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(The Age (Melbourne))   Want to use your own Wi-Fi hotspot at the Olympics™? Too bad   (theage.com.au) divider line 73
    More: Asinine, Wi-Fi, wireless hotspots, counterfeit goods, access points, Beijing Games, fish and chips  
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5061 clicks; posted to Geek » on 03 Aug 2012 at 1:35 PM (2 years ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2012-08-03 11:15:12 AM
I can't say i'm surprised at stories like this. corporations are starting to become very weird these days.
 
2012-08-03 11:35:22 AM
How is this legal? They can't ban airwaves. But this is the UK, where you have no rights and just about everything is banned.
 
2012-08-03 11:53:37 AM

Walker: How is this legal? They can't ban airwaves. But this is the UK, where you have no rights and just about everything is banned.


i'm half expecting to see something like this happen at US sporting events.
 
2012-08-03 11:59:36 AM
So...if you have a smartphone with internet service, that's fine. Or an iPad with a cell plan, that's fine. Or a wireless card for your laptop with a data plan, that's fine. But if you tether your phone to your laptop or use Wireless Tether to connect your wi-fi only iPad, that's illegal?

What the farking fark?
 
2012-08-03 12:06:38 PM

dahmers love zombie: So...if you have a smartphone with internet service, that's fine. Or an iPad with a cell plan, that's fine. Or a wireless card for your laptop with a data plan, that's fine. But if you tether your phone to your laptop or use Wireless Tether to connect your wi-fi only iPad, that's illegal?

What the farking fark?


welcome to the 21st century!
 
2012-08-03 12:09:45 PM

Weaver95: I can't say i'm surprised at stories like this. corporations are starting to become very weird these days.


Came here to pretty much say the same thing.

On paper, in their planning sessions, in their board rooms, all these things seem to make sense - must use our WiFi, protect the brand name and imagery, only McDonalds fries, not allowed to upload photos taken to Social Media sites, can only serve these types of beer...and so on...but then when these rules come to light and are "enforced" on the general public, mom and pop shop owners and the like these corporations look like a bunch of backwards, money grubbing whores with zero grasp on reality.
 
vpb [TotalFark]
2012-08-03 12:24:11 PM

Walker: How is this legal? They can't ban airwaves. But this is the UK, where you have no rights and just about everything is banned.


Sure they can. It would be legal here too. It's not any different from a movie theater prohibiting people from bringing their own popcorn and drinks so they can sell their own at inflated prices.
 
2012-08-03 12:43:37 PM

Weaver95: I can't say i'm surprised at stories like this. corporations are starting to become very weird these days.


Meh. My guess is the Olympic organizers did a terrible job negotiating. I happen to be a NASCAR fan. Everyone knows how sponsorship is *everywhere* in that sport. Yet, when you go to an event, there are no onerous rules for fans or vendors. If Bud Light is sponsoring the race, you can still bring in your own Miller (or a real beer) into the stands. If McDonalds is sponsoring something, you can still get a hamburger and fries from some random vendor (generally a ma and pa business).

Yes, ads are plastered on every single damn thing that an ad could be plastered on... but they don't go as far as affecting the fan's experience.

And I'm sure some company paid to be the official wi-fi sponsor of events, I've never heard of someone tethering their phone being banned.
 
2012-08-03 01:17:58 PM
It'll be interesting to see how the next couple of Olympic sites handle this. I think the South Koreans (2018 Winter, I believe) would more than willing to bypass any corporate crap that tried to ban phone usage.
 
2012-08-03 01:44:08 PM

Weaver95: I can't say i'm surprised at stories like this. corporations are starting to become very weird these days.


Not new. You could not take your own pictures, beyond snapshots, at the 1893 Fair in Chicago. You had to buy their pictures.
 
2012-08-03 01:54:43 PM
And this is one major reason why I am not actively watching Olympic events on TV. This brand-protection is bordering on brownshirt lunacy.
 
2012-08-03 02:01:09 PM
Man... you could have so much fun farking with those guys.
 
2012-08-03 02:02:30 PM
The IOC are a bunch of asshats, and will do anything to protect their revenue stream. Whoever came up with the idea that an international celebration of peaceful competition should be profitable needs to be beaten with the Ugli stick.
 
2012-08-03 02:05:50 PM

dahmers love zombie: So...if you have a smartphone with internet service, that's fine. Or an iPad with a cell plan, that's fine. Or a wireless card for your laptop with a data plan, that's fine. But if you tether your phone to your laptop or use Wireless Tether to connect your wi-fi only iPad, that's illegal?

What the farking fark?


Wifi is an unlicensed spectrum, and multiple Access Points (hotspots too) that arent synchronized can play hell with each other and interrupt wifi service. Since it's a private venue, I'd think that BT could request no unauthorized APs so that they can try and keep their paid service working.

I found the ban on fish & chip vendors from just selling fries alone since McDonalds was the "Official" french fry supplier of the Olympics to be far more disturbing.

/on the flip side...$9 for 90 minutes of wifi access?! WTF?
 
2012-08-03 02:14:34 PM
Side question, has anyone else seen these around?

lh4.googleusercontent.com
 
2012-08-03 02:16:34 PM

Walker: How is this legal? They can't ban airwaves. But this is the UK, where you have no rights and just about everything is banned.


The 2.4/5 GHz ranges are unlicensed up to a certain wattage in the UK like they are in the US (and in fact a little larger range of frequencies). There's nothing illegal about using a WiFi AP inside the Olympic grounds, just against the terms and conditions of your Olympic ticket, so they have the civil right to throw you out.
 
2012-08-03 02:18:06 PM

China White Tea: Man... you could have so much fun farking with photoshopping those guys.


FTFM but I'm right with you

/gets popcorn
 
2012-08-03 02:19:27 PM

downstairs: And I'm sure some company paid to be the official wi-fi sponsor of events


Which I find to be truly bizarre. I mean, sure...I guess there may be a need for folks to need a WiFi connection...but if you think about this...you have to run the cable, buy a lot of expensive networking equipment, pay network engineers to maintain said equipment, pay people to run around the Olympic park with expensive monitoring equipment...I mean, a Core switch...Cisco Nexus 7000 series is going to run you $150K to $200K, you are going to need 2 of them for redundancy purposes, then all the access layer switches - several tens of thousands of dollars each, then all the remote WiFi antennas...

I just do not see the potential return on investment being all that significant.
 
2012-08-03 02:20:08 PM

queezyweezel: /on the flip side...$9 for 90 minutes of wifi access?! WTF?


That's just crazy. It's worse than those hotels that charge per night for incredibly slow WiFi, which is laughable because my phone is an LTE hotspot in most cities now.
 
2012-08-03 02:22:37 PM

azazyel: Side question, has anyone else seen these around?

[lh4.googleusercontent.com image 408x116]


You can configure you own custom name for a hotspot, so I have to wonder if someone did that as a joke to fark with the paranoid. If it was an actual NSA listening post, they'd name it something much more innocuous, like "Free Candy".
 
2012-08-03 02:22:53 PM

azazyel: Side question, has anyone else seen these around?

[lh4.googleusercontent.com image 408x116]


nerd.co.ke

fumaga.com
 
2012-08-03 02:23:13 PM

azazyel: Side question, has anyone else seen these around?

[lh4.googleusercontent.com image 408x116]


Nope. Just these:

www.howtogeek.com

i.imgur.com
 
2012-08-03 02:26:00 PM
I don't really know much about how tethering devices work, but it seems like it'd be great if everyone just changed the name of their tethering device to that of the Olympic WiFi netowork. You could have upwards of 100 networks with same name. While it sounds like they can sniff out the non-official WiFi sources, it would make a pretty good trollish statement. But again, I don't know how that stuff works.
 
2012-08-03 02:27:29 PM

azazyel: Side question, has anyone else seen these around?

[lh4.googleusercontent.com image 408x116]


Someone's a trollin'.
 
2012-08-03 02:27:45 PM

queezyweezel: azazyel: Side question, has anyone else seen these around?

[lh4.googleusercontent.com image 408x116]

Nope. Just these:

[www.howtogeek.com image 640x396]

[i.imgur.com image 294x397]


In my last apartment complex, for the lulz, I left one of my wireless routers open...I monitored a neighbors internet browsing history - he was a sick man. I then set up another router with something like "FBI Surveillance Van 11_A7N." He toned down his browsing quite a bit. I found that when the FBI router was NOT running, he went crazy with the porn, and when it was running, he behaved.
 
2012-08-03 02:33:59 PM
Thanks for the responses. I was waiting for my bus and I saw it pop up and was a little curious.
 
2012-08-03 02:35:39 PM
Inside the stadium/venue, I understand some of these rules. But this part...

Under laws specifically passed for the London Games, the brand army has rights to enter shops and business premises and bring courts actions and fines up to £20,000.

Words such as "Olympic", "gold", "silver", "bronze", "sponsors", "summer" and "London" have been banned from business advertisements so as not to give the impression they are connected to the Olympics. Even pubs can't have signs displaying brands of beer that are not official sponsors.


Complete horseshiat. Not to mention that businesses may have pre-existing contracts. Even the greed at the Olympics is top-of-the-world. I'm honestly surprised no "brand army" member has gone into a pub and been dragged out.
 
2012-08-03 02:39:29 PM

Droog8912: Inside the stadium/venue, I understand some of these rules. But this part...

Under laws specifically passed for the London Games, the brand army has rights to enter shops and business premises and bring courts actions and fines up to £20,000.

Words such as "Olympic", "gold", "silver", "bronze", "sponsors", "summer" and "London" have been banned from business advertisements so as not to give the impression they are connected to the Olympics. Even pubs can't have signs displaying brands of beer that are not official sponsors.

Complete horseshiat. Not to mention that businesses may have pre-existing contracts. Even the greed at the Olympics is top-of-the-world. I'm honestly surprised no "brand army" member has gone into a pub and been dragged out.


How does that work if your business is called "Bob's house of Jewelry - We buy Gold, Silver and precious and semi-precious stones"
 
2012-08-03 02:41:48 PM

Weaver95: dahmers love zombie: So...if you have a smartphone with internet service, that's fine. Or an iPad with a cell plan, that's fine. Or a wireless card for your laptop with a data plan, that's fine. But if you tether your phone to your laptop or use Wireless Tether to connect your wi-fi only iPad, that's illegal?

What the farking fark?

welcome to the 21st century1984!


FTFY

/it was a warning not a blueprint
 
2012-08-03 02:53:20 PM
Someone ties a hotspot to a pigeon in 3..2...
 
2012-08-03 02:53:56 PM
"Welcome to the Olympics. Fark you! Gimme money!"
 
2012-08-03 02:59:02 PM
So fascists really do wear red polo shirts.
 
2012-08-03 03:08:44 PM

vpb: Walker: How is this legal? They can't ban airwaves. But this is the UK, where you have no rights and just about everything is banned.

Sure they can. It would be legal here too. It's not any different from a movie theater prohibiting people from bringing their own popcorn and drinks so they can sell their own at inflated prices.


Yes it is. I would be like the theater blocking cellphone reception, which is illegal. The US is very particular about people trying to block the public airwaves.
 
2012-08-03 03:09:22 PM
FTFA: Under laws specifically passed for the London Games, the brand army has rights to enter shops and business premises and bring courts actions and fines up to £20,000.

Take notes, people: This is what fascism looks like.
 
2012-08-03 03:19:02 PM
"However at the same time you don't want to protect that investment so much that you piss off everyone," he said.

Judging by the rest of the article, I'd say that ship has sailed.
 
2012-08-03 03:46:01 PM

Snarcoleptic_Hoosier: It'll be interesting to see how the next couple of Olympic sites handle this. I think the South Koreans (2018 Winter, I believe) would more than willing to bypass any corporate crap that tried to ban phone usage.


If they're not doing it already, I'll bet the IOC starts taking things like this into account when they decide which cities get the games.

"Lovely city, easy to get around, great infrastructure... oh, your country's laws won't let us impose our own version of martial law? Sorry, no Games™ for you!"

And a lot of countries will be more than willing to enact or change their laws to accommodate these farks.
 
2012-08-03 03:48:55 PM

Endive Wombat: downstairs: And I'm sure some company paid to be the official wi-fi sponsor of events

Which I find to be truly bizarre. I mean, sure...I guess there may be a need for folks to need a WiFi connection...but if you think about this...you have to run the cable, buy a lot of expensive networking equipment, pay network engineers to maintain said equipment, pay people to run around the Olympic park with expensive monitoring equipment...I mean, a Core switch...Cisco Nexus 7000 series is going to run you $150K to $200K, you are going to need 2 of them for redundancy purposes, then all the access layer switches - several tens of thousands of dollars each, then all the remote WiFi antennas...

I just do not see the potential return on investment being all that significant.


They probably already had the gear, and are getting paid by the IOC to do it. The advertising probably knocks $$ off their price is all.
 
2012-08-03 04:03:37 PM

Droog8912: Inside the stadium/venue, I understand some of these rules. But this part...

Under laws specifically passed for the London Games, the brand army has rights to enter shops and business premises and bring courts actions and fines up to £20,000.

Words such as "Olympic", "gold", "silver", "bronze", "sponsors", "summer" and "London" have been banned from business advertisements so as not to give the impression they are connected to the Olympics. Even pubs can't have signs displaying brands of beer that are not official sponsors.

Complete horseshiat. Not to mention that businesses may have pre-existing contracts. Even the greed at the Olympics is top-of-the-world. I'm honestly surprised no "brand army" member has gone into a pub and been dragged out.


I want the next olympics to be in Texas.

Olympic Goon (French accent): You must take down those signs for Lone Star beer!
Bar Owner: It's my bar, it's what I sell.
Olympic Goon: Tough, I'm an olympic rent-a-cop and you have to do what I say.
Bar Owner: Oh, really?
sound of pump action shotgun cycling
Bar Owner: Make me.
Sound of olympic thug pissing his pants
 
2012-08-03 04:12:50 PM
I might just have to rename my home router, "Conquistador Instant Leprosy."
 
2012-08-03 04:22:39 PM

machodonkeywrestler: vpb: Walker: How is this legal? They can't ban airwaves. But this is the UK, where you have no rights and just about everything is banned.

Sure they can. It would be legal here too. It's not any different from a movie theater prohibiting people from bringing their own popcorn and drinks so they can sell their own at inflated prices.

Yes it is. I would be like the theater blocking cellphone reception, which is illegal. The US is very particular about people trying to block the public airwaves.


Well, yes and no. You cannot use an active jammer, as it would interfere with liscenced use of that spectrum. This is part 15 of the FCC rules, IIRC. However, if you were to build a faraday cage, a passive 'jammer', this would not be illegal. Many steel frame buildings do this, and not by design; although I admit it hasn't seemed as bad with modern handsets.
 
2012-08-03 04:28:03 PM

queezyweezel: azazyel: Side question, has anyone else seen these around?

[lh4.googleusercontent.com image 408x116]

Nope. Just these:

[www.howtogeek.com image 640x396]

[i.imgur.com image 294x397]


Why is "youcanthazwireless" unsecured?
 
2012-08-03 04:30:33 PM
I forgot to post the comment that was relevant to the discussion:

I wonder if this sort of practice is new, or if it has always happened and it's just now getting attention because of the rate at which information disseminates.
 
2012-08-03 04:34:13 PM

azazyel: Side question, has anyone else seen these around?

[lh4.googleusercontent.com image 408x116]


Yeah, I hacked one once. It was just some bad porn involving some guy who kind of looked like Bill Clinton and a mock up of the oval office labeled "Eagle banging the fat chick, again. "
 
2012-08-03 04:38:41 PM
Unless the local businesses have signed a contract and are getting a cut, can't the tell them to fark off? They were there first after all.
 
2012-08-03 04:45:01 PM

queezyweezel: azazyel: Side question, has anyone else seen these around?

[lh4.googleusercontent.com image 408x116]

Nope. Just these:

[www.howtogeek.com image 640x396]

[i.imgur.com image 294x397]


Man, my neighborhood's SSIDs are so boring compared those, 'linksys' as far as the eye can see.
 
2012-08-03 04:45:05 PM
Only official sponsors who have paid a certain amount of money are permitted to use Olympic Games trademarks


i47.tinypic.com

Ha! In your face IOC
 
2012-08-03 04:45:29 PM
Weaver95
I can't say i'm surprised at stories like this. corporations are starting to become very weird these days.


Some German IT website had a nice long article (actually: TLDR;) about the IT infrastructure behind the scenes.
Compared to brand/advertising restrictions I can kind of understand Wi-Fi restrictions at the venues.

I can see how you don't want unexpected hotspots competing for frequencies popping up if you have a comparatively small area where you have to provide cell phone, wireless LAN and other network services for 300000+ visitors, TV stations, journalists, athletes and their staff (for example, if you watch field hockey, the coaches at the bench are usually wearing a headset; they're in radio contact with an assistant coach up in the video tower who, besides having a different view and advice, is filming the game; the video guy might also send a video of e.g. the last penalty corner or some other data down to an iPad at the bench).
 
2012-08-03 04:45:31 PM
How does that work? Can they compell you to turn off your own device and not use your own service? What could possibly be the legal grounds? You aren't infringing their trademark by checkingyour own twitter account or browsing to Fark on your own wi-fi.

I can't imagine anyone actually agreed to be bound by that, and I wonder what the language on the back of the ticet could be that would extend that level of broad control?
 
2012-08-03 04:46:53 PM

rosonowski: machodonkeywrestler: vpb: Walker: How is this legal? They can't ban airwaves. But this is the UK, where you have no rights and just about everything is banned.

Sure they can. It would be legal here too. It's not any different from a movie theater prohibiting people from bringing their own popcorn and drinks so they can sell their own at inflated prices.

Yes it is. I would be like the theater blocking cellphone reception, which is illegal. The US is very particular about people trying to block the public airwaves.

Well, yes and no. You cannot use an active jammer, as it would interfere with liscenced use of that spectrum. This is part 15 of the FCC rules, IIRC. However, if you were to build a faraday cage, a passive 'jammer', this would not be illegal. Many steel frame buildings do this, and not by design; although I admit it hasn't seemed as bad with modern handsets.


Not an expert on FCC rules, but if you did this with the explicit purpose of not letting cel phones work, wouldn't that be illegal.

I mean, i don't want people yapping away at the theaters... but I also know that doctors and nurses are on 24/7 call, and need to be able to receive a call (which hopefully they'd do on silent, and jog out of the theater to take the actual call.)
 
2012-08-03 04:51:01 PM
Fish and chip stalls have been advised they are not allowed to serve chips on their own without fish as McDonald's is the official chip maker of the Games. The Independent reported that the ban on chips extended to 800 retailers at the 40 Olympic venues.



FARK EVERYTHING ABOUT THIS>>> OH MY FREAKING GOD
 
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