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(Huffington Post)   Finally, it's socially acceptable to admit Citizen Kane is not, in fact, the best movie ever made   (huffingtonpost.com) divider line 294
    More: Spiffy, Citizen Kane, Sight & Sound, Kim Novak, British Film Institute, A.O. Scott, Jean Renoir, art film, silent era  
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7753 clicks; posted to Entertainment » on 02 Aug 2012 at 1:19 AM (2 years ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



294 Comments   (+0 »)
   
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2012-08-01 11:06:08 PM  
Really, "Vertigo" ? I will gladly accede that "Citizen Kane" is not all that and a bag of nuts. But "A face in the crowd" and "Meet John Doe" are far better films.
 
2012-08-01 11:07:56 PM  
i218.photobucket.com
 
2012-08-01 11:15:59 PM  
Apparently it's still socially unacceptable to enjoy a movie made in the last 50 years though.

/painting peaked during the Aurignacian period
 
2012-08-01 11:18:41 PM  
It can't be the best, I haven't seen it.

Duh.
 
2012-08-01 11:18:57 PM  

SJKebab: Apparently it's still socially unacceptable to enjoy a movie made in the last 50 years though.

/painting peaked during the Aurignacian period


Architecture peaked during the Roman Empire, and Plato defined all future philosophies.
 
2012-08-01 11:20:42 PM  

Ambivalence: It can't be the best, I haven't seen it.

Duh.


Mel Brooks did it better in "High Anxiety".
 
2012-08-01 11:32:50 PM  
No film past 1968 is in the top 10.

I guess these guys never heard of a little movie called The Empire Strikes Back?

Hogwash.
 
2012-08-01 11:37:18 PM  

ourbigdumbmouth: No film past 1968 is in the top 10.

I guess these guys never heard of a little movie called The Empire Strikes Back?

Hogwash.


Ah, C'mon. It's not that great a film. I'd put "Dr. Strangelove" above it.
 
2012-08-01 11:47:46 PM  
The magazine -- published by the British Film Institute --

Yeah, well, I only listen to the American Film Institute, which still lists Kane at the top.

Thankfully, at least one institution still resists Obama's tyranny.
 
2012-08-01 11:51:03 PM  

simplicimus: ourbigdumbmouth: No film past 1968 is in the top 10.

I guess these guys never heard of a little movie called The Empire Strikes Back?

Hogwash.

Ah, C'mon. It's not that great a film. I'd put "Dr. Strangelove" above it.


Ok agreed, not a great film. But fun.
I was bring silly.

I think Goodfellas is great. And Strange Brew
 
2012-08-01 11:54:44 PM  

ourbigdumbmouth: simplicimus: ourbigdumbmouth: No film past 1968 is in the top 10.

I guess these guys never heard of a little movie called The Empire Strikes Back?

Hogwash.

Ah, C'mon. It's not that great a film. I'd put "Dr. Strangelove" above it.

Ok agreed, not a great film. But fun.
I was bring silly.

I think Goodfellas is great. And Strange Brew


Goodfellas is great. Liotta breaking the fourth wall is great acting, as well as good screenwriting.
 
2012-08-02 12:25:09 AM  
What. A. Rip. Are you seriously gonna look me in the face and tell me Vertigo is a better film than Toxic Avenger 3: The Last Temptation of Toxie?
 
2012-08-02 12:34:22 AM  
 
2012-08-02 12:38:04 AM  
All Quiet On The Western Front deserves consideration somewhere.
 
2012-08-02 12:42:23 AM  
Still a great film though...

I know kiddies, it's shockingly bereft of car chases, explosions, lasers and scantily-clad 19 year-old babes, but it's a good film nonetheless. Maybe someday you'll understand.

simplicimus: ourbigdumbmouth: No film past 1968 is in the top 10.

I guess these guys never heard of a little movie called The Empire Strikes Back?

Hogwash.

Ah, C'mon. It's not that great a film. I'd put "Dr. Strangelove" above it.


I like the cut of your jib
 
2012-08-02 12:46:47 AM  

SJKebab: Apparently it's still socially unacceptable to enjoy a movie made in the last 50 years though.

/painting peaked during the Aurignacian period


If it's recent, it sucks. This has been the position of "critics" since shortly after the dawn of civilization.
 
2012-08-02 12:54:01 AM  

Marcus Aurelius: There can be only one.


Good, but no "They Live".
 
2012-08-02 12:56:17 AM  
Only one John Ford movie? I'm ok with this.

/Howard Hawks was the better director
 
2012-08-02 01:05:25 AM  
Goodfellas is awesome, but Casino is MEGA AWESOME.
 
2012-08-02 01:08:12 AM  
Eh, Citizen Kane suffers from two things... it's been #1 for years, and it's no longer the hipster critic darling the way it was when it was first made #1, back when the film was relegated to TV airings and was still considered to be a failure because it didn't do too well at the box office upon its initial release.
 
2012-08-02 01:10:19 AM  

The_Sponge: Goodfellas is awesome, but Casino is MEGA AWESOME.


Well, there are baseball bats, so there's that. Casino is awesome, but Pesci makes that film.
 
2012-08-02 01:13:21 AM  

FirstNationalBastard: Eh, Citizen Kane suffers from two things... it's been #1 for years, and it's no longer the hipster critic darling the way it was when it was first made #1, back when the film was relegated to TV airings and was still considered to be a failure because it didn't do too well at the box office upon its initial release.


It also suffers because the sublities of B&W film escapes modern viewers.
 
2012-08-02 01:23:49 AM  
Nah, it's The Road Warrior. By a mile.
 
2012-08-02 01:23:54 AM  
I've never seen it. I may someday, but I really don't like the way lines were dlivered in that era.
 
2012-08-02 01:26:08 AM  
Why can't there be two classes of lists a Hayes Code List and a Post Hayes Code list? Y'know to give things made after the 50's a chance.
 
2012-08-02 01:27:36 AM  

DeltaPunch: What. A. Rip. Are you seriously gonna look me in the face and tell me Vertigo is a better film than Toxic Avenger 3: The Last Temptation of Toxie?


That was by far the weakest of the series. Had you gone with Citizen Toxie: The Toxic Avenger IV you might have had some semblance of a point.
 
2012-08-02 01:27:52 AM  
So according to that article, the top 10 greatest movies ever made all came out before 1968.

Bullshiat!
 
2012-08-02 01:33:08 AM  
Is "Freddy got Fingered" number 3? It must be number 3. Should be number 1.
 
2012-08-02 01:34:45 AM  
After all these years I feel vindicated in my love of Vertigo!

/Citizen Kane is the greatest film in history
//Rear Window is also an excellent film
 
2012-08-02 01:35:32 AM  
Why did the writer of that article go out of his way to post the spoiler about Rosebud?
 
2012-08-02 01:36:29 AM  
If it weren't for the last scene, I'd consider this film for consideration.

i.imgur.com



Though viscerally satisfying, it turns a great film into a good film.
 
2012-08-02 01:36:35 AM  
Seems clear to me that it's "The Godfather."
 
2012-08-02 01:36:57 AM  
No mention of "The Erotic Adventures of Helen Keller: Based on the novel 'Push' by Sapphire?'"

You people know nothing about movies.
 
2012-08-02 01:37:57 AM  
Of course it isn't.

Zoolander is.
 
2012-08-02 01:38:02 AM  

simplicimus: ourbigdumbmouth: No film past 1968 is in the top 10.

I guess these guys never heard of a little movie called The Empire Strikes Back?

Hogwash.

Ah, C'mon. It's not that great a film. I'd put "Dr. Strangelove" above it.


I'd put Empire up there with Pulp Fiction. I mean, yes, it had cheesy lines and the acting was hit or miss but the organic flow from scene to scene never made it feel forced. That's not something easily achieved in cinema.
 
2012-08-02 01:38:30 AM  

walrusonion: Why can't there be two classes of lists a Hayes Code List and a Post Hayes Code list? Y'know to give things made after the 50's a chance.


The Maltese Falcon would have been a much better movie if they could have said I want to fark you instead of I love you. No way they loved each other. They just wanted to be having serious banging boning all over the place.

But you couldn't say fark that back then, so they had to say love.
 
2012-08-02 01:39:58 AM  

GentlemanJ: Seems clear to me that it's "The Godfather."


It insists upon itself.
 
2012-08-02 01:40:35 AM  
I'm not hipster but i do think Citizen Kane should still be in the conversation for best ever. Will now read the article.

/personally, i think Goodfellas is pretty flawless.
 
2012-08-02 01:41:49 AM  
It's Casablanca. Everybody knows it's Casablanca. No one ever says "Hey, let's watch Citizen Kane again tonight."

That list was a pretentious pile of crap. Sunrise: a Song for Two Humans? Blow me.
 
2012-08-02 01:42:35 AM  

underwhere: Why did the writer of that article go out of his way to post the spoiler about Rosebud?


Rosebud was calling from inside the house.
 
2012-08-02 01:43:29 AM  

Solid Muldoon: The Maltese Falcon


No Star Wars sequels belong in the list, please.
 
2012-08-02 01:44:26 AM  

Teufelaffe: underwhere: Why did the writer of that article go out of his way to post the spoiler about Rosebud?

Rosebud was calling from inside the house.


Rosebud killed Dumbledore.
 
2012-08-02 01:45:00 AM  

stoli n coke: No mention of "The Erotic Adventures of Helen Keller: Based on the novel 'Push' by Sapphire?'"

You people know nothing about movies.


No No No, the correct title is Tyler Perry Presents : Fifty Shades of Grey, The Erotic Adventures of Helen Keller: Based on the novel 'Push' by Sapphire. Play Adaptation by Tyler Perry.
 
2012-08-02 01:45:56 AM  

simplicimus: Ambivalence: It can't be the best, I haven't seen it.

Duh.

Mel Brooks did it better in "High Anxiety".


Faith No More did it pretty well.
 
2012-08-02 01:46:36 AM  

Dr.Zom: It's Casablanca. Everybody knows it's Casablanca. No one ever says "Hey, let's watch Citizen Kane again tonight."

That list was a pretentious pile of crap. Sunrise: a Song for Two Humans? Blow me.


Casablanca is just insanely great. A bunch of contract actors and a B level script turned out to be so much more.
 
2012-08-02 01:48:15 AM  

Dr.Zom: Teufelaffe: underwhere: Why did the writer of that article go out of his way to post the spoiler about Rosebud?

Rosebud was calling from inside the house.

Rosebud killed Dumbledore.


Rosebud was a MAN.
 
2012-08-02 01:49:30 AM  

Dr.Zom: Teufelaffe: underwhere: Why did the writer of that article go out of his way to post the spoiler about Rosebud?

Rosebud was calling from inside the house.

Rosebud killed Dumbledore.


Rosebud is actually Keyser Soze.
 
2012-08-02 01:49:32 AM  

Teufelaffe: underwhere: Why did the writer of that article go out of his way to post the spoiler about Rosebud?

Rosebud was calling from inside the house.


I thought it was that Rosebud had a dick.
 
2012-08-02 01:51:29 AM  

simplicimus: Dr.Zom: It's Casablanca. Everybody knows it's Casablanca. No one ever says "Hey, let's watch Citizen Kane again tonight."

That list was a pretentious pile of crap. Sunrise: a Song for Two Humans? Blow me.

Casablanca is just insanely great. A bunch of contract actors and a B level script turned out to be so much more.


And Claude Rains with all the best lines!
 
2012-08-02 01:54:03 AM  
As a liberal, if Bush was doing this sort of thing I would be very concerned.

Because Bush was incompetent.
 
2012-08-02 01:54:57 AM  
Crap, wrong thread. Please delete, mods.
 
2012-08-02 01:54:57 AM  
film snobs gonna snob
 
zez
2012-08-02 01:55:39 AM  

underwhere: Why did the writer of that article go out of his way to post the spoiler about Rosebud?


That's what I was thinking. I know it's an old film but how many kids might want to check it out after hearing about it on the interwebs.

Granted, the first time I saw Citizen Kane, it was at an arthouse cinema after some rerelease for something. I liked it but didn't understand why everyone thought it was so great. Then I got the Laserdisc and listened to the commentary and finally realized that all the same old stuff I've seen a thousand times was all done in this movie for the very first time!

Time really has hurt that film, as well as the horrible old age makeup Wells used on himself.
 
2012-08-02 01:55:47 AM  
fark it, I'll give my top ten that I think critics and fans can agree at least partially, in no particular order.

Citizen Kane
The Great Dictator
Apocalypse Now
Raging Bull
Mccabe and Mrs Miller
Jackie Brown
Once Upon a Time in Mexico
Gates of Heaven
Barry Lyndon
Oldboy.

(honorable mentions to Trainspotting and LA Confidential, but those are the two movies I've seen the most)


Don't like my list, come up with something better.
/Admittedly lacking in world cinema, but hey the majority of film viewers globally go with American cinema when given a choice. And I'm an ugly American that still hasn't seen Tokyo story.
/seriously though "Vertigo? Wouldn't even rank in my top five hitch films.
 
2012-08-02 01:56:07 AM  
Still the most groundbreaking.
 
2012-08-02 01:56:17 AM  
I am going with this movie...

3.bp.blogspot.com
 
2012-08-02 01:56:49 AM  
blade runner, dune....... my list goes on i hold no favorites i hold only well made movies that require people to think. kindda sad the stupider ones get all the attention. farken glee, lost........
 
2012-08-02 01:56:59 AM  
Kane was the prototype for a ton of modern film techniques, both camera and story telling. Flash backs, half frame shots, and dozens of other factors never done before first appeared in the film.

But I don't think it deserves the best ever spot just because it was so innovative. It earned it's spot in history for what it was at the time, but so many other movies have used the same elements so much better since. And, quite frankly, it hasn't aged that well. As someone mentioned above, the dialogue deliveries were kind of weird back then, very much reminiscent of stage acting where they were being intentionally obvious with their voices and faces to play to the cheap seats.
 
2012-08-02 01:57:23 AM  

LonMead: simplicimus: Dr.Zom: It's Casablanca. Everybody knows it's Casablanca. No one ever says "Hey, let's watch Citizen Kane again tonight."

That list was a pretentious pile of crap. Sunrise: a Song for Two Humans? Blow me.

Casablanca is just insanely great. A bunch of contract actors and a B level script turned out to be so much more.

And Claude Rains with all the best lines!


Round up all the usual suspects.
 
2012-08-02 01:58:37 AM  
Vertigo is a very beautifully filmed movie. It's also as boring as a Teletubbie marathon.
 
2012-08-02 02:01:58 AM  

simplicimus: Dr.Zom: It's Casablanca. Everybody knows it's Casablanca. No one ever says "Hey, let's watch Citizen Kane again tonight."

That list was a pretentious pile of crap. Sunrise: a Song for Two Humans? Blow me.

Casablanca is just insanely great. A bunch of contract actors and a B level script turned out to be so much more.


That's why I really do think it's the greatest film of all time - the process took so many people's contributions and almost accidentally created this wonderful work of art. In Thomas Lennon and Robert Ben Garant's book on screenwriting (highly recommended by the way) they claim that Rick's entire backstory was added to the screenplay by the SEVENTH team of writers, which doesn't surprise me in the least.
 
2012-08-02 02:03:47 AM  

simplicimus: LonMead: simplicimus: Dr.Zom: It's Casablanca. Everybody knows it's Casablanca. No one ever says "Hey, let's watch Citizen Kane again tonight."

That list was a pretentious pile of crap. Sunrise: a Song for Two Humans? Blow me.

Casablanca is just insanely great. A bunch of contract actors and a B level script turned out to be so much more.

And Claude Rains with all the best lines!

Round up all the usual suspects.


Monsieur Rick, what kind of a man is Captain Renault?
Oh, he's just like any other man... only more so.
 
2012-08-02 02:05:34 AM  

Dr.Zom: simplicimus: Dr.Zom: It's Casablanca. Everybody knows it's Casablanca. No one ever says "Hey, let's watch Citizen Kane again tonight."

That list was a pretentious pile of crap. Sunrise: a Song for Two Humans? Blow me.

Casablanca is just insanely great. A bunch of contract actors and a B level script turned out to be so much more.

That's why I really do think it's the greatest film of all time - the process took so many people's contributions and almost accidentally created this wonderful work of art. In Thomas Lennon and Robert Ben Garant's book on screenwriting (highly recommended by the way) they claim that Rick's entire backstory was added to the screenplay by the SEVENTH team of writers, which doesn't surprise me in the least.


Plus, Ingrid Bergman was farking hot back then.
 
2012-08-02 02:09:15 AM  

stoli n coke: Dr.Zom: simplicimus: Dr.Zom: It's Casablanca. Everybody knows it's Casablanca. No one ever says "Hey, let's watch Citizen Kane again tonight."

That list was a pretentious pile of crap. Sunrise: a Song for Two Humans? Blow me.

Casablanca is just insanely great. A bunch of contract actors and a B level script turned out to be so much more.

That's why I really do think it's the greatest film of all time - the process took so many people's contributions and almost accidentally created this wonderful work of art. In Thomas Lennon and Robert Ben Garant's book on screenwriting (highly recommended by the way) they claim that Rick's entire backstory was added to the screenplay by the SEVENTH team of writers, which doesn't surprise me in the least.

Plus, Ingrid Bergman was farking hot back then.


You are quite correct.
 
2012-08-02 02:11:38 AM  
You can't rank art. Is there a list of the ten best paintings of all time? (Probably on some shiat stain of a blog, but it would be wrong.)

These movies are influential and still worth watching if you like cinema, but the best of all time? Have we not learned anything and refined the craft of movie making in the last 44 years to bump one off the list?
 
2012-08-02 02:20:37 AM  
Also fans of Citizen Kane:

assets0.ordienetworks.com
 
2012-08-02 02:21:20 AM  

Mark Ratner: You can't rank art. Is there a list of the ten best paintings of all time? (Probably on some shiat stain of a blog, but it would be wrong.)

These movies are influential and still worth watching if you like cinema, but the best of all time? Have we not learned anything and refined the craft of movie making in the last 44 years to bump one off the list?


Anybody that actually thinks they can rank the worthiness of one piece of art to another is full of shiat. But these sorts of things are fun. Also, film is a recent art form so we can judge the "inspirational/influential" aspect of the art. And while ranking artists is almost as asinine as ranking the art itself, it' creates a lot of interesting arguments like arguing about baseball. ( I'd liken Stanley Kubrick to Ty Cobb, and Scorsese to Pete Rose, and the whole pre-code era think is sorta like the negro leagues.)
 
2012-08-02 02:26:43 AM  

Gordon Bennett: DeltaPunch: What. A. Rip. Are you seriously gonna look me in the face and tell me Vertigo is a better film than Toxic Avenger 3: The Last Temptation of Toxie?

That was by far the weakest of the series. Had you gone with Citizen Toxie: The Toxic Avenger IV you might have had some semblance of a point.


Whatevs... Toxic Avenger III is so artistically beyond the scope of human understanding that it doesn't even have a score on Rotten Tomatoes. Truly, it is like like a god compared to Citizen Toxie's mere mortal score of 67%.
 
2012-08-02 02:29:28 AM  
Great movies should at least have 20 to 30 years to see if they're still great..and have staying power.

I'd add to the list:
Rear Window
Lawrence of Arabia
Wizard of Oz.

IMHO: I thought Vertigo was rather boring, and badly paced. Great filming tho.
North By North West was better...but Rear Window as filmed art really works well.
Lawrence of Arabia is great for filming, acting, and story.
 
2012-08-02 02:32:16 AM  

loooongview1: Mark Ratner: You can't rank art. Is there a list of the ten best paintings of all time? (Probably on some shiat stain of a blog, but it would be wrong.)

These movies are influential and still worth watching if you like cinema, but the best of all time? Have we not learned anything and refined the craft of movie making in the last 44 years to bump one off the list?

Anybody that actually thinks they can rank the worthiness of one piece of art to another is full of shiat. But these sorts of things are fun. Also, film is a recent art form so we can judge the "inspirational/influential" aspect of the art. And while ranking artists is almost as asinine as ranking the art itself, it' creates a lot of interesting arguments like arguing about baseball. ( I'd liken Stanley Kubrick to Ty Cobb, and Scorsese to Pete Rose, and the whole pre-code era think is sorta like the negro leagues.)


Good point in bringing up baseball. It's all about the era, just like movies. Citizens Kane was the Babe Ruth of movies, but what is Vertigo?
 
2012-08-02 02:34:05 AM  
A rich old man died.

nobody cared.
 
2012-08-02 02:41:39 AM  

Dr.Zom: simplicimus: Dr.Zom: It's Casablanca. Everybody knows it's Casablanca. No one ever says "Hey, let's watch Citizen Kane again tonight."

That list was a pretentious pile of crap. Sunrise: a Song for Two Humans? Blow me.

Casablanca is just insanely great. A bunch of contract actors and a B level script turned out to be so much more.

That's why I really do think it's the greatest film of all time - the process took so many people's contributions and almost accidentally created this wonderful work of art. In Thomas Lennon and Robert Ben Garant's book on screenwriting (highly recommended by the way) they claim that Rick's entire backstory was added to the screenplay by the SEVENTH team of writers, which doesn't surprise me in the least.


Well, for me, if it's playing I'll watch it like it's the very first time I've seen it.
 
2012-08-02 02:42:53 AM  

Mark Ratner: loooongview1: Mark Ratner: You can't rank art. Is there a list of the ten best paintings of all time? (Probably on some shiat stain of a blog, but it would be wrong.)

These movies are influential and still worth watching if you like cinema, but the best of all time? Have we not learned anything and refined the craft of movie making in the last 44 years to bump one off the list?

Anybody that actually thinks they can rank the worthiness of one piece of art to another is full of shiat. But these sorts of things are fun. Also, film is a recent art form so we can judge the "inspirational/influential" aspect of the art. And while ranking artists is almost as asinine as ranking the art itself, it' creates a lot of interesting arguments like arguing about baseball. ( I'd liken Stanley Kubrick to Ty Cobb, and Scorsese to Pete Rose, and the whole pre-code era think is sorta like the negro leagues.)

Good point in bringing up baseball. It's all about the era, just like movies. Citizens Kane was the Babe Ruth of movies, but what is Vertigo?


It's hard for me to equate individual films to ball players, like I said I prefer doing that with directors. So the best answer I can give you is Hitchcock is kinda like Nolan Ryan, Racked up a lot of wins and strikeouts, but plenty of losses and was perfectly capable of getting pulled in the first. I'd argue Welles is probably more of a Roger Maris type, two unbelievable years/films but a middling career when you take that away. And yeah, I know I'm mixing my eras, but still.
 
2012-08-02 02:45:40 AM  

Eric The Pilot: Also fans of Citizen Kane:

[assets0.ordienetworks.com image 464x348]


It wasn't The Trouble with Angels, that was a Hayley Mills vehicle, you're not even close



/I think about that sketch every time Citizen Kane comes up
 
2012-08-02 02:50:03 AM  
Just think...right now a producer is snorting a line of Peruvian off some twink's shaved asscrack and saying "It's time for a wacky romcom reboot! We'll need Kutcher as Kane and let's screen test Miley Cyrus as Rosebud"
 
2012-08-02 02:52:37 AM  

Mr. Coffee Nerves: Just think...right now a producer is snorting a line of Peruvian off some twink's shaved asscrack and saying "It's time for a wacky romcom reboot! We'll need Kutcher as Kane and let's screen test Miley Cyrus as Rosebud"


If the rumors are true about what rosebud meant between Davis and Hearst, that could actually be worth watching.
 
zez
2012-08-02 02:58:01 AM  

loooongview1: I'd argue Welles is probably more of a Roger Maris type, two unbelievable years/films but a middling career when you take that away. And yeah, I know I'm mixing my eras, but still.


That's mostly because Wells was demoted to the Negro Leagues.

www.cinemanews.gr
 
2012-08-02 02:58:06 AM  

loooongview1: Mr. Coffee Nerves: Just think...right now a producer is snorting a line of Peruvian off some twink's shaved asscrack and saying "It's time for a wacky romcom reboot! We'll need Kutcher as Kane and let's screen test Miley Cyrus as Rosebud"

If the rumors are true about what rosebud meant between Davis and Hearst, that could actually be worth watching.


Oh great. Another "A Star is Born" remake.
 
2012-08-02 03:00:26 AM  
I rank movies solely on my visceral reaction to the movie. I don't care about political messages or underlying themes. Because of that, I would rate Captain Ron ahead of Citizen Kane. Kurt Russell was funny as the one-eyed captain, Nothing fun about watching Citizen Kane. Citizen Kane is a lot like Ulysses by James Joyce....hailed as a classic, one of the best of all-time by those that take movies and writing *very* seriously, but a boring grind on the senses for the casual fan..
 
2012-08-02 03:07:48 AM  

Strongbeerrules: A rich old man died.

nobody cared.


Everybody runs around trying to find the secret of his dying word. Except. No one was with him when he died. Slightly more than a minor plot flaw.
 
2012-08-02 03:12:16 AM  

zez: loooongview1: I'd argue Welles is probably more of a Roger Maris type, two unbelievable years/films but a middling career when you take that away. And yeah, I know I'm mixing my eras, but still.

That's mostly because Wells was demoted to the Negro Leagues.

[www.cinemanews.gr image 200x296]


I think your analogy works on a Satchel Paige level. Showed that he had the same chops in the majors that he did in the Negro leagues, and left the majors because of differences between his own self-worth and what the majors thought of him. The last time the Indians won the series they had Paige, and the last time RKO was a major force to be reckoned with was with Welles.

shiat, this is starting to get fun, but I'm getting to drunk to pull this off. One last one thought (maybe) Sidney Lumet is the Rickey Henderson AND Willie Mays of directing. Slammed some of his out of the park, and sometimes turned a bullshiat Reached on Error into a run scored.
 
2012-08-02 03:17:17 AM  

optikeye: Great movies should at least have 20 to 30 years to see if they're still great..and have staying power.

I'd add to the list:
Rear Window
Lawrence of Arabia
Wizard of Oz.

IMHO: I thought Vertigo was rather boring, and badly paced. Great filming tho.
North By North West was better...but Rear Window as filmed art really works well.
Lawrence of Arabia is great for filming, acting, and story.


Rear Window is awesome. I certainly like it better than Vertigo. And +1 on the Lawrence mention. Film making at its finest.

From the list in the article, I'd probably go with 2001: A Space Odyssey as greatest. But there are certainly more modern films that rival it.
 
zez
2012-08-02 03:18:59 AM  

loooongview1: zez: loooongview1: I'd argue Welles is probably more of a Roger Maris type, two unbelievable years/films but a middling career when you take that away. And yeah, I know I'm mixing my eras, but still.

That's mostly because Wells was demoted to the Negro Leagues.

[www.cinemanews.gr image 200x296]

I think your analogy works on a Satchel Paige level. Showed that he had the same chops in the majors that he did in the Negro leagues, and left the majors because of differences between his own self-worth and what the majors thought of him. The last time the Indians won the series they had Paige, and the last time RKO was a major force to be reckoned with was with Welles.

shiat, this is starting to get fun, but I'm getting to drunk to pull this off. One last one thought (maybe) Sidney Lumet is the Rickey Henderson AND Willie Mays of directing. Slammed some of his out of the park, and sometimes turned a bullshiat Reached on Error into a run scored.


I don't know anything about baseball, I'm a hockey fan. I just thought it would be funny to make that joke with Welles in blackface since it was sort of relevant to his decline of output. But you do make a lot of sense for probably being about half as drunk as me. Go with it! Maybe you could write a book.
 
2012-08-02 03:40:32 AM  

zez: loooongview1: zez: loooongview1: I'd argue Welles is probably more of a Roger Maris type, two unbelievable years/films but a middling career when you take that away. And yeah, I know I'm mixing my eras, but still.

That's mostly because Wells was demoted to the Negro Leagues.

[www.cinemanews.gr image 200x296]

I think your analogy works on a Satchel Paige level. Showed that he had the same chops in the majors that he did in the Negro leagues, and left the majors because of differences between his own self-worth and what the majors thought of him. The last time the Indians won the series they had Paige, and the last time RKO was a major force to be reckoned with was with Welles.

shiat, this is starting to get fun, but I'm getting to drunk to pull this off. One last one thought (maybe) Sidney Lumet is the Rickey Henderson AND Willie Mays of directing. Slammed some of his out of the park, and sometimes turned a bullshiat Reached on Error into a run scored.

I don't know anything about baseball, I'm a hockey fan. I just thought it would be funny to make that joke with Welles in blackface since it was sort of relevant to his decline of output. But you do make a lot of sense for probably being about half as drunk as me. Go with it! Maybe you could write a book.


That "demoted to the Negro Leagues" is more accurate than you may realize. The decline in his output was directly related to Citizen Kane: remember that not only did the Hearst paper chain attack and effective bury the movie (only to be "rediscovered" decades later), But Hearst used his clout to effectively blackball Welles' career.

That's why he shows up in obscure releases and foreign productions: While still recognizing his brilliance, Hollywood wouldn't touch him with a 10 foot pole for decades later. Even the Othello movie was produced and shot in Europe.

You've got to give the film credit for being able to piss Hearst off that bad.
 
2012-08-02 03:54:44 AM  

zez: loooongview1: zez: loooongview1: I'd argue Welles is probably more of a Roger Maris type, two unbelievable years/films but a middling career when you take that away. And yeah, I know I'm mixing my eras, but still.

That's mostly because Wells was demoted to the Negro Leagues.

[www.cinemanews.gr image 200x296]

I think your analogy works on a Satchel Paige level. Showed that he had the same chops in the majors that he did in the Negro leagues, and left the majors because of differences between his own self-worth and what the majors thought of him. The last time the Indians won the series they had Paige, and the last time RKO was a major force to be reckoned with was with Welles.

shiat, this is starting to get fun, but I'm getting to drunk to pull this off. One last one thought (maybe) Sidney Lumet is the Rickey Henderson AND Willie Mays of directing. Slammed some of his out of the park, and sometimes turned a bullshiat Reached on Error into a run scored.

I don't know anything about baseball, I'm a hockey fan. I just thought it would be funny to make that joke with Welles in blackface since it was sort of relevant to his decline of output. But you do make a lot of sense for probably being about half as drunk as me. Go with it! Maybe you could write a book.


Well I know little to nothing about hockey, but I'll try and equate it to my friends from the north (keeping in my North Carolina is north of me; who have a hockey team which I didn't even know about until they won the cup.) To equate my previous directors, let's say Kubrick and Hitch could each be described as the Gretzky/Messier of directing, with Lumet being the Brodeur. I can't figure out who to equate Welles to, but it would have to be some body that started real strong, went to shiat, came back for one hell of a year, and than went back to shiat. My limited knowledge of Hockey wants to call him the Bourque of directing. (If somebody can come up with better analogies to historical players, please do so, we don't play hockey where I live, or learn how to properly use commas, condiments, condoms)

But back to baseball analogies; John Ford and Billy Wilder are the Josh Gibson/Satchel Paige of directing in that their careers were predominantly done during the Hayes code/ban on black players. Jackie Robinson and Mike Nichols seem like the obvious paring, due to outstanding work as well as breaking down barriers over acceptability in their respective fields. Reggie Jackson and Spielberg seem apt as well, changing the game forever, but not always for the better. I'm more of a Catfish Hunter/Cohen Brothers kinda guy. And because I'm too lazy at the moment to do the proper research here, but Bogdonavich reminds me of a guy who had a regular season and world series MVP with "The Last Picture Show" his rookie season and went to shiat immediately following and hasn't ever recovered. Woody Allan is Yogi Berra just because of longevity and I can't think of anybody else. Sandy Kofax and Francis Ford Coppola kinda work, because when they were at their top there was nobody in history better. It doesn't quite gel though because Coppola kept working well after his prime while Kofax retired to save his arm from further damage. Coppola and Joe DiMaggio'shiat streak could also be comparable (Keep in mind Coppola had a stretch where he made Godfather 1&2, The Conversation, and Apocalypse Now ; in that order. . Arthur Hiller is a guy who had an awesome breakout season by looks standards (Bonnie and Clyde) but contributed more as a teammate and as a talent the next season (Little BIg Man).


I"ll also be honest in my complete love of the NY Yankees (though I'm from the south and have had to listen to Braves fan be the up-noxious band wagoneers my whole life) so feel free to substitute players from other teams.
 
2012-08-02 03:57:04 AM  
Goodfellas is great right up until they started making a completely different movie two thirds of the way through.
 
2012-08-02 04:04:35 AM  
Oh shiat, I completely forgot about George Lucas. He is so obviously the Barry Bonds/Roger Clemens of directing. The things he did in the second half of his career really seem to distract from all his accomplishments. (Keep in mind I'm not talking about your view of the worthiness of their criticisms , just my feeling for the consensus on fark. Love them or hate them, you have to accept that people love them or hate them him like nobody else in film/baseball)
 
2012-08-02 04:05:58 AM  
Random favorites:
Dr. Strangelove
Manchurian Candidate (1962)
Wizard of Oz
City Lights
2001
Animal House
Never on Sunday
The Graduate
Soylent Green
Psycho

Working with the articles pro pre-1968 bias
 
2012-08-02 04:22:14 AM  

loooongview1: Oh shiat, I completely forgot about George Lucas. He is so obviously the Barry Bonds/Roger Clemens of directing. The things he did in the second half of his career really seem to distract from all his accomplishments. (Keep in mind I'm not talking about your view of the worthiness of their criticisms , just my feeling for the consensus on fark. Love them or hate them, you have to accept that people love them or hate them him like nobody else in film/baseball)


Lucas is more like the OJ Simpson of directing. Two good movies, then he murdered two people.
 
2012-08-02 04:23:44 AM  

AverageAmericanGuy: Goodfellas is great right up until they started making a completely different movie two thirds of the way through.


After Pesci's character gets whacked, the film definitively changes.
 
2012-08-02 04:31:44 AM  

Solid Muldoon: loooongview1: Oh shiat, I completely forgot about George Lucas. He is so obviously the Barry Bonds/Roger Clemens of directing. The things he did in the second half of his career really seem to distract from all his accomplishments. (Keep in mind I'm not talking about your view of the worthiness of their criticisms , just my feeling for the consensus on fark. Love them or hate them, you have to accept that people love them or hate them him like nobody else in film/baseball)

Lucas is more like the OJ Simpson of directing. Two good movies, then he murdered two people.


Not baseball related so how bout no. But in all seriousness, he might not even really be equivalent to an actual player. For the sake of argument let's say that all he directed was Star Wars: no American graffiti or thx, and keep in mind he didn't direct "Empire" and "Jedi" just wrote and produced them. Not counting the prequels this basically makes him a one year player that went on to make lasting contributions to the equipment side of their field. He could be considered the Spalding/Rawlings of film making.
 
2012-08-02 04:33:38 AM  
No Seven Samurai in the top 10? List FAIL!
 
2012-08-02 04:42:49 AM  

zez: Granted, the first time I saw Citizen Kane, it was at an arthouse cinema after some rerelease for something. I liked it but didn't understand why everyone thought it was so great. Then I got the Laserdisc and listened to the commentary and finally realized that all the same old stuff I've seen a thousand times was all done in this movie for the very first time


Even though I didnt like Kane that much, I'd agree that it deserves best film b/c of that. Its one thing to do improve on something someone else invented, as has been done with the techniques used by Welles, but inventing is much, much harder and deserves much more credit. Its easy to be derivative.

zez: That's mostly because Wells was demoted to the Negro Leagues.


Honestly, I liked this more than Citizen Kane. Iago was really, really great.

Random favorites b/c everybody is just dying to know...

Blade runner--directors cut
Brazil and Baron Munchasen
7th Seal and Wild Strawberries
Apocalypse Now Redux
Excalibur (Nicol Williamson FTW)
Hero (with the right subtitles)
The Thing--Carpenters version, of course
The Prestige
The Good, The Bad, and the Ugly (but all in the "man w/ no name" trilogy are great movies)
Millers Crossing
From Hell

Thats all I can think of for now...
 
2012-08-02 05:04:31 AM  
www.empireonline.com
 
2012-08-02 05:07:25 AM  
I like other Hitchcock films more. I like Citizen Kane more.

I've seen Vertigo once. It's a very good film, but I've never been back to it like I have North By Northwest.

I'll take Casablanca, Goodfellas or Schindler's List over both of them.
 
2012-08-02 05:13:10 AM  
Like so many things that have been absolutely masterfully parodied over the years, Citizen Kane is one of those movies that if youve seen the Simpsons episode, you dont really need to see the movie.

Also on the list; Cape Fear, The Shining, Evita, Karate Kid, 101 Dalmations (and to a lesser extent Lady and the Tramp), The Poseidon Adventure, Rear Window, All the President's Men, Amadeus, The Fly, Nightmare on Elm Street and Paint Your Wagon. Well, im not sure about Paint Your Wagon, i bought it for $2, but ill never watch it, because it cant be as good as this.
 
2012-08-02 05:28:49 AM  
Never seen it, no desire to see it.

There also is no "Best Movie Ever Made!!!!!11"
 
2012-08-02 05:36:05 AM  
It might not be the 'best movie ever made', but it certainly is right up there on the list.
 
2012-08-02 05:53:33 AM  
content9.flixster.com


Ricky Bobby: Wow. I feel like I'm Highlander!
Jean Girard: [Jean chuckles, confused] What is the Highlander?
Ricky Bobby: It's a movie. It won the Academy Award.
Jean Girard: Oh for what?
Ricky Bobby: Best movie ever made.
 
2012-08-02 05:59:02 AM  
My top 5 - order is flexible:

Citizen Kane
Ran
Lawrence of Arabia
The Third Man
M

I like Hitchcock's movies - I thought The 39 Steps and Rebecca were brilliant but somewhere in the top 20's.

I have no problem with Tokyo Story or The Searchers in the top ten. My problem is refraining from putting in four more Kurosawa movies... A GOD!

/Criminal that Chaplin is not in the top 10.
//As far as 'modern' movies - it wouldn't surprise me if Apocalypse, Godfather, Saving Private Ryan, and Shawshank Redemption - some or all make the top 15.
///Sorry, I prefer Usual Suspects to Goodfellas - I assume that completely renders my opinions regarding movies as obviously wrong and sentences me to the special hell.)
 
2012-08-02 06:01:40 AM  
Citizen Kane lost the number one spot. Well I guess it's time for a remake.
 
2012-08-02 06:10:05 AM  
I like Citizen Kane, but I think we need to start making two lists considering the vast amounts of movies. One for the influential or technical accomplishments of the movies, where Kane would still dominate, and another list for the actual quality of the movie.

While I appreciate what Kane gave us, it's hard to agree that there aren't better overall movies since it's been made. (I have a soft spot for the Kurosawa films)
 
2012-08-02 06:15:35 AM  
I saw Citizen Kane once, back when I was in high school, because I had to.

The only other film on their list that I've seen is 2001, and because I'd read the book first, many times, I found it somewhat disappointing.
 
2012-08-02 06:21:26 AM  
I think this is as much a vindication of Jimmy Stewart as one of the greatest actors in history as it is
recognizing Hitchcock as a director. A lesser actor would have probably wanted to show that Scottie
Ferguson still had a core of decency and strength and portray him as a hero. Stewart realized that
the whole point Hitch was trying to make was that no matter how good and strong a person is, as a
human they are prey to their own emotions, desires and demons and that in the end they will get
you, either by making you become evil or by clouding your mind to the point where you don't see
things clearly.

I also always found an eerie parallel between this movie and PSYCHO, inasmuchas the rooming
house (The McKitrick Hotel) where Scottie finds Madeline looks an awful lot like the Bates house, and
Ellen Corby (the manager of said hotel) \would have been a great choice to play a live version of
Mrs. Bates. I'm sure the parallel is purely accidental, but it is striking to me nevertheless.
 
2012-08-02 06:37:07 AM  
I tried to overcome the chronological bias of this poll by picking one film from each decade, 1910-2009. Reading this thread reminded me that people look for different things in movies--beautiful pictures, good stories, funny lines, mind-blowing sfx--and that, honestly, I myself like different things about different films. So I've come up with three lists--I've got a lot of time on my hands.

Beautiful
1915. Intolerance (Griffith)
1927 Sunrise (Murnau)
1939 The Rules of the Game (Renoir)
1945 Les Enfants du Paradis (Carne)
1958 Vertigo (Hitchcock)
1963 8 1/2 (Fellini)
1976 Nashville (Altman)
1988 The Moderns (Rudolph)-an idiosyncratic choice, I admit.
1990 Goodfellas (Scorcese)
2008 Synechdoche, New York (Kaufman)

Fun
1914 Les Vampires (Feuillade)
1924 Sherlock Jr (Keaton)
1938 Holiday (Cukor)
1942 The Palm Beach Story (Sturges)
1952 Singin' in the Rain (Kelly/Donen)
1964 Bande a Part (Godard)
1979 Manhattan (Allen)
1980 The Shining (Kubrick)
1998 The Big Lebowski (Coen)
2005 The Squid and the Whale (Baumbach)

Kickass
1919 The Cabinet of Dr. Caligari (Wiene)
1928 Un chien andalou (Dali/Bunuel)
1932 The Old Dark House (Whale)
1941 Citizen Kane (Welles)
1957 Sweet Smell of Success (MacKendrick)
1968 2001: A Space Odyssey (Kubrick)
1972 Aguirre, The Wrath of God (Herzog)
1982 Blade Runner (Scott)
1994 Ed Wood (Burton)
2008 My Winnipeg (Madden)

...and I still had to leave out a bunch of my favorites.
 
2012-08-02 06:52:03 AM  

tankjr: After all these years I feel vindicated in my love of Vertigo!

/Citizen Kane is the greatest film in history
//Rear Window is also an excellent film


I cam in here to essentially say the same thing.
 
2012-08-02 06:56:42 AM  
No mention of Megaforce?
 
2012-08-02 06:57:59 AM  

Cornelius Dribble: .


Not bad. Just switch Synechdoche, New York with The Fall.
 
2012-08-02 07:02:41 AM  
Anything with Barbara Dare in it.

GISs for her will be NSFW, just in case you don't know who she is/was.
 
2012-08-02 07:24:29 AM  
For me, Citizen Kane and Vertigo are more important for their craftsmanship as opposed to their status as "great films." I'm big on cinematography, particularly in widescreen ratios, so I dearly love Welles, Hitchcock, David Lean, Ford, & Kubrick.

Here's my top 20:

Casablanca (1941)
Rear Window (1954)
Seven Samurai (1954)
To Catch a Thief (1955)
The Searchers (1956)
Rio Bravo (1959)
Lawrence of Arabia (1962)
From Russia With Love (1963)
Cleopatra (1963)
Doctor Zhivago (1965)
The Good, The Bad, and the Ugly (1966)
Fiddler on the Roof (1971)
Young Frankenstein (1974)
Back to the Future (1985)
The Adventures of Priscilla, Queen of the Desert (1994)
The Shawshank Redemption (1994)
Clerks II (2006)
The Departed (2006)
Hot Fuzz (2006)
Inglourious Basterds (2009)

So, my list stretches over multiple decades. I will admit that I have a bias for pre-1970 films, as my favorite era of film is the post-Studio System era (1950-1967).
 
2012-08-02 07:27:28 AM  
nomorepopcorn.files.wordpress.com

/that is all.
 
2012-08-02 07:29:03 AM  
I finally saw Vertigo a few months back and not only would I not place it number one, I wouldn't even say it'shiatchcock's best. North by Northwest and Psycho are far superior movies.
 
2012-08-02 08:05:44 AM  
i would think alien 3 & 4 would be the best movies ever

followed by AVP
 
2012-08-02 08:06:32 AM  

Palooka_Joe: If it weren't for the last scene, I'd consider this film for consideration.

[i.imgur.com image 645x347]

Though viscerally satisfying, it turns a great film into a good film.


totally agree.
 
2012-08-02 08:09:38 AM  
200movies1woman.com

All-time fave movie, at least the greatest Western filmed IMHO.



/"Give'em hell, Pike!"
 
2012-08-02 08:11:47 AM  
You know how I know Citizen Kane is the best movie ever made? I've never been able to make it all the way through it, so it MUST be good.

Seriously, whether or not it's the best movie ever is irrelevant. The fact that Wells was able to bring that vision to fruition, at that scale, at what, 25? It's pretty much the gold standard for ambition and accomplishment in the movie business.
 
2012-08-02 08:12:43 AM  
List fails without "Meatballs 4"
 
2012-08-02 08:13:27 AM  

Dr.Zom: It's Casablanca. Everybody knows it's Casablanca. No one ever says "Hey, let's watch Citizen Kane again tonight."

That list was a pretentious pile of crap. Sunrise: a Song for Two Humans? Blow me.


LOVE "Casablanca," and there are many other great suggestions. "Vertigo" is a pretty great film, but I wouldn't put it in my Top 10. Of course, I wouldn't have put "Citizen Kane" in there, either.

Hell, "Vertigo" isn't even Hitchcock's best movie. ("North By Northwest," for those wondering.)

If I'm in the mood for an older movie, I'll go for any of these:

Casablanca
The Maltese Falcon
North By Northwest
The Seven Samurai
Rashomon
Dr. Strangelove
Touch Of Evil (another great movie by Welles, and I think superior to "Citizen Kane" in many ways)
The Good, The Bad & The Ugly
The African Queen -- (want to see two great actors carry a movie on their shoulders? -- this is the movie to see)
Abbot & Costello Meet Frankenstein -- (don't judge me, but this was a perfect blending of two huge movie franchises)
It's a Mad Mad Mad Mad World
 
2012-08-02 08:13:34 AM  

Vodka Zombie: No mention of Megaforce?


Galaxina bumps it off the list.

/Porno, porno, porno patrol....
 
kab
2012-08-02 08:17:29 AM  

shpritz: Cornelius Dribble: .

Not bad. Just switch Synechdoche, New York with The Fall.


Well, that certainly wins my "most depressing movie I've ever watched" award.

Good flick, but jesus.
 
2012-08-02 08:17:53 AM  

loooongview1: Anybody that actually thinks they can rank the worthiness of one piece of art to another is full of shiat. But these sorts of things are fun.


Let's just progress to the end point: ranking all things.

#1 Arguing on the internet
#2 Boobs
 
2012-08-02 08:20:05 AM  

Freakin Rican: i would think alien 3 & 4 would be the best movies ever

followed by AVP


Alien3 gets a lot of shiat that it doesn't deserve. It's a perfect capstone to the Ripley v. Xenomorph trilogy. It's actually quite a good film. People just don't like it because everyone of "worth" (Newt, Corporal Hicks, Dillon, and Ripley herself) dies. Hey, sometimes bad things happen to good people, or to people who don't deserve it. I think it rounds out that story arc quite nicely, and in keeping with the generally dark tone of the series.

Alien Resurrection, on the other hand, ain't that good. It's OK-ish, sort of, in a popcorn movie sort of way. AvP1 just sucked despite some decent ideas. AvP2 was better, but still seriously lacking.
 
2012-08-02 08:24:41 AM  

Dog Welder: The African Queen -- (want to see two great actors carry a movie on their shoulders? -- this is the movie to see)


Absolutely. The African Queen is one of my favorites, and it's actually my favorite Bogart movie.
 
2012-08-02 08:26:30 AM  

Palooka_Joe: If it weren't for the last scene, I'd consider this film for consideration.

[i.imgur.com image 645x347]



Though viscerally satisfying, it turns a great film into a good film.


I finally got around to watching it this weekend, and I totally agree.
 
2012-08-02 08:32:54 AM  
Any 'Best Ever' list that doesn't have Terry Gilliam represented is suspect. The Fisher King makes the mundane magical.
Imginarium of Dr Parnassus
Brazil
12 Monkeys
 
2012-08-02 08:33:00 AM  

mikemoto: I finally saw Vertigo a few months back and not only would I not place it number one, I wouldn't even say it'shiatchcock's best. North by Northwest and Psycho are far superior movies.


www.biography.com

"That is what you get for talking trash, my good man."
 
2012-08-02 08:43:22 AM  

FirstNationalBastard: Eh, Citizen Kane suffers from two things... it's been #1 for years, and it's no longer the hipster critic darling the way it was when it was first made #1, back when the film was relegated to TV airings and was still considered to be a failure because it didn't do too well at the box office upon its initial release.


AApparently the gag to keep saying screw you to Hearst has finally lost its luster. As if by occult hand
 
2012-08-02 08:46:33 AM  

Palooka_Joe: If it weren't for the last scene, I'd consider this film for consideration.

i.imgur.com



Though viscerally satisfying, it turns a great film into a good film.


I tried watching this movie again a couple weeks ago. I love all of this guys movies, but this one, IMO is by far his worst. It's not a bad movie, but it's far from great. Punch Drunk Love was infinitely better.
 
2012-08-02 08:53:27 AM  
YOU ALL KNOW THAT MIKE MEYERS' "THE LOVE GURU" IS THE BEST MOVIE IN THE HISTORY OF MOVIES. ADMIT IT! CONFESS!
 
2012-08-02 08:53:34 AM  
i.ytimg.com

It's his sled. It was a sled from when he was a kid. There. I just saved you two long, boobless hours.
 
2012-08-02 09:00:26 AM  

Dog Welder: Touch Of Evil (another great movie by Welles, and I think superior to "Citizen Kane" in many ways)


I remember being hooked with that opening crane shot. I don't think I really understood film tension until I saw that opening.

Allansfirebird: For me, Citizen Kane and Vertigo are more important for their craftsmanship as opposed to their status as "great films." I'm big on cinematography, particularly in widescreen ratios, so I dearly love Welles, Hitchcock, David Lean, Ford, & Kubrick.


I couldn't agree more. Also, going somewhat against the grain in this thread when it comes to Hitchcock Vertigo is that film that is absolutely essential in his canon of work. You don't realize just how effed up his idea of women is until you really watch that movie. You only get that idea here and there in his other films. Also, To Catch A Thief had thoroughly cemented itself in my brain just what ultimate femininity really is. I don't think I really 'got' the whole thing about Grace Kelly until I saw that movie and then I was like "Yup. That there is Princess Grace of Monaco alright."

/My father was in a test screening of Vertigo back before it was released. He says the ending was better before it was recut for the general release that we know now
 
2012-08-02 09:01:46 AM  
Uh. "Man with a Movie Camera" (Vertov, 1929) makes the top 10?

Pretentious article is pretentious.
 
2012-08-02 09:03:02 AM  

GentlemanJ: Seems clear to me that it's "The Godfather."


Two is better.
 
2012-08-02 09:03:12 AM  
I'll wait for AFI's new list before admitting anything.
 
2012-08-02 09:05:55 AM  
I've never thought much of "Vertigo," mostly because I find the characters' behavior so improbable, and the attempt to convey the title disorder is a bit cartoonish. "High Anxiety" didn't have to go far to parody it.

I don't think "Citizen Kane" is the greatest film of all time on its own merits (though it is certainly a great film), but it certainly has been very influential. I'd go with

The Crowd
Apocalypse Now
M
Nosferatu (the original)
Casablanca
The Empire Strikes Back
Miller's Crossing
Touch of Evil
The Third Man
Back to the Future
A Clockwork Orange

/yeah, that's eleven, so what?
 
2012-08-02 09:11:17 AM  
My personal top 10 films list in no particular order:

All That Jazz (1979)
Vertigo (1958)
Eternal Sunshine of the Spotless Mind (2004)
Inglorious Basterds (2009)
The Incredibles (2004)
Rashomon (1950)
The Royal Tenenbaums (2001)
West Side Story (1962)
Amadeus (1984)
The Haunting (1963)
 
2012-08-02 09:15:18 AM  

Allansfirebird: For me, Citizen Kane and Vertigo are more important for their craftsmanship as opposed to their status as "great films." I'm big on cinematography, particularly in widescreen ratios, so I dearly love Welles, Hitchcock, David Lean, Ford, & Kubrick.

Here's my top 20:

Casablanca (1941)
Rear Window (1954)
Seven Samurai (1954)
To Catch a Thief (1955)
The Searchers (1956)
Rio Bravo (1959)
Lawrence of Arabia (1962)
From Russia With Love (1963)
Cleopatra (1963)
Doctor Zhivago (1965)
The Good, The Bad, and the Ugly (1966)
Fiddler on the Roof (1971)
Young Frankenstein (1974)
Back to the Future (1985)
The Adventures of Priscilla, Queen of the Desert (1994)
The Shawshank Redemption (1994)
Clerks II (2006)
The Departed (2006)
Hot Fuzz (2006)
Inglourious Basterds (2009)

So, my list stretches over multiple decades. I will admit that I have a bias for pre-1970 films, as my favorite era of film is the post-Studio System era (1950-1967).


wat
 
2012-08-02 09:17:47 AM  
I like so many movies it's hard to pick out 10.

Robert1966: Miller's Crossing

I keep forgetting how much I love this one

Now that he's mainstream it's easy to dismiss Christopher Nolan, but he makes some pretty damned good movies.
 
2012-08-02 09:18:57 AM  

RumsfeldsReplacement: Allansfirebird: stuff...
Clerks II (2006)
Hot Fuzz (2006)
stuff...

wat


Nothing wrong with Hot Fuzz. Like at all. That was made by a group of tremendous movie nerds who one upped several excellently made action films when you talk about scope and framing and even some of the action as well. As for Clerks II... ummm... well?
 
2012-08-02 09:20:43 AM  

KatjaMouse: Dog Welder: Touch Of Evil (another great movie by Welles, and I think superior to "Citizen Kane" in many ways)

I remember being hooked with that opening crane shot. I don't think I really understood film tension until I saw that opening.


I know people point out "Kane" for Welles' mastery behind the camera. The stuff he did in that movie to develop mood and character was certainly worth the accolades. But you are correct about that opening crane shot. It's nothing short of amazing and I couldn't help but think, "Holy shiat...Welles' REALLY knew what he was doing with a camera." It's also a movie that was rather risque for the period it was made in. There's a good deal of content that just wasn't really allowed in movies at that point in time and it did get Welles into some hot water with the studio. Throw in a pretty decent performance by Heston and it's a winner.
 
2012-08-02 09:21:03 AM  

Crewmannumber6: I like so many movies it's hard to pick out 10.

Robert1966: Miller's Crossing
I keep forgetting how much I love this one

Now that he's mainstream it's easy to dismiss Christopher Nolan, but he makes some pretty damned good movies.


I forgot how much I enjoyed Fargo until I caught it the other night. Then I discovered Future Mr. Mouse had never seen it and I was like "OMG SIT RIGHT NOW!!1!11" If I extended my list to 15 I'd include O' Brother! Where Art Thou? and also Memento (going back to the Nolan comment of course).
 
2012-08-02 09:24:33 AM  
It'll never make anybody's top 10 lists, but this
i132.photobucket.com
is modestly brilliant as a modern film noir
 
2012-08-02 09:25:50 AM  

Crewmannumber6: It'll never make anybody's top 10 lists, but this
[i132.photobucket.com image 200x296]
is modestly brilliant as a modern film noir


I can't decide if this is one of the more underrated or overrated movies of the last decade. I loved it, and I remember everyone gushing about it at the time but it almost is never brought up anymore.
 
2012-08-02 09:33:16 AM  

KatjaMouse: Crewmannumber6: It'll never make anybody's top 10 lists, but this
[i132.photobucket.com image 200x296]
is modestly brilliant as a modern film noir

I can't decide if this is one of the more underrated or overrated movies of the last decade. I loved it, and I remember everyone gushing about it at the time but it almost is never brought up anymore.


I loved how dialogue straight out of THe Maltese Falcon and others fit seamlessly into the story.
 
2012-08-02 09:42:55 AM  

KatjaMouse: RumsfeldsReplacement: Allansfirebird: stuff...
Clerks II (2006)
Hot Fuzz (2006)
stuff...

wat

Nothing wrong with Hot Fuzz. Like at all. That was made by a group of tremendous movie nerds who one upped several excellently made action films when you talk about scope and framing and even some of the action as well. As for Clerks II... ummm... well?


Clerks II is on there more for nostalgia than anything else. 2006 was the last year I was a regular theater goer & I saw it on the first day. Plus, I think it has one of Kevin Smith's best written scripts. I almost took Clerks II off the list in favor for Dogma, but my attachment to the former kept it on there. I enjoy a few dick and fart jokes occasionally, it keeps me from being totally smug with film. I know, I'm weird.
 
2012-08-02 09:44:01 AM  
A very brief explanation of why Vertigo is Hitchock's best film and deserves to be called the greatest film: There are two films going on at the same time within Vertigo. There's the story line we get through the dialogue (the whole thing with Madeline being possessed by a ghost), and what the film is really about told purely through visuals (Scottie's impotence). It's a commentary one how film is a visual medium, and that if you focus on dialogue, you're failing to take advantage of the medium (so for viewers who only pay attention to Vertigo's dialogue rather than what they see on the screen -- right down to the choice of color in costumes and props -- they are faked out by the possession plot which is a red herring). The final act of the film is particularly brilliant. Hitchcock gives us the big reveal with 30 minutes still to go, but instead of creating less suspense, it creates more because we're anxious about what will happen if Judy gets caught, and perplexed about her actions -- her willingness to be remade into a dead woman and the fact that she recognizes what is happening.
 
2012-08-02 09:45:23 AM  
4.bp.blogspot.com
 
2012-08-02 09:47:59 AM  

mr smart the great: blade runner, dune....... my list goes on i hold no favorites i hold only well made movies that require people to think. kindda sad the stupider ones get all the attention. farken glee, lost........


I really want to resist dignifying this with a response, but as a TV guy more than a movie guy, I can't help myself:

You do realize that both Glee and Lost are TV shows, right? And they're totally incomparable? And Lost, although I didn't like its last season, has been off the air for more than two years and was usually fairly thought-provocative?

And Dune? The movie? Farking seriously?
 
2012-08-02 09:48:46 AM  

EyeballKid: [200movies1woman.com image 600x400]

All-time fave movie, at least the greatest Western filmed IMHO.



/"Give'em hell, Pike!"


"If they move.....kill 'em!"
 
2012-08-02 09:49:41 AM  

KatjaMouse: Nothing wrong with Hot Fuzz. Like at all. That was made by a group of tremendous movie nerds who one upped several excellently made action films when you talk about scope and framing and even some of the action as well.


I see where you're coming from, and everything you've said of Hot Fuzz is true, but I would argue that it's difficult to rank a film which is a tribute to a certain kind of action film higher than any of the films that Hot Fuzz is paying homage to, and I sure as hell don't think anybody's rushing to put Point Break in their all-time top 10.
 
2012-08-02 09:53:38 AM  

EyeballKid: KatjaMouse: Nothing wrong with Hot Fuzz. Like at all. That was made by a group of tremendous movie nerds who one upped several excellently made action films when you talk about scope and framing and even some of the action as well.

I see where you're coming from, and everything you've said of Hot Fuzz is true, but I would argue that it's difficult to rank a film which is a tribute to a certain kind of action film higher than any of the films that Hot Fuzz is paying homage to, and I sure as hell don't think anybody's rushing to put Point Break in their all-time top 10.


I also imagine people have greater affection for Hot Fuzz because it was a clever script and the casting was absolutely wonderful. Timothy Datlon was delicious through the whole thing and even if you removed the spoof aspect from it it was a great genre piece overall. I think this is what got studios to really think that this Edgar Wright guy just might have a future in directing and not just be a one off with that little indie Zombie flick.
 
2012-08-02 09:56:53 AM  
I don't care if it's supposed to be "the greatest" or whether pretentious filmophiles declare it the pinnacle of movie-making... I just LOVE Citizen Kane. I've watched it dozens of times and I. just. enjoy it. Best? Don't know. But it's a great.
 
2012-08-02 09:59:02 AM  
I'm sure no one cares, but here are 10 of my favorite films

Seven Samurai (1954)
The Exterminating Angel (1962)
Dr. Strangelove (1964)
2001: A Space Odyssey (1968)
Eraserhead (1977)
Fanny and Alexander (1982)
Brazil (1985)
Goodfellas (1990)
Waiting For Guffman (1996)
There Will Be Blood (2007)

This list would probably be different if I made it a few weeks from now. 2001, Eraserhead, and Fanny and Alexander are the only ones solidly top ten material.
 
2012-08-02 10:06:06 AM  

alowishus: Goodfellas (1990)


I loved Goodfellas UNTIL I went back and watched Mean Streets, then I realised Scorsese has been making the same movie over and over ever since. Except for Color Of Money and Gangs of New York.
 
2012-08-02 10:07:36 AM  
...Terry Gilliam... ...Hot Fuzz...

ooh whole other topic. If we're talking about modern genre-defining movies, I recently have new favorites to my top ten list. The Guard and The Good the Bad and the Weird are the only movies I've re-watched on back to back days in the last 10 years. Brilliant stuff!

/as far as TV goes - as much as I'm a fan boy of older series - and really enjoyed several - IMHO none hold a candle to what's currently being done in Breaking Bad.
 
2012-08-02 10:10:18 AM  
EyeballKid at least the greatest Western filmed IMHO


Wrong. You are SO wrong.


The Wild Bunch is very VERY much more than just the greatest Western.

The Wild Bunch changed everything. (Bonnie and Clyde too)
Scorcese for one.
Paul Shrader,John Milius...etc. All have cited this film as "masterpiece"

Every action,drama,Western,cop story.....changed because of The Wild Bunch.
 
2012-08-02 10:10:33 AM  

dittybopper: Freakin Rican: i would think alien 3 & 4 would be the best movies ever

followed by AVP

Alien3 gets a lot of shiat that it doesn't deserve. It's a perfect capstone to the Ripley v. Xenomorph trilogy. It's actually quite a good film. People just don't like it because everyone of "worth" (Newt, Corporal Hicks, Dillon, and Ripley herself) dies. Hey, sometimes bad things happen to good people, or to people who don't deserve it. I think it rounds out that story arc quite nicely, and in keeping with the generally dark tone of the series.

Alien Resurrection, on the other hand, ain't that good. It's OK-ish, sort of, in a popcorn movie sort of way. AvP1 just sucked despite some decent ideas. AvP2 was better, but still seriously lacking.


dude i was only kidding.


Baryogenesis: loooongview1: Anybody that actually thinks they can rank the worthiness of one piece of art to another is full of shiat. But these sorts of things are fun.

Let's just progress to the end point: ranking all things.



#1 Arguing on the internet
#2 Boobs


#1 Boobs
#2 Arguing on Fark
 
2012-08-02 10:11:13 AM  
HERETIC! BURN THE HERETIC! BURN! BURN! BURN!
 
2012-08-02 10:12:17 AM  

Tired_of_the_BS: ooh whole other topic. If we're talking about modern genre-defining movies, I recently have new favorites to my top ten list. The Guard and The Good the Bad and the Weird are the only movies I've re-watched on back to back days in the last 10 years. Brilliant stuff!


LOOOOOOVED The Guard! It's easy to see the writer/director is the writer/director of In Bruges (that must have been some house growing up).Haven't see The Good The Bad and The Weird but must check it out.

'How many murders have you had in the last 24 hours?"
"That's for us to know and you to find out."
 
2012-08-02 10:13:23 AM  

Crewmannumber6: LOOOOOOVED The Guard! It's easy to see the writer/director is the brother of the writer/director of In Bruges (that must have been some house growing up).Haven't see The Good The Bad and The Weird but must check it out.


FTFM
shiat
 
2012-08-02 10:13:37 AM  
My Top 10, no particular order:

Amadeus
Blade Runner
The Godfather (I & II)
Goodfellas
Crimes and Misdemeanors
Pulp Fiction
Miller's Crossing
Dr. Strangelove
The Sting
Fight Club

Honorable mentions to Children of Men, Raising Arizona, Alien, The Bicycle Thief, Rear Window, The Shining.
 
2012-08-02 10:16:07 AM  

simplicimus: Really, "Vertigo" ? I will gladly accede that "Citizen Kane" is not all that and a bag of nuts. But "A face in the crowd" and "Meet John Doe" are far better films.


Kane had a story and a message.
Vertigo, not so much.

I would get if Kane lost to Avatar, which also had a message, but not Vertigo.

The special effects in Vertigo were silly.
 
2012-08-02 10:18:02 AM  

Mr_Fabulous: My Top 10, no particular order:

Amadeus
Blade Runner
The Godfather (I & II)
Goodfellas
Crimes and Misdemeanors
Pulp Fiction
Miller's Crossing
Dr. Strangelove
The Sting
Fight Club

Honorable mentions to Children of Men, Raising Arizona, Alien, The Bicycle Thief, Rear Window, The Shining.


Fark! I forgot to mention 12 Monkeys!
 
2012-08-02 10:20:04 AM  
Rear Window. But this is a damn fine film in its own right -


gothamist.com
 
2012-08-02 10:21:35 AM  

thornhill: A very brief explanation of why Vertigo is Hitchock's best film and deserves to be called the greatest film: There are two films going on at the same time within Vertigo. There's the story line we get through the dialogue (the whole thing with Madeline being possessed by a ghost), and what the film is really about told purely through visuals (Scottie's impotence). It's a commentary one how film is a visual medium, and that if you focus on dialogue, you're failing to take advantage of the medium (so for viewers who only pay attention to Vertigo's dialogue rather than what they see on the screen -- right down to the choice of color in costumes and props -- they are faked out by the possession plot which is a red herring). The final act of the film is particularly brilliant. Hitchcock gives us the big reveal with 30 minutes still to go, but instead of creating less suspense, it creates more because we're anxious about what will happen if Judy gets caught, and perplexed about her actions -- her willingness to be remade into a dead woman and the fact that she recognizes what is happening.


Like I had said previously, while the movie is great from a craftsmanship level, it never quite gells for me as a "great" movie. It's too cold, too sterile, too distant, too "arthouse" I guess I could say. That film needed the help of a writer like John Michael Hayes to put some more feeling and humor into the script. The characters don't really seem to be very involving other than Scottie, and even then, it's still difficult to identify with him. It's hard to connect to the movie on anything other than an intellectual level. Vertigo really suffers from the lack of warmth that his 4 John M Hayes scripted movies (Rear Window, To Catch a Theif, The Trouble With Harry, The Man Who Knew Too Much) had.
 
2012-08-02 10:22:58 AM  

tenpoundsofcheese: The special effects in Vertigo were silly.


By today's standards, but in 1958 they f*@cked people up.
 
2012-08-02 10:24:12 AM  
It insists upon itself.
 
2012-08-02 10:26:20 AM  

Mr_Fabulous: My Top 10, no particular order:

Amadeus
Blade Runner
The Godfather (I & II)
Goodfellas
Crimes and Misdemeanors
Pulp Fiction
Miller's Crossing
Dr. Strangelove
The Sting
Fight Club

Honorable mentions to Children of Men, Raising Arizona, Alien, The Bicycle Thief, Rear Window, The Shining.


In the immortal words of Dug the dog from Up! "I've just met you and I love you"!
 
2012-08-02 10:27:33 AM  
It's not the best film ever made (I'd lean towards Rashomon or The Seven Samurai, possibly the Bicycle Thief), but certainly the most influential. Welles basically created the modern art of filmmaking with the film (largely because he had no idea how other people made films - he relied primarily on his radio and theater background to guide him)- major innovations in cinematography, effects, use of soundtrack to not only evoke a mood but also to smooth edits, the first film to use an L cut to transition between scenes, the first film to rely heavily on flashbacks and use a non-linear narrative, the use of an audience surrogate (the reporter) which was extremely rare at the time and so on.


Also the film holds up extremely well for its age since many of the techniques it uses are still used today so it comes of as a very modern film (and I still find the journey Kane takes from idealistic young reformer to wealthy, corrupt powerbroker - the very thing he spoke out so passionately against in his youth to be fascinating).

So, best film ever made? Of course not - the film is 7 decades old and filmmakers just as brilliant and inventive as he was have built on what he did. However, it is a film that anyone with any sort of interest in film should see repeatedly (preferably with Ebert's commentary) and if you can't recognize its importance then you really shouldn't be talking about movies to begin with.
 
2012-08-02 10:31:39 AM  

Dr.Zom: simplicimus: Dr.Zom: It's Casablanca. Everybody knows it's Casablanca. No one ever says "Hey, let's watch Citizen Kane again tonight."

That list was a pretentious pile of crap. Sunrise: a Song for Two Humans? Blow me.

Casablanca is just insanely great. A bunch of contract actors and a B level script turned out to be so much more.

That's why I really do think it's the greatest film of all time - the process took so many people's contributions and almost accidentally created this wonderful work of art. In Thomas Lennon and Robert Ben Garant's book on screenwriting (highly recommended by the way) they claim that Rick's entire backstory was added to the screenplay by the SEVENTH team of writers, which doesn't surprise me in the least.


The ONLY vaguely negative thing I can say about Casablanca is that the Paris scenes can go a little slow. And that's not even that bad either. The movie is just amazing especially because, as you said, it's accidentally perfect.

But I remember just being in awe when I finished watching it for the first time.
 
2012-08-02 10:31:43 AM  

Crewmannumber6: alowishus: Goodfellas (1990)

I loved Goodfellas UNTIL I went back and watched Mean Streets, then I realised Scorsese has been making the same movie over and over ever since. Except for Color Of Money and Gangs of New York.


And Last Temptation of Christ and After Hours and Kundun and The Age of Innocence and The Aviator and Taxi Driver and Hugo and Bringing out the Dead and Shutter Island.

But other than those, yeah. He makes the same movie over and over
 
2012-08-02 10:33:12 AM  

Crewmannumber6: tenpoundsofcheese: The special effects in Vertigo were silly.

By today's standards, but in 1958 they f*@cked people up.



Snapper Carr said it better than I could.

By the standards of when the film was made, Kane was far more influential.
 
2012-08-02 10:34:15 AM  

loooongview1: Anybody that actually thinks they can rank the worthiness of one piece of art to another is full of shiat.


You're wrong.

Art can be objectively measured. With film you can critically evaluate the editing, cinematography, shot composition, lighting, camera work, etc. There are very concrete reasons that people point to these films as being the best.

What remains completely subjective is if the film (or any work of art) has an emotional impact on people.
 
2012-08-02 10:34:50 AM  

stoli n coke: Crewmannumber6: alowishus: Goodfellas (1990)

I loved Goodfellas UNTIL I went back and watched Mean Streets, then I realised Scorsese has been making the same movie over and over ever since. Except for Color Of Money and Gangs of New York.

And Last Temptation of Christ and After Hours and Kundun and The Age of Innocence and The Aviator and Taxi Driver and Hugo and Bringing out the Dead and Shutter Island.

But other than those, yeah. He makes the same movie over and over


Point taken
 
2012-08-02 10:34:56 AM  

Marcus Aurelius: There can be only one.


Nice find. So thats what happened to Rowdy Roddy Piper.
 
2012-08-02 10:39:35 AM  

KatjaMouse: RumsfeldsReplacement: Allansfirebird: stuff...
Clerks II (2006)
Hot Fuzz (2006)
stuff...

wat

Nothing wrong with Hot Fuzz. Like at all. That was made by a group of tremendous movie nerds who one upped several excellently made action films when you talk about scope and framing and even some of the action as well. As for Clerks II... ummm... well?


Clerks II was funny, but Hot Fuzz was excellent.

My number one pick will always be Blazing Saddles.
/It's twue.
 
2012-08-02 10:43:03 AM  
Again, not a modern masterpiece, but My Favorite Year is a great farkin film.

The Field
The Wind That Shakes The Barley

and just for fun

The Commitments
 
2012-08-02 10:43:07 AM  
i.ytimg.com

No, that's not it.
 
2012-08-02 10:44:51 AM  

zez: underwhere: Why did the writer of that article go out of his way to post the spoiler about Rosebud?

That's what I was thinking. I know it's an old film but how many kids might want to check it out after hearing about it on the interwebs.

Granted, the first time I saw Citizen Kane, it was at an arthouse cinema after some rerelease for something. I liked it but didn't understand why everyone thought it was so great. Then I got the Laserdisc and listened to the commentary and finally realized that all the same old stuff I've seen a thousand times was all done in this movie for the very first time!

Time really has hurt that film, as well as the horrible old age makeup Wells used on himself.


Reminds me of when I heard someone hating on Seven Samurai with the argument that " all the camera shots looked like all these other movies," without realizing that, yeah, it does, cause Kurosawa did it first.
 
2012-08-02 10:44:52 AM  

Allansfirebird: thornhill: A very brief explanation of why Vertigo is Hitchock's best film and deserves to be called the greatest film: There are two films going on at the same time within Vertigo. There's the story line we get through the dialogue (the whole thing with Madeline being possessed by a ghost), and what the film is really about told purely through visuals (Scottie's impotence). It's a commentary one how film is a visual medium, and that if you focus on dialogue, you're failing to take advantage of the medium (so for viewers who only pay attention to Vertigo's dialogue rather than what they see on the screen -- right down to the choice of color in costumes and props -- they are faked out by the possession plot which is a red herring). The final act of the film is particularly brilliant. Hitchcock gives us the big reveal with 30 minutes still to go, but instead of creating less suspense, it creates more because we're anxious about what will happen if Judy gets caught, and perplexed about her actions -- her willingness to be remade into a dead woman and the fact that she recognizes what is happening.

Like I had said previously, while the movie is great from a craftsmanship level, it never quite gells for me as a "great" movie. It's too cold, too sterile, too distant, too "arthouse" I guess I could say. That film needed the help of a writer like John Michael Hayes to put some more feeling and humor into the script. The characters don't really seem to be very involving other than Scottie, and even then, it's still difficult to identify with him. It's hard to connect to the movie on anything other than an intellectual level. Vertigo really suffers from the lack of warmth that his 4 John M Hayes scripted movies (Rear Window, To Catch a Theif, The Trouble With Harry, The Man Who Knew Too Much) had.


This list doesn't attempt to rank movies that have the most emotional impact because that's totally subjective -- it's different for everyone. Instead it purposely focuses on craftsmanship because that is something subjective, that we can all agree upon.

A few things:

The film is supposed to lack warmth because it's pretty dark -- Scottie is a necrophiliac!

I would say that it does have humor. The first two-thirds of the film are over the top in melodrama -- it purposely plays out like a bad 1950s romantic tragedy -- and then we found out that it was all an old fashion "kill your wife for the money plot." It'shiatchcock's twist on a tiresome genre.

While I think it's hard to connect with Scottie's character, the theme about him wanting to remake a woman into an visually aesthetic ideal of what's considered attractive remains pretty prevalent in our culture. The film confronts us with uncomfortable aspects of masculinity and desire in our culture.
 
2012-08-02 10:45:39 AM  
1. 12 Angry Men
2. The Godfather
3. The Godfather 2
4. Dog Day Afternoon
5. Dr. Strangelove
 
2012-08-02 10:47:36 AM  
Also, since everyone likes to harp on the sled, I feel it's only proper to point out that Rosebud is nothing more than a framing device for the plot (the aforementioned journey from young idealist to corrupt cynic). Personally I prefer the more cynical explanation (it was Hearst's pet name for his mistress's clitoris)
 
2012-08-02 10:49:27 AM  
I don't see much love here for silence of the lambs. Am I a heathen for thinking that movie was great, and thinking it should be considered for at least some folks' top 10/20/50 lists?
 
2012-08-02 10:49:45 AM  

Snapper Carr: It's not the best film ever made (I'd lean towards Rashomon or The Seven Samurai, possibly the Bicycle Thief), but certainly the most influential. Welles basically created the modern art of filmmaking with the film (largely because he had no idea how other people made films - he relied primarily on his radio and theater background to guide him)- major innovations in cinematography, effects, use of soundtrack to not only evoke a mood but also to smooth edits, the first film to use an L cut to transition between scenes, the first film to rely heavily on flashbacks and use a non-linear narrative, the use of an audience surrogate (the reporter) which was extremely rare at the time and so on.


Also the film holds up extremely well for its age since many of the techniques it uses are still used today so it comes of as a very modern film (and I still find the journey Kane takes from idealistic young reformer to wealthy, corrupt powerbroker - the very thing he spoke out so passionately against in his youth to be fascinating).

So, best film ever made? Of course not - the film is 7 decades old and filmmakers just as brilliant and inventive as he was have built on what he did. However, it is a film that anyone with any sort of interest in film should see repeatedly (preferably with Ebert's commentary) and if you can't recognize its importance then you really shouldn't be talking about movies to begin with.


A voice of reason in a thread full of nonsense.
 
2012-08-02 10:52:11 AM  

Thresher: Mr_Fabulous: My Top 10, no particular order:

Amadeus
Blade Runner
The Godfather (I & II)
Goodfellas
Crimes and Misdemeanors
Pulp Fiction
Miller's Crossing
Dr. Strangelove
The Sting
Fight Club

Honorable mentions to Children of Men, Raising Arizona, Alien, The Bicycle Thief, Rear Window, The Shining.

In the immortal words of Dug the dog from Up! "I've just met you and I love you"!



Well, thanks man. I appreciate it. And please... help keep Austin weird.
 
2012-08-02 10:52:37 AM  

mr smart the great: blade runner, dune....... my list goes on i hold no favorites i hold only well made movies that require people to think. kindda sad the stupider ones get all the attention. farken glee, lost........


Why are you comparing tv shows to movies?
 
2012-08-02 10:53:06 AM  

ThePixies: 1. 12 Angry Men


On my list of films that my kids HAVE to see once, along with To Kill A mockingbird and Saving Private Ryan.
 
2012-08-02 10:54:02 AM  

Pete_T_Mann:

Honestly, I liked this more than Citizen Kane. Iago was really, really great.

Random favorites b/c everybody is just dying to know...

Blade runner--directors cut
Brazil and Baron Munchasen
7th Seal and Wild Strawberries
Apocalypse Now Redux
Excalibur (Nicol Williamson FTW)
Hero (with the right subtitles)
The Thing--Carpenters version, of course
The Prestige
The Good, The Bad, and the Ugly (but all in the "man w/ no name" trilogy are great movies)
Millers Crossing
From Hell

Thats all I can think of for now...


Finally got the fiancee to watch Millers Crossing. Also appreciate Brazil and Baron Munchasen being on the list, shame Time Bandits fell apart in the end.
Would have to remove From Hell, and replace with Amadeus however.
 
2012-08-02 10:58:12 AM  

ZiegZeon: zez: underwhere: Why did the writer of that article go out of his way to post the spoiler about Rosebud?

That's what I was thinking. I know it's an old film but how many kids might want to check it out after hearing about it on the interwebs.

Granted, the first time I saw Citizen Kane, it was at an arthouse cinema after some rerelease for something. I liked it but didn't understand why everyone thought it was so great. Then I got the Laserdisc and listened to the commentary and finally realized that all the same old stuff I've seen a thousand times was all done in this movie for the very first time!

Time really has hurt that film, as well as the horrible old age makeup Wells used on himself.

Reminds me of when I heard someone hating on Seven Samurai with the argument that " all the camera shots looked like all these other movies," without realizing that, yeah, it does, cause Kurosawa did it first.


Seven Samurai is as influential to the modern action film as Citizen Kane is to modern film techniques. Samurai is leaps and bounds ahead of anything else that was being done at the time, and its influence is still abundant today (including in Michael Bay films). It's a film that SHOULD be in a film critic's top ten.
 
2012-08-02 10:59:14 AM  

Solid Muldoon: walrusonion: Why can't there be two classes of lists a Hayes Code List and a Post Hayes Code list? Y'know to give things made after the 50's a chance.

The Maltese Falcon would have been a much better movie if they could have said I want to fark you instead of I love you. No way they loved each other. They just wanted to be having serious banging boning all over the place.

But you couldn't say fark that back then, so they had to say love.


Seriously cannot agree there. Spade was cheerfully bonking his partner's wife and nothing was said about love. But Bridget was something else entirely to him, which is why his winning in yhe end wasn't such a win.
 
2012-08-02 11:01:47 AM  

GentlemanJ: Seems clear to me that it's "The Godfather."


The Godfather and Godfather II are a seamless continuum of cinematic excellence.

The thing people miss the point about about a list of the greatest movies of all time appearing in a trade specialty publication like Sight and Sound is that the criteria really isn't the "most enjoyable film ever made"; the criteria generally is the film which had the greatest impact on film after it made it to the silver screen. By that criteria, there is so much to Citizen Kane which is groundbreaking in terms of story, cinematography, direction, sound, etc. that CK influenced an entire couple of generations of filmmakers to come. Plus it's not a bad little film.
 
2012-08-02 11:04:47 AM  

loooongview1: Once Upon a Time in Mexico


uhhh heheh
 
2012-08-02 11:07:04 AM  

Harry_Seldon: I am going with this movie...

[3.bp.blogspot.com image 425x298]


Princess Mononoke was better. But I realize people didn't know Miyazaki until he sold out.
 
2012-08-02 11:07:19 AM  
It's about time Citizen Kane took a back seat to truly great films, like Highlander 3.
 
2012-08-02 11:09:15 AM  
The Good The Bad and The Ugly is better than all 10 of those movies. Film snobs are the worst.
 
2012-08-02 11:09:35 AM  
I just kinda rolled through this thread, and I'm seeing a lot of Hitchcock love for Vertigo and Rear Window. For me, though, it's gotta be North by Northwest or Rope.

And somebody upthread mentioned Katharine Hepburn in The African Queen, but her best role by far is as Eleanor in The Lion in Winter - another incredible film.
 
2012-08-02 11:10:49 AM  
Movies since 1968 that should be in the top ten:

THE GODFATHER, FOR FARK'S SAKE
The Shawshank Redemption

Other contenders since 1968 for the top ten:
American Beauty
Pulp Fiction
2001

Should be number one:
The Godfather
or
Casablanca
 
2012-08-02 11:11:10 AM  

phyrkrakr: And somebody upthread mentioned Katharine Hepburn in The African Queen, but her best role by far is as Eleanor in The Lion in Winter - another incredible film.


And it had Richard Harris in it, too
 
2012-08-02 11:12:01 AM  

Mr_Fabulous: My Top 10, no particular order:

Amadeus
Blade Runner
The Godfather (I & II)
Goodfellas
Crimes and Misdemeanors
Pulp Fiction
Miller's Crossing
Dr. Strangelove
The Sting
Fight Club

Honorable mentions to Children of Men, Raising Arizona, Alien, The Bicycle Thief, Rear Window, The Shining.


You have excellent taste.

/ hasn't seen Crimes and Misdemeanors
// or The String
/// Barton Fink was better than Miller's Crossing
 
2012-08-02 11:12:52 AM  
Oh, and another film since 1968 that needs to be in the top ten: No Country for Old Men
 
2012-08-02 11:13:25 AM  

Lord Dimwit: /// Barton Fink was better than Miller's Crossing


I'm a huge Coen Brothers fan, but I hated Barton Fink. If any of their other films rates above Miller's Crossing it's The MAn Who Wasn't There
 
2012-08-02 11:14:26 AM  

Crewmannumber6: LOOOOOOVED The Guard! It's easy to see the writer/director is the writer/director of In Bruges (that must have been some house growing up).Haven't see The Good The Bad and The Weird but must check it out.


I'll check out The Guard then. If you're interested, the director also did a really good short film called Six Shooter that is well worth seeing.
 
2012-08-02 11:15:17 AM  
Came for Ricky Bobby reference. Leaving satisfied.

/I'm a simpleton.
 
2012-08-02 11:17:36 AM  

phyrkrakr: The Lion in Winter


Words cannot express how much I love that film - objectively I have to admit that there are many better films but Lion in Winter is probably my personal favorite film.

"My life, when it is written, will read better than it lived. Henry Fitz-Empress, first Plantagenet, a king at twenty-one, the ablest soldier of an able time. He led men well, he cared for justice when he could and ruled, for thirty years, a state as great as Charlemagne's. He married out of love, a woman out of legend. Not in Alexandria, or Rome, or Camelot has there been such a queen. She bore him many children. But no sons. King Henry had no sons. He had three whiskered things but he disowned them "


"He's here. He'll get no satisfaction out of me. He isn't going to see me beg. "

"My you chivalric fool... as if the way one fell down mattered. "

"When the fall is all there is, it matters."
 
2012-08-02 11:18:02 AM  
List fails without AssBlasters 15

The way the camera zooms to the freshly farked fart box in the second scene is what cinema is all about!
 
2012-08-02 11:18:42 AM  

Crewmannumber6: phyrkrakr: And somebody upthread mentioned Katharine Hepburn in The African Queen, but her best role by far is as Eleanor in The Lion in Winter - another incredible film.

And it had Richard Harris in it, too


Are you farking with me? Peter O'Toole is not Richard Harris. Peter O'Toole pisses from great heights on Richard Harris, who stands meekly at the foothills of his greatness, with Ollie Reed and Richard Burton. They were all great, but O'Toole was the best of them.

Oh, and Anthony Hopkins and a very young Timothy Dalton were in The Lion in Winter, too.

As far as Richard Harris, I finally watched The Wild Geese the other day. Richard Burton, Richard Harris, and Roger Moore are all mercenaries going down to Africa to rescue some guy. SPOILERS FOR A THIRTY YEAR OLD MOVIE When they get screwed by their boss, Harris tries to talk the other two into a revolution. Mrs. Phyrkrakr leans over and says "King Arthur, James Bond, and Julius Ceasar conquer Africa" and I about died.
 
2012-08-02 11:20:52 AM  

mikemoto: I finally saw Vertigo a few months back and not only would I not place it number one, I wouldn't even say it'shiatchcock's best. North by Northwest and Psycho are far superior movies.


They are at least more-imitated. North by Northwest is the prototype action-hero movie and Psycho spawned the slasher genre.
 
2012-08-02 11:21:23 AM  
Only 10 does no justice, but these are the top 10 RIGHT now, though 1-5 will always be the list

Amadeus- Just amazing, all natural lighting, and when the orchestra is playing the instrumentation matches what is heard.

Brazil- 1984 thorough a comedic lens, and assuming you watch the directors cut, just as terrifying.

Robocop- IMO the perfect mix of action, comedy, and satire. Frighting how accurate it's predictions were.

Millers Crossing- Everything just works, and Gabriel Byrne is wonderful, all the actors play off each other perfectly.

Seven Samurai- The angles, the message, the acting. It's just amazing. To me the movie feels like it's trying to boil over, but manages to contain its self.

and the others that shift in and out

Castle of Cagliostro (favorite Miyazaki film)
Princess Mononoke
The Adventures of Baron Munchasen
Fantasia
Dawn of the Dead (original of course)
 
2012-08-02 11:23:35 AM  

phyrkrakr: Crewmannumber6: phyrkrakr: And somebody upthread mentioned Katharine Hepburn in The African Queen, but her best role by far is as Eleanor in The Lion in Winter - another incredible film.

And it had Richard Harris in it, too

Are you farking with me? Peter O'Toole is not Richard Harris. Peter O'Toole pisses from great heights on Richard Harris, who stands meekly at the foothills of his greatness, with Ollie Reed and Richard Burton. They were all great, but O'Toole was the best of them.

Oh, and Anthony Hopkins and a very young Timothy Dalton were in The Lion in Winter, too.

As far as Richard Harris, I finally watched The Wild Geese the other day. Richard Burton, Richard Harris, and Roger Moore are all mercenaries going down to Africa to rescue some guy. SPOILERS FOR A THIRTY YEAR OLD MOVIE When they get screwed by their boss, Harris tries to talk the other two into a revolution. Mrs. Phyrkrakr leans over and says "King Arthur, James Bond, and Julius Ceasar conquer Africa" and I about died.


My bad, sorry
 
2012-08-02 11:24:26 AM  

Crewmannumber6: Lord Dimwit: /// Barton Fink was better than Miller's Crossing

I'm a huge Coen Brothers fan, but I hated Barton Fink. If any of their other films rates above Miller's Crossing it's The MAn Who Wasn't There


The Man Who Wasn't There was by far my least favorite Coen Brothers film.

Funny story, though - the first time we watched that film (TMWWT), it was at a friend's house who had his VCR routed through his X-box and from there to his TV. That was enough to have the signal issues caused by Macrovision copy protection. These issues cause the image to fade in and out at regular intervals (about ten seconds from almost invisible to normal brightness). None of us had ever seen Macrovision kick in before, so we just thought it was something wrong with the tape or something.

SPOILER ALERT

Anyway, at the end when he goes to the electric chair, we're all like "whoa, the picture is doing that because it's like it's his point of view while he was dying in the chair! That's so avant garde (we were 19).

Later we read about Macrovision and realized we were just idiots.
 
2012-08-02 11:28:46 AM  

Lord Dimwit: Crewmannumber6: Lord Dimwit: /// Barton Fink was better than Miller's Crossing

I'm a huge Coen Brothers fan, but I hated Barton Fink. If any of their other films rates above Miller's Crossing it's The MAn Who Wasn't There

The Man Who Wasn't There was by far my least favorite Coen Brothers film.

Funny story, though - the first time we watched that film (TMWWT), it was at a friend's house who had his VCR routed through his X-box and from there to his TV. That was enough to have the signal issues caused by Macrovision copy protection. These issues cause the image to fade in and out at regular intervals (about ten seconds from almost invisible to normal brightness). None of us had ever seen Macrovision kick in before, so we just thought it was something wrong with the tape or something.

SPOILER ALERT

Anyway, at the end when he goes to the electric chair, we're all like "whoa, the picture is doing that because it's like it's his point of view while he was dying in the chair! That's so avant garde (we were 19).

Later we read about Macrovision and realized we were just idiots.


That may be the best ending to the worst story I ever heard
 
2012-08-02 11:29:54 AM  
simplicimus
It also suffers because the sublities of B&W film escapes modern viewers.

It didn't have sublities. It was filmed in English.
 
2012-08-02 11:36:27 AM  
blog.truffleshuffle.co.uk

End of discussion.
 
2012-08-02 11:39:25 AM  
The thing with Citizen Kane is that people oft forget that it really standardized much of the modern movie format. That is why it was so renowned. It's really hard to appreciate that in hindsight when it has become the standard.



/Also, The Guard is a friggin' fantastic movie and one of the most entertaining I have seen in years.
 
2012-08-02 11:39:27 AM  

SharkTrager: GentlemanJ: Seems clear to me that it's "The Godfather."

Two is better.


Two is more than one.
 
2012-08-02 11:40:09 AM  

Snapper Carr: phyrkrakr: The Lion in Winter

Words cannot express how much I love that film - objectively I have to admit that there are many better films but Lion in Winter is probably my personal favorite film.

"My life, when it is written, will read better than it lived. Henry Fitz-Empress, first Plantagenet, a king at twenty-one, the ablest soldier of an able time. He led men well, he cared for justice when he could and ruled, for thirty years, a state as great as Charlemagne's. He married out of love, a woman out of legend. Not in Alexandria, or Rome, or Camelot has there been such a queen. She bore him many children. But no sons. King Henry had no sons. He had three whiskered things but he disowned them "


"He's here. He'll get no satisfaction out of me. He isn't going to see me beg. "

"My you chivalric fool... as if the way one fell down mattered. "

"When the fall is all there is, it matters."


My personal favorite: Eleanor [to her earrings] "I'd hang you from the nipples, but you'd shock the children."
 
2012-08-02 11:40:53 AM  
Yay top # list thread! It's just like IMDB!
Here's my Top 22, in no particular order

Last Life in the Universe
Key Largo
The French Lieutenant's Woman
Goodfellas
Blade Runner
The Conversation
Apocalypse Now
Amadeus
Unforgiven
The Remains of the Day
Paper Moon
The Lion in Winter
City of God
Lost in Translation
Dr. Strangelove
Little Miss Sunshine
Citizen Kane
Annie Hall
The Best Years of Our lives
Bridge on the River Kwai
All About Eve
It Happened One Night
 
2012-08-02 11:42:03 AM  

Palooka_Joe: If it weren't for the last scene, I'd consider this film for consideration.



Is that like suggesting this film for suggestion?

Or recommending this film for recommendation?

My list has The Shawshank Redemption, The Godfather, Dangerous Lisasons, Aliens, Inception, It's a Wonderful Life, Braveheart, American Beauty, the Avengers, the Lord Of The Rings trilogy and the Wizard of Oz.
 
2012-08-02 11:43:19 AM  
The Eternal Sunshine of the Spotless Mind was tremendous too.
 
2012-08-02 11:46:14 AM  

someonelse: Snapper Carr: phyrkrakr: The Lion in Winter

Words cannot express how much I love that film - objectively I have to admit that there are many better films but Lion in Winter is probably my personal favorite film.

"My life, when it is written, will read better than it lived. Henry Fitz-Empress, first Plantagenet, a king at twenty-one, the ablest soldier of an able time. He led men well, he cared for justice when he could and ruled, for thirty years, a state as great as Charlemagne's. He married out of love, a woman out of legend. Not in Alexandria, or Rome, or Camelot has there been such a queen. She bore him many children. But no sons. King Henry had no sons. He had three whiskered things but he disowned them "


"He's here. He'll get no satisfaction out of me. He isn't going to see me beg. "

"My you chivalric fool... as if the way one fell down mattered. "

"When the fall is all there is, it matters."

My personal favorite: Eleanor [to her earrings] "I'd hang you from the nipples, but you'd shock the children."


"I dressed my maids as Amazons and rode bare-breasted halfway to Damascus. Louis had a seizure and I damn near died of windburn...

...but the troops...were dazzled."

Something something "pork in the treetops before breakfast"

That movie is just incredibly quotable.
 
2012-08-02 11:47:45 AM  

Freakin Rican: dude i was only kidding.


Yeah, I know, but Alien3 is one of a handful of films that I personally think is much better than its reputation. Another is Red Dawn, it's a much more balanced film than people give it credit for, and it's subtly anti-war. but that's a whole 'nother story.
 
2012-08-02 11:48:06 AM  
Off the list, great movies I can rewatch NOW all the way through:

Seven Samurai
Searchers (though there was a time when I'd always fall asleep during it)
2001
L'Atalante
Metropolis
The General
Rules of the Game
Rashomon
Godfather
Rashomon
City Lights
Algiers
Apocalypse Now
Passion of Joan of Arc

Great films with at least that one damn part I can't....

Bicycle Thieves
8 1/2
Breathless
Kane
Persona
Some Like it Hot
Psycho
La Jetee
Pierrot (Spoiler: that boat scene near the end)
Taxi Driver
Singin' in the Rain

Okay to Great films watched all the way through that it might be better to not watch again:
Ugetsu
Mulholland
Sunrise
Ordet
Stalker
Au Hasard Balthazar
Andrei Rublev

Needs a rewatch for me to make up my mind:
Late Spring
Vertigo

Quite the drag, isn't it:
La Dolce Vita
Gertrud
400 Blows
Play Time
Man with a Movie Camera

"Forget it, I'm done," within the first 20 minutes:

Le Mepris
The Mirror
L'Avventura
Godfather Part II

Not seen those unnamed above.
 
2012-08-02 11:51:53 AM  
There's a hell of a lot of hipster in this thread. As far as this:

Finally, it's socially acceptable to admit Citizen Kane is not, in fact, the best movie ever made

Good. I'm glad to see Ebony Ass Sluts VIII finally get its due.
 
2012-08-02 11:54:08 AM  
Oops, forgot to add Potemkin to the second list and Tokyo Story to "Needs a rewatch."
 
2012-08-02 12:24:39 PM  

dittybopper: Another is Red Dawn, it's a much more balanced film than people give it credit for, and it's subtly anti-war. but that's a whole 'nother story.


The closing monologue, about how Leah Thompson is the only person who still visits the monument to
the dead freedom fighters all those years later does have to rank as one of the most authentically
poignant moments in modern film, and makes it point very well.

I'd forgotten it until you mentioned it.
 
2012-08-02 12:25:43 PM  
The Grapes of Wrath. Book it done.

Is there a book or movie about The Grapes of Wrath II: 1 Percenter Boogaloo?

I would love to see a movie about house after suburban house left abandoned with personal property like family photos, clothes, food just left behind. And their former residents living in tents in the middle of cities.

But, just like The Grapes of Wrath, that stuff never really happened. And it's all water under the bridge.
 
2012-08-02 12:48:17 PM  
The cultural importance of Deep Throat far outweighs anything in Vertigo or Citizen Kane.
 
2012-08-02 12:57:52 PM  
Who ever considered CK to be the "greatest film ever produced?" The cinematography was revolutionary, but greatest film? Hell naw.
 
2012-08-02 12:58:32 PM  
List is heavy on the angst-ridden trophy bait stuff, and light on everything else.

As usual.
 
2012-08-02 01:03:25 PM  
Godfather 1 and II
Goodfellas
Boogie Nights
La Confidential
Night of the Hunter
All the Presidents Men
Annie Hall
Lawrence of Arabia
Taxi Driver
 
2012-08-02 01:51:23 PM  
What a real sled looks like:

img23.imageshack.us
 
2012-08-02 02:03:26 PM  
To me, Dark Knight is the most perfect movie.
The music, the acting, the pacing, the FX, the camera shots, etc.
It may not be the best ever made, but it's darn near perfect to me.
Also, Raiders. Everything just comes together perfectly.

Of course, I also like Sucker Punch, so don't feel you have to tell me my taste is bad. I know it is.
 
2012-08-02 02:07:50 PM  
I just finished Hellraiser: Bloodline and, hear me out, I'm fairly certain that is the greatest film ever made.
 
2012-08-02 02:18:36 PM  

alowishus: I'm sure no one cares, but here are 10 of my favorite films

Seven Samurai (1954)
The Exterminating Angel (1962)
Dr. Strangelove (1964)
2001: A Space Odyssey (1968)
Eraserhead (1977)
Fanny and Alexander (1982)
Brazil (1985)
Goodfellas (1990)
Waiting For Guffman (1996)
There Will Be Blood (2007)

This list would probably be different if I made it a few weeks from now. 2001, Eraserhead, and Fanny and Alexander are the only ones solidly top ten material.


I care man, but only because you included Fanny and Alexander. Discovered this movie about 5 years ago. And since then the wife and I watch it each year around Christmas. It obviously not a cheery Christmas movie, but it is great to build a fire and have a nice wine while watching. I actually look forward to it every year. It's a great movie.
 
zez
2012-08-02 02:25:45 PM  

Crewmannumber6: Lord Dimwit: /// Barton Fink was better than Miller's Crossing

I'm a huge Coen Brothers fan, but I hated Barton Fink. If any of their other films rates above Miller's Crossing it's The MAn Who Wasn't There


I love Miller's Crossing, but isn't it just a remake of a Kurosawa film?
 
2012-08-02 02:28:26 PM  
Here's 20 that aren't necessarily in any order

Seven Samurai

The Bicycle Thief

The 400 Blows

The Seventh Seal

Aguirre: The Wrath of God

Rashomon

The Third Man

2001: A Space Odyssey

Citizen Kane

The Godfather

The Magnificent Ambersons

La Grande Illusion

Metropolis

Triumph of the Will (I feel icky putting this one here but it's an extraordinarily well made propaganda film and Leni Riefenstahl is rightly lauded for her artistic and technical innovations in filming it)

Casablanca

Brazil

The Wild Bunch

Grave of the Fireflies

Wings of Desire

Solaris
 
2012-08-02 02:40:44 PM  

simplicimus: Dr.Zom: It's Casablanca. Everybody knows it's Casablanca. No one ever says "Hey, let's watch Citizen Kane again tonight."

That list was a pretentious pile of crap. Sunrise: a Song for Two Humans? Blow me.

Casablanca is just insanely great. A bunch of contract actors and a B level script turned out to be so much more.


This.
 
2012-08-02 02:41:30 PM  

zez: Crewmannumber6: Lord Dimwit: /// Barton Fink was better than Miller's Crossing

I'm a huge Coen Brothers fan, but I hated Barton Fink. If any of their other films rates above Miller's Crossing it's The MAn Who Wasn't There

I love Miller's Crossing, but isn't it just a remake of a Kurosawa film?


Is it? I wouldn't know.
 
2012-08-02 02:46:00 PM  

Crewmannumber6: zez: Crewmannumber6: Lord Dimwit: /// Barton Fink was better than Miller's Crossing

I'm a huge Coen Brothers fan, but I hated Barton Fink. If any of their other films rates above Miller's Crossing it's The MAn Who Wasn't There

I love Miller's Crossing, but isn't it just a remake of a Kurosawa film?

Is it? I wouldn't know.



No, it's extremely loosely based on Dashiel Hammet's Red Harvest (which was the basis for Yojimbo) and The Glass Key (which inspired The Big Sleep)
 
2012-08-02 02:55:10 PM  
That was a weird list.

A good number of them were obligatory museum pieces. Clearly the meaning of "Great" != "Good", but rather, historically significant.

Can you imagine subjecting your friends to Man with a Movie Camera on movie night? They would never let you pick the movie again. The only people who ever see that film are students in a film history class.
 
2012-08-02 03:42:45 PM  
Vertigo is definitely one of my favorite movies and I never really cared for Citizen Kane all that much, so this makes me happy. Strangers On a Train is probably my second favorite Hitchcock movie... But wait, Rear Window is really good... And am I the only one that liked The Birds, cheesy as it could be sometimes?

And someone mentioned Brick above... I also cannot suggest watching that movie enough. Like, tonight. It has such great, snappy dialogue and is really fun to watch.


Yay movies.
 
2012-08-02 03:50:54 PM  

arghyematey: Vertigo is definitely one of my favorite movies and I never really cared for Citizen Kane all that much, so this makes me happy. Strangers On a Train is probably my second favorite Hitchcock movie... But wait, Rear Window is really good... And am I the only one that liked The Birds, cheesy as it could be sometimes?

And someone mentioned Brick above... I also cannot suggest watching that movie enough. Like, tonight. It has such great, snappy dialogue and is really fun to watch.


Yay movies.


There is soo much to love in that post. 10/10
 
2012-08-02 04:20:42 PM  

DjangoStonereaver: dittybopper: Another is Red Dawn, it's a much more balanced film than people give it credit for, and it's subtly anti-war. but that's a whole 'nother story.

The closing monologue, about how Leah Thompson is the only person who still visits the monument to
the dead freedom fighters all those years later does have to rank as one of the most authentically
poignant moments in modern film, and makes it point very well.

I'd forgotten it until you mentioned it.


Yeah, but it was a tacked-on ending. Watch it without it next time, and you'll see what I mean about the film being, well, ambiguous.
 
2012-08-02 05:09:23 PM  
Citizen Kane was revolutionary for its time I guess, but it's nowhere near as well directed, written and acted as Manos: The Hands of Fate.
 
2012-08-02 05:14:32 PM  

El Freak: Citizen Kane was revolutionary for its time I guess, but it's nowhere near as well directed, written and acted as Manos: The Hands of Fate.


Well, Manos is the benchmark for films made for $1,000 or less.
 
2012-08-02 05:26:55 PM  

Freakin Rican: dittybopper: Freakin Rican: i would think alien 3 & 4 would be the best movies ever

followed by AVP

Alien3 gets a lot of shiat that it doesn't deserve. It's a perfect capstone to the Ripley v. Xenomorph trilogy. It's actually quite a good film. People just don't like it because everyone of "worth" (Newt, Corporal Hicks, Dillon, and Ripley herself) dies. Hey, sometimes bad things happen to good people, or to people who don't deserve it. I think it rounds out that story arc quite nicely, and in keeping with the generally dark tone of the series.

Alien Resurrection, on the other hand, ain't that good. It's OK-ish, sort of, in a popcorn movie sort of way. AvP1 just sucked despite some decent ideas. AvP2 was better, but still seriously lacking.

dude i was only kidding.


Baryogenesis: loooongview1: Anybody that actually thinks they can rank the worthiness of one piece of art to another is full of shiat. But these sorts of things are fun.

Let's just progress to the end point: ranking all things.


#1 Arguing on the internet
#2 Boobs

#1 Boobs
#2 Arguing on Fark


I notice you corrected the list, but didn't post any boobs. The original ranking stands!
 
2012-08-02 05:41:29 PM  

simplicimus: El Freak: Citizen Kane was revolutionary for its time I guess, but it's nowhere near as well directed, written and acted as Manos: The Hands of Fate.

Well, Manos is the benchmark for films made for $1,000 or less.


I know you're trolling, but I am still of the opinion that had it been made by an actual film maker, MANOS could have
been a very effective and creepy horror film. The ending, for all its inept execution, is still shocking even in this
day of over the top torture porn.

Still: it is the CITIZEN KANE of vanity productions by a Texas fertilizer salesman.
 
2012-08-02 05:42:10 PM  

LonMead: Dr.Zom: Teufelaffe: underwhere: Why did the writer of that article go out of his way to post the spoiler about Rosebud?

Rosebud was calling from inside the house.

Rosebud killed Dumbledore.

Rosebud is actually Keyser Soze.


No, your mixing it up.
Kevin Spacey's character cuts off Rosebud's head and sends it to the detectives in a box.
 
2012-08-02 05:48:59 PM  

DjangoStonereaver: simplicimus: El Freak: Citizen Kane was revolutionary for its time I guess, but it's nowhere near as well directed, written and acted as Manos: The Hands of Fate.

Well, Manos is the benchmark for films made for $1,000 or less.

I know you're trolling, but I am still of the opinion that had it been made by an actual film maker, MANOS could have
been a very effective and creepy horror film. The ending, for all its inept execution, is still shocking even in this
day of over the top torture porn.

Still: it is the CITIZEN KANE of vanity productions by a Texas fertilizer salesman.


The only things holding Manos back are plotting, acting, dialogue and continuity.
 
2012-08-02 06:10:48 PM  

simplicimus: DjangoStonereaver: simplicimus: El Freak: Citizen Kane was revolutionary for its time I guess, but it's nowhere near as well directed, written and acted as Manos: The Hands of Fate.

Well, Manos is the benchmark for films made for $1,000 or less.

I know you're trolling, but I am still of the opinion that had it been made by an actual film maker, MANOS could have
been a very effective and creepy horror film. The ending, for all its inept execution, is still shocking even in this
day of over the top torture porn.

Still: it is the CITIZEN KANE of vanity productions by a Texas fertilizer salesman.

The only things holding Manos back are plotting, acting, dialogue and continuity.


Well, yeah.

But apart from those things... GENIUS!!!!!

/THe mAsTeR WOulD NoT ApPROve
 
2012-08-02 06:17:53 PM  
Ctrl+F "Twilight"
0 hits

FAIL
 
2012-08-02 06:24:17 PM  
Snapper That's a pretty good list.
 
2012-08-02 06:24:42 PM  
It is a mystery to me why people rave about The Searchers.

It isn't anywhere close to being the best Western. It isn't even John Wayne's best Western. (That would be Stagecoach.)

Wayne isn't an actor, he's a movie star. The rest of the cast is worse. You are really going to tell me that a movie that co-stars Jeffery Hunter is one of the greatest of all time?

Hey, let's go off on a months-long quest. Let's not bring any food or water or spare horses, though. We'll be fine.

Sure, there is some beautiful photography of Monument Valley, but have you forgotten the scenes shot in a studio with the fake bushes and fake moonlight and the stupid fake firepit that looks worse than what they did on Bonanza every week?

And then there's Natalie Wood in an Injun costume that looks like something from Disneyland.

But the absolute worst is that idiot who keeps running around talking about the Fee Yan See.

This is an illiterate yahoo who has never seen the word Fiance in print in his life. The only way he would know the word is from HEARING IT SPOKEN! He would pronounce it right!

When I see The Searchers on any kind of list of Best Movies, I know right away to dismiss that list.
 
2012-08-02 06:29:09 PM  

Solid Muldoon: It is a mystery to me why people rave about The Searchers.

It isn't anywhere close to being the best Western. It isn't even John Wayne's best Western. (That would be Stagecoach.)

Wayne isn't an actor, he's a movie star. The rest of the cast is worse. You are really going to tell me that a movie that co-stars Jeffery Hunter is one of the greatest of all time?

Hey, let's go off on a months-long quest. Let's not bring any food or water or spare horses, though. We'll be fine.

Sure, there is some beautiful photography of Monument Valley, but have you forgotten the scenes shot in a studio with the fake bushes and fake moonlight and the stupid fake firepit that looks worse than what they did on Bonanza every week?

And then there's Natalie Wood in an Injun costume that looks like something from Disneyland.

But the absolute worst is that idiot who keeps running around talking about the Fee Yan See.

This is an illiterate yahoo who has never seen the word Fiance in print in his life. The only way he would know the word is from HEARING IT SPOKEN! He would pronounce it right!

When I see The Searchers on any kind of list of Best Movies, I know right away to dismiss that list.


But, yes. The Searchers is great. The themes in that movie are very powerful. OR DO I HAVE TO SPELL IT OUT FOR YOU!?!
 
2012-08-02 06:46:29 PM  
Seven Samurai I'm happy for you and imma let you finish but Yojimbo was the best samurai movie of all time.
 
2012-08-02 07:01:28 PM  
Not in any particular order:

The Magnificent Seven

Where Eagles Dare

She Wore A Yellow Ribbon

The Wild Geese

Dr. Strangelove

The Dogs Of War

The Shootist

The Day Of The Jackal

Captain America

The Avengers

Serenity

Star Wars

The Desert Rats

His Girl Friday

To Catch a Thief

The Guns of Navarone

The Memphis Belle

Twelve O'Clock High

Dawn Patrol

All Quite On the Western Front


A&E TV Movies:
The Crossing
The Lost Battalion
 
2012-08-02 07:07:58 PM  

Clash City Farker: Solid Muldoon: It is a mystery to me why people rave about The Searchers.

It isn't anywhere close to being the best Western. It isn't even John Wayne's best Western. (That would be Stagecoach.)



I would put Stagecoach in the top 5 John Wayne Films but not the best. She War A Yellow Ribbon and the Shootist were better IMHO along The Man Who Shot Liberty Valance.
 
2012-08-02 07:15:00 PM  

hasty ambush: Clash City Farker: Solid Muldoon: It is a mystery to me why people rave about The Searchers.

It isn't anywhere close to being the best Western. It isn't even John Wayne's best Western. (That would be Stagecoach.)



I would put Stagecoach in the top 5 John Wayne Films but not the best. She War A Yellow Ribbon and the Shootist were better IMHO along The Man Who Shot Liberty Valance.


Oh and Rio Grande
 
2012-08-02 07:26:47 PM  
don't forget 'Singing in the Rain' --greatest musical evah
 
2012-08-02 07:29:34 PM  

hasty ambush: Clash City Farker: Solid Muldoon: It is a mystery to me why people rave about The Searchers.

It isn't anywhere close to being the best Western. It isn't even John Wayne's best Western. (That would be Stagecoach.)



I would put Stagecoach in the top 5 John Wayne Films but not the best. She War A Yellow Ribbon and the Shootist were better IMHO along The Man Who Shot Liberty Valance.


Well, I overlooked She Wore a Yellow Ribbon. Now I'll have to spend the next week running this around in my brain.

I think The Searchers is one of those "affirmative action, politically correct Hollywood apologizes for treating natives like dirt for years" kind of picks.

I'd bet that anyone who calls The Searchers one of the greatest films of all time hasn't watched it in 30 years.
The best Western of all time, though? The Road Warrior. Yeah, I said it.
 
2012-08-02 07:37:26 PM  

hasty ambush: hasty ambush: Clash City Farker: Solid Muldoon: It is a mystery to me why people rave about The Searchers.

It isn't anywhere close to being the best Western. It isn't even John Wayne's best Western. (That would be Stagecoach.)



I would put Stagecoach in the top 5 John Wayne Films but not the best. She War A Yellow Ribbon and the Shootist were better IMHO along The Man Who Shot Liberty Valance.

Oh and Rio Grande


I would agree with Muldoon that Jeffery Hunter's performance mars The Seachers. It's a hambone performance for the ages.

For my money, John Wayne's best film is Howard Hawks' Red River, followed closely by The Man Who Shot Liberty Valance.

However, if you want to see John Wayne's best performance, it is The Cowboys.
 
2012-08-02 07:55:30 PM  

ZiegZeon: Would have to remove From Hell, and replace with Amadeus however.


From Hell doesnt get much love, but I think its about the best modern gothic horror film (still havent seen Call of Cthulhu). It does well what Coppola did amazingly badly with Dracula. Plus it has Depp. And Heather Gram. Mmmmmm.... Heather Gram.....

Speaking of Depp and Gilliam, Fear and Loathing hasn't been mentioned much. Its got those two plus Hunter S Thompson, so that's a "trifecta of win" as Farkers like to say.

And to address the somewhat debate going on, the best western is, and will always be, The Good, The Bad, and The Ugly. Sorry, but the gunfight at the end transformed an excellent movie into something legendary. Well, that and the fact that Eastwood was completely perfect for the role. If someone wants to say that The Wild Bunch is a better movie, that's fine, but it wasn't a better Western.
 
2012-08-02 08:22:18 PM  

Dog Welder: Touch Of Evil (another great movie by Welles, and I think superior to "Citizen Kane" in many ways)


That's simply not true. There are some major issues with Touch of Evil - ridiculous, poorly researched plot elements, Heston's incredibly stiff acting (not to mention that fact that it was a bad casting decision to begin with) and that was BEFORE the studio hacked the film to bits. It was intended as a B grade film noir (in fact it's probably the last major film noir of the classic period) that Welles meant to use to get back into Hollywood (it's budget was around 870k - less than 1/3 the average Hollywood budget) The fact that it is an artfully crafted B movie is further testament to the man's talent.

But yeah, that opening tracking shot is pure genius.
 
2012-08-02 08:28:14 PM  
Not trolling.

Love, Actually is sublime perfection.
 
2012-08-02 08:35:18 PM  
A couple of votes for...

Glengarry Glen Ross. The writing, the timing, the directing, the acting. Blows me away every.single.time.

And just because I assume most Farkers drink like a fish, The Lost Weekend. Even if you don't think you have a drinking problem, you should see this film. Ray Milland is magnificent.
 
2012-08-02 08:56:54 PM  
I like The Money Pit.
 
2012-08-02 09:05:34 PM  

paulseta: I like The Money Pit.


It should be mandatory viewing for any potential homeowner.
 
2012-08-02 09:17:42 PM  

Wasn't Looking at his Neck: Off the list, great movies I can rewatch NOW all the way through:

Seven Samurai
Searchers (though there was a time when I'd always fall asleep during it)
2001
L'Atalante
Metropolis
The General
Rules of the Game
Rashomon
Godfather
Rashomon
City Lights
Algiers
Apocalypse Now
Passion of Joan of Arc


You said Rashomon twice.
 
2012-08-02 10:05:55 PM  

simplicimus: El Freak: Citizen Kane was revolutionary for its time I guess, but it's nowhere near as well directed, written and acted as Manos: The Hands of Fate.

Well, Manos is the benchmark for films made for $1,000 or less.


I believe Birdemic: Shock and Terror has raised that bar.
 
2012-08-02 11:35:45 PM  
Good read. Worth a look if you haven't read it yet:
img.photobucket.com
 
2012-08-02 11:46:11 PM  
Vertigo... seriously?

It's not even Hitchcock's best film. That would be The Trouble With Harry... err... I mean, North By Northwest.
 
2012-08-03 12:10:32 AM  

simplicimus: paulseta: I like The Money Pit.

It should be mandatory viewing for any potential homeowner.


I know the Boobies is a "Family Guy" reference but I will say The Money Pit is at least noteworthy for the scene where the raccoon attacks Shelley Long.
 
2012-08-03 12:48:11 AM  

Snapper Carr: Dog Welder: Touch Of Evil (another great movie by Welles, and I think superior to "Citizen Kane" in many ways)

That's simply not true. There are some major issues with Touch of Evil - ridiculous, poorly researched plot elements, Heston's incredibly stiff acting (not to mention that fact that it was a bad casting decision to begin with) and that was BEFORE the studio hacked the film to bits. It was intended as a B grade film noir (in fact it's probably the last major film noir of the classic period) that Welles meant to use to get back into Hollywood (it's budget was around 870k - less than 1/3 the average Hollywood budget) The fact that it is an artfully crafted B movie is further testament to the man's talent.

But yeah, that opening tracking shot is pure genius.


The bolded part makes me suspicious. That sounds like a lot for the time.
 
zez
2012-08-03 12:48:22 AM  
How does this affect the ranking of the Citizen Kane of clown movies?

upload.wikimedia.org
 
2012-08-03 12:50:54 AM  
IMDB doesn't seem to rate any Hitchcock movies above 8.7 or so. Hmm.
 
2012-08-03 01:05:02 AM  

KatjaMouse: tankjr: After all these years I feel vindicated in my love of Vertigo!

/Citizen Kane is the greatest film in history
//Rear Window is also an excellent film

I cam in here to essentially say the same thing.


I see you have excellent taste in film. Do you have a clone in my area?
 
2012-08-03 01:05:40 AM  

Fano: Snapper Carr: Dog Welder: Touch Of Evil (another great movie by Welles, and I think superior to "Citizen Kane" in many ways)

That's simply not true. There are some major issues with Touch of Evil - ridiculous, poorly researched plot elements, Heston's incredibly stiff acting (not to mention that fact that it was a bad casting decision to begin with) and that was BEFORE the studio hacked the film to bits. It was intended as a B grade film noir (in fact it's probably the last major film noir of the classic period) that Welles meant to use to get back into Hollywood (it's budget was around 870k - less than 1/3 the average Hollywood budget) The fact that it is an artfully crafted B movie is further testament to the man's talent.

But yeah, that opening tracking shot is pure genius.

The bolded part makes me suspicious. That sounds like a lot for the time.


I checked (at least did a wiki search). The following films released in 1958 are the ones I could get budget information on.

Seperate Tables - $2.7m

Some Came Running - $3.15m

The Young Lions - $3m

Vertigo - $2.47m

The Vikings - $5m

The Seventh Voyage of Sinbad - $650k (apparently Ray Harryhausen came cheap in 1958)

Gigi - $3.3m

Cat on a Hot Tin Roof - 3m

South Pacific - $6m

The Badlanders - $1.4m

And so forth. The only film I could find that was made cheaper than Touch of Evil was the Sinbad film.
 
2012-08-03 05:33:48 AM  

hamiltonjdavid: Uh. "Man with a Movie Camera" (Vertov, 1929) makes the top 10?

Pretentious article is pretentious.


Man with a Movie Camera is a work of genius. It most certainly deserves its place on the list. As for the list itself, it's compiled by the BFI from a nationwide survey of respected film critics. There's no pretention, it's genuine expertise.
 
2012-08-03 05:42:13 AM  

StoPPeRmobile: [4.bp.blogspot.com image 471x287]


The jig is up!

/and gone
 
2012-08-03 05:45:34 AM  
tickateeboo.files.wordpress.com

Update, male perspective, Pride and Prejudice.

Perfect time capsule of the 80's.
 
2012-08-03 08:36:56 AM  
mr smart the great: blade runner, dune.......

Dune? Seriously?
 
2012-08-03 09:36:53 AM  

Gordon Bennett: hamiltonjdavid: Uh. "Man with a Movie Camera" (Vertov, 1929) makes the top 10?

Pretentious article is pretentious.

Man with a Movie Camera is a work of genius. It most certainly deserves its place on the list. As for the list itself, it's compiled by the BFI from a nationwide survey of respected film critics. There's no pretention, it's genuine expertise.


"respected film critics" and "no pretention" are mutually exclusive.
 
2012-08-03 01:44:22 PM  

Teufelaffe: "respected film critics" and "no pretention" are mutually exclusive.


I'm not sure "respected" and "film critics" go together.
 
2012-08-03 02:23:11 PM  

Dee Snarl: Wasn't Looking at his Neck: Off the list, great movies I can rewatch NOW all the way through:

Seven Samurai
Searchers (though there was a time when I'd always fall asleep during it)
2001
L'Atalante
Metropolis
The General
Rules of the Game
Rashomon
Godfather
Rashomon
City Lights
Algiers
Apocalypse Now
Passion of Joan of Arc


You said Rashomon twice.


"I like Rashoman."

/It's pronounced Headly
 
2012-08-03 07:35:44 PM  
Well, my 100:

2001: A Space Odyssey - Akira - Alexander Nevsky - Alien - the All Barkie Dogville Comedies - the Alphabet (Lynch) - Amadeus - Amarcord - An American Werewolf in London - Apocalypse Now - Bicycle Thieves - Big Meat Eater - Bitter Rice - Black Narcissus - Blazing Saddles - Blue - A Boy Named Charlie Brown - Bring Me the Head of Alfredo Garcia - Caddyshack - Cannibal! the Musical - City Lights - Come and See - Cries and Whispers - the Dentist (1933) - The Evil Dead - Evil Dead II - Fantasia - Ferris Bueller's Day Off - Food Trilogy (Svankmajer) - Forbidden Zone - the Four Days of Naples - Friday - Freaks - Ghostbusters - the Gods Must be Crazy - Godzilla - Godzilla Raids Again - Grave of the Fireflies - the Great Outdoors - Hard Boiled - the Harder they Come - Hausu - The Henpecked Duck - I Love to Singa - Indiana Jones and the Last Crusade - L'Inferno (1911) - Jaws - the Jerk - King Kong ('33) - The Lady Vanishes - The Land Before Time - A Matter of Life and Death - Metropolis (1927) - The Miracle Woman (1931) - Monkey Business (1931) - Monty Python and the Holy Grail - My Winnipeg - A Night at the Opera (1935) - Night of the Living Dead (1968) - Nikita (1990) - Ninotchka - Nosferatu (1922) - O Brother, Where Art Thou - Once Upon a Time in the West - The Passion of Joan of Arc - Peeping Tom - Pink Floyd: the Wall - Popeye the Sailor Meets Sinbad the Sailor - Rabbit of Seville - Rashomon - Ran - Return of the Living Dead - Rules of the Game - The Searchers - Seven Samurai - The Secret of NIMH - Shaolin Drunkard - The Skeleton Dance - Slapshot - the Snake Pit - Solaris (1972) - Sparrows (1926) - Spartacus - Stagecoach - Story of Ricky - the Thing (1982) - A Town Called Panic - the Trip to Bountiful - Used Cars - the Wild Bunch - Yojimbo - Zero for Conduct
 
2012-08-03 10:56:34 PM  

Wasn't Looking at his Neck: Well, my 100:

2001: A Space Odyssey - Akira - Alexander Nevsky - Alien - the All Barkie Dogville Comedies - the Alphabet (Lynch) - Amadeus - Amarcord - An American Werewolf in London - Apocalypse Now - Bicycle Thieves - Big Meat Eater - Bitter Rice - Black Narcissus - Blazing Saddles - Blue - A Boy Named Charlie Brown - Bring Me the Head of Alfredo Garcia - Caddyshack - Cannibal! the Musical - City Lights - Come and See - Cries and Whispers - the Dentist (1933) - The Evil Dead - Evil Dead II - Fantasia - Ferris Bueller's Day Off - Food Trilogy (Svankmajer) - Forbidden Zone - the Four Days of Naples - Friday - Freaks - Ghostbusters - the Gods Must be Crazy - Godzilla - Godzilla Raids Again - Grave of the Fireflies - the Great Outdoors - Hard Boiled - the Harder they Come - Hausu - The Henpecked Duck - I Love to Singa - Indiana Jones and the Last Crusade - L'Inferno (1911) - Jaws - the Jerk - King Kong ('33) - The Lady Vanishes - The Land Before Time - A Matter of Life and Death - Metropolis (1927) - The Miracle Woman (1931) - Monkey Business (1931) - Monty Python and the Holy Grail - My Winnipeg - A Night at the Opera (1935) - Night of the Living Dead (1968) - Nikita (1990) - Ninotchka - Nosferatu (1922) - O Brother, Where Art Thou - Once Upon a Time in the West - The Passion of Joan of Arc - Peeping Tom - Pink Floyd: the Wall - Popeye the Sailor Meets Sinbad the Sailor - Rabbit of Seville - Rashomon - Ran - Return of the Living Dead - Rules of the Game - The Searchers - Seven Samurai - The Secret of NIMH - Shaolin Drunkard - The Skeleton Dance - Slapshot - the Snake Pit - Solaris (1972) - Sparrows (1926) - Spartacus - Stagecoach - Story of Ricky - the Thing (1982) - A Town Called Panic - the Trip to Bountiful - Used Cars - the Wild Bunch - Yojimbo - Zero for Conduct


That's actually a pretty good list. Bring Me the Head of Alfredo Garcia is one of the most underrated films of all time. Peckinpah went a bit over the top in it, but that's what makes it work.
 
2012-08-04 03:31:39 AM  

mikemoto: Bring Me the Head of Alfredo Garcia is one of the most underrated films of all time. Peckinpah went a bit over the top in it, but that's what makes it work.


Water is wet.
The sky is blue
The sun rises in the east.
Peckinpah goes over the top.
 
2012-08-04 06:19:54 AM  
The closest I could come to narrowing my all-time faves down to a top100:

(alright so I was about 250 shy. I tried damn it!)

(also: if you're wondering if I meant the original version, unless specified the answer is "yes")

12 Angry Men
Ace in the Hole
Adam's Rib
The Adventures of Priscilla, Queen of the Desert
The Adventures of Robin Hood
After Dark, My Sweet
After Hours
The Age of Innocence
Aguirre, the Wrath of God
Ali: Fear Eats the Soul
Alien
All About Eve
Amadeus
Amarcord
The Apartment
Apocalypse Now
The Apu Trilogy
Army of Shadows
Arsenic and Old Lace
Atlantic City
Au Hasard Balthazar
Au Revoir, les Enfants
An Autumn Afternoon
Babel
Badlands
The Band Wagon
The Bank Dick
Baraka
Barry Lyndon
The Battle of Algiers
The Battleship Potemkin
Beat the Devil
Beauty and the Beast
Being There
Belle de Jour
La Belle Noiseuse
Best In Show
The Best Years of Our Lives
The Bicycle Thief/Bicycle Thieves
The Big Heat
The Big Red One
The Big Sleep
Blade Runner: The Final Cut
Blazing Saddles
Blow-Up
The Blue Kite
Bob le Flambeur
Body Heat
Breathless
Bride of Frankenstein
The Bridge on the River Kwai
Bringing Up Baby
Bring Me the Head of Alfredo Garcia
Broken Blossoms
The Brood
The Cabinet of Dr. Caligari
Cache
Casablanca
Cat People
La Ceremonie
Un Chien Andalou
Children of Paradise
Chimes at Midnight
Chinatown
Chop Shop
A Christmas Story
The Circus
Citizen Kane
City Lights
La Collectionneuse
Come and See
The Conqueror Worm/The Witchfinder General
The Conversation
The Cook, The Thief, His Wife and Her Lover
Cool Hand Luke
Cries and Whispers
Crimes and Misdemeanors
Crumb
George A. Romero's 'Dawn of the Dead'
Day For Night
George A. Romero's 'Day of the Dead'
Days of Heaven
The Dead
The Decalogue
Dellamorte Dellamore
Departures
Detour
The Devil's Backbone
Diary of a Country Priest
Diary of a Lost Girl
The Discreet Charm of the Bourgeoisie
Diva
Do the Right Thing
Dog Day Afternoon
Don't Look Now
Double Indemnity
The Double Life of Veronique
Dr. Strangelove
Coppola's "Bram Stoker's 'Dracula'"
Duck Soup
8 1/2
El Norte
El Topo
The Enigma of Kaspar Hauser
Eternal Sunshine of the Spotless Mind
Exotica
The Exterminating Angel
Eyes Without A Face
A Face In The Crowd
The Fall of the House of Usher
Fanny and Alexander
Fargo
Faust
The Firemen's Ball
Fitzcarraldo
Five Easy Pieces
Floating Weeds
Forbidden Games
The 400 Blows
French Cancan
The Friends of Eddie Coyle
Gates of Heaven
The General
Glengarry Glen Ross
The Godfather
The Godfather, Part II
Goldfinger
The Good, the Bad and the Ugly
GoodFellas
Gospel According to St. Matthew
Grand Illusion
The Grapes of Wrath
Grave of the Fireflies
The Great Dictator
Great Expectations
Greed
The Grey Zone
Groundhog Day
The Hairdresser's Husband
Harakiri
A Hard Day's Night
Heart of Glass
House of Games
Howards End
The Hustler
Ikiru
In a Lonely Place
In Bruges
In Cold Blood
Inherit the Wind
Ivan the Terrible, Parts I & II
I Walked With A Zombie
Jackie Brown
Jaws
Johnny Guitar
Jules and Jim
Juliet of the Spirits
Killer of Sheep
The Killing
Kind Hearts and Coronets
King Kong
L'Atalante
L.A. Confidential
La Dolce Vita
The Lady Eve
The Ladykillers
The Last Laugh
The Last Picture Show
Last Tango in Paris
The Last Temptation of Christ
Last Year at Marienbad
Late Spring
Laura
Lawrence of Arabia
Le Boucher/The Butcher (Published: 11/23/03)
Le Samourai
Leaving Las Vegas
Leolo
Leon Morin, Priest
The Leopard
Let's Scare Jessica To Death
The Life and Death of Colonel Blimp
(Monty Python's 'The Life of Brian')
The River (Le Fleuve)
The Long Goodbye
The Long Good Friday
M
Magnolia
Make Way for Tomorrow
The Maltese Falcon
A Man Escaped
The Man Who Laughs
The Man Who Shot Liberty Valance
Man With a Movie Camera
The Manchurian Candidate
The Marriage of Maria Braun
The Match Factory Girl
McCabe & Mrs. Miller
M*A*S*H
Mean Streets
Mephisto
Metropolis [2010 Restoration]
Mishima: A Life in Four Chapters
Mona Lisa
Mon Oncle
Mon Oncle Antoine
Mon oncle d'Amerique
Moolaade
Mr. Hulot's Holiday
The Music Room
My Darling Clementine
My Dinner With Andre
My Fair Lady
My Man Godfrey
My Neighbor Totoro
Mystery Train
The Naked Kiss
Nashville
Network
Night Moves
The Night of the Hunter
George A. Romero's 'Night of the Living Dead'
Nights of Cabiria
North By Northwest
Nosferatu
Notorious
On the Waterfront
One Flew Over the Cuckoo's Nest
The Only Son
Ordet
Orpheus
The Other
Out of the Past
Pale Flower
Pan's Labyrinth
Pandora's Box
The "Paradise Lost" series
The Parallax View
Paris, Texas
The Party
The Passion of Joan of Arc
Paths of Glory
Patton
Peeping Tom
Persona
The Phantom of the Opera
The Philadelphia Story
Pickpocket
Picnic at Hanging Rock
Pink Floyd: The Wall
Pinocchio
Pixote
Planes, Trains and Automobiles
Playtime
The Pledge
Point Blank
The Producers
Psycho
Raging Bull
Raiders of the Lost Ark
Raise the Red Lantern
Ran
Rashomon
Rear Window
Rebel Without a Cause
Red Beard
Red River
The Red Shoes
Richard III
Rififi
The Right Stuff
Rio Bravo
Ripley's Game
Rocco and His Brothers
The Rules of the Game
Ryan's Daughter
Safety Last
Samurai Rebellion
Sansho the Bailiff
Santa Sangre
Say Anything...
Scarface
The Scarlet Empress
The Searchers
Secrets & Lies
Senso
The Seven Samurai
The Seventh Seal
Shadow of a Doubt
Shane
The Shawshank Redemption
Shoah
Shortbus
Short Cuts
The Silence
Singin' in the Rain
Smiles of a Summer Night
Snow White and the Seven Dwarfs
Solaris
Some Like It Hot
Souls For Sale
Spirited Away
Spring, Summer, Fall, Winter... and Spring
Stagecoach
Star Wars
Strangers on a Train
Stroszek
A Sunday in the Country
Sunrise
Sunset Boulevard
Superman The Movie
Superman II
Suspiria
The Sweet Smell of Success
The Sweet Hereafter
Swing Time
The Taking of Pelham One Two Three
A Tale of Winter
Taxi Driver
The Tenant
Tender Mercies
The Terrorist
Theatre of Blood
The Thief of Bagdad
The Thin Man
John Carpenter's 'The Thing'
The Third Man
This Is Spinal Tap
Three Colors Trilogy: Blue, White, Red
3 Women
Through a Glass Darkly
Tokyo Story
Top Hat
Touch of Evil
Touchez Pas au Grisbi
The Treasure of the Sierra Madre
Triumph of the Will
Trouble in Paradise
25th Hour
2001: A Space Odyssey
Ugetsu
Umberto D
Unforgiven
The Up Documentaries
Vengeance Is Mine
Vertigo
Victim
Videodrome
Viridiana
Vivre sa Vie/My Life to Live
Waiting For Guffman
The Wages of Fear
Waking Life
Walkabout
Werckmeister Harmonies
What Ever Happened to Baby Jane?
The Wild Bunch
Wings of Desire
Winter Light
Withnail & I
The Wizard of Oz
Woman in the Dunes
A Woman Under the Influence
A Woman's Tale
Woodstock
Written on the Wind
Yankee Doodle Dandy
A Year of the Quiet Sun
Yellow Submarine
Yojimbo
Young Frankenstein
 
2012-08-04 06:21:21 AM  
Er...allow me to alter that to "250 over..."
 
2012-08-04 06:48:51 AM  
I'd also add:

Airplane!
Top Secret!
The Naked Gun - From The Files of 'Police Squad!'
Sherlock, Jr.
Steamboat Bill, Jr.
The Empire Strikes Back
Invasion of the Body Snatchers (both 1956 and 1978 versions)


and I'd add an explanation about why I think "Triumph of the Will" should be on that list. Hint: It's not because I'm anything even resembling an adherent of its filmed subject matter. Like "Birth of a Nation" (which I almost included), I think the technical and historical aspects are more fascinating and conversation-worth than the indefensibly vile subject matter the actual film contained.
 
2012-08-04 06:51:37 AM  
"worthy"
 
2012-08-04 07:09:34 AM  
And:

Get Carter (1971)
Scarlet Street
Monsters, Inc.
Pixar's "Up"
Fantasia
Blood Simple
Miller's Crossing
The 7th Victim

Screw it, nobody's reading this.
 
2012-08-04 06:10:54 PM  
A few more (for the road):

The Butcher Boy
The Company of Wolves
The Crying Game
Last Night
C.R.A.Z.Y.
Diabolique
 
2012-08-04 10:17:55 PM  
Actually make mine 101. Forgot to add Spinal Tap.
 
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  3. Other Farkers comment on the links. This is the number of comments. Click here to read them.

  4. Click here to submit a link.

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