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(WTOP)   Woman tries to steal infant from hospital by putting it in a tote bag, is caught when she crosses the baby detector line. In other news, hospitals have a baby detector line   (wtop.com) divider line 222
    More: Dumbass, Garden Grove, Jeff Nightengale, woman tries  
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9389 clicks; posted to Main » on 07 Aug 2012 at 9:44 AM (2 years ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2012-08-07 10:45:39 AM  

stevetherobot: What's all this crazy, when they take the baby away and when they bring it to you talk? When my son was born, my wife wouldn't let him leave her sight unless I was handcuffed to him.


My son wasn't breathing when he was born. I only got to see him for the two seconds it took to cut the cord, then they were running out of the room with him. I made my mom and sister follow them to make sure they didn't lose or switch my baby. He only left my sight one other time, also because of his breathing.
 
2012-08-07 10:45:41 AM  

Kirzania: QueenMamaBee: When I had mine, the alarm sounded at 1 am one night....

I'm amazed to learn about the noise-alarms. Our hospital was very impressed with their silent alarm. They had those emergency lights everywhere but the whole point was that no one would know it was happening except for security - you might see a whole ton of flashing lights in the hallway but you'd sit and stare at it and not go off in a panic if you didn't know what it was. Perhaps it's a state/regional thing about alarms that produce noise. All I can say is, I'm glad it never went off. I barely got any sleep as it was.


When my first was born I was "sleeping" on a fold out recliner (I'm 6'4" and the "bed" was about 5'10" so yeah, comfy) in the room with my wife and daughter who was born 7 hours earlier. My wife and I hadn't slept in the 36 prior hours and had finally drifted off at midnight. At 2:00 some nurse walks in and bangs on the lights and starts talking at roughly the volume of a Pearl Jam concert in a hurricane. It was a "welfare check" for the baby. Her supervisor said she was just transferred from the geriatric unit. I told her that I wasn't aware that elder abuse was systemic and smiled upon but if that woman scared/woke up my family like that again the police would be coming to pick me up on assault charges. Never saw that nurse again.

I was really tired.
 
2012-08-07 10:45:43 AM  
When I worked IS Support for a major hospital system, I only had 1 Code Pink in the 3 or 4 years I was there (worked 7p-7a). I had the hostpial locked down and was in the process of setting up a command center to liaise with local authorities when I found out it was only a drill. Hospitals don't play around with baby snatchers. With all of the life and death stuff I dealt with there, that was the only thing that ever scared me.
 
2012-08-07 10:46:33 AM  

TNel: I find it odd that people still don't know there are rfid sensors on the baby's tag. All it would take though is to block the sensor by putting the baby in a container that can block that signal.


Well yeah, but they kinda look funny at you leaving the maternity ward with something like that. Also, I'm pretty sure they get an alarm if one of the babies drops off the radar. When my daughter was born, it was like going through a background check to have the President to your house for dinner...
 
2012-08-07 10:49:34 AM  

Intrepid00: TNel: I find it odd that people still don't know there are rfid sensors on the baby's tag. All it would take though is to block the sensor by putting the baby in a container that can block that signal.

Or you know, cut the bracelet off.


Would not be as effective as you might think. Let's just say there are back up systems in non-obvious places. In 1986 I was a summer intern at NSA's building near BWI, back when the facility was so secret that the Us Government didn;t even officially admit it existed
My Sis now works at a NICU in Suburban No. Va.

The security and access control systems in both places are roughly comparable
 
2012-08-07 10:50:14 AM  

H31N0US: And because I know it must be killing you, what do you and the littlebopper do on the weekends?


i52.tinypic.com

i40.tinypic.com

i46.tinypic.com

i45.tinypic.com
 
2012-08-07 10:50:49 AM  

DjangoStonereaver: dittybopper: Absolutely they do, because people try to steal babies. The littlebopper was kept in the NICU after he was dropped off at the hospital anonymously hours after his birth not because it was medically necessary, but because public access was controlled to a much greater degree than in the normal maternity ward. An unattached, unclaimed baby would have been "easy pickin's", had it been known about. That was in addition to the standard alarm at the door if you tried to leave with a newborn that hadn't been discharged, because a person familiar with the procedures could have just cut off the ID ankle-bracelet.

BTW, on this topic, my public service announcement: Ladies, if you are pregnant and scared and for whatever reason you don't think abortion is for you, but you know you can't take care of the child, consider leaving the child anonymously under your state's "Safe Haven" or "Baby Moses" law. All 50 states have some form of it, where you can leave a child anonymously without being prosecuted for child abandonment, or worse. Not only will you be saving a life and protecting your future, you just might make a childless couple very happy.

[i1265.photobucket.com image 501x525]

I mean that from the bottom of my heart.


I second the awesomeness

I don't know how more people don't know about the safe haven laws...instead they throw they babies in the creek or in trash cans, it makes me genuinely and sincerely weep :(
 
2012-08-07 10:50:58 AM  

H31N0US: SirDigbyChickenCaesar: H31N0US: What's a babby worth, anyway? $20k?

I am sure there are people that would pay that and more. People are spending in the six figures for IVF and fertility drugs. Steal a baby and tell the, hopefully, unknowing couple that the mother gave it up, was in prison, died, etc...

So why would anyone need to rely on the safe haven laws when they are sitting on a potential $20k? I guess diddy really was lucky.

Good on you diddybopper for taking on that responsibility and raising a child. I have one, I want to have another, but my wife is dreading another pregnancy. I would probably adopt if given a zero cost oppty. Race doesn't matter.

And because I know it must be killing you, what do you and the littlebopper do on the weekends? (layup excuse for you to post your old school firearms picture in yet another thread)


If you're willing to adopt an older child or a very sick infant, that's possible. If you're interested in adopting a baby, infant, or toddler? That's REALLY tough.
 
2012-08-07 10:52:23 AM  

AgentBang: A lot of hospitals have a line printed right on the ground in front of the exit doors letting you know where the threshold is for carrying a newborn baby. They don't screw around with this and I'm very glad for it.

Also, many hospitals put the same id number on the mom's bracelet as well as the baby's, so anytime the baby is brought out of the room for examinations or tests, they reconfirm the numbers to make sure there aren't any mix ups at the hospital. I see no issues with these kinds of things.


Yep we had this with my daughter. It kinda reminded me of when I got my gallbladder out. Every time a new person walked into the room they quizzed me on who I was and why I was there to make sure my paperwork matched and they didn't take something else out. I have no problem with redundancy checks to keep accidents and mixups down.
 
2012-08-07 10:52:34 AM  

notatrollorami: When my first was born I was "sleeping" on a fold out recliner (I'm 6'4" and the "bed" was about 5'10" so yeah, comfy) in the room with my wife and daughter who was born 7 hours earlier. My wife and I hadn't slept in the 36 prior hours and had finally drifted off at midnight. At 2:00 some nurse walks in and bangs on the lights and starts talking at roughly the volume of a Pearl Jam concert in a hurricane. It was a "welfare check" for the baby. Her supervisor said she was just transferred from the geriatric unit. I told her that I wasn't aware that elder abuse was systemic and smiled upon but if that woman scared/woke up my family like that again the police would be coming to pick me up on assault charges. Never saw that nurse again.


Yeah, we had just got my kid settled down for a little snooze and had a few visitors in the room when this obnoxious nurse came in, woke the baby without asking and proceeded to jab her in the foot for a blood sample. I almost lost my shiat. Complained, never saw that idiot again. Yeah, people are just doing their jobs, I know, but have a little empathy for what others are going through!
 
2012-08-07 10:54:12 AM  
stevetherobot

What's all this crazy, when they take the baby away and when they bring it to you talk? When my son was born, my wife wouldn't let him leave her sight unless I was handcuffed to him.

he is our second child...so we knew the sleepless nights were coming...and I had to go home to be with our daughter and my wife needed to get a bit of sleep...hence my boy going to the nursery for the night and coming back to us bright and early in the morning.
 
2012-08-07 10:54:19 AM  
Intrepid00: TNel: I find it odd that people still don't know there are rfid sensors on the baby's tag. All it would take though is to block the sensor by putting the baby in a container that can block that signal.


This should be sufficient.
encrypted-tbn1.google.com
 
2012-08-07 10:54:44 AM  

meanmutton: If you're willing to adopt an older child or a very sick infant


Not willing to take that chance. Too much heartbreak at stake.
 
2012-08-07 10:58:08 AM  

meanmutton: If you're willing to adopt an older child or a very sick infant, that's possible. If you're interested in adopting a baby, infant, or toddler? That's REALLY tough.


Yep.

Almost *ALL* of the older children that are free for adoption have, well, issues. Developmental, emotional, etc.

Healthy newborns of any race and color are as rare as hen's teeth. That's why people go overseas to adopt. The distaffbopper and I just happened to hit the lottery, getting a healthy newborn infant barely two months after becoming certified foster parents.
 
2012-08-07 11:00:37 AM  

notatrollorami: Kirzania: QueenMamaBee: When I had mine, the alarm sounded at 1 am one night....

I'm amazed to learn about the noise-alarms. Our hospital was very impressed with their silent alarm. They had those emergency lights everywhere but the whole point was that no one would know it was happening except for security - you might see a whole ton of flashing lights in the hallway but you'd sit and stare at it and not go off in a panic if you didn't know what it was. Perhaps it's a state/regional thing about alarms that produce noise. All I can say is, I'm glad it never went off. I barely got any sleep as it was.

When my first was born I was "sleeping" on a fold out recliner (I'm 6'4" and the "bed" was about 5'10" so yeah, comfy) in the room with my wife and daughter who was born 7 hours earlier. My wife and I hadn't slept in the 36 prior hours and had finally drifted off at midnight. At 2:00 some nurse walks in and bangs on the lights and starts talking at roughly the volume of a Pearl Jam concert in a hurricane. It was a "welfare check" for the baby. Her supervisor said she was just transferred from the geriatric unit. I told her that I wasn't aware that elder abuse was systemic and smiled upon but if that woman scared/woke up my family like that again the police would be coming to pick me up on assault charges. Never saw that nurse again.

I was really tired.



I am literally laughing so hard at that image that i have tears rolling down my cheeks. My patients probably think I've lost it.

I have.
 
2012-08-07 11:01:13 AM  

H31N0US: meanmutton: If you're willing to adopt an older child or a very sick infant

Not willing to take that chance. Too much heartbreak at stake.


Hell, I couldn't even find single older children (or even two!) that were available for adoption. It was groups of 3+ or severe medical difficulty.
 
2012-08-07 11:01:27 AM  

Mikey1969: Yep we had this with my daughter. It kinda reminded me of when I got my gallbladder out. Every time a new person walked into the room they quizzed me on who I was and why I was there to make sure my paperwork matched and they didn't take something else out. I have no problem with redundancy checks to keep accidents and mixups down.


We didn't have to go through all that, as I recall. We were introduced to the nursing staff, and because of the very special circumstances and the relatively small size of the nursery at that hospital, everyone knew who we were.

/Distaffbopper might have had a bracelet, but I can't recall.
//Have to ask her when I get home.
 
2012-08-07 11:02:23 AM  

Aidan: H31N0US: meanmutton: If you're willing to adopt an older child or a very sick infant

Not willing to take that chance. Too much heartbreak at stake.

Hell, I couldn't even find single older children (or even two!) that were available for adoption. It was groups of 3+ or severe medical difficulty.


Or developmental issues. A lot of the older kids available have FASD.
 
2012-08-07 11:05:24 AM  
Aidan: Uh... Wow.

I thought the bracelet was to convince me that it was indeed my kid and I had to take him home.

Clearly I did not receive the full boat of maternal hormones.

I DEMAND MORE HORMONES!


Me too! My maternal instinct didn't show up until about a year after the baby was born.
 
2012-08-07 11:05:38 AM  

dittybopper: Aidan: H31N0US: meanmutton: If you're willing to adopt an older child or a very sick infant

Not willing to take that chance. Too much heartbreak at stake.

Hell, I couldn't even find single older children (or even two!) that were available for adoption. It was groups of 3+ or severe medical difficulty.

Or developmental issues. A lot of the older kids available have FASD.


Now that's a damn shame.

I'm not against alcohol, even though I almost never drink, but... FASD makes me want to go all Temperance League on people. :(

I guess the more fair and useful response is to strongly encourage contraception.
 
2012-08-07 11:06:27 AM  
P: Doctor didn't have the right form.

C: What doctor?

P: The doctor from the baby detector van.

C: The loony detector van you mean.

P: Look, it's people like you what cause unrest.

C: What baby detector van?

P: The baby detector van from the Ministry of Birthinge.

C: Birthinge?

P: It was spelt like that on the van. I'm very observant. I never seen so many bleedin' aerials. The man said their equipment could pinpoint a gurgle at four hundred yards, and litllebopper being such a happy baby was a piece of cake.
 
2012-08-07 11:07:57 AM  

dittybopper: Healthy newborns of any race and color are as rare as hen's teeth. That's why people go overseas to adopt.


Buddy of mine and his wife are heading over to Thailand this fall I think. This is after tens of $ks for ivf and other random sorcery that for whatever reason just didn't work for them.

They will get back with their kid, and she'll be knocked au natural up within months. Happens a lot.
 
2012-08-07 11:11:17 AM  

dittybopper:
r how we had to go through a number of gyrations after the adoption to get a foundling birth certificate for him because the Social Security Administration wouldn't take the adoption papers as proof that he was a citizen


www.christianandamerican.com

Feels distaffbopper's pain....

/Couldn't help it.
 
2012-08-07 11:11:58 AM  

numbone: Intrepid00: TNel: I find it odd that people still don't know there are rfid sensors on the baby's tag. All it would take though is to block the sensor by putting the baby in a container that can block that signal.


This should be sufficient.
[encrypted-tbn1.google.com image 259x194]


Not even that. Just line your tote bag with steel cloth or Faraday mesh. It's not the cheapest solution in the world, but the expense is minor compared to how depressingly lucrative human trafficking can be.

mciann: Is it really reasonable anymore to question the wisdom of permanently implanted RFID chips?


Quite reasonable. The risks are not even remotely worth the false sense of security such a thing would provide. But I could see a temporary embed, perhaps in a randomly-chosen fingernail or toenail. The chip could then not be removed without doing fairly significant harm (and raising a hell of a racket), but would grow out on its own in a few months.
 
2012-08-07 11:13:00 AM  

dittybopper: We didn't have to go through all that, as I recall. We were introduced to the nursing staff, and because of the very special circumstances and the relatively small size of the nursery at that hospital, everyone knew who we were.


That would have been cool with the little one. We still had a really good experience, we used a midwife at the hospital, and it was a breeze. It was a big hospital and all, but we still got what felt like one-on-one care, like we were the only people there. Hell, we almost got the VIP suite for the night. They had a super nice room that went to VIP types, and the nurse was like 'Screw it, if it's open, we get to use it, and it's about time someone nice got to sleep in there.', but alas, someone had already called dibs on it.
 
2012-08-07 11:14:15 AM  

johnperkins: P: Doctor didn't have the right form.

C: What doctor?

P: The doctor from the baby detector van.

C: The loony detector van you mean.

P: Look, it's people like you what cause unrest.

C: What baby detector van?

P: The baby detector van from the Ministry of Birthinge.

C: Birthinge?

P: It was spelt like that on the van. I'm very observant. I never seen so many bleedin' aerials. The man said their equipment could pinpoint a gurgle at four hundred yards, and litllebopper being such a happy baby was a piece of cake.


I use that line on people all of the time, and constantly get a blank stare. Absolutely LOVE that skit. Good interneting! +500 points for you.
 
2012-08-07 11:16:57 AM  
dittybopper:

Seriously, what a lovely story. I'm sure your kid will love hearing that story when he grows up.
 
2012-08-07 11:19:45 AM  

QueenMamaBee: H31N0US: What's a babby worth, anyway? $20k?

In West Virginia you can trade one for a Dodge pickup

http://www.wokv.com/news/news/local/police-woman-sells-baby-boy-picku p -truck/nP76d/


Plus a free dose of meth.
 
2012-08-07 11:19:48 AM  
At a local but apparently world renowned hospital (known for trauma care) I recently went to visit my then pregnant friend in the secure area. She had an at-risk pregnancy, so they were waiting either for a scheduled C-section or a crash and bleed on her part. In the meantime she waited in bed.

I went to visit... asked an info desk where she was, got a map and directions, walked up to the door to the secure section looking confused. The nurse behind the glass was supposed to call the room and find out if I was allowed, but apparently saw the University staff ID I was wearing (this is at a non-U hospital) and assumed I was supposed to be there. I told her a room number I was going to and she opened the door, no other questions asked and no ID shown.

For that and other reasons, I know not to go there for anything other than ER visits for trauma.

/PS my friend and her new daughter are fine now.
 
2012-08-07 11:22:43 AM  

dittybopper: Or how we had to go through a number of gyrations after the adoption to get a foundling birth certificate for him because the Social Security Administration wouldn't take the adoption papers as proof that he was a citizen, and that he didn't have another SSN.


Here's one for you:

Mother died when I was 5.

'Adopted' by my aunt and uncle.

At 16, got my SS Card, different name than my birth certificate.

Went through life explaining that my birth certificate and my SS Card didn't match because I was adopted.

Looked into it more when I got my passport for a cruise back in '07.

Found out that not only was I never adopted, I had been using the wrong surname since 1975. All my aunt and uncle did was assume guardianship, so my last name had never officially changed, but I had been using their name for 33 years, with nobody ever asking questions. I had 2 choices. I could start right then and there using my correct last name, but i would have to go to about a bazillion different government agencies and change everything from employment and tax history to Social Security to my credit reports(Plus my wife's name). Or, I could petition for a name change to the courts and get it legally changed to what I was using. Problem is, I had to have lived in the state for something like 2 years, and I had only been here about 9 months at the time. I had to write a special letter to the judge, explain my situation and get a waiver to get an early hearing. Luckily the judge was super cool about it, I told my story, he said there was no reason to make me wait, and I was out in 10 minutes.

Talk about a pain in the ass. All because the pieces of shiat that ruined my life only slightly worse than the man who killed my daughter couldn't be bothered to do things the right way. They were too busy sneaking me out of the state before my other relatives could get enough money together to find a lawyer to smack theirs down.
 
2012-08-07 11:22:43 AM  

dittybopper: I'm not awesome. The birth parents of the littlebopper, who cared enough to make sure he was safe, are awesome. The distaffbopper and I are just *LUCKY*.


wishing you and the littlebopper the best!

same for the birth parents of the LB
 
2012-08-07 11:23:05 AM  

ChipNASA: The Bunyip: Bracelets can be defeated. This is why the newer hospitals simply inject the RFID chips when they administer the HepB vaccination.

Which prepares them for the autism later on when the germ is released by the gubment.


wow, it is staggering how commonly accepted chipping people has become. brave new world n such.

also: ever considered that pumping a brand new baby with lots of vaccines would overburden their developing immune system & cause damage?

probably not.
 
2012-08-07 11:25:26 AM  

dittybopper: Healthy newborns of any race and color are as rare as hen's teeth. That's why people go overseas to adopt.


Plus with US adoptions it's not unheard of for birth parents to show up years after the adoption and demand their children back. And succeed. "I wasn't in my right mind when I gave my baby away...." blah blah blah.
 
2012-08-07 11:26:39 AM  

dittybopper: H31N0US: And because I know it must be killing you, what do you and the littlebopper do on the weekends?

[i52.tinypic.com image 640x440]

[i40.tinypic.com image 640x480]

[i46.tinypic.com image 240x320]

[i45.tinypic.com image 225x319]


Doin' it right.
 
2012-08-07 11:27:58 AM  

Mikey1969: All because the pieces of shiat that ruined my life only slightly worse than the man who killed my daughter couldn't be bothered to do things the right way


Dude...you have had a rough go.
 
2012-08-07 11:28:41 AM  

Mikey1969: dittybopper: Or how we had to go through a number of gyrations after the adoption to get a foundling birth certificate for him because the Social Security Administration wouldn't take the adoption papers as proof that he was a citizen, and that he didn't have another SSN.

Here's one for you:

Mother died when I was 5.

'Adopted' by my aunt and uncle.

At 16, got my SS Card, different name than my birth certificate.

Went through life explaining that my birth certificate and my SS Card didn't match because I was adopted.

Looked into it more when I got my passport for a cruise back in '07.

Found out that not only was I never adopted, I had been using the wrong surname since 1975. All my aunt and uncle did was assume guardianship, so my last name had never officially changed, but I had been using their name for 33 years, with nobody ever asking questions. I had 2 choices. I could start right then and there using my correct last name, but i would have to go to about a bazillion different government agencies and change everything from employment and tax history to Social Security to my credit reports(Plus my wife's name). Or, I could petition for a name change to the courts and get it legally changed to what I was using. Problem is, I had to have lived in the state for something like 2 years, and I had only been here about 9 months at the time. I had to write a special letter to the judge, explain my situation and get a waiver to get an early hearing. Luckily the judge was super cool about it, I told my story, he said there was no reason to make me wait, and I was out in 10 minutes.

Talk about a pain in the ass. All because the pieces of shiat that ruined my life only slightly worse than the man who killed my daughter couldn't be bothered to do things the right way. They were too busy sneaking me out of the state before my other relatives could get enough money together to find a lawyer to smack theirs down.


Wow, I'm sorry about..........all of that.
 
2012-08-07 11:29:59 AM  

TNel: All it would take though is to block the sensor by putting the baby in a container that can block that signal.


Wouldn't that also block other things, like air?
 
2012-08-07 11:32:07 AM  

inner ted: ever considered that pumping a brand new baby with lots of vaccines would overburden their developing immune system & cause damage?

probably not.


As an autism parent I twitched.

Yes that's been looked at (by me and others). Normal immune systems recognize hundreds of thousands of different things. Adding 5-10 more does not cause it to break a sweat.
 
2012-08-07 11:32:28 AM  
Works in a hospital. Knows all about the baby detector line.

/yes, people do try to steal kids more than you think.
//code pink or purple depending on the age. I have to block a doorway if it's called.
///easy for me since I'm 6'3, 240
 
2012-08-07 11:34:09 AM  

pciszek: TNel: All it would take though is to block the sensor by putting the baby in a container that can block that signal.

Wouldn't that also block other things, like air?


Probably not. There can be plenty of holes in the metal as long as they're small compared to the signal wavelength. Think the mesh on a microwave oven door, it blocks the microwaves because the holes are a lot smaller than the radio wavelength in there (2.4 cm).

/Why is everyone backing away slowly?
 
2012-08-07 11:35:42 AM  

starzman2003: Works in a hospital. Knows all about the baby detector line.

/yes, people do try to steal kids more than you think.
//code pink or purple depending on the age. I have to block a doorway if it's called.
///easy for me since I'm 6'3, 240


At 5'10/310 I also easily block doorways. Though if you butter me up you might be able to get through.

/shamelessly stolen from Frasier
 
2012-08-07 11:37:05 AM  

H31N0US: notatrollorami: When my first was born I was "sleeping" on a fold out recliner (I'm 6'4" and the "bed" was about 5'10" so yeah, comfy) in the room with my wife and daughter who was born 7 hours earlier. My wife and I hadn't slept in the 36 prior hours and had finally drifted off at midnight. At 2:00 some nurse walks in and bangs on the lights and starts talking at roughly the volume of a Pearl Jam concert in a hurricane. It was a "welfare check" for the baby. Her supervisor said she was just transferred from the geriatric unit. I told her that I wasn't aware that elder abuse was systemic and smiled upon but if that woman scared/woke up my family like that again the police would be coming to pick me up on assault charges. Never saw that nurse again.

Yeah, we had just got my kid settled down for a little snooze and had a few visitors in the room when this obnoxious nurse came in, woke the baby without asking and proceeded to jab her in the foot for a blood sample. I almost lost my shiat. Complained, never saw that idiot again. Yeah, people are just doing their jobs, I know, but have a little empathy for what others are going through!


Yeah with my second child, my son, the foot stick nurse was having trouble getting blood. Without even looking up at us she goes from carefully sticking his heel to full on Anthony Perkins shower stabbing his foot while he cried and thrashed. My wife grabbed my arms as I lunged to grab my boy and she asked for another nurse.

That and the crazy Leche League ideologues (and the aforementioned screaming middle of the night lady) were my only complaints in the six days of hospitalization for two kids. Most of the medical people were great.
 
2012-08-07 11:37:46 AM  

HailRobonia: Plus with US adoptions it's not unheard of for birth parents to show up years after the adoption and demand their children back. And succeed. "I wasn't in my right mind when I gave my baby away...." blah blah blah.


Too many stories of this sht. I'm sorry, but I don't care... once you sign your rights away, you have no right to that child, especially if they went to a loving home. (Aunt and uncle were fostering-to-adopt three kids... and 4 months later they were told Dad wanted the kids back. My aunt and uncle were crushed beyond words and the kids didn't understand any of it. ... But this is an argument for another thread.)

Mikey1969: All because the pieces of shiat that ruined my life only slightly worse than the man who killed my daughter couldn't be bothered to do things the right way.

This thread just took a wrong turn. How awful for you - I'm so sorry.

notatrollorami: At 2:00 some nurse walks in and bangs on the lights and starts talking at roughly the volume of a Pearl Jam concert in a hurricane. It was a "welfare check" for the baby.

Your nurses stopped in? Mine just called - "When did the baby last eat? Last poop? Last urinate?" Me: "Aaaaaaaaaaarguguuggslksj. What time is it?" At the worst possible hours. 1am. 3am. 5am. Didn't physically come into the room until 8am.
 
2012-08-07 11:39:39 AM  

H31N0US: Mikey1969: All because the pieces of shiat that ruined my life only slightly worse than the man who killed my daughter couldn't be bothered to do things the right way

Dude...you have had a rough go.



notatrollorami: Wow, I'm sorry about..........all of that.


Thanks guys, it sucked, but that's the shiat that makes us stronger. I was just floored that over the years of foster care, and 5 other state or private institutions, nobody bothered to find this out. The lady at the state records said that stuff like that happened up until the 80's or so, your parents didn't have to provide any documentation to get you into school,, besides immunization records. Nowadays, you can't fart in public without filing forms in triplicate, unless you are crop dusting, since that one keeps you anonymous...
 
2012-08-07 11:47:05 AM  
Hehe. Crop dusting.
 
2012-08-07 11:47:59 AM  

Gaseous Anomaly: inner ted: ever considered that pumping a brand new baby with lots of vaccines would overburden their developing immune system & cause damage?

probably not.

As an autism parent I twitched.

Yes that's been looked at (by me and others). Normal immune systems recognize hundreds of thousands of different things. Adding 5-10 more does not cause it to break a sweat.


isn't that kinda the point? newborns don't have "normal immune systems" - they have whatever they get from their mothers milk & / or formula.
slamming them with a vaccine would seem to put that under duress.
considering that hospital's seem to employ a "get 'em while we got 'em" policy, i think there are several (including hep b) given before baby leaves, unless parents object. which doesn't help in the cause of convincing me it's good for a newborn.


/waits to see who will say [citation needed] first
 
2012-08-07 11:52:21 AM  

tenpoundsofcheese: dittybopper: I'm not awesome. The birth parents of the littlebopper, who cared enough to make sure he was safe, are awesome. The distaffbopper and I are just *LUCKY*.

wishing you and the littlebopper the best!

same for the birth parents of the LB


I hope that one day, I'll get to meet them and thank them.

We've been honest with the littlebopper about his origins, or at least as honest as possible. He knows that he's adopted, and what adoption is (a couple of his friends are also adopted, one when he was old enough to know). He hasn't really asked about his birth parents yet. Every once in a while, he gets close to the subject, and the distaffbopper and I trade a look, but we answer honestly. If the subject comes up, though, I've got my speech all ready, about how they cared for him enough to realize that they couldn't take care of him, so they took him to a place where they knew he would be safe.

/Choke up thinking about it.
 
2012-08-07 11:54:28 AM  
Hep B is the only one given before they leave. 2 months before they get any more.
 
2012-08-07 11:55:26 AM  
The hospital we were at when Wifey popped out lil scientist #2, had the rfid tag bands on us and the new little one, but also had a camera at the entrance to Babbyland and had to be buzzed in and out. Not too shabby unless unloading stuff and bringing toys for lil scientist #1...

Though I did think the infra-red baby bake tables were hilarious. I asked if I could make a pizza on it like the commercials, and the nurse glared and showed me there was a sensor so babby wouldn't overheat. I told groggy Wifey that the sensor would know when the top was browned and had a perfect crust. Atleast I thought I was funny anyways...
 
2012-08-07 11:58:58 AM  

notatrollorami: That and the crazy Leche League ideologues (and the aforementioned screaming middle of the night lady) were my only complaints in the six days of hospitalization for two kids. Most of the medical people were great.


One of the things that *DID* bother me about WIC was the talk about how breast feeding is best. They didn't bother us with that personally, because it didn't really apply to our situation, but there were posters and handouts on the benefit of breast feeding.

The problem: A significant fraction of the mothers on WIC have, erm, substance abuse issues. We took in a little girl that was two months old (hoping for another adoption!) whose mother was breast feeding, and doing cocaine. The first night was hell, baby was crying half the night and all colicy. She was coming off the drugs. Mother claimed the baby needed "special formula" because of colic, but what she needed was to not be sucking the tit of a drug addict. After that first night she settled down into a normal routine, and slept most of the night, waking up for a single feeding.

So I think those posters and educational material should be modified so that they promote breast feeding *IF YOU AREN'T DOING DRUGS*.

/Sorry, just pisses me off.
//Baby was eventually given to paternal grandparents who are great people.
///Hurt like Hell to see her go, though.
 
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