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(News.com.au)   Missing father returns after 23 years. Good, because the trash ain't taking itself to the curb   (news.com.au) divider line 38
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7997 clicks; posted to Main » on 04 Aug 2012 at 3:49 AM (1 year ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2012-08-04 03:52:53 AM
Does this story smell like bullshiat to anyone else?
 
2012-08-04 03:55:34 AM

kudayta: Does this story smell like bullshiat to anyone else?


Uh huh. Real convenient that he somehow remembered his own name when it came to having someone pay for his surgery.
 
2012-08-04 04:01:55 AM
Also "convenient" that some "truck driver turned preacher" has a story to tell about saving someone.
That is a good story to build up a congregation with. They gotta get enough butt's in the pews to keep
the lights on and bills paid at home.
 
2012-08-04 04:02:30 AM
The Flitcraft Parable, Maltese Falcon, Dashiell Hammet

Spade sat down in the armchair beside the table and without any preliminary, without an introductory remark of any sort, began to tell the girl about a thing that had happened some years before in the Northwest. He talked in a steady matter-of-fact voice that was devoid of emphasis or pauses, though now and then he repeated a sentence slightly rearranged, as if it were important that each detail be related exactly as it had happened.

At the beginning Brigid O'Shaughnessy listened with only partial attentiveness, obviously more surprised by his telling the story than interested in it, her curiosity more engaged with his purpose in telling the story than with the story he told; but presently, as the story went on, it caught her more and more fully and she became still and receptive.

A man named Flitcraft had left his real-estate-office, in Tacoma, to go to luncheon one day and had never returned. He did not keep and engagement to play golf after four that afternoon, though he had taken the initiative in making the engagement less than half and hour before he went out to luncheon. His wife and children never saw him again. His wife and he were supposed to be on the best of terms. He had two children, boys, one five and the other three. He owned his house in a Tacoma suburb, a new Packard, and the rest of the appurtenances of successful American living.

Flitcraft had inherited seventy thousand dollars from his father, and, with his sucess in real estate, was worth something in the neighborhood of two hundred thousand dollars at the time he vanished. His affairs were in order, though there were enough loose ends to indicate that he had not been setting them in order preparatory to vanishing. A deal that would have brought him an attractive profit, for instance, was to have been concluded the day after the one on which he disappeared. There was nothing to suggest that he had more than fifty or sixty dollars in his immediate possession at the time of his going. His habits for months past could be accounted for too thoroughly to justify any suspicion of secret vices, or even of another woman in his life, though either was barely possible.

"He went like that," Spade said, "like a fist when you open your hand,"

"... Well, that was in 1922. In 1927 I was with one of the big detective agencies in Seattle. Mrs. Flitcraft came in and told us somebody had seen a man in Spokane who looked a lot like her husband. I went over there. It was Flitcraft, all right. He had been living in Spokane for a couple of years as Charles - that was his first name - Pierce. He had a automobile-business that was netting him twenty or twenty-five thousand a year, a wife, a baby son, owned his home in a Spokane suburb, and usually got away to play golf after four in the afternoon during the season."

Spade had not been told very definitely what to do when he found Flitcraft. They talked in Spade's room at the Davenport. Flitcraft had no feeling of guilt. He had left his first family well provided for, and what he had done seemed to him perfectly reasonable. The only thing that bothered him was a doubt that he could make that reasonableness clear to Spade. He had never told anybody his story before, and thus had not had to attempt to make its reasonableness explicit. He tried now.

"I got it all right," Spade told Brigid O'Shaughnessy, "but Mrs. Flitcraft never did. She thought it was silly. Maybe it was. Anyway it came out all right. She didn't want any scandal, and, after the trick he had played on her - the way she looked at it - she didn't want him. So they were divorced on the quiet and everything was swell all around.

"Here's what happened to him. Going to lunch he passed an office-building that was being put up - just the skeleton. A beam or something fell eight or ten stories down and smacked the sidewalk alongside him. It brushed pretty close to him, but didn't touch him, though a piece of the sidewalk was chipped off and flew up and hit his cheek. It only took a piece of skin off, but he still had the scar when I saw him. He rubbed it with his finger - well, affectionately - when he told me about it. He was scared stiff of course, he said, but he was more shocked than really frightened. He felt like somebody had taken the lid off life and let him look at the works."

Flitcraft had been a good citizen and a good husband and father, not by any outer compulsion, but simply because he was a man most comfortable in step with his surroundings. He had been raised that way. The people he knew were like that. The life he knew was a clean orderly sane responsible affair. Now a falling beam had shown him that life was fundamentally none of these things. He, the good citizen-husband-father, could be wiped out between office and restaurant by the accident of a falling beam. He knew then that men died at haphazard like that, and lived only while blind chance spared them.

It was not, primarily, the injustice of it that disturbed him: he accepted that after the first shock. What disturbed him was the discovery that in sensibly ordering his affairs he had got out of step, and not in step, with life. He said he knew before he had gone twenty feet from the fallen beam that he would never know peace until he had adjusted himself to this new glimpse of life. By that time he had eaten his luncheon he had found his means of adjustment. Life could be ended for him at random by a falling beam: he would change his life at random by simply going away. He loved his family, he said, as much as he supposed was usual, but he knew he was leaving them adequately provided for, and his love for them was not of the sort that would make absence painful.

He went to Seattle that afternoon," Spade said, "and from there by boat to San Francisco. For a couple of years he wandered around and then drifted back to the Northwest, and settled in Spokane and got married. His second wife didn't look like the first, but they were more alike than they were different. You know, the kind of women that play fair games of golf and bridge and like new salad-recipes. He wasn't sorry for what he had done. It seemed reasonable enough to him. I don't think he even knew he had settled back naturally in the same groove he had jumped out of in Tacoma. But that the part of it I always liked. He adjusted himself to beams falling, and then no more of them fell, and he adjusted himself to them not falling."
 
2012-08-04 04:04:42 AM
Maybe he lied because he went off to cook meth and needed an excuse!
 
2012-08-04 04:18:00 AM
something something Whoa look at the blonde
 
2012-08-04 04:20:38 AM

kudayta: Does this story smell like bullshiat to anyone else?


You had me at:
"But he never arrived and the following day his burnt-out car was found on the side of the road ... About two weeks later, Mr Nagy withdrew money from his bank account and used it to buy camping supplies at a store in Newcastle."

Amnesia seemed to remember his PIN just fine.
 
2012-08-04 04:21:09 AM
100% of these amnesia stories are bullcrap.
 
2012-08-04 04:24:16 AM
That's unbelievable!


/No seriously, i don't believe it.
 
2012-08-04 04:25:55 AM

Oysterman: "But he never arrived and the following day his burnt-out car was found on the side of the road ... About two weeks later, Mr Nagy withdrew money from his bank account and used it to buy camping supplies at a store in Newcastle."

Amnesia seemed to remember his PIN just fine.


23 years ago, a person could probably walk into a bank and not have to show one piece of ID if a teller recognized them. Hell, in some places, you could've said "I need enough money to get a tent" and the teller would know how much to hand you.

I mean, did they even have ATM cards in Australia back then?

Not that the story doesn't sound a tad fishy.
 
2012-08-04 04:26:35 AM
youjivinmeturkey.files.wordpress.com
 
2012-08-04 04:35:40 AM
 
2012-08-04 04:36:35 AM
and he didn't return subby
 
2012-08-04 04:39:09 AM
I'd be suspicious if it wasn't for the head injury. And the fact he lived on the streets for 20 years instead of with his mistress.

What's more likely is that he either abandoned his family and then suffered the injury before he could do anything else, or was attacked by some mugger who took his ID and bank card (accounting for the bank withdrawal). 20 years ago, just about anyone could access a bank account in rural areas with ID and a convincing story.

It makes more sense if you realize that amnesia doesn't really affect long-term memory, but attacks your short-term memory (think Dory in "Finding Nemo"). If he had a bad head injury that scrambled his short-term memory, his life would be nothing but a series of day after day after day...but if someone had given him links to his past, his long-term memory would have kicked back in.

I'll hold judgment till anything else comes out.
 
2012-08-04 04:48:04 AM
And the cat's in the cradle and the silver spoon
Little boy blue and the man on the moon
When you comin' home dad?
I don't know when, but we'll get together then son
You know we'll have a good time then
 
2012-08-04 05:09:22 AM

Gyrfalcon: I'd be suspicious if it wasn't for the head injury. And the fact he lived on the streets for 20 years instead of with his mistress.

What's more likely is that he either abandoned his family and then suffered the injury before he could do anything else, or was attacked by some mugger who took his ID and bank card (accounting for the bank withdrawal). 20 years ago, just about anyone could access a bank account in rural areas with ID and a convincing story.

It makes more sense if you realize that amnesia doesn't really affect long-term memory, but attacks your short-term memory (think Dory in "Finding Nemo"). If he had a bad head injury that scrambled his short-term memory, his life would be nothing but a series of day after day after day...but if someone had given him links to his past, his long-term memory would have kicked back in.

I'll hold judgment till anything else comes out.


Except for the guy withdrew money from an ATM, you don't need money for the ATM just your pin number. And the only we know he lived on the streets is from the stories he told. He could have been scamming people and living of others for all that time. Like somebody else earlier said, it is very funny that he suddenly remembered his name when it came time for to have somebody pay for his surgery.

I thinking he owed some shady people money that he couldn't pay back, so he decided to take a powder.
 
2012-08-04 05:23:57 AM

ongbok: Gyrfalcon: I'd be suspicious if it wasn't for the head injury. And the fact he lived on the streets for 20 years instead of with his mistress.

What's more likely is that he either abandoned his family and then suffered the injury before he could do anything else, or was attacked by some mugger who took his ID and bank card (accounting for the bank withdrawal). 20 years ago, just about anyone could access a bank account in rural areas with ID and a convincing story.

It makes more sense if you realize that amnesia doesn't really affect long-term memory, but attacks your short-term memory (think Dory in "Finding Nemo"). If he had a bad head injury that scrambled his short-term memory, his life would be nothing but a series of day after day after day...but if someone had given him links to his past, his long-term memory would have kicked back in.

I'll hold judgment till anything else comes out.

Except for the guy withdrew money from an ATM, you don't need money for the ATM just your pin number. And the only we know he lived on the streets is from the stories he told. He could have been scamming people and living of others for all that time. Like somebody else earlier said, it is very funny that he suddenly remembered his name when it came time for to have somebody pay for his surgery.

I thinking he owed some shady people money that he couldn't pay back, so he decided to take a powder.


Where does it say he used an ATM?

I think it just said he "withdrew money from his bank account,"

The fact that the guy lived on the street for so long makes this story somewhat plausible.

Maybe he was attacked, or maybe he was in a car accident, or maybe his car caught fire and exploded.

Interesting article.
 
2012-08-04 05:30:23 AM
...Hmm, but to add to what i just said about it being plausible...

It does seem rather suspicious that he remembered his name when it came time to have cataract surgery.
 
2012-08-04 05:39:53 AM

danielscissorhands: ...Hmm, but to add to what i just said about it being plausible...

It does seem rather suspicious that he remembered his name when it came time to have cataract surgery.


He didn't remember his name then; he registered for medical care then. Which is not wholly implausible or illogical, him being in need of medical care and all that.

Dr Google tells me that dissociative fugue is a real but rare condition.
 
2012-08-04 06:01:46 AM
About two weeks later, Mr Nagy withdrew money from his bank account and used it to buy camping supplies at a store in Newcastle.

Nothing in there says it was withdrawn from an ATM.
 
2012-08-04 06:09:38 AM

orbister: danielscissorhands: ...Hmm, but to add to what i just said about it being plausible...

It does seem rather suspicious that he remembered his name when it came time to have cataract surgery.

He didn't remember his name then; he registered for medical care then. Which is not wholly implausible or illogical, him being in need of medical care and all that.

Dr Google tells me that dissociative fugue is a real but rare condition.


Hmmm.

But how did the pastor help him to "register in his original name" ?
 
2012-08-04 06:17:53 AM

KumquatMay: The Flitcraft Parable, Maltese Falcon, Dashiell Hammet

Spade sat down in the armchair beside the table and without any preliminary, without an introductory remark of any sort, began to tell the girl about a thing that had happened some years before in the Northwest. He talked in a steady matter-of-fact voice that was devoid of emphasis or pauses, though now and then he repeated a sentence slightly rearranged, as if it were important that each detail be related exactly as it had happened.


That's not a parable, that's fraud. What the fk kind of story is that? Dude abandoned his kids. His kids didn't need money, they needed their father. His first wife must have had some on the side -- or her own wealth coming into the marriage -- to shrug her shoulders that easily at being a divorcee in the freaking 20s. As for second wife and son, they should be paranoid 24/7 that dude would do the same thing to them, or that he had a string of other 'second families' all over the country.

Plus, since dude is alive, what happens to the will? Dude committed major fraud, his second marriage is void, I guess he at least had things squared with the IRS? Spade had no business relaying a story like that to some chick. I'd be more likely to believe the concrete beam was the Mafia and dude was running drugs/booze/girls on the side, so he fled town and settled down elsewhere hoping things would cool down. And to expect chicks to say 'hey, what he did made sense'.. is that for real? Do dudes actually think like that, that if they drop some change off that their responsibilities are done?
 
2012-08-04 06:24:40 AM
everything else i might say has been said
i will add tho
that after 20 years he needs to stay gone
no way hes the same guy they remember - not after all that time


honey im hoooommmmeeee (with 20 years of experience we never shared)(and the likelyhood we have nothing in common now shouldnt be an issue, right??)
 
2012-08-04 06:48:57 AM
Smells like bullshart.
 
2012-08-04 06:57:46 AM
I'm going to tell her I'm her long lost fark buddy. Apparently she will believe anything.
 
2012-08-04 07:08:01 AM
Fark off, deadbeat.
 
2012-08-04 07:34:47 AM
The Courier-Mail is Australia's version of the Daily Mail.

Just saying.
 
2012-08-04 07:49:12 AM

Gyrfalcon: I'd be suspicious if it wasn't for the head injury. And the fact he lived on the streets for 20 years instead of with his mistress.

What's more likely is that he either abandoned his family and then suffered the injury before he could do anything else, or was attacked by some mugger who took his ID and bank card (accounting for the bank withdrawal). 20 years ago, just about anyone could access a bank account in rural areas with ID and a convincing story.

It makes more sense if you realize that amnesia doesn't really affect long-term memory, but attacks your short-term memory (think Dory in "Finding Nemo"). If he had a bad head injury that scrambled his short-term memory, his life would be nothing but a series of day after day after day...but if someone had given him links to his past, his long-term memory would have kicked back in.

I'll hold judgment till anything else comes out.


Maybe the crack to the bead made him realize his wife was a complete coont? I could see that but its still unlikely and his story is probably bullshiat.
 
2012-08-04 08:15:16 AM
Thinking back 23 years, there were ATM's around, not one on every corner, but they were out there, at least in the USA. Who knows about Australia.

What makes it smell is that he obviously had his wallet and some memory because he either found an ATM and remembered his PIN or had enough information in his wallet to find a bank and convince a teller to let him withdraw money.

As well as the he had something on his person that 23 years later lets his pastor help him register for benefits under his own name.
 
2012-08-04 08:23:15 AM

Apollonia James: Fark off, deadbeat.


STAY OUT OF MALIBU, LEBOWSKI!
 
2012-08-04 09:47:48 AM
sleeper2995:

And the cat's in the cradle and the silver spoon
Little boy blue and the man on the moon
When you comin' home dad?
I don't know when, but we'll get together then son
You know we'll have a good time then


Admit it people. You sang this in your head and it sounded just like Jim Croche.
 
2012-08-04 10:13:19 AM

Richard Johnson: sleeper2995:

And the cat's in the cradle and the silver spoon
Little boy blue and the man on the moon
When you comin' home dad?
I don't know when, but we'll get together then son
You know we'll have a good time then

Admit it people. You sang this in your head and it sounded just like Jim Croche.


Nope. Morgan Freeman,

/And now you are too.
 
2012-08-04 10:19:12 AM

Iceman_Cometh: Richard Johnson: sleeper2995:

And the cat's in the cradle and the silver spoon
Little boy blue and the man on the moon
When you comin' home dad?
I don't know when, but we'll get together then son
You know we'll have a good time then

Admit it people. You sang this in your head and it sounded just like Jim Croche.

Nope. Morgan Freeman,

/And now you are too.


Gordon Lightfoot.

/yw
 
2012-08-04 11:53:29 AM

Deranger: Iceman_Cometh: Richard Johnson: sleeper2995:

And the cat's in the cradle and the silver spoon
Little boy blue and the man on the moon
When you comin' home dad?
I don't know when, but we'll get together then son
You know we'll have a good time then

Admit it people. You sang this in your head and it sounded just like Jim Croche.

Nope. Morgan Freeman,

/And now you are too.

Gordon Lightfoot.

/yw


Roger Waters
 
2012-08-04 12:42:49 PM

saturn badger: Deranger: Iceman_Cometh: Richard Johnson: sleeper2995:

And the cat's in the cradle and the silver spoon
Little boy blue and the man on the moon
When you comin' home dad?
I don't know when, but we'll get together then son
You know we'll have a good time then

Admit it people. You sang this in your head and it sounded just like Jim Croche.

Nope. Morgan Freeman,

/And now you are too.

Gordon Lightfoot.

/yw

Roger Waters


Nope.

Ugly Kid Joe.

/thread over yet?
 
2012-08-04 01:26:11 PM

Gyrfalcon: I'd be suspicious if it wasn't for the head injury. And the fact he lived on the streets for 20 years instead of with his mistress.

What's more likely is that he either abandoned his family and then suffered the injury before he could do anything else, or was attacked by some mugger who took his ID and bank card (accounting for the bank withdrawal). 20 years ago, just about anyone could access a bank account in rural areas with ID and a convincing story.

It makes more sense if you realize that amnesia doesn't really affect long-term memory, but attacks your short-term memory (think Dory in "Finding Nemo"). If he had a bad head injury that scrambled his short-term memory, his life would be nothing but a series of day after day after day...but if someone had given him links to his past, his long-term memory would have kicked back in.

I'll hold judgment till anything else comes out.


Yeah, it was suspicious to me, too, until I saw the head injury. Any kind of head injury will affect each person differently. It could be that he remembered his identity but not the fact that he had a family (or that he only knew his name because of his driver's license). It sounds like this guy had anterograde amnesia, where you can remember information for a few minutes, but it doesn't transfer to your long-term memory.

The brain is a really complicated organ.
 
2012-08-04 01:48:00 PM

puffy999: Oysterman: "But he never arrived and the following day his burnt-out car was found on the side of the road ... About two weeks later, Mr Nagy withdrew money from his bank account and used it to buy camping supplies at a store in Newcastle."

Amnesia seemed to remember his PIN just fine.

23 years ago, a person could probably walk into a bank and not have to show one piece of ID if a teller recognized them. Hell, in some places, you could've said "I need enough money to get a tent" and the teller would know how much to hand you.

I mean, did they even have ATM cards in Australia back then?

Not that the story doesn't sound a tad fishy.


Wouldn't know if they had ATM or even PIN security back then. But now that I think about it and you mention it, an even greater logic flaw in my selection seems to be that he had to have known his identity in order to withdraw from his account. Or less plausibly he had thought he scored some stranger's wallet assuming there wouldn't be a photo ID... at which point the story is complete bull if there was such ID. Hard to forget who you are for 20 years when you have a card telling you.
 
2012-08-04 06:33:27 PM
What a crock of Vegemite.
 
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