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(KOCO Oklahoma City)   Woman calls police because of domestic dispute with boyfriend. As they often do in such cases, the responding officer shot her dog for no apparent reason   (koco.com) divider line 41
    More: Fail, domestic violences, police officers, Cleveland County, dogs  
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11901 clicks; posted to Main » on 06 Aug 2012 at 2:56 AM (2 years ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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Archived thread
2012-08-06 03:04:18 AM  
12 votes:
I guess the lesson here is: don't call the cops for anything. Ever.
2012-08-05 10:59:33 PM  
4 votes:
Shoot my dog, and I'm shooting you and your family.
2012-08-06 03:08:57 AM  
3 votes:
Agitated owner + big dog w/litter = nervous cop.

I'm not saying I would have done the same, but I can see how an unfortunate turn of events could escalate to this.
2012-08-06 12:52:20 AM  
3 votes:

This About That: I would sure like to hear from a real cop what it is with cops shooting people's dogs.


When all you've got is a hole maker, everything starts to look like it could use a few holes.
2012-08-06 10:58:32 AM  
2 votes:

The Homer Tax: Sucks for the dog that she had an owner too buttfark stupid to handle her own domestic issues and thought the cops would make the situation better and not worse.


I have to disagree with this sentiment. Given, I live in a city where our police are trained much differently, apparently, from most other districts (I honestly had no idea how bad it was throughout the country until I started visiting Fark).

I've HAD to call the cops multiple times regarding my bi-polar and physically violent ex boyfriend... after I had left his ass. After I had placed a restraining order against him. After he had been convicted and placed on probation with GPS house arrest. And, I have a large dog. A large black dog who is very protective me.

Each time the cops came to my home, I hold onto my dogs collar while I back us both up to allow the officers entry, while reassuring them that he is, indeed, a good boy. They are aware enough to see that he is nervous, not because of them, but because of the psycho who's been banging on the front door screaming and trying to kick the door in... and he's also picking up on my fear and anxiety. Each and every time, the officers take the time to bend down to my dogs level, let him smell their hand and speak reassuringly to him... letting him know they are there to help us. I have never been in fear of the police for own nor my dogs safety.

Point is, sometimes you can't do it on your own, and thankfully I live in a city where our PDs main objective is protect and serve. YMMV.
2012-08-06 07:59:20 AM  
2 votes:
Assuming the story is as it is being reported, the woman TOLD the officer, "Wait a minute while I
put my two dogs away, please". The officer didn't listen and waltzed right on in.

If the poor dog had just had puppies, of COURSE she's going to be more territorial and protective
than normal. It's hard wired into her - "I must protect my babies from this unknown threat".

The fact that the police department is keeping mum behind the whole "we're investigating it" wall
strikes me as fishy too. As we've frequently seen, the officer's superior will often toss a soundbite
to the media to the effect that "We're investigating the situation, but preliminary reports indicate
that Officer Dillhole was acting in accordance with proper police procedure...yadda yadda yadda"

I hope the officer in question gets more than a paid vacation while they "investigate".

Why is it that for every GOOD police officer, there seem to be a dozen or more assh0les with
more testosterone than brains who don't know their asses from a hole in the ground?
2012-08-06 04:19:27 AM  
2 votes:

Mock26: doglover: Mock26: Yeah, I am sure that the dog was just standing there all peaceful, tail wagging and the cop just thought to himself, "Finally! I get to shoot a farking dog!" Because, the fact that there had probably been a pretty big fight between the woman and her boyfriend with lots of screaming and yelling had no negative impact on a dog that had just had puppies and the presence of a stranger into that volatile situation did get the dog further worked up, because everyone knows that a female dog will not try to protect its puppies. Not saying that this was the case, but to me it is a hell of a lot more reasonable explanation than the rest of the farking derp that is flying around here.

But it's still unreasonable to shoot a dog.

There's a dozen things you can do that aren't shooting the dog. A million. An infinite number of other options.

I stand by the kick the cop in the dick repeatedly theory.

Such as?


Well for one there is not shooting the dog. That's always an option.
2012-08-06 04:06:02 AM  
2 votes:

Mock26: Yeah, I am sure that the dog was just standing there all peaceful, tail wagging and the cop just thought to himself, "Finally! I get to shoot a farking dog!" Because, the fact that there had probably been a pretty big fight between the woman and her boyfriend with lots of screaming and yelling had no negative impact on a dog that had just had puppies and the presence of a stranger into that volatile situation did get the dog further worked up, because everyone knows that a female dog will not try to protect its puppies. Not saying that this was the case, but to me it is a hell of a lot more reasonable explanation than the rest of the farking derp that is flying around here.


But it's still unreasonable to shoot a dog.

There's a dozen things you can do that aren't shooting the dog. A million. An infinite number of other options.

I stand by the kick the cop in the dick repeatedly theory.
2012-08-06 04:00:26 AM  
2 votes:
Yeah, I am sure that the dog was just standing there all peaceful, tail wagging and the cop just thought to himself, "Finally! I get to shoot a farking dog!" Because, the fact that there had probably been a pretty big fight between the woman and her boyfriend with lots of screaming and yelling had no negative impact on a dog that had just had puppies and the presence of a stranger into that volatile situation did get the dog further worked up, because everyone knows that a female dog will not try to protect its puppies. Not saying that this was the case, but to me it is a hell of a lot more reasonable explanation than the rest of the farking derp that is flying around here.
2012-08-06 03:16:18 AM  
2 votes:
CSB

As a kid had a large St Bernard.....If you were wearing a uniform, well lets just say you were on the menu......St. Bernards can be very fierce......A Highway Patrol pulls up in our yard one day and yep that dog was on the drivers door like black on Gaby or white on Phelps.......anyway...the cop stays put while the dog is trying to eat the creamy filling inside the car......He did not shoot.....surprise...he waited till the dog was secured and went about our business.......no drama lama was he.........this day and age of no patience, tolerance and lack of balls is truly appalling.
2012-08-06 03:14:50 AM  
2 votes:

AbbeySomeone: He shot a dog that had just had puppies. Goddamnit, they didn't need to show a picture of the puppies.


Personally, I would armor police responding to calls so they can IGNORE a dog instead of shooting it. Unless it's a trained attack dog, you can get by with a hard plastic gauntlet on the left hand and or maybe some pepper spray. I'd much rather hear about cops shooting dogs with pepper spray than guns.

That said a biatch with new pups is going to react least friendly to a stranger then of all possible times in her life. It's highly possible he was threatened or even attacked by the dog. Look at how black bears are harmless until there's a cub involved.

Even still I've been attacked and threatened by all kinds of animals, only I've never needed to shoot any of them because my brain and dick are both larger than this cop's. Which is why he should have his guns taken away and be kicked in his tiny night stick until it's an innie.
2012-08-06 03:04:09 AM  
2 votes:

Mark Ratner: Sounds like the blue heeler didn't heel, and now she's blue.

/sorry, couldn't help it


Awwwww damn it. I hadn't read it yet and assumed it was something more along the lines of pitbull or other similar breed. Blue heelers are awesome and usually very smart. Obviously I don't support shooting any dog except in extreme cases, but hearing it's a heeler makes me even sadder about this.

Now, I say this with just the article to go off, but I can understand why someone might feel threatened by one though. My MIL's blue heeler, despite his age, can still knock a person over if he wants to and runs right at them - he almost knocked me over one day just because I was between him and the frisbee someone threw. He also barks very loudly and urgently when unknown people enter the yard (in cars or whatever). It is pretty intimidating if you're on the receiving end, especially if he is feeling aggressive and protective.

Fortunately, he thinks I'm his pack member :)
2012-08-06 12:13:05 AM  
2 votes:
Punishment for shooting someone's dog really depends on why you did it.

There's two possibilities that spring immediately to mind.

1. You're a spineless worm not fit to live among humans.

2. You're a psychotic animal killer just waiting for your next chance to end a life without jail risk.

Both of those situations are bad, and you should not be allowed even a pointy stick, let alone a gun. But there's a remote chance this dog really was a lethal threat and the cop did a clean shooting. I seriously doubt this was the case, but it's there.

I still think he should be kicked off the force and in the nuts, repeatedly.
2012-08-07 12:50:27 AM  
1 votes:

gulogulo: LordZorch: Shooting a dog is essentially murder of a family member

No. It's not. I know you feel like it's human, but it's not. I really wish people would stop equating their pets and human, because that's when people start becoming insanely irresponsible with their pets. It's owners who think of them as people that get them into trouble and don't correct bad behavior. Do we love them? Absolutely. But they are not people.


Your concept of "people" seems antiquated.
2012-08-06 03:55:09 PM  
1 votes:

digitalrain: KiplingKat872: The Homer Tax: Short of some sort of security camera this woman obviously doesn't have in her home, it's always going to be her word against his. What other "evidence" could their possibly be? The cop "felt threatened," whether it was justified or not, shot the dog, and now the dog's dead. End of story. The officer's report on the incident will include the standard explanation of why he had to shoot the dog with nothing else, and that will be the end of that.

In fact, in the Border Collie shooting in Fort Worth I linked to on the previous page, the officer who shot the dog claimed it was a pit bull.

Someone needs to make a Know Your Dog Breeds chart (like the Know Your Guns chart that gets floated
around Fark every now and then).


Been done:

www.seattledogspot.com(hotlink)
2012-08-06 12:42:30 PM  
1 votes:

SkunkWerks: Right next door to "my dog would never do that...", is "only, vicious dogs like, pittbulls and rottweilers bite people" comes in second on my list of Willful Canine Conceits.

I don't know if it's still accurate, but when I was a kid, do you know what the most common breed of dog to get bit by was?

Cocker Spaniel.

Know why? Because- at that time- everyone and their brother had one. The "viciousness" of the breed has very, very little to do with it.


And "the cops are always right" come right next to, "I believe politicians" in my book.

If these dogs were attacking, why have NONE of the cops in these stories been treated for bites? Not one.

It bullshiat paranoia and machismo, the assumption that anything approaching you is a threat and you have to use deadly force to subdue it. That attitude makes for a shiatty police officer. As I said, they are there to serve the public, not make war on them.
2012-08-06 12:35:04 PM  
1 votes:
Cops need to be trained in reading animal behavior. A dog approaching you does not automatically mean it is attacking, but in all the cases in the last two years, the cops said they assumed the a dog approaching them was hostile. That is an idiotic assumption and step away from cops assuming that any human approaching them is hostile. It's farked up and needs to be addressed in police training. They are there to serve the public, not wage war on them.
2012-08-06 12:28:35 PM  
1 votes:

gulogulo: What we have here is a sampling bias, though. It's a sensational story, and the kind that makes the news. In order to understand just how systemic the problem is, we'd need to know how many domestic disturbances go down with dogs that don't result in the dog dead. My guess is that what we're reading in the news is a tiny fraction compared to all hte cops doing good jobs.


It's possible, but is that a risk you want to take? I don't.

I know I'm repeating myself here, but it only takes one cop to kill your dog (or you, or keep you alive and ruin your life forever). Just one cop having one bad day and everything you know and love goes away. Will it likely happen to you? No, probably not. Could it? Absolutely. Is that a risk you want to take? It's up to you, I guess.

Like I said, while unlikely, Cops are trained to treat each interaction with civilians as a potentially life-threatening situation. Civilians would be wise to do the same.
2012-08-06 12:27:14 PM  
1 votes:
Another aspect of automatically killing dogs:

Link

"But shooting the animals as a matter of procedure is also dangerous. During a 2008 raid in Lima, Ohio, one officer heard his fellow officer shooting dogs in the home and mistook the shots for hostile gunfire. Thinking he was under attack, he opened fire at shadows coming from an upstairs bedroom. In that room, 24-year-old Tarika Wilson was on her knees, as she had been instructed, with one hand in the air and her other arm holding her year-old son. Wilson was killed, and the boy lost a hand. During a 2007 raid in Stockton, Calif., a police officer inadvertently wounded Kari Bailey, 23, and her 5-year-old daughter Hailey while trying to kill the family dog. (The police had shown up at the wrong address.) Last month, one officer firing at pit bulls in Minneapolis accidentally shot a fellow cop."

These guys are just trigger happy bastards.
2012-08-06 12:22:04 PM  
1 votes:

The Homer Tax: No offense intended with the statement, but I am justgetting kind of tired of these stories where people call police for some sort of "protection" and then they act all surprised when the cops shoot, them, their brother, or their dog. So, I was being a little glib as a result.

That said, it's Fark, so the filter is a little lighter than before. Again I'm sorry about your situation, but I'm having a problem being sympathetic to this woman who is surprised that the cops shot her dog.


What we have here is a sampling bias, though. It's a sensational story, and the kind that makes the news. In order to understand just how systemic the problem is, we'd need to know how many domestic disturbances go down with dogs that don't result in the dog dead. My guess is that what we're reading in the news is a tiny fraction compared to all hte cops doing good jobs.
2012-08-06 11:35:39 AM  
1 votes:

SkunkWerks: People who have misbehaving kids seem to take a similar attitude: "MY son would NEVER..." As the person reporting to the parent whose child did indeed just do that thing they had put beyond the realm of all possibility of them doing, if you don't feel much like hitting them upside the skull with a clue sledgehammer, then you're at least really wanting to tell them that it would do them a great deal of good if they'd kindly return to planet Earth- where mere familiarity with the animal in question (no matter how lengthy) isn't sufficient grounds on which to deny all possibility of a thing happening because of that animal.

Can't tell you how many times that sort of attitude inevitably ends in "Well, I never saw him do anything like that before..." And of course by then, it's too late for the person he just did it to, and in this case, too late for your dog as well.

This gonna sound like a strange thing to say, but trusting your dog's "angelic" nature a good deal less would be not only doing the next phone repairman, plumber, or insurance salesman you happen to have in your house a favor, but also, your dog as well. Once again, dogs don't know any better, can't know any better. You, its owner, are responsible for keeping them out of danger in these matters. And there it isn't enough to assume what they "wouldn't" do. Make sure they can't do it. You may just save Fido's life one day.


I knew that statement was going to invite this response, and I agree with you for the most part. I try to keep my dogs as restrained as humanly possible when they are barking very loudly and completely understand and agree with what you're saying.

That said, I also go the extra mile and try to keep cops away from them as often as my power allows it, for their own safety as well.
2012-08-06 10:57:28 AM  
1 votes:

gulogulo: I suppose you can believe the sun revolves around the earth, too, but it doesn't make it right. I refuse to think of cops as inhuman as you do. There are bad seeds, always. Most people I've met who really hate the cops are the kind of people who do things that often warrant cops involvement. These aren't exactly the best judges of character.


I don't think "all cops" are anything. I'm just not blind. There are plenty of good cops out there, sure. But the point is that it only takes one "bad cop" to end your life, ruin your life, or kill your dog. And they'll probably get away with it to, because the entire system is designed to protect them. How many "bad seeds" are there, would you say? Every time you interact with a cop, you roll the dice that you get one. Is that a chance you want to take? I have a wife and a family, it's not a chance I want to take. I have two dogs that bark very very loudly, but wouldn't bite anyone. They bark *a lot* when people come to the door and like to approach and sniff strangers (like delivery guys). Is that "hostile behavior?" depends on the cop. Is that a risk I want to take? No. I like my dogs being bullet-free as they are in their current state.

So, cast all the aspersions about my character that you like. I am a middle-class husband and father with a good job, no criminal record, and I don't do drugs. The only reason I have to be wary of cops is the cops themselves. I'm also not stupid - Cops approach every situation with civilians as if it is one that could end their lives. Civilians that don't treat interactions with cops with exactly the same precaution do so at their own peril.
2012-08-06 10:40:07 AM  
1 votes:

SirDigbyChickenCaesar: What brought the officer to the door starts the whole chain of events and is what you use to start the whole "bad luck for the dog" or "what a total dumbass" decision.


I agree completely. The mistake was made when the chick called the cops in the first place.

If the cops come to your house, they are going to kill your dog. I used to get all upset about stuff like this, but now I just blame the lady. She invited the armed person who is going to enter the situation looking to kill things *first* and think second into her house on purpose.

Sucks for the dog that she had an owner too buttfark stupid to handle her own domestic issues and thought the cops would make the situation better and not worse. The Cops #1 job is to protect themselves, not you. If that means killing your dog, your bird, your cat, your mom, or you they will not hesitate to do so. Voluntarily interact with the cops at your own peril.
2012-08-06 10:30:10 AM  
1 votes:
That said, discharging your weapon inside a house could have resulted in an unintended human casualty. That is far more of concern to me than a dog

Shooting a dog is essentially murder of a family member. We've spent at least 20K years evolving a symbiotic relationship with dogs that includes, extensive medical care, naming them, talking to them, allowing them to sleep with us in our beds, and instinctively protecting each other. People love their dogs just as much as, and frequently more, than spouses and children. Throughout history people have mourned their dogs when they die, and have erected memorials to their love and dedication. We honor them, feel deeply for them during tragedy, and readily take them in for safekeeping and shelter without a second thought, and take care not to place them with untrustworthy people.

We've made dogs into a 4-legged person that poops on the lawn.
2012-08-06 09:33:56 AM  
1 votes:

gulogulo: indylaw: This isn't a legal case. Newspaper articles are, by definition, hearsay within hearsay. What's your point?

I guess what I'm saying is don't believe everything you read, and that your experience with one bad cop does not mean all cops are bad. Doesn't mean they are all good, but it doesn't mean that this cop wasn't necessarily justified in that moment. The facts will tell us one way or the other eventually. I just get tired of people that fly off the handle without any sense of logic about the situation.


I don't have many personal bad cop experiences, but I sue them for a living. Lots of cops are bad. A job that attracts bullies who love guns and distrust minorities is going to have a lot of bad apples. Not all cops are bad, but they're entitled to no more benefit of the doubt than the "perps" that they arrest and treat like animals.

Let's just say that this sort of behavior by the cop is common enough among cops that it doesn't surprise me. Nothing about it seems implausible. Some cops are clearly being trained to shoot any dog that faces them as if they're all pit bulls about to rip someone's throat out.
2012-08-06 08:34:42 AM  
1 votes:

gulogulo: and it was obvious the situation was tense enough to warrant the gun already being drawn


Wow, that's "obvious" to you? That cops would show up at a domestic disturbance call with guns drawn?

You have what it takes to be a cop, I guess.... a complete disregard for common sense, safety and reason and a reckless frontier attitude aimed at shootin-first and asking questions in the reports later.

You should join SWAT or Vice, you're probably the sort of psycho that really excels at no-knocks.
2012-08-06 08:25:59 AM  
1 votes:

Mock26: Not saying that this was the case, but to me it is a hell of a lot more reasonable explanation than the rest of the farking derp that is flying around here.


Yep. Everybody else is derpin' it up. Totally.

A deputy barged into another person's home without waiting a moment for the dog to be moved - as he was asked to do - then shot it, and everybody else is derpin' it up. Because there are a lot of scenarios where barging into someone's occupied house and discharging a firearm into an animal less than a quarter of your weight and two feet tall is completely justifiable.

Go away, fool.
2012-08-06 07:53:34 AM  
1 votes:
img84.imageshack.us
2012-08-06 07:49:19 AM  
1 votes:
Hey, don't give the cops guns if you don't want them shooting things.
2012-08-06 04:50:26 AM  
1 votes:

MagSeven: A cop could take a 6 monthhour long course on dogs and never have to shoot them. Dogs aren't that complicated.

2012-08-06 04:44:20 AM  
1 votes:

Mock26: Yeah, I am sure that the dog was just standing there all peaceful, tail wagging and the cop just thought to himself, "Finally! I get to shoot a farking dog!" Because, the fact that there had probably been a pretty big fight between the woman and her boyfriend with lots of screaming and yelling had no negative impact on a dog that had just had puppies and the presence of a stranger into that volatile situation did get the dog further worked up, because everyone knows that a female dog will not try to protect its puppies. Not saying that this was the case, but to me it is a hell of a lot more reasonable explanation than the rest of the farking derp that is flying around here.


I delivered pizzas for 2 years during college walking through snarling asshole dogs on occasion. As long as I kept my head up and walked with no fear (kind of like the Walk of faith during Last Crusade) the mutts were no problem. They bark and snarl but won't bite you because you walk with purpose. You are above them. This is because I grew up with dogs and neighbors who had them and neighbors who'd let their wild dogs roam from time to time. every now and again you'd meet them while on a walk. You hold your ground and they'd fark off. A cop could take a 6 month long course on dogs and never have to shoot them. Dogs aren't that complicated.
2012-08-06 04:40:13 AM  
1 votes:
www.kelliewinnell.com.au
Do not approve

/obscure outside Australia
//and a few other countries, probably
2012-08-06 04:22:36 AM  
1 votes:

Mock26: doglover: Mock26: Yeah, I am sure that the dog was just standing there all peaceful, tail wagging and the cop just thought to himself, "Finally! I get to shoot a farking dog!" Because, the fact that there had probably been a pretty big fight between the woman and her boyfriend with lots of screaming and yelling had no negative impact on a dog that had just had puppies and the presence of a stranger into that volatile situation did get the dog further worked up, because everyone knows that a female dog will not try to protect its puppies. Not saying that this was the case, but to me it is a hell of a lot more reasonable explanation than the rest of the farking derp that is flying around here.

But it's still unreasonable to shoot a dog.

There's a dozen things you can do that aren't shooting the dog. A million. An infinite number of other options.

I stand by the kick the cop in the dick repeatedly theory.

Such as?


I dunno, maybe listen when she says she's going to put the 20lb dog away?
2012-08-06 03:27:40 AM  
1 votes:
Is shooting the family dog now part of police protocol? If so, I think that should be reviewed.
2012-08-06 03:25:26 AM  
1 votes:

LordZorch: Shoot my dog, and I'm shooting you and your family.


Yah.. someone shoots my dog and I would go nuts. I'd end up in jail or dead, but I would find revenge.
2012-08-06 03:21:06 AM  
1 votes:

fusillade762: I guess the lesson here is: don't call the cops for anything. Ever.

^^This
2012-08-06 03:14:40 AM  
1 votes:
My dog is part heeler. She had a litter (her first and last) this year, 8 puppies! She was fairly protective of them, and she's prone to barking at strangers at the best of times (and cats, and birds, and kids on bikes, and anyone holding an umbrella).

She's never bitten anyone though and a cop who shot her would look pretty pathetic.
2012-08-06 03:11:10 AM  
1 votes:
2012-08-06 03:06:50 AM  
1 votes:
I suppose there is the other side of the story, but... nah.

Happens too often.
2012-08-06 12:21:17 AM  
1 votes:
I would sure like to hear from a real cop what it is with cops shooting people's dogs. Especially those little dogs.
2012-08-05 11:58:01 PM  
1 votes:
Do cops ever shoot a cat? I wonder.
 
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