If you can read this, either the style sheet didn't load or you have an older browser that doesn't support style sheets. Try clearing your browser cache and refreshing the page.

(Discover)   What was it like for Curiosity to descend to Mars? See for yourself in this rover's-eye-view video of the landing   (blogs.discovermagazine.com) divider line 158
    More: Cool, heat shield, other worlds, Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter, mantle plume  
•       •       •

19203 clicks; posted to Main » on 06 Aug 2012 at 10:32 PM (2 years ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



158 Comments   (+0 »)
   
View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest

Archived thread

First | « | 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | » | Last | Show all
 
2012-08-07 12:54:43 AM

fragMasterFlash: EffervescingElephant: isn't this like the 4th rover we've sent there?

Seven rovers have been sent to Mars:

Mars 2, Prop-M rover, 1971, landing failed.

Mars 3, Prop-M rover, 1971, communication failure after landing. The Mars 2 and 3 spacecraft from the USSR, had identical 4.5 kg Prop-M rovers. They were to move on skis while connected to the landers with cables. The Mars 2 rover crashed into the Martian surface.[2] The Mars 3 lander stopped communicating about 20 seconds after landing.[2] Mars 2 and Mars 3 both had companion orbiters which were successful.

Sojourner rover, Mars Pathfinder, landed successfully on July 4, 1997. Communications were lost on September 27, 1997.

Beagle 2, Planetary Undersurface Tool, lost with Beagle 2 on deployment from Mars Express.[3] A compressed spring mechanism was designed to enable to movement across the surface at a rate of 1 cm per 5 seconds[3] and to burrow into the ground and collect a subsurface sample in a cavity in its tip.

Spirit (MER-A), Mars Exploration Rover, landed successfully on January 4, 2004. Nearly 6 years after the original mission limit, Spirit had covered a total distance of 7.73 km (4.80 mi) but its wheels became trapped in sand.[4] Around January 26, 2010, NASA conceded defeat in its efforts to free the rover and stated that it would now function as a stationary science platform.[5] The last communication received from the rover was on March 22, 2010 and NASA ceased attempts to re-establish communication on May 25, 2011.[6]

Opportunity (MER-B), Mars Exploration Rover, landed successfully on January 25, 2004. Opportunity was still operating as of 2012, having surpassed the previous record for longevity of a surface mission to Mars on May 20, 2010.[7][8]

Curiosity, Mars Science Laboratory, by NASA. It was launched November 26, 2011 at 10:02 EST[9][10] and landed in the Aeolis Palus plain near Aeolis Mons (formerly "Mount Sharp")[11][12][13][14] in Gale Crater on August 6, 2012, 05:31 UTC.[15][16][17]


Right...
i did check wiki before i made my post for accuracy...
7 were sent
4 of OURS made it there successfully
the first one was awesome...i will always remember it like the day Kennedy was shot on the moon...
i still don't understand what the big friggin deal is...
alright i get it, it is a great human achievement...USA...USA and everything
but seriously...
is there something special about this one that i am not getting?
 
2012-08-07 12:56:06 AM
That video almost made me tear up all over again. Humanity rules!
 
2012-08-07 12:59:40 AM

EffervescingElephant: is there something special about this one that i am not getting?


I bet if you hang around the monolith long enough you might just find a new and interesting use for those dried up old bones...
 
2012-08-07 01:03:14 AM

EffervescingElephant: Can one of you Farkers please explain to me why this one is so friggin special, and why do i KNEED to watch the landing of another rover?


Hi, are you watching the Olympics? So far, we've had 30 of them, we have one every 4 years and the events are, more or less, the same ones every 4 years. Do you like watching people set world records? They are doing things marginally faster/higher/stronger than have ever been done before. Why do we care? Because it is something that people have planned and prepared for for years and have only one chance to succeed at. When they do, and they surpass what humanity has ever done before through sweat, blood, and tears, that is something worth getting excited about. If you don't get that, I really don't know what to tell you.
 
2012-08-07 01:04:11 AM

Trapper439: You'd think that Curiousity would have been listening to some music on the way down in order to heighten the experience. What a dull individual it must be. I bet it's a real blast at parties.



I am thinking it should have had some loudspeakers installed - blasting out Flight of the Valkyries on it's decent...now that would have been cool


/THAT i would have watched...
 
2012-08-07 01:06:41 AM

miniflea: Just how stupid are you?


Not as stupid as someone who is so illiterate that he misreads a post and attacks the poster for saying the exact opposite of what he thinks he said.
 
2012-08-07 01:14:06 AM

EffervescingElephant: I am thinking it should have had some loudspeakers installed - blasting out Flight of the Valkyries on it's decent...now that would have been cool


You know who else like Wagner?
 
2012-08-07 01:15:16 AM
I turned my speakers all the way up, but CAN'T GET ANY SOUND. WTF NASA??

/sending an angry email to their admin right now
 
2012-08-07 01:16:40 AM

Buckner: EffervescingElephant: I am thinking it should have had some loudspeakers installed - blasting out Flight of the Valkyries on it's decent...now that would have been cool

You know who else like Wagner?


Kurt Wimmer?
 
2012-08-07 01:17:50 AM

EffervescingElephant: Right...
i did check wiki before i made my post for accuracy...
7 were sent
4 of OURS made it there successfully
the first one was awesome...i will always remember it like the day Kennedy was shot on the moon...
i still don't understand what the big friggin deal is...
alright i get it, it is a great human achievement...USA...USA and everything
but seriously...
is there something special about this one that i am not getting?


Yes, there is. It's way, way larger than the previous rovers and as a result, the landing procedure was far more complex, and involved a rocket hovering over the surface of Mars lowering the car-sized rover to the surface via cables, cutting the cables, and flying off, amongst other things. This would have been a difficult procedure on Earth, much less hundreds of millions of miles away. It's an engineering feat that we haven't accomplished before, and the fact that it went flawlessly on the first try is a Big Deal.
 
2012-08-07 01:23:03 AM

nmrsnr: EffervescingElephant: Can one of you Farkers please explain to me why this one is so friggin special, and why do i KNEED to watch the landing of another rover?

Hi, are you watching the Olympics? So far, we've had 30 of them, we have one every 4 years and the events are, more or less, the same ones every 4 years. Do you like watching people set world records? They are doing things marginally faster/higher/stronger than have ever been done before. Why do we care? Because it is something that people have planned and prepared for for years and have only one chance to succeed at. When they do, and they surpass what humanity has ever done before through sweat, blood, and tears, that is something worth getting excited about. If you don't get that, I really don't know what to tell you.



Hi..
and no i am not watching the Olympics either...thanks for the history lesson tho...having lived in a cave for the last few decades i wasn't aware they held those events every 4 years...but thanks none the less for the education.
No i don't particularly like watching people set world records, especially when it involves people running around in circles trying to edge out another by a millisecond or so - just not relevant to my interests.
Personally i would prefer to see humanity trying to surpass what has ever done before through sweat, blood, and tears by treating each other better and making this world a better place through education, development and kindness...but meh... that is just my opinion
you keep striving for that gold in beach volleyball tho...


/sorry i don't feed into what the mass media forces down our cultural throats...
 
2012-08-07 01:27:37 AM

anfrind: Harry_Seldon: You would think if they were going to fly all that way, they would spool out a couple of strands of fiber optic cable.

What about a really long stick?

[www.internetmemepics.com image 461x600]


sorry to burst your bubble, but when you push one end of the stick the atoms must propagate the wave so to speak, and it doesn't go faster than the speed of light.

Link
 
2012-08-07 01:27:42 AM

EffervescingElephant: nmrsnr: EffervescingElephant: Can one of you Farkers please explain to me why this one is so friggin special, and why do i KNEED to watch the landing of another rover?

Hi, are you watching the Olympics? So far, we've had 30 of them, we have one every 4 years and the events are, more or less, the same ones every 4 years. Do you like watching people set world records? They are doing things marginally faster/higher/stronger than have ever been done before. Why do we care? Because it is something that people have planned and prepared for for years and have only one chance to succeed at. When they do, and they surpass what humanity has ever done before through sweat, blood, and tears, that is something worth getting excited about. If you don't get that, I really don't know what to tell you.


Hi..
and no i am not watching the Olympics either...thanks for the history lesson tho...having lived in a cave for the last few decades i wasn't aware they held those events every 4 years...but thanks none the less for the education.
No i don't particularly like watching people set world records, especially when it involves people running around in circles trying to edge out another by a millisecond or so - just not relevant to my interests.
Personally i would prefer to see humanity trying to surpass what has ever done before through sweat, blood, and tears by treating each other better and making this world a better place through education, development and kindness...but meh... that is just my opinion
you keep striving for that gold in beach volleyball tho...


/sorry i don't feed into what the mass media forces down our cultural throats...


Facebook effect. More people are aware of shiat these days than before just because their friends are talking about it online.

Expect this to be a continued occurrence in various fields going forward.

Who would have even known wtf tahrir square was or some random guy called kony.
 
2012-08-07 01:28:07 AM

BigJake: EffervescingElephant: Right...
i did check wiki before i made my post for accuracy...
7 were sent
4 of OURS made it there successfully
the first one was awesome...i will always remember it like the day Kennedy was shot on the moon...
i still don't understand what the big friggin deal is...
alright i get it, it is a great human achievement...USA...USA and everything
but seriously...
is there something special about this one that i am not getting?

Yes, there is. It's way, way larger than the previous rovers and as a result, the landing procedure was far more complex, and involved a rocket hovering over the surface of Mars lowering the car-sized rover to the surface via cables, cutting the cables, and flying off, amongst other things. This would have been a difficult procedure on Earth, much less hundreds of millions of miles away. It's an engineering feat that we haven't accomplished before, and the fact that it went flawlessly on the first try is a Big Deal.



Cool...thanks
i did not know that...
thanks, that is the answer i was looking for
i should probably not try to get the majority of my news and current events here...lol
would certainly save on the amount of flaming i get for asking questions from my peers

/that would explain the Rube Goldberg references i was reading about tho...
 
2012-08-07 01:29:20 AM

Trapper439: You'd think that Curiousity would have been listening to some music on the way down in order to heighten the experience. What a dull individual it must be. I bet it's a real blast at parties.


Gustav Holst's Mars

Coincidentally 7 minutes long.

/OR IS IT??!
//Anyone remember playing Sierra's 'Outpost'?
 
2012-08-07 01:34:24 AM

Oznog: I turned my speakers all the way up, but CAN'T GET ANY SOUND. WTF NASA??

/sending an angry email to their admin right now


Maybe someone could mix something out of this Free falling

/:)
 
2012-08-07 01:36:53 AM
also, it has much more advanced capabilities than anything else before it.

it can analyze stuff, in more detail, it is basically a roving science lab, in comparison to its predecessor which was basically a scientist with a short poking stick.

Also, it's in a diff. spot altogether, so as far as exploring goes it also has that going for itself.
 
2012-08-07 01:41:24 AM

GungFu: I just saw this on the NASA website. Is that real?

[www.agoracosmopolitan.com image 500x412]


images1.wikia.nocookie.net
 
2012-08-07 01:51:09 AM
FTFA:
Those thumbnail images have been put together into a stop-motion video that's just jaw-droppingly cool

Isn't it just video? What would NOT be stop-motion video by this criteria?
 
2012-08-07 01:55:58 AM

SevenizGud: FTFA:
Those thumbnail images have been put together into a stop-motion video that's just jaw-droppingly cool

Isn't it just video? What would NOT be stop-motion video by this criteria?


Where the human eye can no longer detect individual frames?
 
2012-08-07 02:08:43 AM
Maybe something from thisfor sound :)
 
2012-08-07 03:17:43 AM

MaudlinMutantMollusk: mjjt: Here's a story from Omni mag back in 1985 that suggested you shouldn't trust what cameras show of Mars

Gods of Mars

Were you an Omni reader? Seems there weren't a lot of us

/got a whole box full of them


Me too. First place I read about nanotechnology.
 
2012-08-07 03:20:39 AM

roughridersfan: See this page for the current distance from Mars and how long it takes a signal to reach Earth from that point.


and bookmarked. That's farking awesome.
 
2012-08-07 03:29:23 AM
When folks look back at 2012 one hundred years from now, this event that occurred today..... will be seen as the #1 OR #2 thing that happened this year.
 
2012-08-07 03:29:28 AM

Lordserb: Token Anarchist: ple bemoan the costs?!? farking savages.

I think it's more about spending the money on things that will have a greater effect on solving national problems. Don't get me wrong, this mars mission is beyond cool, but you can't tell someone he or she is wrong for wanting to have spent the money feeding the poor. Just a matter of perspective for some people I guess.


The problem is, the people bemoaning the spending on space exploration are the same people who don't want to see a penny of their tax dollars to go to the poor, quality education, or anything else that the talking heads who think for them dislike.
 
2012-08-07 03:37:25 AM

geezus: anfrind: Harry_Seldon: You would think if they were going to fly all that way, they would spool out a couple of strands of fiber optic cable.

What about a really long stick?

[www.internetmemepics.com image 461x600]

sorry to burst your bubble, but when you push one end of the stick the atoms must propagate the wave so to speak, and it doesn't go faster than the speed of light.

Link


Seriously? Someone suggests using a stick over a hundred million miles long being held at both ends by humans on two different planets to communicate, and the obvious thing you find to point out as being impossible is that the information can't travel faster than light?

If it'll make you happy, you can assume that the 'stick' is made of two quantum entangled photons, one at each planet, with little handles to hold onto so you can shake them.

/sheesh
 
2012-08-07 03:46:54 AM

skylabdown: When folks look back at 2012 one hundred years from now, this event that occurred today..... will be seen as the #1 OR #2 thing that happened this year.


I like that way of looking at it, I mean the technical achievements done in this mission already is a huge step towards a humans on Mars in a multiple phase mission. I mean landing within 250 meters from the target, such a big step. And that's with out any of the science the rover is going to be doing for years to come.

/mind boggling
 
2012-08-07 03:47:19 AM

Gyrfalcon: Lordserb: Token Anarchist: ple bemoan the costs?!? farking savages.

I think it's more about spending the money on things that will have a greater effect on solving national problems. Don't get me wrong, this mars mission is beyond cool, but you can't tell someone he or she is wrong for wanting to have spent the money feeding the poor. Just a matter of perspective for some people I guess.

We could take the money they're spending on the Osprey that can't fly and the Abrams upgrade the Army doesn't want, give door-to-door meal service to all those hungry people...and STILL have enough leftover to go to Mars.


Exactly. It's all about priorities. We could do all of that, and much more, and still be in the black without the wars.
 
2012-08-07 03:48:37 AM

Lordserb: roughridersfan: Lordserb: Token Anarchist: ple bemoan the costs?!? farking savages.

I think it's more about spending the money on things that will have a greater effect on solving national problems. Don't get me wrong, this mars mission is beyond cool, but you can't tell someone he or she is wrong for wanting to have spent the money feeding the poor. Just a matter of perspective for some people I guess.

Well, Americans could spend less than 50 billion dollars on pets, which includes 3.79 BILLION for various pet services. I'm willing to bet we could squeeze out 2.5 billion from there and give that to the poor instead.

Or, Americans could maybe not spend 60+ BILLION on weight-loss products. We could probably almost erase this entirely by eating healthier - go look up how much we spent on fast food in 2011. Never mind, we're talking around 160 BILLION DOLLARS!

Did you want more "perspective" from the 270 billion dollars above? Think we could squeeze out a 2.5 billion dollar Mars mission and give 2.5 billion dollars for your idea from that 270 billion?



Making the argument that americans waste money all the time is not relevant, I'm simply pointing out that it is your opinion that going to mars benefits us more than helping our poor, just as it is someone else's opinion that helping the poor is better than going to mars. All the stats in the world aren't going to make you right in this instance.


I think helping the poor is more important, but both could be done if we didn't have that one obvious money drain...
 
2012-08-07 03:49:45 AM
Every person I have heard complain about the spend drinks, maybe smokes, watches TV, drives needlessly, goes to the movies, buys fashion clothing and a host of other useless activity and consumption. Things that multiplied by the western population make something like this mission a simply drop in the ocean.

Hypocritical idiots are hypocritical.
 
2012-08-07 05:17:44 AM

space_cowgirl: PunGent: Afa feeding the poor, was the number of Americans that starved to death last year higher than zero? Frankly, most of us could eat LESS...

Anyway, serious question: why did we go all Rube Goldberg on this? I'm delighted it worked, but didn't we get the last rover down a little more simply?

The other rovers were much smaller and lighter than this guy. Air bags and parachutes alone wouldn't cut it.


Plus I'm guessing that it's a great test of the technology that might be needed to put a human mission safely on the surface.
 
2012-08-07 05:53:13 AM

the ham sap gwailo: space_cowgirl: PunGent: Afa feeding the poor, was the number of Americans that starved to death last year higher than zero? Frankly, most of us could eat LESS...

Anyway, serious question: why did we go all Rube Goldberg on this? I'm delighted it worked, but didn't we get the last rover down a little more simply?

The other rovers were much smaller and lighter than this guy. Air bags and parachutes alone wouldn't cut it.

Plus I'm guessing that it's a great test of the technology that might be needed to put a human mission safely on the surface.


Yep, what good is it if we preposition supplies for an expedition and they're all scattered over 150 KM, this proves we can do better and will do better again. I still want to see a craft go to Mars orbit drop things of and return, until we do that , no humans on Mars.
 
2012-08-07 05:57:49 AM

MaudlinMutantMollusk: cretinbob: I'm amazed at just how farking retarded most people are.

As long as you've been a Farker?

/I'm amazed you're still amazed
//at least your spirit hasn't been crushed into unquestioning acceptance of it yet


Long time. Sometimes I just have to say it out loud I guess.
 
2012-08-07 06:05:55 AM

cretinbob: MaudlinMutantMollusk: cretinbob: I'm amazed at just how farking retarded most people are.

As long as you've been a Farker?

/I'm amazed you're still amazed
//at least your spirit hasn't been crushed into unquestioning acceptance of it yet

Long time. Sometimes I just have to say it out loud I guess.


I haven't been farking as long as you but I'm glad someone can still be amazed at the general stupidity of people at times.
 
2012-08-07 06:51:51 AM

roughridersfan: trappedspirit: Cheesehead_Dave: [sphotos-b.xx.fbcdn.net image 499x354]

Just a 7 minute delay in seeing the automated results. It's a 14 minute round trip delay between triggering and action and getting the results. But the landing was all scripted and happened 7 minutes before the NASA JPL control room got their rocks off.

No, it's not a 14 minute round trip. It's currently 14 minutes for the signal to get from Mars, as noted in 7 Minutes of Terror. By the time they got the indication that the equipment had entered the atmosphere, the lander was either successfully landed or destroyed for at least seven minutes.

Also, they had stopped communicating with the equipment about a half hour before it entered the atmosphere. It was on its own because there was nothing Mission Control could do.

See this page for the current distance from Mars and how long it takes a signal to reach Earth from that point.


I love how that link says 'Not to be used for navigation'...

Space Cowgirl, et al, TY for the useful info.
 
2012-08-07 06:57:19 AM

the ham sap gwailo: space_cowgirl: PunGent: Afa feeding the poor, was the number of Americans that starved to death last year higher than zero? Frankly, most of us could eat LESS...

Anyway, serious question: why did we go all Rube Goldberg on this? I'm delighted it worked, but didn't we get the last rover down a little more simply?

The other rovers were much smaller and lighter than this guy. Air bags and parachutes alone wouldn't cut it.

Plus I'm guessing that it's a great test of the technology that might be needed to put a human mission safely on the surface.


Heh, it's impressive...but I think I'll wait for a few more successes before I strap myself into one of those...

Hmm. I guess I'd want at least a 90% shot at surviving to do something as cool as going to Mars.
 
2012-08-07 07:03:21 AM
I hate to bandwagon, but SCIENCE BIATCHES!!!
 
2012-08-07 07:11:40 AM

nmrsnr: Whenever I see awesome stuff like this I'm always reminded of the line from The Gladiator when they see the Coliseum "I did not know men could build such things."

Science!


"ARE YOU NOT ENTERTAINED?"
 
2012-08-07 07:24:06 AM

the_chief: Why the low resolution? Doesn't NASA have HD cameras now? I've seen better photos from a GD iPhone.


Yes, they have HD cameras - we'll be seeing lots of hi-res photos from Curiosity, just as we have from Spirit, Opportunity, Surveyor, etc. - but:

A) They're probably not going to mount one on the bottom of a rover just for one shot of the landing, especially when every ounce counts.
B) HD photos and video are huge files, and take more time to process and beam across space than what's essentially an animated gif.
C) More than likely, the "ooh, cool" factor for this shot is low for NASA/JPL; they probably only needed just enough video data to evaluate the landing, especially given that it's the first time the sky-crane was used.
D) On the other hand, maybe they did have an HD camera, too, but the video hasn't made it here yet, or the camera malfunctioned, or whatever.

The landing was awesome, but what I'm excited about is the data Curiosity (it's a rolling laboratory!) will be sending back. I anticipate some very exciting news from Mars.
 
2012-08-07 07:26:40 AM
Feed the poor.
Feed the poor.
Feed the poor.
Feed the poor.
Feed the poor.
Feed the poor.
Feed the poor.
Feed the poor.
Feed the poor.
Feed the poor.

...

Like it's going to make a difference.

This... makes a difference. The poor... well, they're always going to be there. Even in times of plenty, there are always those who just can't seem to get it together and be productive, contributing members of the society they continually expect to reap the rewards of being a part of. Kind of like they're the tonsils of humanity. The dirty little secret: you're not doing a damn thing to promote the "general welfare' by providing for them. In fact, you're hindering the general welfare by siphoning off funds that could better go towards actually benefiting the people who are providing those funds. Should there be any programs to benefit the poor? Of course there should. *But*- these programs should be centered around making them: pull their own weight, pay their share of taxes towards the costs of society, and become self-sufficient. A hand up, not a "hand-out". The government should be involved in the manufacture of a single commodity. Toilet paper, for example. A commodity that there is constant widespread demand for. Anybody who finds their selves "down on their luck" could work for the government manufacturing this commodity, until they can get back on their feet again. The work should be long, hard and uncomfortable, profitable enough to barely make a living, but not so profitable that it should be viewed as a potential career.
 
2012-08-07 07:57:46 AM

nmrsnr: Whenever I see awesome stuff like this I'm always reminded of the line from The Gladiator when they see the Coliseum "I did not know men could build such things."

Science!


encrypted-tbn3.google.com
Joey, do you like movies about gladiators?
 
2012-08-07 08:03:16 AM
farm9.staticflickr.com">
 
2012-08-07 08:04:59 AM
imgs.xkcd.com
This comic makes me sad.
 
2012-08-07 08:05:03 AM
SCIENTS!


This is very cool, if you dont get it you are a huge retard. Go hide in your cave and play your video game.

We (the folks of Earth, really doesnt matter which country does it) need to be exploring the solar system. We dont need to be hiding on our planet pretending that there isnt a rather large Universe out there to learn about.

We dont need to build more bombs or kill each other. It makes no sense to do that, when we could be doing this instead.

Staying on Earth will only make us more stupid in the long run.

This new technique could allow for even more/easier landings on Mars, with even better equipped machinery and maybe a means to allow humans to live/survive there too. That will benefit everyone.
 
2012-08-07 08:07:36 AM

elffster: SCIENTS!


This is very cool, if you dont get it you are a huge retard. Go hide in your cave and play your video game.

We (the folks of Earth, really doesnt matter which country does it) need to be exploring the solar system. We dont need to be hiding on our planet pretending that there isnt a rather large Universe out there to learn about.

We dont need to build more bombs or kill each other. It makes no sense to do that, when we could be doing this instead.

Staying on Earth will only make us more stupid in the long run.

This new technique could allow for even more/easier landings on Mars, with even better equipped machinery and maybe a means to allow humans to live/survive there too. That will benefit everyone.


What if I hope we settle other planets, so I can stay indoors and game there instead?
 
2012-08-07 08:11:48 AM

MythDragon: [imgs.xkcd.com image 639x862]
This comic makes me sad.


The ability of humans to anthropomorphize so that we feel sympathy for inanimate objects is really amazing, isn't it?
 
2012-08-07 08:13:51 AM

James F. Campbell: The ability of humans to anthropomorphize so that we feel sympathy for inanimate objects is really amazing, isn't it?


Though, uh, not as amazing, obviously, as the collaborative human effort necessary to land a one-ton robot safely on Mars.
 
2012-08-07 09:20:13 AM

Fubini:
The rover only has so much bandwidth available to transmit data back to Earth, so rather than transmitting the full, high-resolution version it has instead transmitted a highly compressed version (192x144 resolution). This compressed version will let scientists determine if they need to get the whole video right away, or if it can wait and be a low-priority task. It looks as though the landing went very smoothly, but if something unexpected had happened during landing these images would be very high priority, just to figure out what happened and why.

.


Probably has AT&T.
 
2012-08-07 09:27:32 AM

Trapper439: You'd think that Curiousity would have been listening to some music on the way down in order to heighten the experience. What a dull individual it must be. I bet it's a real blast at parties.


Pretty sure its first Tweet was all full of sexual innuendo, so I thinks its alright.
 
2012-08-07 10:46:12 AM

fragMasterFlash: Dadoody: Aperture science:
We do what me must
Because we can.

I'm not even AZN


That was awesome. I love that song.
 
Displayed 50 of 158 comments

First | « | 1 | 2 | 3 | 4 | » | Last | Show all

View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest


This thread is archived, and closed to new comments.

Continue Farking
Submit a Link »





Report