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(The Verge)   Android Jellybean has hidden, rudimentary support for multiple user accounts which eventually should allow you to hand your phone over to your girlfriend, boss, or kids without that uncomfortable pause   (theverge.com) divider line 59
    More: Spiffy, multiple users, users, Bad Things, PMPs, Android, SlashGear  
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2695 clicks; posted to Geek » on 03 Aug 2012 at 2:34 AM (2 years ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2012-08-03 01:35:51 AM  
I thought the uncomfortable pause comes from when the borrower realizes that the owner probably used the phone several times on the can, or in other uncomfortable places.

/ like the back of a Volkswagen?
 
2012-08-03 02:58:29 AM  
Good start. I'll be happy when they include decent encryption of the contents of the phone, so I can lose it without giving away my data, or hand it to a cop without confessing my recent whereabouts, who I know, junk I've recorded on the notepad, etc...

As far as I know, with one exception for one phone, such a thing doesn't exist, and it should.

/YMMV
 
2012-08-03 02:59:29 AM  
I heard about this, it seems cool. I hate lending out my phone to people but with this I don't think I'd mind.
 
2012-08-03 03:13:02 AM  

sillydragon: Good start. I'll be happy when they include decent encryption of the contents of the phone, so I can lose it without giving away my data, or hand it to a cop without confessing my recent whereabouts, who I know, junk I've recorded on the notepad, etc...

As far as I know, with one exception for one phone, such a thing doesn't exist, and it should.

/YMMV


look harder...encryption is there if you look
 
2012-08-03 03:24:24 AM  
The Deathstalker is usually 3-4 inches long and could be mistaken for a toy because of its spindly legs and rubbery looking yellow or green exterior.

i.dailymail.co.uk

// that looks nothing like construx.
 
2012-08-03 03:28:01 AM  
There's no reason ever your boss should need your phone.
 
2012-08-03 03:28:18 AM  
No comment.
 
2012-08-03 03:32:47 AM  
This is why I use an iPhone.
 
2012-08-03 03:33:42 AM  

sillydragon: Good start. I'll be happy when they include decent encryption of the contents of the phone, so I can lose it without giving away my data, or hand it to a cop without confessing my recent whereabouts, who I know, junk I've recorded on the notepad, etc...

As far as I know, with one exception for one phone, such a thing doesn't exist, and it should.

/YMMV


i20.photobucket.com
Mine came with the stock ROM on the Telus Galaxy Note. and when I rooted and stripped all the samsung crap off, it was still there. Dunno how secure it is though
 
2012-08-03 03:55:22 AM  
Huh. Maybe I should look into things again. Last I looked you were pretty SOL if you wanted encryption, except for an experimental ROM for one particular phone. Ideally I'd like something like TrueCrypt for windows. Encrypt the apps, data, OS, everything.

/ENCRYPT ALL THE BITS!
 
2012-08-03 04:02:27 AM  

sillydragon: Huh. Maybe I should look into things again. Last I looked you were pretty SOL if you wanted encryption, except for an experimental ROM for one particular phone. Ideally I'd like something like TrueCrypt for windows. Encrypt the apps, data, OS, everything.

/ENCRYPT ALL THE BITS!

Filesystem Encryption

Android 3.0 and later provides full filesystem encryption, so all user data can be encrypted in the kernel using the dmcrypt implementation of AES128 with CBC and ESSIV:SHA256. The encryption key is protected by AES128 using a key derived from the user password, preventing unauthorized access to stored data without the user device password. To provide resistance against systematic password guessing attacks (e.g. "rainbow tables" or brute force), the password is combined with a random salt and hashed repeatedly with SHA1 using the standard PBKDF2 algorithm prior to being used to decrypt the filesystem key. To provide resistance against dictionary password guessing attacks, Android provides password complexity rules that can be set by the device administrator and enforced by the operating system. Filesystem encryption requires the use of a user password, pattern-based screen lock is not supported.

More details on implementation of filesystem encryption are available at https://source.android.com/tech/encryption/android_crypto_implementati on.html

 
2012-08-03 04:20:52 AM  
I don't use mine for anything that would make me pause. They can pry it from my .. etc etc. I paid for this thing outright and you can bet the next arsehat would drop it. Get your own.
 
2012-08-03 04:24:13 AM  

sillydragon: Good start. I'll be happy when they include decent encryption of the contents of the phone, so I can lose it without giving away my data, or hand it to a cop without confessing my recent whereabouts, who I know, junk I've recorded on the notepad, etc...

As far as I know, with one exception for one phone, such a thing doesn't exist, and it should.

/YMMV


Correct me if I'm wrong, but wouldn't that decrease battery life (especially if it wasn't hardware accelerated)? Assuming that's correct, why not just store the confidential things in a local crypt and rely on remote wipe for the rest.

Another reason why Google/Apple/MS may not implement full disk encryption is that it can introduce strange behaviours.
 
2012-08-03 04:27:32 AM  
Also, this could be a killer feature for Android tablets, IMHO. Tablets are more likely to be shared within a household than a phone. You can already get multi-user ability on iPad (and iPhone, though not really that useful IMO), but I'm sure Apple will be the manufacturer to add it ("Why not just buy another iPad? ;D -_-").
 
2012-08-03 04:28:16 AM  

digistil: Also, this could be a killer feature for Android tablets, IMHO. Tablets are more likely to be shared within a household than a phone. You can already get multi-user ability on iPad via Jailbreaking (and iPhone, though not really that useful IMO), but I'm sure Apple will be the manufacturer to add it ("Why not just buy another iPad? ;D -_-").


FTFM
 
2012-08-03 04:43:24 AM  

RoyBatty: sillydragon: Huh. Maybe I should look into things again. Last I looked you were pretty SOL if you wanted encryption, except for an experimental ROM for one particular phone. Ideally I'd like something like TrueCrypt for windows. Encrypt the apps, data, OS, everything.

/ENCRYPT ALL THE BITS!

Filesystem Encryption

Android 3.0 and later provides full filesystem encryption, so all user data can be encrypted in the kernel using the dmcrypt implementation of AES128 with CBC and ESSIV:SHA256. The encryption key is protected by AES128 using a key derived from the user password, preventing unauthorized access to stored data without the user device password. To provide resistance against systematic password guessing attacks (e.g. "rainbow tables" or brute force), the password is combined with a random salt and hashed repeatedly with SHA1 using the standard PBKDF2 algorithm prior to being used to decrypt the filesystem key. To provide resistance against dictionary password guessing attacks, Android provides password complexity rules that can be set by the device administrator and enforced by the operating system. Filesystem encryption requires the use of a user password, pattern-based screen lock is not supported.

More details on implementation of filesystem encryption are available at https://source.android.com/tech/encryption/android_crypto_implementati on.html


Ah, excellent. I'm glad to stand corrected on this.


digistil: sillydragon: Good start. I'll be happy when they include decent encryption of the contents of the phone, so I can lose it without giving away my data, or hand it to a cop without confessing my recent whereabouts, who I know, junk I've recorded on the notepad, etc...

As far as I know, with one exception for one phone, such a thing doesn't exist, and it should.

/YMMV

Correct me if I'm wrong, but wouldn't that decrease battery life (especially if it wasn't hardware accelerated)? Assuming that's correct, why not just store the confidential things in a local crypt and rely on remote wipe for the rest.

Another reason why Google/Apple/MS may not implement full disk encryption is that it can introduce strange behaviours.


I dunno. I've used TrueCrypt on my laptop for quite a while now with no real noticeable lagginess or problems with battery life. Or strange behavior for that matter.
 
2012-08-03 04:48:39 AM  
Meh. I don't loan my phone out to anyone except my girlfriend. She knows all my passwords anyway, so it isn't like I have anything to hide.

/in four years, I've never been more than three feet away from my phone.
//I make sure I have my phone before my keys when I'm leaving my apartment
 
2012-08-03 05:25:22 AM  

sillydragon: I dunno. I've used TrueCrypt on my laptop for quite a while now with no real noticeable lagginess or problems with battery life. Or strange behavior for that matter.


I should have elaborated on the "strange behavior." I've had trouble getting a few licensing systems (read DRM) to work for some specialized software.
 
2012-08-03 06:19:30 AM  
Ten years ago if you told me I'd be using a product called Android Jellybean I would have told you to GTFO.

/googletwitterflickryelp
 
2012-08-03 06:47:20 AM  

LDM90: Ten years ago if you told me I'd be using a product called Android Jellybean I would have told you to GTFO.

/googletwitterflickryelp


Coke is it.
 
2012-08-03 06:58:36 AM  
Wasn't Android Jellybean the code name of one of Castro's plots to replace Reagan with a robot?
 
2012-08-03 07:04:40 AM  
There is an app called SwitchMe that gives you this functionality. I've only been using it for a little while on my Nexus 7, but I like it so far. It's a reboot to switch users, but thats not a deal breaker.

Now, if I could only encrypt my phone and still be able to flash the most recent nightly ....
 
2012-08-03 07:39:08 AM  

Bob Down: I don't use mine for anything that would make me pause. They can pry it from my .. etc etc. I paid for this thing outright and you can bet the next arsehat would drop it. Get your own.


bingo. these are personal items of hands-off status. no tolerance for phone touching. same with PC/laptops. Mrs. Kritter has her stuff I has mine. we respect the space.
 
2012-08-03 07:40:35 AM  

sillydragon: Huh. Maybe I should look into things again. Last I looked you were pretty SOL if you wanted encryption, except for an experimental ROM for one particular phone. Ideally I'd like something like TrueCrypt for windows. Encrypt the apps, data, OS, everything.

/ENCRYPT ALL THE BITS!


Help me understand, what's the point of encrypting stuff? If I lose my phone and someone picks it up and looks at it the phone will be decrypting it because it won't know it's not me looking at it. Or does it require a password everytime the screen powers off and then back on again?
 
2012-08-03 07:44:36 AM  

AverageAmericanGuy: This is why I use an iPhone.


What is?
 
2012-08-03 08:15:23 AM  

meanmutton: AverageAmericanGuy: This is why I use an iPhone.

What is?


Which is?
 
2012-08-03 08:17:25 AM  

Buckaroo Beeblebrox: Wasn't Android Jellybean the code name of one of Castro's plots to replace Reagan with a robot?


Funny you should mention that. It took longer than expected to get the project off the ground and granted, it's not perfect...
 
2012-08-03 08:23:31 AM  

Slaxl: Or does it require a password everytime the screen powers off and then back on again?


Yes and no. Some devices -- BlackBerry, for example -- really do wipe all non-encrypted data every time the phone locks (if you configure them to do so). On a fully encrypted BlackBerry the phone number -> address book lookup doesn't work because the address book is encrypted until you unlock the phone.

Most other devices are encrypted on-disk but decrypted in-RAM. If you rebooted them you'd need the password, but while running they are decrypted. In combination with a decent screen-lock it's decent protection, but if you can bypass the screen-lock the encryption doesn't mean anything until the phone reboots.
 
2012-08-03 08:29:04 AM  

sillydragon: Encrypt the apps, data, OS, everything.


I honestly think that's less useful, because it requires that the encryption key be kept live in RAM continuously. If you only encrypt user data (and not the OS) you can wipe any and/or all non-encrypted data when the phone locks, or at any other event that suited your usage. The OS doesn't contain any private data -- anyone else with the same phone already has a copy of the OS. Apps I could go either way on; the operation of the phone is easier if you don't encrypt them, but I guess I can see scenarios where simply knowing what apps were installed would be considered an information leak.
 
2012-08-03 08:29:30 AM  
Android Jelly Bean is not compatible with Adobe Flash, so if you bought an android instead of an i-Pad to get the whole Internet, sorry sucker.
http://www.uncoveror.com/android_tablets.htm
 
2012-08-03 08:29:59 AM  

Buckaroo Beeblebrox: Wasn't Android Jellybean the code name of one of Castro's plots to replace Reagan with a robot?


Romney needs a Pompadour.
 
2012-08-03 08:40:43 AM  

AverageAmericanGuy: This is why I use an iPhone.


Because no one in their right mind would ask to borrow an iPhone to make a real phone call?
 
2012-08-03 08:43:00 AM  

uncoveror: Android Jelly Bean is not compatible with Adobe Flash, so if you bought an android instead of an i-Pad to get the whole Internet, sorry sucker.
http://www.uncoveror.com/android_tablets.htm


You can still side load the latest version of flash. It is just not officially supported. Try doing that on an iPad.

/Have both an iPad and Nexus 7. Guess which one runs flash.
 
2012-08-03 08:43:20 AM  

meanmutton: AverageAmericanGuy: This is why I use an iPhone.

What is?


Yea, elaborate. Explain how that wasn't just a pointless fanboy derp.
 
2012-08-03 08:46:43 AM  
We have had that for awhile already thanks to guys on XDA... it works well too:)
 
2012-08-03 08:49:50 AM  

Buckaroo Beeblebrox: Wasn't Android Jellybean the code name of one of Castro's plots to replace Reagan with a robot?


Is this the new 'great band name' tedium?

Personally I'd love a default user accout or something that lets you just punch in 1111 or whatever and access a phone and whatever apps I allow on that, vs my master access where I can install, view all data usage, purchase stuff, and is encrypted so I can store sensitive data if I want.
 
2012-08-03 08:53:45 AM  

uncoveror: Android Jelly Bean is not compatible with Adobe Flash, so if you bought an android instead of an i-Pad to get the whole Internet, sorry sucker.
http://www.uncoveror.com/android_tablets.htm


Adobe Flash has been renamed Adobe Air and is available on every Android device.
 
2012-08-03 09:01:29 AM  

DuudeStanky: Mine came with the stock ROM on the Telus Galaxy Note. and when I rooted and stripped all the samsung crap off, it was still there. Dunno how secure it is though


You answered your own question.
 
2012-08-03 09:03:32 AM  

Abe Vigoda's Ghost: Because no one in their right mind would ask to borrow an iPhone to make a real phone call?


Who makes phone calls anymore?

/seriously
//I would be perfectly happy with a gadget with a data only plan
 
2012-08-03 09:03:34 AM  
I can't tell you how many times one of my friends or their kids has tried to look something up on my phone and opened up the browser to whatever pr0n page I was browsing at work.
 
2012-08-03 09:04:55 AM  

Bullseyed: Adobe Flash has been renamed Adobe Air and is available on every Android device.


So we went from one awful application delivery system not optimized for mobile devices to another?

/lots of win there.
 
2012-08-03 09:08:42 AM  

Abe Vigoda's Ghost: You can still side load the latest version of flash. It is just not officially supported. Try doing that on an iPad.

/Have both an iPad and Nexus 7. Guess which one runs flash.


Who cares? I really don't understand the love affair to a bloated buggy application environment. Whether it be on a PC or mobile device. As far as I can tell flash was only used on restaurant websites, poorly conceived games, and as a video delivery mechanism. The latter has been converted to other formats eons ago.

Seriously - why do you care about flash so much? You should be caring about the best experience for applications on your device. Flash isn't it.
 
2012-08-03 09:12:38 AM  

Bullseyed: uncoveror: Android Jelly Bean is not compatible with Adobe Flash, so if you bought an android instead of an i-Pad to get the whole Internet, sorry sucker.
http://www.uncoveror.com/android_tablets.htm

Adobe Flash has been renamed Adobe Air and is available on every Android device.


No, it hasn't; AIR and Flash aren't the same thing.
 
2012-08-03 09:15:53 AM  

A Leaf in Fall: I can't tell you how many times one of my friends or their kids has tried to look something up on my phone and opened up the browser to whatever pr0n page I was browsing at work.


There was a great little add-on for the Android version of Firefox that let you open up completely different sessions. It lets me keep the "adult" browsing on my Kindle Fire separate from everything else so I don't to worry about my daughter stumbling into something uncomfortable.

Of course, they just recently "updated" FireFox for Android which killed the add-on and dramatically changed the way that FireFox works. Thankfully, I only loaded it on my phone and not my Fire. I just don't see any reason to use FireFox anymore after the update.
 
2012-08-03 09:18:31 AM  

gingerjet: Abe Vigoda's Ghost: You can still side load the latest version of flash. It is just not officially supported. Try doing that on an iPad.

/Have both an iPad and Nexus 7. Guess which one runs flash.

Who cares? I really don't understand the love affair to a bloated buggy application environment. Whether it be on a PC or mobile device. As far as I can tell flash was only used on restaurant websites, poorly conceived games, and as a video delivery mechanism. The latter has been converted to other formats eons ago.

Seriously - why do you care about flash so much? You should be caring about the best experience for applications on your device. Flash isn't it.


While I don't disagree with you on Flash being buggy on a mobile/tablet device; it still has a presence on many websites. I just like having the ability to have full access to the content on the internet.
 
2012-08-03 09:19:28 AM  

gingerjet: Abe Vigoda's Ghost: You can still side load the latest version of flash. It is just not officially supported. Try doing that on an iPad.

/Have both an iPad and Nexus 7. Guess which one runs flash.

Who cares? I really don't understand the love affair to a bloated buggy application environment. Whether it be on a PC or mobile device. As far as I can tell flash was only used on restaurant websites, poorly conceived games, and as a video delivery mechanism. The latter has been converted to other formats eons ago.

Seriously - why do you care about flash so much? You should be caring about the best experience for applications on your device. Flash isn't it.


There are still lots of websites with lots of Flash out there. I care less about "the best experience for applications" and more about "getting the information that I'm looking to get".

Also, there are websites using Flash that are WAY better than any particular app that does the same thing -- Yahoo's baseball tracker is a good example. It's a great Flash-enabled website that presents everything I want in a nice, neat package. All of the baseball apps I've tried are TERRIBLE in comparison.
 
2012-08-03 09:28:35 AM  

digistil: digistil: Also, this could be a killer feature for Android tablets, IMHO. Tablets are more likely to be shared within a household than a phone. You can already get multi-user ability on iPad via Jailbreaking (and iPhone, though not really that useful IMO), but I'm sure Apple will be the manufacturer to add it ("Why not just buy another iPad? ;D -_-").

FTFM


OS X already has multi-user support, and if they want to unify iOS and OS X, this would be one thing to do.
 
2012-08-03 09:41:34 AM  
The killer app for this is not to have a husband and wife share a phone... it's to allow an employee to carry one device with a personal side and a secure work side under Mobile Device Management, possibly even wit separate phone numbers, data bills etc.

This requires encryption and file separation which is not really mentioned in this article but if it is there it will be very useful in the enterprise space.
 
2012-08-03 09:49:40 AM  
Adobe Air is a runtime that lets developers turn Web apps into standalone apps.
 
2012-08-03 10:08:20 AM  

The Dynamite Monkey: The killer app for this is not to have a husband and wife share a phone... it's to allow an employee to carry one device with a personal side and a secure work side under Mobile Device Management, possibly even wit separate phone numbers, data bills etc.

This requires encryption and file separation which is not really mentioned in this article but if it is there it will be very useful in the enterprise space.


ATT has already developed it for Android, and while I work for the T, I for the life of me cannot remember the name of it.
 
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