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(DeKalb Daily Chronicle)   Northern Illinois University employees have scrapped over $13,000 worth of metal in the past 7.5 years, none of it went back to the college. Employees: "What? Should we not have done that?"   (daily-chronicle.com) divider line 75
    More: Dumbass, Northern Illinois University, Southern Illinois University, Northern Illinois, electronic records, metals, colleges  
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8088 clicks; posted to Main » on 04 Aug 2012 at 4:56 PM (2 years ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2012-08-04 02:14:07 PM
Less than a couple of grand per year in an enterprise that size, with a budget that big, is almost certainly not worth the investment of managers' time to save.
 
2012-08-04 02:21:22 PM
ZOMG! Where will they get the money to make it up? 2 or 3 extra students' tuition?
 
2012-08-04 02:43:13 PM
I'm just surprised that they didn't go with Seinfeld's Michigan Bottle Deposit Scheme.
 
2012-08-04 03:53:42 PM
"Thou shalt not muzzle the ox when he treadeth out the corn." Deuteronomy 25:4

Nor deprive the lowly workers of their coffee when they haul away your scraps.
 
2012-08-04 05:02:39 PM
$4.75/day. I'm outraged.
 
2012-08-04 05:02:44 PM
i.imgur.com

I know someone willing to buy it.
 
2012-08-04 05:07:03 PM
Where did the University think the scrap was going?
Were they expecting to be paid for the garbage they were throwing away? If so, why?
 
2012-08-04 05:09:52 PM
I'm surprised they can come up with numbers for this - everywhere there's scrap it gets stolen by whoever can, and they don't exactly tell you about it.
 
2012-08-04 05:14:30 PM
If there's not a recycling policy in place and that stuff would normally be thrown away, I only see a problem with how they used university vehicles to do it.
 
2012-08-04 05:14:58 PM
While other farkers are complaining that it's not that big of a deal, catching petty fraud such as this is often an indication of a larger fraud happening elsewhere. I'm exceptionally curious to know where this "coffee fund" is banked and where all that was going, as well as what else may have been going into it. In accounting, the books must always balance; once that balance starts to be systemically broken, it means internal auditing has failed to account for things, and that should set off red alarms everywhere.
 
2012-08-04 05:15:17 PM
Christ. Are we really tallying up the total theoretical salvage value of trash? I heard that once in 1998, the RNC failed to recycle a glass bottle, which today would be redeemable for as much as 3 cents in some states.

Why won't Mitt Romney condemn them for this wasteful spending?
 
2012-08-04 05:16:10 PM
doing the math, that amount of cash would just about cover 2 starbucks coffees per day. who cares.
 
2012-08-04 05:16:40 PM

NutWrench: Where did the University think the scrap was going?
Were they expecting to be paid for the garbage they were throwing away? If so, why?


This. Just wait till they hear what those guys who haul away junk cars do with them.
 
2012-08-04 05:17:28 PM
less than 150 a month to have scrap metal removed from your school and provide a small perk to your employees at the same time doesnt sound worthy of outrage
 
2012-08-04 05:18:37 PM
Obviously these people have no idea what goes on in the bowels of a hospital.
 
2012-08-04 05:19:37 PM

bronyaur1: Less than a couple of grand per year in an enterprise that size, with a budget that big, is almost certainly not worth the investment of managers' time to save.


Times 30,000,000 government employees pieces of dirt and pretty soon you are talking real money.
 
2012-08-04 05:24:26 PM
Thanks, Obama.
 
2012-08-04 05:24:43 PM

david_gaithersburg: bronyaur1: Less than a couple of grand per year in an enterprise that size, with a budget that big, is almost certainly not worth the investment of managers' time to save.

Times 30,000,000 government employees pieces of dirt and pretty soon you are talking real money.


Why do you hate living in a civilized country so much? Or do you not hate it, and only want to get out of paying for it?
 
2012-08-04 05:25:42 PM

howlinmadmurphy: less than 150 a month to have scrap metal removed from your school and provide a small perk to your employees at the same time doesnt sound worthy of outrage


Doppleganger!
 
2012-08-04 05:27:14 PM
Used to work at a university that did stuff like that. To get rid of some forms of trash often costs more than just letting it disappear. Some of these items were probably "assets". It takes more time, effort, and money to actually dispose of them at state auction (where incidentally most goes as scrap) than it's worth. Paying for transportation etc. Why not just set it out and let it go away by itself and mark it down as "broken"? I saw a guy once who had a budding collection hobby for pallets. Stuff came delivered on pallets. He just took them home and used them for projects. I suppose technically it was supposed to be trash but in order to throw it away he'd have to have broken them down. Instead it was sort of the town's free source of pallets. Same with cardboard boxes. They recycled them and in theory I suppose one could get a small sum of money from the boxes but it you just went up and asked them they'd give you as many as you like. In the end the university saved money and the stuff was put to good use. Win win I think.

in summary....big deal.
 
2012-08-04 05:28:07 PM
did that go to the 'terrist?
/W
 
2012-08-04 05:28:44 PM
Seeing as I've got a box of scrap copper sitting in my truck that I have accrued soley through my work i'm getting a kick out of this thread.

/old grounds mostly
//I usually even put new ones in
///slashies.
 
2012-08-04 05:28:52 PM
I've worked in many machine shops that did the same thing, the scrap went to the coffee fund. It was OK with the owner and management because they got coffee for free too. The material was agreed to and paid for by the customers and they didn't want to deal with the scrap so we kept it.
 
2012-08-04 05:29:14 PM
swotti.starmedia.com
/not impressed!
 
2012-08-04 05:29:55 PM

Mithiwithi: david_gaithersburg: bronyaur1: Less than a couple of grand per year in an enterprise that size, with a budget that big, is almost certainly not worth the investment of managers' time to save.

Times 30,000,000 government employees pieces of dirt and pretty soon you are talking real money.

Why do you hate living in a civilized country so much? Or do you not hate it, and only want to get out of paying for it?

.
.

You either support stealing from the working people or you're attempting to be funny, not sure which.
 
2012-08-04 05:30:15 PM
I dunno, if they were tasked with disposing of it and sold it to a scrap yard instead of bringing it to the dump I wouldn't worry about it.

If they were supposed to sell it to the scrapyard and are diverting funds for personal use, well...
 
2012-08-04 05:30:16 PM
Howlin Mad Murphy
Fark account number: 331712

howlinmadmurphy
Fark account number: 39797

You're the doppelganger. Take that back to Queen Doppelpopolous!
 
2012-08-04 05:30:19 PM

Captain_Ballbeard: Obviously these people have no idea what goes on in the bowels of a hospital.


media.tumblr.com
 
2012-08-04 05:34:01 PM
I worked at a university, but the scrap policy was set because its better to have that stuff sorted out. The coffee fund was one thing, but it sounds like people were getting a little extra on the side out of it, and that can cause problems. Suddenly the choice of repair vs scrap or store parts for reuse vs. scrap is tainted by employee self-interest.

Its better to solve this now and get a formal recycling contract in place.
 
2012-08-04 05:37:21 PM

Ed Willy: I worked at a university, but the scrap policy was set because its better to have that stuff sorted out. The coffee fund was one thing, but it sounds like people were getting a little extra on the side out of it, and that can cause problems. Suddenly the choice of repair vs scrap or store parts for reuse vs. scrap is tainted by employee self-interest.

Its better to solve this now and get a formal recycling contract in place.


This is Fark! We can't have this sort of sound logic here, scat, scat!
 
2012-08-04 05:39:59 PM
$13,000?
That's almost as much as NIU graduates have earned in the past 7.5 years.
 
2012-08-04 05:41:03 PM

brandent: Used to work at a university that did stuff like that. To get rid of some forms of trash often costs more than just letting it disappear. Some of these items were probably "assets". It takes more time, effort, and money to actually dispose of them at state auction (where incidentally most goes as scrap) than it's worth. Paying for transportation etc. Why not just set it out and let it go away by itself and mark it down as "broken"? I saw a guy once who had a budding collection hobby for pallets. Stuff came delivered on pallets. He just took them home and used them for projects. I suppose technically it was supposed to be trash but in order to throw it away he'd have to have broken them down. Instead it was sort of the town's free source of pallets. Same with cardboard boxes. They recycled them and in theory I suppose one could get a small sum of money from the boxes but it you just went up and asked them they'd give you as many as you like. In the end the university saved money and the stuff was put to good use. Win win I think.

in summary....big deal.


If everyone got to take home state owned property, there wouldn't be any left.
 
2012-08-04 05:44:02 PM
My college let me haul away scrap for any purpose I wanted. Some I sold, the choice bits I kept.

/had fun explaining it to the cops one night. Fortunately cool cops were cool, all ended well.
 
2012-08-04 05:49:15 PM
It sounds like the money from the scrape metal was supposed to go to the university but the employees had the money diverted to the "coffee fund" instead.

From TFA

"Kunkel was asked not to pay any money to the representative, but instead issue a check once a month to NIU's Physical Plant.

Kunkel said scrap metal transactions with NIU employees dropped sharply after that policy was implemented, but new faces gradually showed up and checks were once again directed to the coffee fund."

They might do things differently at NIU but where I work (which is a university) the director of plant operations sales bigger pieces of scrape metal to a local yard and that money goes back to his department so he can buy other things like new tools, wood, parts, etc.
 
2012-08-04 05:51:03 PM
Yeah, no big deal. While we're at it, let the librarians take home all the old books, IT can have all the old hardware, etc. It's not like all of that adds up.

That said, having spent the majority of my life in academia, I'm comfortable pronouncing this chump change. The open fraud and corruption I witnessed in the upper ranks was considerably worse. One of the universities I worked at diverted the entire merit raise pool to deans and department heads one year, so it is easy to see why a lot of folks are perfectly happy to steal their little piece of the pie, even if it is scrap metal.
 
2012-08-04 05:52:12 PM
BarkingUnicorn

"Thou shalt not muzzle the ox when he treadeth out the corn."

This.

/A smart master lets a few choice morsels slip off the table every now and then.
 
2012-08-04 05:54:34 PM
Unless there is an explicit policy on how scap and its proceeds are handled- all's fair.

It's pretty easy money though i wouldn't advise it lately as prices on most metals are down as of late.

Scrappers have been the bane of property owners as they have been brazen enough to still AC units and copper plumbing if unobtrusive opening to crawlspace is available. I spent the first part of the year house hunting and I can't remember how many homes I've visited with missing wiring, gutters,plumbing, how many times I have notified realtors of missing condensors from back yard ac units.
 
2012-08-04 06:01:07 PM

Ed Willy: I worked at a university, but the scrap policy was set because its better to have that stuff sorted out. The coffee fund was one thing, but it sounds like people were getting a little extra on the side out of it, and that can cause problems. Suddenly the choice of repair vs scrap or store parts for reuse vs. scrap is tainted by employee self-interest.

Its better to solve this now and get a formal recycling contract in place.


Right. In Illinois, nobody ever gets "a little on the side" from government contracts.
 
2012-08-04 06:03:03 PM
MY alma mater? On Fark? Unpossible.
 
2012-08-04 06:06:23 PM
I work in the physical plant at a university and ran an Idea past the director. we were throwing all this scrap away and I told him we should recycle it and all the money should go to a college scrap scholarship for kids that need it. Well we took a couple loads down and the scrapyard only gives cash and a reciept. The higher up's got wind of this little scholarship thing and put the kabash on it. Now the recycling deal is the recycling plant drops off a dumpster and picks it up for free. Wow What a deal!!!!! They give us no money for the scrap,kids don't get a scholarship and the scrap place pockets all the money. I just don't understand goverment.
 
2012-08-04 06:12:38 PM
Back in the 90s, there was a big squawk about local university employees taking used toner cartridges out of the trash and selling them to refillers. This was back when refillers were paying $40-50 per cartridge for empties. When the university "found out", they made a bunch of noise about theft and ethics and whatnot. It soon came to light that the university had refused to recycle the cartridges, claiming it would be far too expensive. They finally got shamed into setting up a recycling program (which made a lot of money).
 
2012-08-04 06:12:40 PM
sevenpointsixtwo
IT can have all the old hardware,


I've seen that often enough; selling old, written-off shiat on ebay or disposing of it properly takes time and effort which equals money if employees have to do it on company time.
When my father was still a teacher, he got lots of hardware donations from companies which were usually deals like "we have 10 CRTs and 5 desktops for you if you take them all and collect them yourself".
 
2012-08-04 06:19:58 PM

astinkywind: I work in the physical plant at a university and ran an Idea past the director. we were throwing all this scrap away and I told him we should recycle it and all the money should go to a college scrap scholarship for kids that need it. Well we took a couple loads down and the scrapyard only gives cash and a reciept. The higher up's got wind of this little scholarship thing and put the kabash on it. Now the recycling deal is the recycling plant drops off a dumpster and picks it up for free. Wow What a deal!!!!! They give us no money for the scrap,kids don't get a scholarship and the scrap place pockets all the money. I just don't understand goverment.


Because some people just can not stand the idea that someone, somewhere got 2 cents more than their meager existence would demand they get. They would NEVER stoop so low as to collect it themselves but damn it, if someone is making extra off of it then heads must roll....
 
2012-08-04 06:22:55 PM
Our workplace has a policy about how scrap and the revenues are handled and they really suck at it. They actually pay people to take away batteries (including nicads and other rechargeables) rather than sell them to a local recycling center that will actually pick them up simply because they will only issue a check.They sell everything in bulk rather than break things down into components such as wiring, scrap metal, it components, etc. where they increase in scrap value. Sell items for far below worth their value in scrap (but not to employees). Recently saw an obsolete model of medical equipment containing probably 700lbs of stainless sell for less than $100 because the buyer "probably couldn't get accesories". Not including the various chrome plated brass knobs and attachments, this unit would have fetched about $400-$500 dollars at current local prices for scrap stainless.

As long as there is someone out there more willing to make the effort- why inhibit the individual employee to make a little cash on the side as long as all employees are provided equal opportunity to do so.
 
2012-08-04 06:28:55 PM
I have to laugh at stuff like this. I remember being an employee at an office supplies store and being told to dispose of excess furniture inventory by smashing it up and throwing it in the dumpster. It was perfectly good, brand new, unopened furniture. No one could buy it. No one could take it home. All we were allowed to do with it was destroy it and throw it away.
 
2012-08-04 06:29:21 PM

The Voice of Doom: sevenpointsixtwo
IT can have all the old hardware,

I've seen that often enough; selling old, written-off shiat on ebay or disposing of it properly takes time and effort which equals money if employees have to do it on company time.
When my father was still a teacher, he got lots of hardware donations from companies which were usually deals like "we have 10 CRTs and 5 desktops for you if you take them all and collect them yourself".


One ton (2000 lbs) of "average" circuit board from modern computers and electronics generally yields (in a very good system) between 8 and 11 troy ounces of 24k gold. This gold is found in a number of places, including the plated gold leads referred to earlier, on plated pins inside the connectors and on the board in a number of places and on and within the ic (integrated circuits) on the board itself. In addition, there will generally be around 10 to 20 times this amount in silver from the solder and other components (although depending upon the method of recovery, this yield may not be reached). Some types of electronic board have greater yields of silver and almost no gold; this is generally the board without connector ends and major ics. There are also minute amounts of palladium, platinum and other pgms (mostly in certain capacitors, but also in some chips and connectors). Your highest yields of gold in computer scrap especially are rarely from clipped plated leads, but from the processor/cpu, memory and other ics (which can yield 2 gm/lb or more, depending upon the type and age). Many of the older electronics and early computer equipment will be much much higher in volume, while the newest (97 and newer) I would surmise would be lower, although I have not processed enough to tell you for sure. There are, of course, many other places (like automotive catalytic converters) where you can find precious metals that may be recycled, but the scope of this section seems to be on electronic board/PCB so I will stay on that subject.
 
2012-08-04 06:34:15 PM
I'm pretty sure that when you recover the valuable metals from computer parts, you spend more in chemicals for the process than you obtain in precious metals, unless you do it on an industrial scale. lol

/but what do I know
 
2012-08-04 06:38:59 PM

clowncar on fire: The Voice of Doom: sevenpointsixtwo
IT can have all the old hardware,

I've seen that often enough; selling old, written-off shiat on ebay or disposing of it properly takes time and effort which equals money if employees have to do it on company time.
When my father was still a teacher, he got lots of hardware donations from companies which were usually deals like "we have 10 CRTs and 5 desktops for you if you take them all and collect them yourself".

One ton (2000 lbs) of "average" circuit board from modern computers and electronics generally yields (in a very good system) between 8 and 11 troy ounces of 24k gold. This gold is found in a number of places, including the plated gold leads referred to earlier, on plated pins inside the connectors and on the board in a number of places and on and within the ic (integrated circuits) on the board itself. In addition, there will generally be around 10 to 20 times this amount in silver from the solder and other components (although depending upon the method of recovery, this yield may not be reached). Some types of electronic board have greater yields of silver and almost no gold; this is generally the board without connector ends and major ics. There are also minute amounts of palladium, platinum and other pgms (mostly in certain capacitors, but also in some chips and connectors). Your highest yields of gold in computer scrap especially are rarely from clipped plated leads, but from the processor/cpu, memory and other ics (which can yield 2 gm/lb or more, depending upon the type and age). Many of the older electronics and early computer equipment will be much much higher in volume, while the newest (97 and newer) I would surmise would be lower, although I have not processed enough to tell you for sure. There are, of course, many other places (like automotive catalytic converters) where you can find precious metals that may be recycled, but the scope of this section seems to be on electronic board/PCB so I will stay on th ...


You can get alot of Pm's from computer boards but it's so labor intensive. it's almost Not even worth it. Not to mention all the specific acid's you need to get the gold plate off the base metals. Beaker's and not to mention hazardous waste from the used acids. I find gold plated stuff all over the place computers,cell phones circuit boards. You actually have to break down every computer and take the pins off the board. Trying to refine the whole board sucks. too many diffrent base metals to deal with. lead solder,tin, ect.
 
2012-08-04 06:40:16 PM

david_gaithersburg: Mithiwithi: david_gaithersburg: bronyaur1: Less than a couple of grand per year in an enterprise that size, with a budget that big, is almost certainly not worth the investment of managers' time to save.

Times 30,000,000 government employees pieces of dirt and pretty soon you are talking real money.

Why do you hate living in a civilized country so much? Or do you not hate it, and only want to get out of paying for it?
.
.

You either support stealing from the working people or you're attempting to be funny, not sure which.


Your right, we don't need government at all. Let's just go back to feudalism, the aristocracy was never crooked or abusive.
 
2012-08-04 06:40:19 PM

minuslars: I have to laugh at stuff like this. I remember being an employee at an office supplies store and being told to dispose of excess furniture inventory by smashing it up and throwing it in the dumpster. It was perfectly good, brand new, unopened furniture. No one could buy it. No one could take it home. All we were allowed to do with it was destroy it and throw it away.


I saw the same thing happening with sizeable quantity of bicycles and a bobcat while stationed on a base in Japan. I had connections with a local orphanage and hoped I could use those to save the bikes for donations. I was told no donations as they did not want to risk the base be sued as a result of a defective donation. They don't sue in Japan- they take the responsibility of getting hurt upon themselves rather than point fingers elsewhere.

Found out the real reason a few years later- in vague terms having to do with taxes on spare inventory and recovery of moneys for "lost and stolen" assets. You don't get back as nearly as much for donated items as you do for "lost stock".
 
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