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(Ustream)   NASA Cam for Curiosity's landing. Coverage of the event is scheduled to begin at 11:30 p.m. Sunday night (ET) and go until 4 a.m. Monday morning. The landing itself is scheduled for 1:31 a.m. Monday   (ustream.tv) divider line 1632
    More: Survey, NASA Cam, NASA  
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8604 clicks; posted to Main » on 05 Aug 2012 at 11:30 PM (2 years ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2012-08-06 02:56:30 AM  

jdbob: The news conference sure has turned into a nationalistic suck-fest.


No, this is a nationalistic suck-fest

thebladereport.com

This news conference is celebrating what is good about America and what we can do when we work together instead of whining about stupid shiat.
 
2012-08-06 02:56:32 AM  
i45.tinypic.com
i49.tinypic.com
 
2012-08-06 02:56:57 AM  

SJKebab: I didn't get to watch it all unfold, so what did he do?


Stole our hearts and steamed up the place.
 
2012-08-06 02:58:16 AM  

Thrakkorzog: ...and claim it was money wasted that could have helped the poor Job Creators.

 
2012-08-06 02:58:43 AM  

Mad_Radhu: Will-Mun: Seriously guys, this is an achievement for all humanity... I know you're trying to pump up the national pride for a well deserved padded budget next year, but really... tone it down.

So exactly how much money did the Russians and Chinese provide for this mission?


Cause Neil hopped out of the Lunar Module and said "One small step for man, one giant leap for America!"

Yeah, then he planted an American flag in the dirt. But this isn't about who put the money forward, this is about the achievement of man, an inspirational story for ALL human kind. But no, yeah, let's just make it about dollar signs, that's what matters.
 
2012-08-06 03:00:52 AM  

clear_prop: IronTom: Who is watching the rover if all the scientists are in this room getting on TV?

The B-Team.


thebladereport.com

this is what they drive
 
2012-08-06 03:02:29 AM  

cretinbob: clear_prop: IronTom: Who is watching the rover if all the scientists are in this room getting on TV?

The B-Team.
[thebladereport.com image 610x407]

images.hemmings.com

this is what they drive


//damnit
 
2012-08-06 03:06:17 AM  

cretinbob: clear_prop: IronTom: Who is watching the rover if all the scientists are in this room getting on TV?

The B-Team.


Keeping your rover safe.
 
2012-08-06 03:07:09 AM  
Rear ass-cam view?
 
2012-08-06 03:07:19 AM  
I'm no geek but I find this really fascinating. The technological challenges are just mind boggling. It takes like 20 minutes for a radio signal to travel from Mars to Earth, and then another 20 minutes for the mission controller to send a command response back. That leaves absolutely no room for error; they have to be able to predict everything that happens long before the actual event.

It all just boggles the mind. These guys deserve to party after this achievement, but I'm not so sure the money we're spending on it all is worth it right now. Whatever is out there will still be there in 1000 years or whatever. Humans are more likely to become extinct long before we find a planet that's worth the immense resources it takes to get us there.

Unless some smart guy like Einstein comes along and invents the Wormhole we'll never have intergalactic travel, and the ability to get to another star system to find an Earth-like planet humans can survive on.

The money spent on these Mars missions could be better used right now. We're not a space race with the Soviet Union anymore.
 
2012-08-06 03:07:38 AM  

Redwing: Nobody. The Rover is in LOS so there's nothing anyone can do for now until contact is re-established.


There are multiple orbiters that can communicate with the rover and relay the information to the earth.

But, you're right, there is no DIRECT rover to earth communication right now.
 
2012-08-06 03:07:40 AM  

evilhomer2300: Max Awesome: What the fark I'm crying.

Because these people have spent YEARS of their lives for this moment, and for once it didn't drive itself into the ground while on fire.


I love you for that!
 
2012-08-06 03:10:18 AM  
Alright Farkers, I am just exhausted. I want to thank you all, this night was just utterly fantastic. Not just for the amazing science, rock star nerds, and mohawked internet celebs... But also spending it all with you. It was just such an experience, and while it would have been great alone, you all made it so beyond wonderful. Thank you all, truly.

Signing out,

Will-Mun
 
2012-08-06 03:11:10 AM  
More pics coming in about 20 mins when Odyssey flies back over Curiosity.
 
2012-08-06 03:13:14 AM  

Degenz: The money spent on these Mars missions could be better used right now. We're not a space race with the Soviet Union anymore.


I believe someone pointed out before that the budget for Curiosity is at around $2 billion. For purposes of comparison, the budget for the US's part in the Olympics is $19 billion.

We can easily afford this. We need to put more money into this sort of stuff.
 
2012-08-06 03:16:03 AM  

make me some tea: Degenz: The money spent on these Mars missions could be better used right now. We're not a space race with the Soviet Union anymore.

I believe someone pointed out before that the budget for Curiosity is at around $2 billion. For purposes of comparison, the budget for the US's part in the Olympics is $19 billion.

We can easily afford this. We need to put more money into this sort of stuff.


About $2.5 billion.

Compare that to the trillions we're blowing on ill conceived wars... Why not throw $100 billion NASA's way and see what happens?
 
2012-08-06 03:16:54 AM  

Degenz: I'm no geek but I find this really fascinating. The technological challenges are just mind boggling. It takes like 20 minutes for a radio signal to travel from Mars to Earth, and then another 20 minutes for the mission controller to send a command response back. That leaves absolutely no room for error; they have to be able to predict everything that happens long before the actual event.

It all just boggles the mind. These guys deserve to party after this achievement, but I'm not so sure the money we're spending on it all is worth it right now. Whatever is out there will still be there in 1000 years or whatever. Humans are more likely to become extinct long before we find a planet that's worth the immense resources it takes to get us there.

Unless some smart guy like Einstein comes along and invents the Wormhole we'll never have intergalactic travel, and the ability to get to another star system to find an Earth-like planet humans can survive on.

The money spent on these Mars missions could be better used right now. We're not a space race with the Soviet Union anymore.


I say we dump blowing each other up and instead spend cash on these sorts of advancing everyone adventures - be that the bottom of the see, the farthest stars, cancer cures, or the fountain of youth - $2.5 bil to do something clever and sweet, advancing ever so many areas of human knowledge. So prefer watching this sort of stuff than competitive (anything) sport.

Well done NASA - may your budget forever bring you gold and your advances benefit us all in ways few of us get to understand, but all of us get to benefit from.
 
2012-08-06 03:18:20 AM  

make me some tea: For purposes of comparison, the budget for the US's part in the Olympics is $19 billion


19 billion?
 
2012-08-06 03:20:49 AM  

make me some tea: Degenz: The money spent on these Mars missions could be better used right now. We're not a space race with the Soviet Union anymore.

I believe someone pointed out before that the budget for Curiosity is at around $2 billion. For purposes of comparison, the budget for the US's part in the Olympics is $19 billion.

We can easily afford this. We need to put more money into this sort of stuff.


Yea, I'm not really against it. The science does produce a lot of immediate benefits. Who the hell doesn't like Tang and Teflon?
 
2012-08-06 03:21:11 AM  

akuma976: I bet the Mohawk dude is gonna end up guest starring on "The Big Bang Theory"


Certainly hope so. Wouldn't it be funny if he's been a Farker for years?
 
2012-08-06 03:24:43 AM  

Degenz: I'm no geek but I find this really fascinating. The technological challenges are just mind boggling. It takes like 20 minutes for a radio signal to travel from Mars to Earth, and then another 20 minutes for the mission controller to send a command response back. That leaves absolutely no room for error; they have to be able to predict everything that happens long before the actual event.

It all just boggles the mind. These guys deserve to party after this achievement, but I'm not so sure the money we're spending on it all is worth it right now. Whatever is out there will still be there in 1000 years or whatever. Humans are more likely to become extinct long before we find a planet that's worth the immense resources it takes to get us there.

Unless some smart guy like Einstein comes along and invents the Wormhole we'll never have intergalactic travel, and the ability to get to another star system to find an Earth-like planet humans can survive on.

The money spent on these Mars missions could be better used right now. We're not a space race with the Soviet Union anymore.


And if we do not spend the money now, then when that Einstein comes along, he will not have the ground work to build on.

Or even if he has the groundwork, the tech will not be there to prove it, never mind make it affordable enough to actually use. What use is a wormhole generator if we can not get people up there to go through it, or even test it?
 
2012-08-06 03:25:48 AM  
Simply amazing!
 
2012-08-06 03:25:56 AM  

Brick-House: Gosling: Budget of Curiosity: $2.5 billion.

Budget of London Olympics: $14.47 billion.

Cost of war in Afghanistan: $500B and counting :(

and 10 years later, we still haven't found any intelligent life there.


Ok, that's true, but just remember how hard it would be to find intelligence in an Englishman.
 
2012-08-06 03:26:41 AM  

Degenz: We're not a space race with the Soviet Union anymore.


More like China now.
 
2012-08-06 03:32:14 AM  

Ranger677: Degenz: I'm no geek but I find this really fascinating. The technological challenges are just mind boggling. It takes like 20 minutes for a radio signal to travel from Mars to Earth, and then another 20 minutes for the mission controller to send a command response back. That leaves absolutely no room for error; they have to be able to predict everything that happens long before the actual event.

It all just boggles the mind. These guys deserve to party after this achievement, but I'm not so sure the money we're spending on it all is worth it right now. Whatever is out there will still be there in 1000 years or whatever. Humans are more likely to become extinct long before we find a planet that's worth the immense resources it takes to get us there.

Unless some smart guy like Einstein comes along and invents the Wormhole we'll never have intergalactic travel, and the ability to get to another star system to find an Earth-like planet humans can survive on.

The money spent on these Mars missions could be better used right now. We're not a space race with the Soviet Union anymore.

And if we do not spend the money now, then when that Einstein comes along, he will not have the ground work to build on.

Or even if he has the groundwork, the tech will not be there to prove it, never mind make it affordable enough to actually use. What use is a wormhole generator if we can not get people up there to go through it, or even test it?


I'm not saying we should cease space exploration, I'm saying we're in a budget crunch and it's probably not our highest priority at this time. Nothing about astrophysics is going to change anytime in the near future, there's no big rush, especially when the benefits are all a gamble.
 
2012-08-06 03:35:52 AM  

Degenz: I'm not so sure the money we're spending on it all is worth it right now. Whatever is out there will still be there in 1000 years or whatever. Humans are more likely to become extinct long before we find a planet that's worth the immense resources it takes to get us there.

Unless some smart guy like Einstein comes along and invents the Wormhole we'll never have intergalactic travel, and the ability to get to another star system to find an Earth-like planet humans can survive on.

The money spent on these Mars missions could be better used right now. We're not a space race with the Soviet Union anymore.


If the rover finds evidence of past life on Mars, I would bet the vast majority of the folks paying for this (taxpayers in all the countries that contributed to the mission) will disagree with you. However that is probably not going to happen. If the rover is still tooling around on Mars in a few years, I would bet most of us will disagree with you. Even if the robot is totally borked already, I will still disagree with you because the robotic missions, while a bit risky, usually have an excellent ROI it terms of science and engineering. I am a bit on the fence in terms of the human missions but I would rather pay to have a few risk their lives in space rather then pay to have many risk their lives in wars that provide little to no benefit.
 
2012-08-06 03:36:43 AM  

IronTom: Degenz: We're not a space race with the Soviet Union anymore.

More like China now.


Yea, that communist country that is out doing us in our own capitalist game. What a surprise.
 
2012-08-06 03:37:58 AM  

rhiannon: make me some tea: For purposes of comparison, the budget for the US's part in the Olympics is $19 billion

19 billion?


Yes. When converted from pounds to dollars. Link

/I'm aware of the false equivalence there, but it's just for purposes of comparison to reveal our priorities
 
2012-08-06 03:40:46 AM  

Lando Lincoln: EnderX: wOW, President Obamas science officer? Really Interviewer!! Care to show your political leanings.

Romney's science officer wasn't available.


Bazinga!
 
2012-08-06 03:43:05 AM  

make me some tea: rhiannon: make me some tea: For purposes of comparison, the budget for the US's part in the Olympics is $19 billion

19 billion?

Yes. When converted from pounds to dollars. Link

/I'm aware of the false equivalence there, but it's just for purposes of comparison to reveal our priorities


Read your own post again. I think you're confused.
 
2012-08-06 03:45:21 AM  

rwfan: Degenz: I'm not so sure the money we're spending on it all is worth it right now. Whatever is out there will still be there in 1000 years or whatever. Humans are more likely to become extinct long before we find a planet that's worth the immense resources it takes to get us there.

Unless some smart guy like Einstein comes along and invents the Wormhole we'll never have intergalactic travel, and the ability to get to another star system to find an Earth-like planet humans can survive on.

The money spent on these Mars missions could be better used right now. We're not a space race with the Soviet Union anymore.

If the rover finds evidence of past life on Mars, I would bet the vast majority of the folks paying for this (taxpayers in all the countries that contributed to the mission) will disagree with you. However that is probably not going to happen. If the rover is still tooling around on Mars in a few years, I would bet most of us will disagree with you. Even if the robot is totally borked already, I will still disagree with you because the robotic missions, while a bit risky, usually have an excellent ROI it terms of science and engineering. I am a bit on the fence in terms of the human missions but I would rather pay to have a few risk their lives in space rather then pay to have many risk their lives in wars that provide little to no benefit.


There is some kind of life out there, no doubt. But if and when we find it it is most likely to be some kind of micro organism of the kind that started on our own planet and took hundreds of millions of years to evolve into the basic creatures we know of today.

And I already said I'm not against this, I just don't think it's the best use of our resources at this exact time.
 
2012-08-06 03:49:09 AM  

Degenz: I just don't think it's the best use of our resources at this exact time.


Why not? What do you think they did with this money? Dump it down a hole, or shoot it to Mars? The money was used to pay the salaries of the people who designed and built this, and the businesses that provided the raw materials and production facilities, and all that. It was basically a direct economic stimulus to the tune of $ 2.5B. Not bad.
 
2012-08-06 03:50:23 AM  

rhiannon: make me some tea: rhiannon: make me some tea: For purposes of comparison, the budget for the US's part in the Olympics is $19 billion

19 billion?

Yes. When converted from pounds to dollars. Link

/I'm aware of the false equivalence there, but it's just for purposes of comparison to reveal our priorities

Read your own post again. I think you're confused.


You're right, I stand corrected. I'm pretty tired and did not read into it further until the second post.

I support the Olympics and how they bring the world together in a way that isn't possible with any other venue and all that, but my point is that the costs of space exploration are negligible in comparison. Not knocking the Olympics at all, I'm saying that we (as in humanity) have no problem dropping huge amounts of cash for sports, but we skimp on really cool stuff that advances society, like space programs.
 
2012-08-06 03:53:06 AM  
New images coming in
 
2012-08-06 03:58:19 AM  

Doc Ok: Dump it down a hole, or shoot it to Mars?


Yea, that's persuasive.
 
2012-08-06 03:58:28 AM  

New image

s12.postimage.org
Full size
 
2012-08-06 04:02:42 AM  

Grand_Moff_Joseph: Gosling: Budget of Curiosity: $2.5 billion.

Budget of London Olympics: $14.47 billion.

Cost of war in Afghanistan: $500B and counting :(


Sigh.
 
2012-08-06 04:05:09 AM  
For my fellow Farkettes...
Mohawk Guy talking about Saturn's rings:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qnSA3xzrh-w
 
2012-08-06 04:05:40 AM  
Better Quality:
s11.postimage.org
Full size
 
2012-08-06 04:07:03 AM  

bob_ross: Better Quality:
[s11.postimage.org image 850x764]
Full size


Interesting that the rocks appear to be so tiny in this area. It's all pretty much pebbles.
 
2012-08-06 04:07:49 AM  

Degenz: Doc Ok: Dump it down a hole, or shoot it to Mars?

Yea, that's persuasive.


If that's the only sentence you read of my post, then let me elaborate. My point is that they did not in fact shoot the money to Mars; they spent it here, most of it probably even in the USA. Therefore, the money helped stimulate the economy, and was in my opinion pretty well spent given the current recession.

One of my colleagues is on the science team and got some of it, and I just spent a pretty awesome evening watching NASA TV live on a big projector in a classroom with a bunch of students, one of whom is also on the science team and got an RAship from it, and will get to drive the rover around a bit in a few weeks. So bottom line is, I'm pretty happy with how this money was spent.
 
2012-08-06 04:09:43 AM  

make me some tea: bob_ross: Better Quality:
[s11.postimage.org image 850x764]
Full size

Interesting that the rocks appear to be so tiny in this area. It's all pretty much pebbles.


That was a major reason that this area was chosen as landing site. It's pretty flat on a global scale, but it's also the kind of landscape that tends not to have larger rocks or rubble. To use a poor analogy, they chose to land the rover on a sandy beach.
 
2012-08-06 04:13:38 AM  
 
2012-08-06 04:21:45 AM  
The whole reason this space exploration is beneficial to use Earthlings here and now isn't because we might find ET and make funky alien love the way some of you fantasize about.

The only value we get out of studying Mars up close is to help us understand how our own planet formed and evolved. We don't even know why things like earth quakes and lightening happen, we just have a bunch of theories...we're guessing at this shiat.

But nothing is going to change in the next 500 million years, there's no rush to learn everything now while depriving people of resources. The human race as we know it is only a few thousand years old, relatively speaking. We're likely to become extinct long before we ever have a chance to make an impact on anything outside our own solar system.

Yea, it's cool going to Mars, but it's not the best use of our resources all the time.
 
2012-08-06 04:23:24 AM  
This is the last one. Was a random shot they showed for a quick second with the camera pointed towards the Sun.

s18.postimage.org
 
2012-08-06 04:27:34 AM  

Degenz: The whole reason this space exploration is beneficial to use Earthlings here and now isn't because we might find ET and make funky alien love the way some of you fantasize about.

The only value we get out of studying Mars up close is to help us understand how our own planet formed and evolved. We don't even know why things like earth quakes and lightening happen, we just have a bunch of theories...we're guessing at this shiat.

But nothing is going to change in the next 500 million years, there's no rush to learn everything now while depriving people of resources. The human race as we know it is only a few thousand years old, relatively speaking. We're likely to become extinct long before we ever have a chance to make an impact on anything outside our own solar system.

Yea, it's cool going to Mars, but it's not the best use of our resources all the time.


When you get a chance, do yourself a favor and watch this: Link
 
2012-08-06 04:32:08 AM  

Doc Ok: Degenz: Doc Ok: Dump it down a hole, or shoot it to Mars?

Yea, that's persuasive.

If that's the only sentence you read of my post, then let me elaborate. My point is that they did not in fact shoot the money to Mars; they spent it here, most of it probably even in the USA. Therefore, the money helped stimulate the economy, and was in my opinion pretty well spent given the current recession.

One of my colleagues is on the science team and got some of it, and I just spent a pretty awesome evening watching NASA TV live on a big projector in a classroom with a bunch of students, one of whom is also on the science team and got an RAship from it, and will get to drive the rover around a bit in a few weeks. So bottom line is, I'm pretty happy with how this money was spent.


Cool, I hope your colleague will share his/her experiences with us. I'm sure everyone here would enjoy hearing about driving a $2.5 Billion RC car taking pictures of the Nevada desert.
 
2012-08-06 04:47:45 AM  

make me some tea: When you get a chance, do yourself a favor and watch this: Link


Thanks, I love Dr. deGrasse. We actually have something in common in our debate tactics. I was born on the same day Marilyn Monroe posed nekkid for Playboy and that's why pr0n is good.
 
2012-08-06 04:57:09 AM  

Degenz: The whole reason this space exploration is beneficial to use Earthlings here and now isn't because we might find ET and make funky alien love the way some of you fantasize about.

The only value we get out of studying Mars up close is to help us understand how our own planet formed and evolved. We don't even know why things like earth quakes and lightening happen, we just have a bunch of theories...we're guessing at this shiat.

But nothing is going to change in the next 500 million years, there's no rush to learn everything now while depriving people of resources. The human race as we know it is only a few thousand years old, relatively speaking. We're likely to become extinct long before we ever have a chance to make an impact on anything outside our own solar system.

Yea, it's cool going to Mars, but it's not the best use of our resources all the time.


YES!

I get you now - I would (almost) sell my soul (still not sure you are worth it ;-) to start the War on Poverty, the War on Starvation, the War on Depression, the War on Exclusion, the War on Ignorance (though this later tends to be problematic) - but $2.5 bil is a small drop in the ocean and lets enjoy their/our success.

Then lets turn our collective eyes to truly worthy achievements (costing trillions) that don't involve lots of corpses.
 
2012-08-06 05:05:30 AM  
just to make it 1600
 
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