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(Huffington Post)   Finally, it's socially acceptable to admit Citizen Kane is not, in fact, the best movie ever made   (huffingtonpost.com) divider line 294
    More: Spiffy, Citizen Kane, Sight & Sound, Kim Novak, British Film Institute, A.O. Scott, Jean Renoir, art film, silent era  
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7752 clicks; posted to Entertainment » on 02 Aug 2012 at 1:19 AM (2 years ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2012-08-02 01:54:57 AM
Crap, wrong thread. Please delete, mods.
 
2012-08-02 01:54:57 AM
film snobs gonna snob
 
zez
2012-08-02 01:55:39 AM

underwhere: Why did the writer of that article go out of his way to post the spoiler about Rosebud?


That's what I was thinking. I know it's an old film but how many kids might want to check it out after hearing about it on the interwebs.

Granted, the first time I saw Citizen Kane, it was at an arthouse cinema after some rerelease for something. I liked it but didn't understand why everyone thought it was so great. Then I got the Laserdisc and listened to the commentary and finally realized that all the same old stuff I've seen a thousand times was all done in this movie for the very first time!

Time really has hurt that film, as well as the horrible old age makeup Wells used on himself.
 
2012-08-02 01:55:47 AM
fark it, I'll give my top ten that I think critics and fans can agree at least partially, in no particular order.

Citizen Kane
The Great Dictator
Apocalypse Now
Raging Bull
Mccabe and Mrs Miller
Jackie Brown
Once Upon a Time in Mexico
Gates of Heaven
Barry Lyndon
Oldboy.

(honorable mentions to Trainspotting and LA Confidential, but those are the two movies I've seen the most)


Don't like my list, come up with something better.
/Admittedly lacking in world cinema, but hey the majority of film viewers globally go with American cinema when given a choice. And I'm an ugly American that still hasn't seen Tokyo story.
/seriously though "Vertigo? Wouldn't even rank in my top five hitch films.
 
2012-08-02 01:56:07 AM
Still the most groundbreaking.
 
2012-08-02 01:56:17 AM
I am going with this movie...

3.bp.blogspot.com
 
2012-08-02 01:56:49 AM
blade runner, dune....... my list goes on i hold no favorites i hold only well made movies that require people to think. kindda sad the stupider ones get all the attention. farken glee, lost........
 
2012-08-02 01:56:59 AM
Kane was the prototype for a ton of modern film techniques, both camera and story telling. Flash backs, half frame shots, and dozens of other factors never done before first appeared in the film.

But I don't think it deserves the best ever spot just because it was so innovative. It earned it's spot in history for what it was at the time, but so many other movies have used the same elements so much better since. And, quite frankly, it hasn't aged that well. As someone mentioned above, the dialogue deliveries were kind of weird back then, very much reminiscent of stage acting where they were being intentionally obvious with their voices and faces to play to the cheap seats.
 
2012-08-02 01:57:23 AM

LonMead: simplicimus: Dr.Zom: It's Casablanca. Everybody knows it's Casablanca. No one ever says "Hey, let's watch Citizen Kane again tonight."

That list was a pretentious pile of crap. Sunrise: a Song for Two Humans? Blow me.

Casablanca is just insanely great. A bunch of contract actors and a B level script turned out to be so much more.

And Claude Rains with all the best lines!


Round up all the usual suspects.
 
2012-08-02 01:58:37 AM
Vertigo is a very beautifully filmed movie. It's also as boring as a Teletubbie marathon.
 
2012-08-02 02:01:58 AM

simplicimus: Dr.Zom: It's Casablanca. Everybody knows it's Casablanca. No one ever says "Hey, let's watch Citizen Kane again tonight."

That list was a pretentious pile of crap. Sunrise: a Song for Two Humans? Blow me.

Casablanca is just insanely great. A bunch of contract actors and a B level script turned out to be so much more.


That's why I really do think it's the greatest film of all time - the process took so many people's contributions and almost accidentally created this wonderful work of art. In Thomas Lennon and Robert Ben Garant's book on screenwriting (highly recommended by the way) they claim that Rick's entire backstory was added to the screenplay by the SEVENTH team of writers, which doesn't surprise me in the least.
 
2012-08-02 02:03:47 AM

simplicimus: LonMead: simplicimus: Dr.Zom: It's Casablanca. Everybody knows it's Casablanca. No one ever says "Hey, let's watch Citizen Kane again tonight."

That list was a pretentious pile of crap. Sunrise: a Song for Two Humans? Blow me.

Casablanca is just insanely great. A bunch of contract actors and a B level script turned out to be so much more.

And Claude Rains with all the best lines!

Round up all the usual suspects.


Monsieur Rick, what kind of a man is Captain Renault?
Oh, he's just like any other man... only more so.
 
2012-08-02 02:05:34 AM

Dr.Zom: simplicimus: Dr.Zom: It's Casablanca. Everybody knows it's Casablanca. No one ever says "Hey, let's watch Citizen Kane again tonight."

That list was a pretentious pile of crap. Sunrise: a Song for Two Humans? Blow me.

Casablanca is just insanely great. A bunch of contract actors and a B level script turned out to be so much more.

That's why I really do think it's the greatest film of all time - the process took so many people's contributions and almost accidentally created this wonderful work of art. In Thomas Lennon and Robert Ben Garant's book on screenwriting (highly recommended by the way) they claim that Rick's entire backstory was added to the screenplay by the SEVENTH team of writers, which doesn't surprise me in the least.


Plus, Ingrid Bergman was farking hot back then.
 
2012-08-02 02:09:15 AM

stoli n coke: Dr.Zom: simplicimus: Dr.Zom: It's Casablanca. Everybody knows it's Casablanca. No one ever says "Hey, let's watch Citizen Kane again tonight."

That list was a pretentious pile of crap. Sunrise: a Song for Two Humans? Blow me.

Casablanca is just insanely great. A bunch of contract actors and a B level script turned out to be so much more.

That's why I really do think it's the greatest film of all time - the process took so many people's contributions and almost accidentally created this wonderful work of art. In Thomas Lennon and Robert Ben Garant's book on screenwriting (highly recommended by the way) they claim that Rick's entire backstory was added to the screenplay by the SEVENTH team of writers, which doesn't surprise me in the least.

Plus, Ingrid Bergman was farking hot back then.


You are quite correct.
 
2012-08-02 02:11:38 AM
You can't rank art. Is there a list of the ten best paintings of all time? (Probably on some shiat stain of a blog, but it would be wrong.)

These movies are influential and still worth watching if you like cinema, but the best of all time? Have we not learned anything and refined the craft of movie making in the last 44 years to bump one off the list?
 
2012-08-02 02:20:37 AM
Also fans of Citizen Kane:

assets0.ordienetworks.com
 
2012-08-02 02:21:20 AM

Mark Ratner: You can't rank art. Is there a list of the ten best paintings of all time? (Probably on some shiat stain of a blog, but it would be wrong.)

These movies are influential and still worth watching if you like cinema, but the best of all time? Have we not learned anything and refined the craft of movie making in the last 44 years to bump one off the list?


Anybody that actually thinks they can rank the worthiness of one piece of art to another is full of shiat. But these sorts of things are fun. Also, film is a recent art form so we can judge the "inspirational/influential" aspect of the art. And while ranking artists is almost as asinine as ranking the art itself, it' creates a lot of interesting arguments like arguing about baseball. ( I'd liken Stanley Kubrick to Ty Cobb, and Scorsese to Pete Rose, and the whole pre-code era think is sorta like the negro leagues.)
 
2012-08-02 02:26:43 AM

Gordon Bennett: DeltaPunch: What. A. Rip. Are you seriously gonna look me in the face and tell me Vertigo is a better film than Toxic Avenger 3: The Last Temptation of Toxie?

That was by far the weakest of the series. Had you gone with Citizen Toxie: The Toxic Avenger IV you might have had some semblance of a point.


Whatevs... Toxic Avenger III is so artistically beyond the scope of human understanding that it doesn't even have a score on Rotten Tomatoes. Truly, it is like like a god compared to Citizen Toxie's mere mortal score of 67%.
 
2012-08-02 02:29:28 AM
Great movies should at least have 20 to 30 years to see if they're still great..and have staying power.

I'd add to the list:
Rear Window
Lawrence of Arabia
Wizard of Oz.

IMHO: I thought Vertigo was rather boring, and badly paced. Great filming tho.
North By North West was better...but Rear Window as filmed art really works well.
Lawrence of Arabia is great for filming, acting, and story.
 
2012-08-02 02:32:16 AM

loooongview1: Mark Ratner: You can't rank art. Is there a list of the ten best paintings of all time? (Probably on some shiat stain of a blog, but it would be wrong.)

These movies are influential and still worth watching if you like cinema, but the best of all time? Have we not learned anything and refined the craft of movie making in the last 44 years to bump one off the list?

Anybody that actually thinks they can rank the worthiness of one piece of art to another is full of shiat. But these sorts of things are fun. Also, film is a recent art form so we can judge the "inspirational/influential" aspect of the art. And while ranking artists is almost as asinine as ranking the art itself, it' creates a lot of interesting arguments like arguing about baseball. ( I'd liken Stanley Kubrick to Ty Cobb, and Scorsese to Pete Rose, and the whole pre-code era think is sorta like the negro leagues.)


Good point in bringing up baseball. It's all about the era, just like movies. Citizens Kane was the Babe Ruth of movies, but what is Vertigo?
 
2012-08-02 02:34:05 AM
A rich old man died.

nobody cared.
 
2012-08-02 02:41:39 AM

Dr.Zom: simplicimus: Dr.Zom: It's Casablanca. Everybody knows it's Casablanca. No one ever says "Hey, let's watch Citizen Kane again tonight."

That list was a pretentious pile of crap. Sunrise: a Song for Two Humans? Blow me.

Casablanca is just insanely great. A bunch of contract actors and a B level script turned out to be so much more.

That's why I really do think it's the greatest film of all time - the process took so many people's contributions and almost accidentally created this wonderful work of art. In Thomas Lennon and Robert Ben Garant's book on screenwriting (highly recommended by the way) they claim that Rick's entire backstory was added to the screenplay by the SEVENTH team of writers, which doesn't surprise me in the least.


Well, for me, if it's playing I'll watch it like it's the very first time I've seen it.
 
2012-08-02 02:42:53 AM

Mark Ratner: loooongview1: Mark Ratner: You can't rank art. Is there a list of the ten best paintings of all time? (Probably on some shiat stain of a blog, but it would be wrong.)

These movies are influential and still worth watching if you like cinema, but the best of all time? Have we not learned anything and refined the craft of movie making in the last 44 years to bump one off the list?

Anybody that actually thinks they can rank the worthiness of one piece of art to another is full of shiat. But these sorts of things are fun. Also, film is a recent art form so we can judge the "inspirational/influential" aspect of the art. And while ranking artists is almost as asinine as ranking the art itself, it' creates a lot of interesting arguments like arguing about baseball. ( I'd liken Stanley Kubrick to Ty Cobb, and Scorsese to Pete Rose, and the whole pre-code era think is sorta like the negro leagues.)

Good point in bringing up baseball. It's all about the era, just like movies. Citizens Kane was the Babe Ruth of movies, but what is Vertigo?


It's hard for me to equate individual films to ball players, like I said I prefer doing that with directors. So the best answer I can give you is Hitchcock is kinda like Nolan Ryan, Racked up a lot of wins and strikeouts, but plenty of losses and was perfectly capable of getting pulled in the first. I'd argue Welles is probably more of a Roger Maris type, two unbelievable years/films but a middling career when you take that away. And yeah, I know I'm mixing my eras, but still.
 
2012-08-02 02:45:40 AM

Eric The Pilot: Also fans of Citizen Kane:

[assets0.ordienetworks.com image 464x348]


It wasn't The Trouble with Angels, that was a Hayley Mills vehicle, you're not even close



/I think about that sketch every time Citizen Kane comes up
 
2012-08-02 02:50:03 AM
Just think...right now a producer is snorting a line of Peruvian off some twink's shaved asscrack and saying "It's time for a wacky romcom reboot! We'll need Kutcher as Kane and let's screen test Miley Cyrus as Rosebud"
 
2012-08-02 02:52:37 AM

Mr. Coffee Nerves: Just think...right now a producer is snorting a line of Peruvian off some twink's shaved asscrack and saying "It's time for a wacky romcom reboot! We'll need Kutcher as Kane and let's screen test Miley Cyrus as Rosebud"


If the rumors are true about what rosebud meant between Davis and Hearst, that could actually be worth watching.
 
zez
2012-08-02 02:58:01 AM

loooongview1: I'd argue Welles is probably more of a Roger Maris type, two unbelievable years/films but a middling career when you take that away. And yeah, I know I'm mixing my eras, but still.


That's mostly because Wells was demoted to the Negro Leagues.

www.cinemanews.gr
 
2012-08-02 02:58:06 AM

loooongview1: Mr. Coffee Nerves: Just think...right now a producer is snorting a line of Peruvian off some twink's shaved asscrack and saying "It's time for a wacky romcom reboot! We'll need Kutcher as Kane and let's screen test Miley Cyrus as Rosebud"

If the rumors are true about what rosebud meant between Davis and Hearst, that could actually be worth watching.


Oh great. Another "A Star is Born" remake.
 
2012-08-02 03:00:26 AM
I rank movies solely on my visceral reaction to the movie. I don't care about political messages or underlying themes. Because of that, I would rate Captain Ron ahead of Citizen Kane. Kurt Russell was funny as the one-eyed captain, Nothing fun about watching Citizen Kane. Citizen Kane is a lot like Ulysses by James Joyce....hailed as a classic, one of the best of all-time by those that take movies and writing *very* seriously, but a boring grind on the senses for the casual fan..
 
2012-08-02 03:07:48 AM

Strongbeerrules: A rich old man died.

nobody cared.


Everybody runs around trying to find the secret of his dying word. Except. No one was with him when he died. Slightly more than a minor plot flaw.
 
2012-08-02 03:12:16 AM

zez: loooongview1: I'd argue Welles is probably more of a Roger Maris type, two unbelievable years/films but a middling career when you take that away. And yeah, I know I'm mixing my eras, but still.

That's mostly because Wells was demoted to the Negro Leagues.

[www.cinemanews.gr image 200x296]


I think your analogy works on a Satchel Paige level. Showed that he had the same chops in the majors that he did in the Negro leagues, and left the majors because of differences between his own self-worth and what the majors thought of him. The last time the Indians won the series they had Paige, and the last time RKO was a major force to be reckoned with was with Welles.

shiat, this is starting to get fun, but I'm getting to drunk to pull this off. One last one thought (maybe) Sidney Lumet is the Rickey Henderson AND Willie Mays of directing. Slammed some of his out of the park, and sometimes turned a bullshiat Reached on Error into a run scored.
 
2012-08-02 03:17:17 AM

optikeye: Great movies should at least have 20 to 30 years to see if they're still great..and have staying power.

I'd add to the list:
Rear Window
Lawrence of Arabia
Wizard of Oz.

IMHO: I thought Vertigo was rather boring, and badly paced. Great filming tho.
North By North West was better...but Rear Window as filmed art really works well.
Lawrence of Arabia is great for filming, acting, and story.


Rear Window is awesome. I certainly like it better than Vertigo. And +1 on the Lawrence mention. Film making at its finest.

From the list in the article, I'd probably go with 2001: A Space Odyssey as greatest. But there are certainly more modern films that rival it.
 
zez
2012-08-02 03:18:59 AM

loooongview1: zez: loooongview1: I'd argue Welles is probably more of a Roger Maris type, two unbelievable years/films but a middling career when you take that away. And yeah, I know I'm mixing my eras, but still.

That's mostly because Wells was demoted to the Negro Leagues.

[www.cinemanews.gr image 200x296]

I think your analogy works on a Satchel Paige level. Showed that he had the same chops in the majors that he did in the Negro leagues, and left the majors because of differences between his own self-worth and what the majors thought of him. The last time the Indians won the series they had Paige, and the last time RKO was a major force to be reckoned with was with Welles.

shiat, this is starting to get fun, but I'm getting to drunk to pull this off. One last one thought (maybe) Sidney Lumet is the Rickey Henderson AND Willie Mays of directing. Slammed some of his out of the park, and sometimes turned a bullshiat Reached on Error into a run scored.


I don't know anything about baseball, I'm a hockey fan. I just thought it would be funny to make that joke with Welles in blackface since it was sort of relevant to his decline of output. But you do make a lot of sense for probably being about half as drunk as me. Go with it! Maybe you could write a book.
 
2012-08-02 03:40:32 AM

zez: loooongview1: zez: loooongview1: I'd argue Welles is probably more of a Roger Maris type, two unbelievable years/films but a middling career when you take that away. And yeah, I know I'm mixing my eras, but still.

That's mostly because Wells was demoted to the Negro Leagues.

[www.cinemanews.gr image 200x296]

I think your analogy works on a Satchel Paige level. Showed that he had the same chops in the majors that he did in the Negro leagues, and left the majors because of differences between his own self-worth and what the majors thought of him. The last time the Indians won the series they had Paige, and the last time RKO was a major force to be reckoned with was with Welles.

shiat, this is starting to get fun, but I'm getting to drunk to pull this off. One last one thought (maybe) Sidney Lumet is the Rickey Henderson AND Willie Mays of directing. Slammed some of his out of the park, and sometimes turned a bullshiat Reached on Error into a run scored.

I don't know anything about baseball, I'm a hockey fan. I just thought it would be funny to make that joke with Welles in blackface since it was sort of relevant to his decline of output. But you do make a lot of sense for probably being about half as drunk as me. Go with it! Maybe you could write a book.


That "demoted to the Negro Leagues" is more accurate than you may realize. The decline in his output was directly related to Citizen Kane: remember that not only did the Hearst paper chain attack and effective bury the movie (only to be "rediscovered" decades later), But Hearst used his clout to effectively blackball Welles' career.

That's why he shows up in obscure releases and foreign productions: While still recognizing his brilliance, Hollywood wouldn't touch him with a 10 foot pole for decades later. Even the Othello movie was produced and shot in Europe.

You've got to give the film credit for being able to piss Hearst off that bad.
 
2012-08-02 03:54:44 AM

zez: loooongview1: zez: loooongview1: I'd argue Welles is probably more of a Roger Maris type, two unbelievable years/films but a middling career when you take that away. And yeah, I know I'm mixing my eras, but still.

That's mostly because Wells was demoted to the Negro Leagues.

[www.cinemanews.gr image 200x296]

I think your analogy works on a Satchel Paige level. Showed that he had the same chops in the majors that he did in the Negro leagues, and left the majors because of differences between his own self-worth and what the majors thought of him. The last time the Indians won the series they had Paige, and the last time RKO was a major force to be reckoned with was with Welles.

shiat, this is starting to get fun, but I'm getting to drunk to pull this off. One last one thought (maybe) Sidney Lumet is the Rickey Henderson AND Willie Mays of directing. Slammed some of his out of the park, and sometimes turned a bullshiat Reached on Error into a run scored.

I don't know anything about baseball, I'm a hockey fan. I just thought it would be funny to make that joke with Welles in blackface since it was sort of relevant to his decline of output. But you do make a lot of sense for probably being about half as drunk as me. Go with it! Maybe you could write a book.


Well I know little to nothing about hockey, but I'll try and equate it to my friends from the north (keeping in my North Carolina is north of me; who have a hockey team which I didn't even know about until they won the cup.) To equate my previous directors, let's say Kubrick and Hitch could each be described as the Gretzky/Messier of directing, with Lumet being the Brodeur. I can't figure out who to equate Welles to, but it would have to be some body that started real strong, went to shiat, came back for one hell of a year, and than went back to shiat. My limited knowledge of Hockey wants to call him the Bourque of directing. (If somebody can come up with better analogies to historical players, please do so, we don't play hockey where I live, or learn how to properly use commas, condiments, condoms)

But back to baseball analogies; John Ford and Billy Wilder are the Josh Gibson/Satchel Paige of directing in that their careers were predominantly done during the Hayes code/ban on black players. Jackie Robinson and Mike Nichols seem like the obvious paring, due to outstanding work as well as breaking down barriers over acceptability in their respective fields. Reggie Jackson and Spielberg seem apt as well, changing the game forever, but not always for the better. I'm more of a Catfish Hunter/Cohen Brothers kinda guy. And because I'm too lazy at the moment to do the proper research here, but Bogdonavich reminds me of a guy who had a regular season and world series MVP with "The Last Picture Show" his rookie season and went to shiat immediately following and hasn't ever recovered. Woody Allan is Yogi Berra just because of longevity and I can't think of anybody else. Sandy Kofax and Francis Ford Coppola kinda work, because when they were at their top there was nobody in history better. It doesn't quite gel though because Coppola kept working well after his prime while Kofax retired to save his arm from further damage. Coppola and Joe DiMaggio'shiat streak could also be comparable (Keep in mind Coppola had a stretch where he made Godfather 1&2, The Conversation, and Apocalypse Now ; in that order. . Arthur Hiller is a guy who had an awesome breakout season by looks standards (Bonnie and Clyde) but contributed more as a teammate and as a talent the next season (Little BIg Man).


I"ll also be honest in my complete love of the NY Yankees (though I'm from the south and have had to listen to Braves fan be the up-noxious band wagoneers my whole life) so feel free to substitute players from other teams.
 
2012-08-02 03:57:04 AM
Goodfellas is great right up until they started making a completely different movie two thirds of the way through.
 
2012-08-02 04:04:35 AM
Oh shiat, I completely forgot about George Lucas. He is so obviously the Barry Bonds/Roger Clemens of directing. The things he did in the second half of his career really seem to distract from all his accomplishments. (Keep in mind I'm not talking about your view of the worthiness of their criticisms , just my feeling for the consensus on fark. Love them or hate them, you have to accept that people love them or hate them him like nobody else in film/baseball)
 
2012-08-02 04:05:58 AM
Random favorites:
Dr. Strangelove
Manchurian Candidate (1962)
Wizard of Oz
City Lights
2001
Animal House
Never on Sunday
The Graduate
Soylent Green
Psycho

Working with the articles pro pre-1968 bias
 
2012-08-02 04:22:14 AM

loooongview1: Oh shiat, I completely forgot about George Lucas. He is so obviously the Barry Bonds/Roger Clemens of directing. The things he did in the second half of his career really seem to distract from all his accomplishments. (Keep in mind I'm not talking about your view of the worthiness of their criticisms , just my feeling for the consensus on fark. Love them or hate them, you have to accept that people love them or hate them him like nobody else in film/baseball)


Lucas is more like the OJ Simpson of directing. Two good movies, then he murdered two people.
 
2012-08-02 04:23:44 AM

AverageAmericanGuy: Goodfellas is great right up until they started making a completely different movie two thirds of the way through.


After Pesci's character gets whacked, the film definitively changes.
 
2012-08-02 04:31:44 AM

Solid Muldoon: loooongview1: Oh shiat, I completely forgot about George Lucas. He is so obviously the Barry Bonds/Roger Clemens of directing. The things he did in the second half of his career really seem to distract from all his accomplishments. (Keep in mind I'm not talking about your view of the worthiness of their criticisms , just my feeling for the consensus on fark. Love them or hate them, you have to accept that people love them or hate them him like nobody else in film/baseball)

Lucas is more like the OJ Simpson of directing. Two good movies, then he murdered two people.


Not baseball related so how bout no. But in all seriousness, he might not even really be equivalent to an actual player. For the sake of argument let's say that all he directed was Star Wars: no American graffiti or thx, and keep in mind he didn't direct "Empire" and "Jedi" just wrote and produced them. Not counting the prequels this basically makes him a one year player that went on to make lasting contributions to the equipment side of their field. He could be considered the Spalding/Rawlings of film making.
 
2012-08-02 04:33:38 AM
No Seven Samurai in the top 10? List FAIL!
 
2012-08-02 04:42:49 AM

zez: Granted, the first time I saw Citizen Kane, it was at an arthouse cinema after some rerelease for something. I liked it but didn't understand why everyone thought it was so great. Then I got the Laserdisc and listened to the commentary and finally realized that all the same old stuff I've seen a thousand times was all done in this movie for the very first time


Even though I didnt like Kane that much, I'd agree that it deserves best film b/c of that. Its one thing to do improve on something someone else invented, as has been done with the techniques used by Welles, but inventing is much, much harder and deserves much more credit. Its easy to be derivative.

zez: That's mostly because Wells was demoted to the Negro Leagues.


Honestly, I liked this more than Citizen Kane. Iago was really, really great.

Random favorites b/c everybody is just dying to know...

Blade runner--directors cut
Brazil and Baron Munchasen
7th Seal and Wild Strawberries
Apocalypse Now Redux
Excalibur (Nicol Williamson FTW)
Hero (with the right subtitles)
The Thing--Carpenters version, of course
The Prestige
The Good, The Bad, and the Ugly (but all in the "man w/ no name" trilogy are great movies)
Millers Crossing
From Hell

Thats all I can think of for now...
 
2012-08-02 05:04:31 AM
www.empireonline.com
 
2012-08-02 05:07:25 AM
I like other Hitchcock films more. I like Citizen Kane more.

I've seen Vertigo once. It's a very good film, but I've never been back to it like I have North By Northwest.

I'll take Casablanca, Goodfellas or Schindler's List over both of them.
 
2012-08-02 05:13:10 AM
Like so many things that have been absolutely masterfully parodied over the years, Citizen Kane is one of those movies that if youve seen the Simpsons episode, you dont really need to see the movie.

Also on the list; Cape Fear, The Shining, Evita, Karate Kid, 101 Dalmations (and to a lesser extent Lady and the Tramp), The Poseidon Adventure, Rear Window, All the President's Men, Amadeus, The Fly, Nightmare on Elm Street and Paint Your Wagon. Well, im not sure about Paint Your Wagon, i bought it for $2, but ill never watch it, because it cant be as good as this.
 
2012-08-02 05:28:49 AM
Never seen it, no desire to see it.

There also is no "Best Movie Ever Made!!!!!11"
 
2012-08-02 05:36:05 AM
It might not be the 'best movie ever made', but it certainly is right up there on the list.
 
2012-08-02 05:53:33 AM
content9.flixster.com


Ricky Bobby: Wow. I feel like I'm Highlander!
Jean Girard: [Jean chuckles, confused] What is the Highlander?
Ricky Bobby: It's a movie. It won the Academy Award.
Jean Girard: Oh for what?
Ricky Bobby: Best movie ever made.
 
2012-08-02 05:59:02 AM
My top 5 - order is flexible:

Citizen Kane
Ran
Lawrence of Arabia
The Third Man
M

I like Hitchcock's movies - I thought The 39 Steps and Rebecca were brilliant but somewhere in the top 20's.

I have no problem with Tokyo Story or The Searchers in the top ten. My problem is refraining from putting in four more Kurosawa movies... A GOD!

/Criminal that Chaplin is not in the top 10.
//As far as 'modern' movies - it wouldn't surprise me if Apocalypse, Godfather, Saving Private Ryan, and Shawshank Redemption - some or all make the top 15.
///Sorry, I prefer Usual Suspects to Goodfellas - I assume that completely renders my opinions regarding movies as obviously wrong and sentences me to the special hell.)
 
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