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(NBC News)   How do people find the strength to lift cars? Gamma rays, radioactive spider bites, being bathed in electrified chemicals, cosmic radiation, rocketing to earth as the sole survivor of a doomed planet are among the choices   (bodyodd.nbcnews.com) divider line 23
    More: Interesting, gamma-ray, chemicals, cosmic rays, forensic biologist, Southern California freeways, daily life, spider bites, superhuman strength  
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1420 clicks; posted to Geek » on 04 Aug 2012 at 3:20 PM (2 years ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2012-08-04 03:10:18 PM
img836.imageshack.us

"I think there's a half-drunk Schlitz under that Mustang..."
 
ZAZ [TotalFark]
2012-08-04 03:25:57 PM
I read an SF story (probably "Emergence" by David R. Palmer) which suggested superhuman strength came from disabling the usual "give each muscle fiber only a 1/5 duty cycle" algorithm of the muscle control system. I think that was intended to represent current medical thinking as of c. 1980.
 
2012-08-04 03:46:33 PM
Left out getting sand kicked in your face, punymitter
 
2012-08-04 03:49:14 PM
I don't know HOW it works, but I'm glad it does. 2 normal-sized guys once lifted a Ford F250 off of me, and I'm damn glad they did. I'm not just talking about a quick 'lift-n-drop', either. These two guys held that truck up while a third person went under it and pulled me out... crushed chest, burning leg, and all. I wouldn't have lasted much longer under there.
 
2012-08-04 03:55:42 PM
Electrified chemicals make you fast, not strong.
 
2012-08-04 04:05:46 PM

Jgok: I don't know HOW it works, but I'm glad it does. 2 normal-sized guys once lifted a Ford F250 off of me, and I'm damn glad they did. I'm not just talking about a quick 'lift-n-drop', either. These two guys held that truck up while a third person went under it and pulled me out... crushed chest, burning leg, and all. I wouldn't have lasted much longer under there.


Were you under the outside rear wheel when there was an empty bed and the truck was at an incline?
 
2012-08-04 04:40:06 PM
Adrenaline is a helluva drug.
 
2012-08-04 04:51:53 PM

Toshiro Mifune's Letter Opener: [img836.imageshack.us image 500x375]

"I think there's a half-drunk Schlitz under that Mustang..."


thechive.files.wordpress.com
What half-drunk Schlitz may look like.

/Not in the face.
 
2012-08-04 04:52:21 PM
Leverage, necessity
 
2012-08-04 05:32:58 PM

ZAZ: I read an SF story (probably "Emergence" by David R. Palmer) which suggested superhuman strength came from disabling the usual "give each muscle fiber only a 1/5 duty cycle" algorithm of the muscle control system. I think that was intended to represent current medical thinking as of c. 1980.


Nifty. Makes sense. Some times I look at a car and think... somehow I should be able to lift one side of that up. But I know I can't. Still, by brain sort of thinks it should be able to.
 
2012-08-04 05:40:30 PM
1.bp.blogspot.com

Pound for pound, he makes Mariusz Pudzianowski look like a panty waist.
 
2012-08-04 05:55:44 PM

lewismarktwo: Jgok: I don't know HOW it works, but I'm glad it does. 2 normal-sized guys once lifted a Ford F250 off of me, and I'm damn glad they did. I'm not just talking about a quick 'lift-n-drop', either. These two guys held that truck up while a third person went under it and pulled me out... crushed chest, burning leg, and all. I wouldn't have lasted much longer under there.

Were you under the outside rear wheel when there was an empty bed and the truck was at an incline?


Nope... I was looking up at the bottom of the engine, and both front wheels were in the ditch to either side of my head. They DID lift the side I was closest to, of course.
 
2012-08-04 06:11:12 PM
Subby forgot to mention love.
 
2012-08-04 06:56:41 PM
Cue a half-dozen bid solicitations from DARPA and the DOD branches to study this and determine how to turn it on and off.
 
2012-08-04 07:18:45 PM
They don't.

The idea that people do this is retarded, and the people who believe it are retarded. Every instance of this that is on video shows that there is a completely logical explanation that includes feats of strength within the usual bounds of human limitations.

If there is a bona fide example of this, why is it that out of the 8 trillion times it's happened, there is a grand total of farkING ZERO times you can look at the video and conclude, holy FSM, that dude really did lift that car!

Although I do remember one time my mom was stuck 7800m up Xixipangma, and so I chopped the mountain down with the edge of my hand.
 
2012-08-04 07:56:19 PM

SevenizGud:

Although I do remember one time my mom was stuck 7800m up Xixipangma, and so I chopped the mountain down with the edge of my hand.


You must be one of those Voodoo children. Did you pick up all the pieces and make an island?
 
2012-08-04 08:25:20 PM
Sinanju.
 
2012-08-05 12:41:11 AM

Nina_Hartley's_Ass: Electrified chemicals make you fast, not strong.


Ah, but by running really fast around the car, a vortex could be created that would lift the car off the ground.

So, it counts.
 
2012-08-05 02:16:22 AM

SevenizGud: They don't.

The idea that people do this is retarded, and the people who believe it are retarded. Every instance of this that is on video shows that there is a completely logical explanation that includes feats of strength within the usual bounds of human limitations.


To be fair, humans are by far the best cheaters at the 'physical limitations' game on the planet.

Admittedly when I've had things "pinned under the car" I've usually relied on removing the bits it's caught under and shifting the car horizontally, since it's basically never the actual frame. Or just pulling it a couple inches up if it is under the frame (shocks make the defacto weight for the first couple inches not so bad).

Though I've never had an actual _person_ pinned under a car, I imagine mostly because I don't have any friends that would be at a statistical disadvantage in a battle of wits with a 2x4. What the hell kind of retard shiat are you doing to get a farking car dropped on you?

//If it's the result of an accident, you don't shift a car with someone pinned. You wait for the paramedics who can assure that the person won't immediately bleed out as a result.
 
2012-08-05 01:27:02 PM
SevenizGud: The idea that people do this is retarded, and the people who believe it are retarded.

Actually, among actual experts, it's an unsettled question. Biomechanics seems to indicate that there's a so-called 'maximum strength' which represents the limits of the physical structure of the body. Try to lift more than that, no matter how strong and adrenalized you are, and you'll tear something or break a bone. Which, occasionally but rarely, does happen. Maximum strength varies among individuals.

Most people seem to be able to use about 75-80% of their maximum strength on demand, ie, when they try really hard. With training, you can get to over 90% of it. But if you can normally lift 100 lb off the ground, in theory, in a panic, you probably can't lift more than, say, 130 lb even if you're in a panic.

The thing is, actual dynamometer studies of panicked humans are vanishingly rare, for a variety of reasons. Studies of people who are somewhat adrenalized are more common, but these arguably do not match states of panic or rage.

Studies with enraged chimps, however, have been done. And chimps seem able to well exceed their projected maximum strength. By, like, a whole lot. You can google this, I'm sure. Adult chimps whose normal strength limit on a dynamometer seemed to be around 500 lb could pull well over 1000 lb when they were upset. That doesn't match normal projects.

So it's actually not known, scientifically, if a panicking human can lift the end of a car off the ground. If you work with adrenalized lifters, you know that surprisingly small people can in fact lift astonishingly large amounts of weight. Not all weightlifters are huge and bulky -- although the ones with the most muscle mass are the ones who can generally lift the most weight.
 
2012-08-05 05:04:02 PM
RandomAxe: So it's actually not known, scientifically, if a panicking human can lift the end of a car off the ground.

I'll say it again. Show me a SINGLE case of these astonishing feats of strength on bona fide video, as opposed to the the whole car was on opposite corner points in a diagonal-facing ditch, and they lifted up one corner and thus "lifted a car off dad with astonishing unexpected feat of unexplained superhuman strength hurp derp".

Idiots who believe this nonsense are still idiots. Being scared doesn't change your farking neuromuscular junction, it doesn't change the farking amino acid sequence in your myosin.
 
2012-08-05 09:52:33 PM

SevenizGud: They don't.

The idea that people do this is retarded, and the people who believe it are retarded. Every instance of this that is on video shows that there is a completely logical explanation that includes feats of strength within the usual bounds of human limitations.

If there is a bona fide example of this, why is it that out of the 8 trillion times it's happened, there is a grand total of farkING ZERO times you can look at the video and conclude, holy FSM, that dude really did lift that car!

Although I do remember one time my mom was stuck 7800m up Xixipangma, and so I chopped the mountain down with the edge of my hand.


The human body is absolutely capable of performing "super human" feats of strength. Your body has natural regulators that prevent your muscles from damaging themselves. In a highly charged emergency situation, these limiters can be disabled, primarily through the release of adrenaline, which allows a human to exert much more force than they would otherwise be capable of. Side effect: your muscles literally tear themselves apart.... but it doesnt matter, as long as it helps you (or someone else) survive a life and death situation.

The release of adrenaline also increases your heartrate quite a lot, as well as forces changes in the cells of your lung, allowing them to transfer oxygen at a much higher than normal rate. Your newly superchaged over oxygenated cells also compound the strength your muscles are capable of, as its literally a more forceful reaction, like pumping more fuel and air into the cylinder of an engine. Again, this is technically damaging to your body, but humans are extremely resilient and are able to regenerate pretty well.

So yeah... if you'd like more in depth information, do a google search for the physiological effects of PCP or cocaine. Its pretty similar chemistry.
 
2012-08-06 02:30:15 PM

Alonjar: SevenizGud: They don't.

The idea that people do this is retarded, and the people who believe it are retarded. Every instance of this that is on video shows that there is a completely logical explanation that includes feats of strength within the usual bounds of human limitations.

If there is a bona fide example of this, why is it that out of the 8 trillion times it's happened, there is a grand total of farkING ZERO times you can look at the video and conclude, holy FSM, that dude really did lift that car!

Although I do remember one time my mom was stuck 7800m up Xixipangma, and so I chopped the mountain down with the edge of my hand.

The human body is absolutely capable of performing "super human" feats of strength. Your body has natural regulators that prevent your muscles from damaging themselves. In a highly charged emergency situation, these limiters can be disabled, primarily through the release of adrenaline, which allows a human to exert much more force than they would otherwise be capable of. Side effect: your muscles literally tear themselves apart.... but it doesnt matter, as long as it helps you (or someone else) survive a life and death situation.

The release of adrenaline also increases your heartrate quite a lot, as well as forces changes in the cells of your lung, allowing them to transfer oxygen at a much higher than normal rate. Your newly superchaged over oxygenated cells also compound the strength your muscles are capable of, as its literally a more forceful reaction, like pumping more fuel and air into the cylinder of an engine. Again, this is technically damaging to your body, but humans are extremely resilient and are able to regenerate pretty well.

So yeah... if you'd like more in depth information, do a google search for the physiological effects of PCP or cocaine. Its pretty similar chemistry.


Powdered cocaine is a very effective vasoconstrictor (which is why some people have prescriptions for it, to stop bleeding). You feel awake/jittery, but it becomes harder for your body to throw O2 at the cells via circulation. PCP limits your ability to feel pain in the moment, combined with causing hallucinations (and making schizophrenics -including those who had not exhibited schizo behaviors before - WAY WAY WAY worse) that lead to the user actually thinking it is life-or-death, that the angry bears with the glowing eyes (who are actually cops) are *actually* trying to kill them, which leads to the same superhuman strength response that the article and the comments above describe.

It's not PCP granting magical powers, it's PCP a) keeping you from feeling pain and b) screwing with your perception enough to trigger the life-and-death response. The guys that you see being taken down by cops aren't superhumanly-strong erudite lecturers, but raving, snarling animals going through some pretty primal "save my ass/kill the other guy" moments.

/IANAPhD - this is my understanding of the drug.
 
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