and tags before the baby could leave the nursery.
 
2012-08-07 09:49:43 AM  
Even within the "electronic fence", our hospital had us wear bracelets that had to match the kid's so they didn't give the wrong baby out for visits and feedings...etc.
 
2012-08-07 09:50:04 AM  
In the hospital I gave birth in, they call it Baby LoJack. It's not on their ID bracelet, but on the umbilical cord clamp. It takes one of their do-dads to unclamp it or you'd have to cut below it (and quite possible risk injury to the baby) ... The hospital said that they'd never had an incident of baby theft but once a new mother got too close to the "line." Four security officers and a nurse where there in 35 seconds - or so they said.
 
2012-08-07 09:50:32 AM  
Came here to make a joke about the Cat Detector Van, but I just can't do it. Well said, ditty.
 
2012-08-07 09:50:50 AM  

dittybopper: BTW, on this topic, my public service announcement: Ladies, if you are pregnant and scared and for whatever reason you don't think abortion is for you, but you know you can't take care of the child, consider leaving the child anonymously under your state's "Safe Haven" or "Baby Moses" law. All 50 states have some form of it, where you can leave a child anonymously without being prosecuted for child abandonment, or worse. Not only will you be saving a life and protecting your future, you just might make a childless couple very happy.


In these circumstances where babies are left anonymously, how do they get birth certificates and stuff. Is it similar to cars getting salvage titles?
 
2012-08-07 09:51:10 AM  
my brother, sis-in law and the kids they had all had hospital bracelets on with sensors so if the baby "line" was crossed hospital staff could see who crossed the "line" and take appropriate action if harm to the baby or mom was suspected.
 
2012-08-07 09:51:32 AM  
Bracelets can be defeated. This is why the newer hospitals simply inject the RFID chips when they administer the HepB vaccination.
 
2012-08-07 09:53:11 AM  
When we had our kids the hospital was very specific, "Nobody and I mean Nobody" will ask to take your child from you at anytime. Not a doctor or a nurse, and if they try we were to alert staff immediately.
 
2012-08-07 09:53:30 AM  

dittybopper: a person familiar with the procedures could have just cut off the ID ankle-bracelet.


When my daughter was born (6 weeks early, 5 weeks in the NICU), she was small enough that the bracelet wouldn't stay on. So it just got taped to her bed. OTOH since she was in the NICU nobody would be wandering off with her (not that I didn't ponder doing so myself once or twice).

dittybopper: "Safe Haven" or "Baby Moses" law. All 50 states have some form of it, where you can leave a child anonymously without being prosecuted for child abandonment, or worse. Not only will you be saving a life and protecting your future, you just might make a childless couple very happy.


I remember the Fark-worthy consequences of Nebraska's; they didn't put an age limit on it, so a few people drove their teenagers there to drop them off. Good times.
 
2012-08-07 09:53:48 AM  

The Bunyip: Bracelets can be defeated. This is why the newer hospitals simply inject the RFID chips when they administer the HepB vaccination.


Which prepares them for the autism later on when the germ is released by the gubment.
 
2012-08-07 09:54:00 AM  

TNel: I find it odd that people still don't know there are rfid sensors on the baby's tag. All it would take though is to block the sensor by putting the baby in a container that can block that signal.


Just put the baby in a microwave oven for a minute or so. It fries the RFID right up!
 
2012-08-07 09:54:25 AM  
When I had mine, the alarm sounded at 1 am one night.... took the nurses 10 minutes to come check on mine (the bebe slept in the room with me). Apparently a discharged parent left their baby's RFID bracelet in the room and it went out with the laundry. Not impressed that it took 10 whole minutes to make sure my child wasn't abducted.
 
2012-08-07 09:54:26 AM  
dittybopper, a special high five and hug to you.

When we had our last baby we were just walking the floor with the wee'un in the bassinet and accidentally got too close to the line. Alarms went off and everyone came running. Embarrassing but at least the system worked.
 
2012-08-07 09:55:08 AM  
Well, I for one had no idea about the baby detector technology. It dies make sense, though, that they would the parents and kid have matching barcodes, as mentioned upthread.

/babyfree!
 
2012-08-07 09:55:29 AM  

cgraves67: When my kid was born, they had all kinds of RFID's and barcodes for him and my wife and myself. The nurses were very alert to check bracelets and tags before the baby could leave the nursery.


People look at that as a measure to prevent baby theft, but in my opinion it's much more valuable as a measure to prevent unintentional baby mix-ups.
 
2012-08-07 09:55:39 AM  

Kirzania: In the hospital I gave birth in, they call it Baby LoJack. It's not on their ID bracelet, but on the umbilical cord clamp. It takes one of their do-dads to unclamp it or you'd have to cut below it (and quite possible risk injury to the baby) ... The hospital said that they'd never had an incident of baby theft but once a new mother got too close to the "line." Four security officers and a nurse where there in 35 seconds - or so they said.


The hospital where the kid was born had an elevator lobby in the middle of the maternity ward with the lo-jack lines on both sides of it. If a baby crossed the line with an elevator door open, it shut down the whole elevator bank in the hospital and set off loud alarms.

Even if it was an accident at 3:00 in the morning during a feeding time.
 
2012-08-07 09:55:43 AM  
At the last hospital I worked at, during orientation, they actually had one of the women in the new hire group with a large purse attempt to steal a baby, just as a display of the security they had. Apparently they do this at every orientation. I always thought that was a strange statement - were they showing off that your new workplace has great security, or telling the women in the group that they'd better not think of trying to steal a baby?
 
2012-08-07 09:55:46 AM  
Once my wife was feeling well enough to move around we took our newborn son for a stroll down the hospital hallways. Lost in the our baby boy's beautiful existence we passed some kind of censor that set of a series of flashing lights and wailing sirens. I dropped to my knees and put my hands up in the air. My wife, just over 24 hours from giving birth, kicked me in the back and vigorously motioned for me to get up and walk back down the hall.
 
2012-08-07 09:55:57 AM  
when my children were born (youngest one was early January this year) they both had the tags clipped to what was left of their umbilical cords (the part that falls off eventually). They told us that if we tried to leave the maternity area of the hospital, it would set off the alarms.

The tag looked like a smaller version of something you would see on clothes at a store.

dkimball: Even within the "electronic fence", our hospital had us wear bracelets that had to match the kid's so they didn't give the wrong baby out for visits and feedings...etc.


Yep, every time the baby came to us or we went to the baby, the number on the bracelet was checked.
 
2012-08-07 09:56:17 AM  
My oldest is 12, and the hospital had this in place when she was born. So, in other news, welcome to the 1990s subby.
 
2012-08-07 09:56:27 AM  
Why are we getting all "The More You Know" in here, and not talking about the fact that the person in the article who explained all this to the reporter was named Nightengale?

In a hospital.

Am I the only one who finds that interesting?
 
2012-08-07 09:56:45 AM  
how come when you preview a post, you don't see how screwed up it is, but the moment it is posted it is so blaringly obvious?
 
2012-08-07 09:57:22 AM  
Yep, this is exactly why the baby alarm systems are in place. In a lot of hospitals, the alarm will also deactivate the elevator on the maternity foor. When our son was born, we had to wait a few minutes for the elevator to be reset because somebody walked too close to the exit by accident with a baby.
 
2012-08-07 09:57:57 AM  

DSanchez: When we had our kids the hospital was very specific, "Nobody and I mean Nobody" will ask to take your child from you at anytime. Not a doctor or a nurse, and if they try we were to alert staff immediately.


My hospital told us this too. Only nurses with special ID badges could take your baby to the nursery and you received a card with a number and a color. They left a matching card in the bassinet. They have to read and tell you what's on the card and verify it when they bring your baby back.

//requested no separation, so getting a kick...
 
2012-08-07 09:58:09 AM  
A lot of hospitals have a line printed right on the ground in front of the exit doors letting you know where the threshold is for carrying a newborn baby. They don't screw around with this and I'm very glad for it.

Also, many hospitals put the same id number on the mom's bracelet as well as the baby's, so anytime the baby is brought out of the room for examinations or tests, they reconfirm the numbers to make sure there aren't any mix ups at the hospital. I see no issues with these kinds of things.
 
2012-08-07 09:58:17 AM  
I worked desktop support at a medical campus. That's "medical campus", not just a hospital. I worked on computers in just about every sort of medical-related place you can think of. The geriatrics center was posh. All that dying old people money.

I digress. Of all the places I'd been to -- ER, animal testing, cancer research -- the most vigilant security by far was the children's hospital. Heck, even the NICU was rather lax, probably because those babies wouldn't make it very far if disconnected from the machines.

The weird thing is that while I'm vaguely aware some people are obsessed with having kids, I can't think someone willing to steal one would be a good parent, since there's a severe lack of empathy at work.
 
2012-08-07 09:58:20 AM  
I must say, it makes me feel better to know I'm not the only one to have set off the baby LoJack alarm.
 
2012-08-07 09:59:29 AM  
When I had one of my kids, she never left the room, but her bracelet feel off in the sheets. Once the custodians took it out, the alarm was tripped. Within 20 seconds, at least 8 people were in my room. Scared the crap out of me, but worked. Woke up the baby too.
 
2012-08-07 09:59:33 AM  

Kirzania: In the hospital I gave birth in, they call it Baby LoJack. It's not on their ID bracelet, but on the umbilical cord clamp. It takes one of their do-dads to unclamp it or you'd have to cut below it (and quite possible risk injury to the baby) ... The hospital said that they'd never had an incident of baby theft but once a new mother got too close to the "line." Four security officers and a nurse where there in 35 seconds - or so they said.


That's what we called it too. My son had a difficult birth and spent a month at two hospitals. When we were transferred back to the hospital he was born in, they forgot to put it on him. We had to ask. We took him for a walk in the halls and set the alarm off. It works.
 
2012-08-07 10:00:11 AM  

dkimball: Even within the "electronic fence", our hospital had us wear bracelets that had to match the kid's so they didn't give the wrong baby out for visits and feedings...etc.


We didn't have to do that, being the "special case". Every single nurse in the Snuggery knew who we were, and every single one of them was absolutely great.
 
2012-08-07 10:00:32 AM  

QueenMamaBee: When I had mine, the alarm sounded at 1 am one night.... took the nurses 10 minutes to come check on mine (the bebe slept in the room with me). Apparently a discharged parent left their baby's RFID bracelet in the room and it went out with the laundry. Not impressed that it took 10 whole minutes to make sure my child wasn't abducted.

Did you consider the possibility that, with an alarm indicating a baby had left the facility, they likely would not be looking for the missing tot inside the "safe" zone.
 
2012-08-07 10:00:55 AM  
It's sadder that we need a baby detector line.
 
2012-08-07 10:01:27 AM  

Intrepid00: TNel: I find it odd that people still don't know there are rfid sensors on the baby's tag. All it would take though is to block the sensor by putting the baby in a container that can block that signal.

Or you know, cut the bracelet off.


And set off the alarm since you broke the connection, wonder why there is a key to remove those and they are not just cut off by the hospital staff.
 
2012-08-07 10:01:45 AM  
It's pretty easy to get the alarm bracelets off the baby. Just know that a missing appendage knocks down the price.
 
2012-08-07 10:03:24 AM  
img855.imageshack.us
 
2012-08-07 10:04:01 AM  

dittybopper: Absolutely they do, because people try to steal babies. The littlebopper was kept in the NICU after he was dropped off at the hospital anonymously hours after his birth not because it was medically necessary, but because public access was controlled to a much greater degree than in the normal maternity ward. An unattached, unclaimed baby would have been "easy pickin's", had it been known about. That was in addition to the standard alarm at the door if you tried to leave with a newborn that hadn't been discharged, because a person familiar with the procedures could have just cut off the ID ankle-bracelet.

BTW, on this topic, my public service announcement: Ladies, if you are pregnant and scared and for whatever reason you don't think abortion is for you, but you know you can't take care of the child, consider leaving the child anonymously under your state's "Safe Haven" or "Baby Moses" law. All 50 states have some form of it, where you can leave a child anonymously without being prosecuted for child abandonment, or worse. Not only will you be saving a life and protecting your future, you just might make a childless couple very happy.


Adopted kid here who approves this statement.
 
2012-08-07 10:05:06 AM  

QueenMamaBee: When I had mine, the alarm sounded at 1 am one night....


I'm amazed to learn about the noise-alarms. Our hospital was very impressed with their silent alarm. They had those emergency lights everywhere but the whole point was that no one would know it was happening except for security - you might see a whole ton of flashing lights in the hallway but you'd sit and stare at it and not go off in a panic if you didn't know what it was. Perhaps it's a state/regional thing about alarms that produce noise. All I can say is, I'm glad it never went off. I barely got any sleep as it was.
 
2012-08-07 10:05:08 AM  

ajakjoye: When I had one of my kids, she never left the room, but her bracelet feel off in the sheets. Once the custodians took it out, the alarm was tripped. Within 20 seconds, at least 8 people were in my room. Scared the crap out of me, but worked. Woke up the baby too.


For some reason I pictured ninjas in baby-blankie clothes appearing out of nowhere.
 
2012-08-07 10:05:10 AM  
What's a babby worth, anyway? $20k?
 
2012-08-07 10:05:44 AM  

indarwinsshadow: It's sadder that we need a baby detector line.


Need's probably a pretty strong word. I think mostly they're there for the security theater aspect, to make new parents feel better (they have enough things to worry about, reasonable and not, as it is).

Obviously baby theft is not nonexistent (hence this thread) but it's rare (evidence: it made the news and Fark).
 
2012-08-07 10:05:59 AM  

Gaseous Anomaly: I remember the Fark-worthy consequences of Nebraska's; they didn't put an age limit on it, so a few people drove their teenagers there to drop them off. Good times.


I believe they fixed that, but yeah, generally the laws are written so the baby has to be a newborn (most common is a month old or less, I think).
 
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