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(YouTube)   Steve Wozniak explains why he's not allowed at Taco Bell   (youtube.com) divider line 37
    More: Amusing, Steve Wozniak  
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6085 clicks; posted to Video » on 04 Aug 2012 at 2:40 PM (2 years ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2012-08-04 09:29:14 AM
I'm not sure i get what isn't illegal about that
 
2012-08-04 11:14:42 AM
He buys sheets of real notes and has them cut and glued like a notepad.
 
2012-08-04 02:47:01 PM
I can see the "it's made of real notes" thing being a funny joke but he kept saying "I had a printer print these"

Is there a law he can do THAT under?
 
2012-08-04 03:06:37 PM
 
2012-08-04 03:20:03 PM
That hipster interviewer could not have been more agitating. STFU and let the funny man with stories talk! Quit interrupting him! WTF is wrong with you!?!?!
 
2012-08-04 03:33:21 PM
Well, Taco Bell isn't allowed around these parts or else it immediately gets kicked right out the back door.
 
2012-08-04 03:42:38 PM

unlikely: I can see the "it's made of real notes" thing being a funny joke but he kept saying "I had a printer print these"

Is there a law he can do THAT under?


I'm rusty on this, but as I recall, it's only *coins* that are absolutely forbidden for citizens to make on their own. Anyone can make any paper currency they want, as long as it doesn't actually duplicate U.S. paper currency, which would be counterfeiting. And I believe the law around that isn't similar to the laws around, say, product similarity -- that is, it's not about whether anyone might confuse them, but whether it's a plausible duplication of the real thing, as considered by experts, as would be used, for example, in place of the real thing in a real attempt at fraud. But plenty of people make their own paper currency, and it's worth whatever you can negotiate for it. I'm more dubious of his 'legal tender' claim, in that I feel sure that's only whatever the government declares is legal tender, which is surely not this -- unless, again, he's operating under an obscure provision I'm unaware of. (Which he may well be.)

He says it 'feels' like the real thing, which means it may be on a similar rag stock. But the special Crane paper used for U.S. currency is exclusive to that use, and illegal for anyone else to obtain; I'm less sure, however, if it's illegal to duplicate for other purposes, including making novelty (fake) money. It's also unclear to me exactly how large these bills are. It IS legal to perfectly duplicate U.S. currency, as long as it's not of similar size: It must be at least 50% larger (150+%) or a quarter smaller (75-%) in overall document face area. This is the reason that large sums of paper cash in low-budget films look like oversize bills: they are.

If it was anyone but Woz, I'd call it horseshiat without a second thought. But Woz is an eccentric genius, and if he says it's so, then it most likely is, or is very close to the reality: He may not be explaining it clearly for us to understand. And Mr. Buttinsky-I'm-Just-As-Interesting-And-Important-As-Steve-Wozniak-Hurry -Up-And-Finish-Speaking-Before-I-Talk-Over-You-Again isn't helping a bit.
 
2012-08-04 03:47:47 PM

Sylvia_Bandersnatch: unlikely: I can see the "it's made of real notes" thing being a funny joke but he kept saying "I had a printer print these"

Is there a law he can do THAT under?

I'm rusty on this, but as I recall, it's only *coins* that are absolutely forbidden for citizens to make on their own. Anyone can make any paper currency they want, as long as it doesn't actually duplicate U.S. paper currency, which would be counterfeiting. And I believe the law around that isn't similar to the laws around, say, product similarity -- that is, it's not about whether anyone might confuse them, but whether it's a plausible duplication of the real thing, as considered by experts, as would be used, for example, in place of the real thing in a real attempt at fraud. But plenty of people make their own paper currency, and it's worth whatever you can negotiate for it. I'm more dubious of his 'legal tender' claim, in that I feel sure that's only whatever the government declares is legal tender, which is surely not this -- unless, again, he's operating under an obscure provision I'm unaware of. (Which he may well be.)

He says it 'feels' like the real thing, which means it may be on a similar rag stock. But the special Crane paper used for U.S. currency is exclusive to that use, and illegal for anyone else to obtain; I'm less sure, however, if it's illegal to duplicate for other purposes, including making novelty (fake) money. It's also unclear to me exactly how large these bills are. It IS legal to perfectly duplicate U.S. currency, as long as it's not of similar size: It must be at least 50% larger (150+%) or a quarter smaller (75-%) in overall document face area. This is the reason that large sums of paper cash in low-budget films look like oversize bills: they are.

If it was anyone but Woz, I'd call it horseshiat without a second thought. But Woz is an eccentric genius, and if he says it's so, then it most likely is, or is very close to the reality: He may not be explaining it clearly for us to ...


No, it's Woz farking with everyone. As someone earlier mentioned, he is not printing the bills themselves, he is buying uncut sheets directly from the US government, then having someone separate the bills into sets of 4, perforate them, and glue them into a pad. Contrary to what he is saying, it is entirely illegal to print US money and try to spend it.
 
2012-08-04 03:59:11 PM
I'm not getting this. If he's joking, I'm not sure why its funny. Especially since a lot of other stuff he said is true and legal (you can make your own ID.)
 
2012-08-04 03:59:40 PM

DON.MAC: He buys sheets of real notes and has them cut and glued like a notepad.


Actually, can't you actually buy uncut currency from the government?
 
2012-08-04 04:20:17 PM

Rincewind53: No, it's Woz farking with everyone. As someone earlier mentioned, he is not printing the bills themselves, he is buying uncut sheets directly from the US government, then having someone separate the bills into sets of 4, perforate them, and glue them into a pad. Contrary to what he is saying, it is entirely illegal to print US money and try to spend it.


Ah, thanks for the clarification. That makes much more sense. Reminds me of the time I pasted an entire sheet of stamps onto a package, after figuring out that that would pay the required postage. I thought it was funny, and the office I sent it out of thought it was funny, but I'm not sure everyone else along the delivery chain would agree.
 
2012-08-04 04:35:05 PM

Rincewind53: Sylvia_Bandersnatch: unlikely: I can see the "it's made of real notes" thing being a funny joke but he kept saying "I had a printer print these"

Is there a law he can do THAT under?

I'm rusty on this, but as I recall, it's only *coins* that are absolutely forbidden for citizens to make on their own. Anyone can make any paper currency they want, as long as it doesn't actually duplicate U.S. paper currency, which would be counterfeiting. And I believe the law around that isn't similar to the laws around, say, product similarity -- that is, it's not about whether anyone might confuse them, but whether it's a plausible duplication of the real thing, as considered by experts, as would be used, for example, in place of the real thing in a real attempt at fraud. But plenty of people make their own paper currency, and it's worth whatever you can negotiate for it. I'm more dubious of his 'legal tender' claim, in that I feel sure that's only whatever the government declares is legal tender, which is surely not this -- unless, again, he's operating under an obscure provision I'm unaware of. (Which he may well be.)

He says it 'feels' like the real thing, which means it may be on a similar rag stock. But the special Crane paper used for U.S. currency is exclusive to that use, and illegal for anyone else to obtain; I'm less sure, however, if it's illegal to duplicate for other purposes, including making novelty (fake) money. It's also unclear to me exactly how large these bills are. It IS legal to perfectly duplicate U.S. currency, as long as it's not of similar size: It must be at least 50% larger (150+%) or a quarter smaller (75-%) in overall document face area. This is the reason that large sums of paper cash in low-budget films look like oversize bills: they are.

If it was anyone but Woz, I'd call it horseshiat without a second thought. But Woz is an eccentric genius, and if he says it's so, then it most likely is, or is very close to the reality: He may not be explaining ...


he says in the video that they are not even close to real $2 bills. He made them up himself. They are not counterfeit - they are just home made play money. There is nothing illegal about bartering at stores and convincing them that your paper has a value.
 
2012-08-04 04:43:32 PM
That is some 5 star Kibology. He even cross-posted to the secret service, 3 times. Bravo, jolly fat guy, you're like a Liberty Santa.
 
2012-08-04 04:57:27 PM
Could that guy stick his tongue up his own butthole any further?! I mean seriously let the Woz talk, you shiatty little interviewer.
 
2012-08-04 05:06:49 PM
This reminds of an artist who make one of a kind bills of his own money and try to barter with it as real money. The artwork could undoubtedly be sold for much more than the face value, but most of the time nobody took the money artwork because they were unwilling to think any deeper about money and what it actually means.
 
2012-08-04 05:47:26 PM
The odd thing about those sheets is that each bill on the sheet has the same serial number.
 
2012-08-04 05:53:02 PM
Those are real $2 bills, in case that is still being questioned. He's taking a loss on his joke, since the government sells those at 2x face value, but he can afford it.
 
2012-08-04 06:02:05 PM
Here's one of the stories about him being interviewed by a secret service agent because of the bills.
 
2012-08-04 06:20:58 PM

SumoJeb: That hipster interviewer could not have been more agitating.


???
 
2012-08-04 06:44:02 PM

Gwyrddu: This reminds of an artist who make one of a kind bills of his own money and try to barter with it as real money. The artwork could undoubtedly be sold for much more than the face value, but most of the time nobody took the money artwork because they were unwilling to think any deeper about money and what it actually means.


Oh yeah it's the workers at starbucks that can't dig deeper and appreciate the artwork. Not their managers who would can them for taking funny money. Definitely not the bosses. It's gotta be those uncultured swine employees.
 
2012-08-04 07:49:29 PM

Britney Spear's Speculum: Oh yeah it's the workers at starbucks that can't dig deeper and appreciate the artwork. Not their managers who would can them for taking funny money. Definitely not the bosses. It's gotta be those uncultured swine employees.


Or the barista can just pay for the coffee out of his pocket, take the signed artwork and sell it for much more than the cup of coffee is worth, thus avoiding any possibility for being canned and making a nice profit as well.
 
2012-08-04 08:43:17 PM

Rincewind53: Sylvia_Bandersnatch: unlikely: I can see the "it's made of real notes" thing being a funny joke but he kept saying "I had a printer print these"

Is there a law he can do THAT under?

I'm rusty on this, but as I recall, it's only *coins* that are absolutely forbidden for citizens to make on their own. Anyone can make any paper currency they want, as long as it doesn't actually duplicate U.S. paper currency, which would be counterfeiting. And I believe the law around that isn't similar to the laws around, say, product similarity -- that is, it's not about whether anyone might confuse them, but whether it's a plausible duplication of the real thing, as considered by experts, as would be used, for example, in place of the real thing in a real attempt at fraud. But plenty of people make their own paper currency, and it's worth whatever you can negotiate for it. I'm more dubious of his 'legal tender' claim, in that I feel sure that's only whatever the government declares is legal tender, which is surely not this -- unless, again, he's operating under an obscure provision I'm unaware of. (Which he may well be.)

He says it 'feels' like the real thing, which means it may be on a similar rag stock. But the special Crane paper used for U.S. currency is exclusive to that use, and illegal for anyone else to obtain; I'm less sure, however, if it's illegal to duplicate for other purposes, including making novelty (fake) money. It's also unclear to me exactly how large these bills are. It IS legal to perfectly duplicate U.S. currency, as long as it's not of similar size: It must be at least 50% larger (150+%) or a quarter smaller (75-%) in overall document face area. This is the reason that large sums of paper cash in low-budget films look like oversize bills: they are.

If it was anyone but Woz, I'd call it horseshiat without a second thought. But Woz is an eccentric genius, and if he says it's so, then it most likely is, or is very close to the reality: He may not be explaining ...


If those were real he would not be selling 4 for $5
 
2012-08-04 08:45:57 PM

Rincewind53: ...
No, it's Woz farking with everyone. As someone earlier mentioned, he is not printing the bills themselves, he is buying uncut sheets directly from the US government, then having someone separate the bills into sets of 4, perforate them, and glue them into a pad. Contrary to what he is saying, it is entirely illegal to print US money and try to spend it.


damnit, clipped the comment I was actually responding to
 
2012-08-04 09:35:27 PM
Wow... it's a new spin on an idea that's been floating around for ages.

Not sure, but I may have been the Weeners the idea in alt.shenanigans back in '91 or '92 - taking a stack of $2 bills and cutting out a cardboard backing, then gluing them together like a notepad, then tearing them off to pay for things... I might have gotten the idea from somebody else, but honetly, this was 20 years ago.

Somebody put the idea up on instructables, it seems:

i.imgur.com


At any rate, it's a new spin to have 4 together with a perforated edge.
 
2012-08-04 09:46:35 PM

unlikely: I can see the "it's made of real notes" thing being a funny joke but he kept saying "I had a printer print these"

Is there a law he can do THAT under?


He didn't say that, not exactly. He said that a better printer printed the notes. He didn't identify who it was or that the printing was done on his direct order.


/it was the government
 
2012-08-04 11:54:06 PM
What Gordon said.
Woz said he had HIS printer create the PADS. Watch his hand go over the top glued area when he says it. (put the glue at the top and probably perforated them for easy tearing)
Woz said, "I got these supplies from a higher quality printer"

He's just messing with everyone by telling the literal truth and leaving other details out, seeing who catches on.
 
2012-08-05 12:46:11 AM
Wozniak seems funny, and I'm sure he's a decent guy.

He probably just never stopped to think that he's a guy worth $100,000,000 and he's farking with the kid that makes $9 an hour at Taco Bell.
 
2012-08-05 12:52:53 AM
Link

My high quality printer.
 
2012-08-05 01:23:41 AM
What is all this talk about Taco Bell? The fast food chain he mentioned was In 'n Out Burger.
 
2012-08-05 02:03:54 AM

darklingscribe: What is all this talk about Taco Bell? The fast food chain he mentioned was In 'n Out Burger.


You must be new around here...

/http://www.snopes.com/business/money/tacobell.asp
 
2012-08-05 12:56:01 PM
1.) Could you walk into a bank and legally deposit these in your account or exchange them for another denomination?

2.) He says he sells them for five dollars per sheet. Where/how does one buy them?

/Inquiring minds need to know
 
2012-08-05 03:25:30 PM

Rincewind53: Sylvia_Bandersnatch: unlikely: I can see the "it's made of real notes" thing being a funny joke but he kept saying "I had a printer print these"

Is there a law he can do THAT under?

I'm rusty on this, but as I recall, it's only *coins* that are absolutely forbidden for citizens to make on their own. Anyone can make any paper currency they want, as long as it doesn't actually duplicate U.S. paper currency, which would be counterfeiting. And I believe the law around that isn't similar to the laws around, say, product similarity -- that is, it's not about whether anyone might confuse them, but whether it's a plausible duplication of the real thing, as considered by experts, as would be used, for example, in place of the real thing in a real attempt at fraud. But plenty of people make their own paper currency, and it's worth whatever you can negotiate for it. I'm more dubious of his 'legal tender' claim, in that I feel sure that's only whatever the government declares is legal tender, which is surely not this -- unless, again, he's operating under an obscure provision I'm unaware of. (Which he may well be.)

He says it 'feels' like the real thing, which means it may be on a similar rag stock. But the special Crane paper used for U.S. currency is exclusive to that use, and illegal for anyone else to obtain; I'm less sure, however, if it's illegal to duplicate for other purposes, including making novelty (fake) money. It's also unclear to me exactly how large these bills are. It IS legal to perfectly duplicate U.S. currency, as long as it's not of similar size: It must be at least 50% larger (150+%) or a quarter smaller (75-%) in overall document face area. This is the reason that large sums of paper cash in low-budget films look like oversize bills: they are.

If it was anyone but Woz, I'd call it horseshiat without a second thought. But Woz is an eccentric genius, and if he says it's so, then it most likely is, or is very close to the reality: He may not be explaining ...


Real or fake, I remember a story about people spending commemorative coins that they bought from a late night infomercial. No business had to take them, and it wasn't illegal to pay with them. The bank wouldn't take them though. There was one community where it was so prevalent that you could get them back as change.
 
2012-08-05 08:58:34 PM

Tickle Mittens: That is some 5 star Kibology. He even cross-posted to the secret service, 3 times. Bravo, jolly fat guy, you're like a Liberty Santa.


I thought Kibology only ever had one real star. (That's the main difference between it and "Baby Geniuses", which starred several people, most of whom were professional babies.)
 
2012-08-06 11:47:03 PM
I fell asleep.
 
2012-08-07 02:11:00 AM

Gwyrddu: Britney Spear's Speculum: Oh yeah it's the workers at starbucks that can't dig deeper and appreciate the artwork. Not their managers who would can them for taking funny money. Definitely not the bosses. It's gotta be those uncultured swine employees.

Or the barista can just pay for the coffee out of his pocket, take the signed artwork and sell it for much more than the cup of coffee is worth, thus avoiding any possibility for being canned and making a nice profit as well.


When I worked at 7-11, I had an old guy come in and buy a carton of cigarettes and a six pack of beer and paid me with real silver dollars. I pocketed the coins and put some of my own bills in the till. About a week later the owner called me into the office and asked me what he was looking at on the video of the transaction. I told him and he said he wanted the coins.... I told him no...lol
 
2012-08-07 07:22:37 PM

real_kibo: Tickle Mittens: That is some 5 star Kibology. He even cross-posted to the secret service, 3 times. Bravo, jolly fat guy, you're like a Liberty Santa.

I thought Kibology only ever had one real star. (That's the main difference between it and "Baby Geniuses", which starred several people, most of whom were professional babies.)


Self-aggrandizing as ever. But no love for Lupus Yonderboy, Doctress Neutropia (that kind of crazy doesn't just happen), Xibo, and others I've forgotten? As shocking as it is sad. Woz deserves his props, I don't remember you cross-posting between rec.arts.printing.hushhush.money, soc.gov.treasury.usss,alt.religion.atheism and of course rec.arts.sf.starwars.

/I'm a little surprised to see emacs added a fark function
//Shouldn't be.
 
2012-08-07 11:52:42 PM

Tickle Mittens: Self-aggrandizing as ever.


Well, not "as ever". Only for the last four decades or so. I've been trying to get a law passed that would declare I had self-aggrandized myself 15 billion years ago, but I think I haven't been giving enough bribes to government officials. This one guy, I offered him a whole stack of books from the Salvation Army -- "Your 1977 Aquarius Horoscope" and several copies each of "Jaws II" and "The Organization Man". I know the books must be great because otherwise why would Salvation Army have kept them on the same shelves for so many years? So, anyway, I need to get that law passed, unless someone invents a time machine and gives me the only one and lots of batteries for it and oh yeah so I can defend myself against whatever types of dinosaurs they have in the past or future I'm also going to need some accessories like the Terror Claws and an electric fly-swatter twenty feet across.
 
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