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(CTV News)   Today farmers in western Canada are allowed to sell wheat to whoever they want for the first time. Those in the east were apparently allowed to do whatever they wanted. Anyone need a bushel of rye? I got the good stuff   (ctvnews.ca) divider line 41
    More: Interesting, Wheat Board, prairies, Pierre Trudeau, wheat, competitive markets  
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1180 clicks; posted to Business » on 01 Aug 2012 at 2:03 PM (2 years ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2012-08-01 12:30:48 PM
Bushel? No. Bottle? GIMME.
 
2012-08-01 12:52:09 PM
Want some rye? Course ya do!
 
2012-08-01 01:46:25 PM

Ironically, there were hints last week some of the convicted farmers have declined the pardon offer, viewing their record as a badge of freedom-fighting honour.



*facepalm*
 
2012-08-01 02:22:35 PM

Kredal: Want some rye? Course ya do!


Came here on the off chance of a Zork reference. Leaving surprised and satisfied.
 
2012-08-01 02:23:57 PM
One brick for two wheat.
 
2012-08-01 02:29:47 PM

Miramichou: One brick for two wheat.


I've got wood, who wants to give me sheep?
 
2012-08-01 02:30:27 PM

Miramichou: One brick for two wheat.


I need rock more than brick. No way I'm getting Longest Road.
 
2012-08-01 02:38:17 PM

Miramichou: One brick for two wheat.


Handsome B. Wonderful: Miramichou: One brick for two wheat.

I've got wood, who wants to give me sheep?


YixilTesiphon: Miramichou: One brick for two wheat.

I need rock more than brick. No way I'm getting Longest Road.


Settle down, guys.
 
2012-08-01 03:12:10 PM
As an Albertan with a family background of farmers and ranchers, this is a pretty big deal. Of course, it'll once again benefit the large producers at the expense of the small, who see the greatest advantage from economies of scale.

Yet more pressure on the existence of the family farm. And those farmers that want the gummint out of their lives will once again be screaming for help when drought or flood or wind or some other catastrophe levels their crops, leaving them high and dry. The CWB was a shining institution of collective bargaining of their own creation, one that farmers are now willingly giving away.

But hey, they're also the ones that will benefit or lose from the loss of market certainty. At least their fate is now entirely in their own hands.

/anyone want to discuss the Crow rate?
 
2012-08-01 03:12:25 PM

KhanAidan: Kredal: Want some rye? Course ya do!

Came here on the off chance of a Zork reference. Leaving surprised and satisfied.


151 proof, you hit the roof.
 
2012-08-01 03:24:06 PM

unyon: As an Albertan with a family background of farmers and ranchers, this is a pretty big deal. Of course, it'll once again benefit the large producers at the expense of the small, who see the greatest advantage from economies of scale.

Yet more pressure on the existence of the family farm. And those farmers that want the gummint out of their lives will once again be screaming for help when drought or flood or wind or some other catastrophe levels their crops, leaving them high and dry. The CWB was a shining institution of collective bargaining of their own creation, one that farmers are now willingly giving away.

But hey, they're also the ones that will benefit or lose from the loss of market certainty. At least their fate is now entirely in their own hands.

/anyone want to discuss the Crow rate?


However the CWB is still around, the only difference is that farmers now have a choice. I would expect most of the smaller operations to stick with the CWB and some of the larger ones to look elsewhere. Sure the bargaining power of the CWB on the open market will be reduced somewhat but assuming they are competent as a business they will be able maintain a strong market share.

/Also has farming background, in Sask.
 
2012-08-01 03:40:53 PM
I've been to Flaxcombe, Saskatchewan.

This somehow seemed relevant.
 
2012-08-01 03:48:33 PM

Rev.K: I've been to Flaxcombe, Saskatchewan.

This somehow seemed relevant.


You haven't lived until you've been to Climax, or Findlater, or my families hometown of Eyebrow, not to mention Biggar. New York is big, but this is Biggar.

And who doesn't go to Saskatchewan and not visit Tisdale, the land of rape and honey?

/Cool town names, we haz em.
 
2012-08-01 03:55:28 PM

Representative of the unwashed masses: You haven't lived until you've been to Climax, or Findlater, or my families hometown of Eyebrow, not to mention Biggar. New York is big, but this is Biggar.

And who doesn't go to Saskatchewan and not visit Tisdale, the land of rape and honey?



All I know is that I could really go for some Vico.

And I could really go for another visit to Cut Knife to see if that tomahawk got any bigger.
 
2012-08-01 04:07:11 PM

Rev.K: Representative of the unwashed masses: You haven't lived until you've been to Climax, or Findlater, or my families hometown of Eyebrow, not to mention Biggar. New York is big, but this is Biggar.

And who doesn't go to Saskatchewan and not visit Tisdale, the land of rape and honey?


All I know is that I could really go for some Vico.

And I could really go for another visit to Cut Knife to see if that tomahawk got any bigger.


mmmm Vico, the champagne of chocolate milks!
 
2012-08-01 04:33:27 PM

Representative of the unwashed masses: Rev.K: Representative of the unwashed masses: You haven't lived until you've been to Climax, or Findlater, or my families hometown of Eyebrow, not to mention Biggar. New York is big, but this is Biggar.

And who doesn't go to Saskatchewan and not visit Tisdale, the land of rape and honey?


All I know is that I could really go for some Vico.

And I could really go for another visit to Cut Knife to see if that tomahawk got any bigger.

mmmm Vico, the champagne of chocolate milks!


Champagne of chocolate milks?! How have I not heard of this.
 
2012-08-01 04:39:05 PM

change1211: Representative of the unwashed masses: Rev.K: Representative of the unwashed masses: You haven't lived until you've been to Climax, or Findlater, or my families hometown of Eyebrow, not to mention Biggar. New York is big, but this is Biggar.

And who doesn't go to Saskatchewan and not visit Tisdale, the land of rape and honey?


All I know is that I could really go for some Vico.

And I could really go for another visit to Cut Knife to see if that tomahawk got any bigger.

mmmm Vico, the champagne of chocolate milks!

Champagne of chocolate milks?! How have I not heard of this.


The reality is that it was regular chocolate milk but if you're from Saskatchewan and grew up on the stuff you will swear there was nothing better. You could swear you could tell if someone bought an 'inferior' brand etc.
 
2012-08-01 04:44:33 PM
Ah well - most hipsterchondriacs are going gluten-free anyway. The farmers are boned either way.
 
2012-08-01 04:49:11 PM
Came for the pic of CC or Crown Royal being mistaken as rye (they are but they aren't).
This is rye:
static3.wine-searcher.net
 
2012-08-01 05:01:39 PM

Representative of the unwashed masses: Rev.K: I've been to Flaxcombe, Saskatchewan.

This somehow seemed relevant.

You haven't lived until you've been to Climax, or Findlater, or my families hometown of Eyebrow, not to mention Biggar. New York is big, but this is Biggar.

And who doesn't go to Saskatchewan and not visit Tisdale, the land of rape and honey?

/Cool town names, we haz em.


Holy Crap that's real!!!! I thought it was photoshop
 
2012-08-01 05:20:00 PM
Where's ontariolightning to tell us all about how this is some Harper plot to enslave or otherwise marginalize the eastern provinces? This thread feels incomplete.
 
2012-08-01 05:46:04 PM
2.bp.blogspot.com
 
2012-08-01 05:51:16 PM

unyon: As an Albertan with a family background of farmers and ranchers, this is a pretty big deal. Of course, it'll once again benefit the large producers at the expense of the small, who see the greatest advantage from economies of scale.

Yet more pressure on the existence of the family farm. And those farmers that want the gummint out of their lives will once again be screaming for help when drought or flood or wind or some other catastrophe levels their crops, leaving them high and dry. The CWB was a shining institution of collective bargaining of their own creation, one that farmers are now willingly giving away.

But hey, they're also the ones that will benefit or lose from the loss of market certainty. At least their fate is now entirely in their own hands.

/anyone want to discuss the Crow rate?


I'm an Albertan with farming family background too and it's good to see that the farmers can now switch it up and complain about not having the CWB.

/An Albertan farmer can and will complain about anything and everything.
// too much/not enough rain, wind, sun, clouds, bees, weeds, herbicides, equipment, fuel, coffee time....and on and on and on
 
2012-08-01 06:05:27 PM

dallylamma: unyon: As an Albertan with a family background of farmers and ranchers, this is a pretty big deal. Of course, it'll once again benefit the large producers at the expense of the small, who see the greatest advantage from economies of scale.

Yet more pressure on the existence of the family farm. And those farmers that want the gummint out of their lives will once again be screaming for help when drought or flood or wind or some other catastrophe levels their crops, leaving them high and dry. The CWB was a shining institution of collective bargaining of their own creation, one that farmers are now willingly giving away.

But hey, they're also the ones that will benefit or lose from the loss of market certainty. At least their fate is now entirely in their own hands.

/anyone want to discuss the Crow rate?

I'm an Albertan with farming family background too and it's good to see that the farmers can now switch it up and complain about not having the CWB.

/An Albertan farmer can and will complain about anything and everything.
// too much/not enough rain, wind, sun, clouds, bees, weeds, herbicides, equipment, fuel, coffee time....and on and on and on


That's pretty much any farmer. But when you consider how many different variables have to line up in place to be successful every year. Yup they have the right to complain as far as I'm concerned.
 
2012-08-01 06:25:55 PM

Representative of the unwashed masses: dallylamma: unyon: As an Albertan with a family background of farmers and ranchers, this is a pretty big deal. Of course, it'll once again benefit the large producers at the expense of the small, who see the greatest advantage from economies of scale.

Yet more pressure on the existence of the family farm. And those farmers that want the gummint out of their lives will once again be screaming for help when drought or flood or wind or some other catastrophe levels their crops, leaving them high and dry. The CWB was a shining institution of collective bargaining of their own creation, one that farmers are now willingly giving away.

But hey, they're also the ones that will benefit or lose from the loss of market certainty. At least their fate is now entirely in their own hands.

/anyone want to discuss the Crow rate?

I'm an Albertan with farming family background too and it's good to see that the farmers can now switch it up and complain about not having the CWB.

/An Albertan farmer can and will complain about anything and everything.
// too much/not enough rain, wind, sun, clouds, bees, weeds, herbicides, equipment, fuel, coffee time....and on and on and on

That's pretty much any farmer. But when you consider how many different variables have to line up in place to be successful every year. Yup they have the right to complain as far as I'm concerned.


Oh totally, it's just funny to hear my Uncle complain about grain prices as if the bank might swoop in at any moment to take the farm and then go on to talk about his new holiday trailer or snowmobiles.

Maybe that's just my family though.
 
2012-08-01 06:34:36 PM
You can grow things in Canada? I thought it was just a vast tundra full of snow and Ice
 
2012-08-01 06:51:25 PM

Ummon: You can grow things in Canada? I thought it was just a vast tundra full of snow and Ice


It is, we're just that good.
 
2012-08-01 06:52:13 PM
Wait till they have a real bad year and the prices collapse.
 
2012-08-01 07:03:13 PM

mrlewish: Wait till they have a real bad year and the prices collapse.


Pretty much this the CWB was an insurance against price collapses. But hey, now if they fail, they will only have themselves to blame right?
 
2012-08-01 07:03:59 PM

mrlewish: Wait till they have a real bad year and the prices collapse.


no different than any other year. Ask anyone whose family struggled through the 80's in particular. the CWB didn't inflate prices greatly.
 
2012-08-01 07:39:20 PM
I'm in Swift Current, and it just feels like the big banks are going to start another session of rape the family farmers, round two.
 
2012-08-01 07:39:46 PM

SultanofSchwing: Where's ontariolightning to tell us all about how this is some Harper plot to enslave or otherwise marginalize the eastern provinces? This thread feels incomplete.


I have no opinion on this. Couldn't care any less than I do now about the issue.
 
2012-08-01 09:25:50 PM

dallylamma: Representative of the unwashed masses: dallylamma: unyon: As an Albertan with a family background of farmers and ranchers, this is a pretty big deal. Of course, it'll once again benefit the large producers at the expense of the small, who see the greatest advantage from economies of scale.

Yet more pressure on the existence of the family farm. And those farmers that want the gummint out of their lives will once again be screaming for help when drought or flood or wind or some other catastrophe levels their crops, leaving them high and dry. The CWB was a shining institution of collective bargaining of their own creation, one that farmers are now willingly giving away.

But hey, they're also the ones that will benefit or lose from the loss of market certainty. At least their fate is now entirely in their own hands.

/anyone want to discuss the Crow rate?

I'm an Albertan with farming family background too and it's good to see that the farmers can now switch it up and complain about not having the CWB.

/An Albertan farmer can and will complain about anything and everything.
// too much/not enough rain, wind, sun, clouds, bees, weeds, herbicides, equipment, fuel, coffee time....and on and on and on

That's pretty much any farmer. But when you consider how many different variables have to line up in place to be successful every year. Yup they have the right to complain as far as I'm concerned.

Oh totally, it's just funny to hear my Uncle complain about grain prices as if the bank might swoop in at any moment to take the farm and then go on to talk about his new holiday trailer or snowmobiles.

Maybe that's just my family though.


Has he considered becoming a pirate?
 
2012-08-01 09:37:03 PM

onibara: dallylamma: Representative of the unwashed masses: dallylamma: unyon: As an Albertan with a family background of farmers and ranchers, this is a pretty big deal. Of course, it'll once again benefit the large producers at the expense of the small, who see the greatest advantage from economies of scale.

Yet more pressure on the existence of the family farm. And those farmers that want the gummint out of their lives will once again be screaming for help when drought or flood or wind or some other catastrophe levels their crops, leaving them high and dry. The CWB was a shining institution of collective bargaining of their own creation, one that farmers are now willingly giving away.

But hey, they're also the ones that will benefit or lose from the loss of market certainty. At least their fate is now entirely in their own hands.

/anyone want to discuss the Crow rate?

I'm an Albertan with farming family background too and it's good to see that the farmers can now switch it up and complain about not having the CWB.

/An Albertan farmer can and will complain about anything and everything.
// too much/not enough rain, wind, sun, clouds, bees, weeds, herbicides, equipment, fuel, coffee time....and on and on and on

That's pretty much any farmer. But when you consider how many different variables have to line up in place to be successful every year. Yup they have the right to complain as far as I'm concerned.

Oh totally, it's just funny to hear my Uncle complain about grain prices as if the bank might swoop in at any moment to take the farm and then go on to talk about his new holiday trailer or snowmobiles.

Maybe that's just my family though.

Has he considered becoming a pirate?


Nah, they're too far from the North Saskatchewan to make that work.
 
2012-08-01 09:51:17 PM

dallylamma: onibara: dallylamma: Representative of the unwashed masses: dallylamma: unyon: As an Albertan with a family background of farmers and ranchers, this is a pretty big deal. Of course, it'll once again benefit the large producers at the expense of the small, who see the greatest advantage from economies of scale.

Yet more pressure on the existence of the family farm. And those farmers that want the gummint out of their lives will once again be screaming for help when drought or flood or wind or some other catastrophe levels their crops, leaving them high and dry. The CWB was a shining institution of collective bargaining of their own creation, one that farmers are now willingly giving away.

But hey, they're also the ones that will benefit or lose from the loss of market certainty. At least their fate is now entirely in their own hands.

/anyone want to discuss the Crow rate?

I'm an Albertan with farming family background too and it's good to see that the farmers can now switch it up and complain about not having the CWB.

/An Albertan farmer can and will complain about anything and everything.
// too much/not enough rain, wind, sun, clouds, bees, weeds, herbicides, equipment, fuel, coffee time....and on and on and on

That's pretty much any farmer. But when you consider how many different variables have to line up in place to be successful every year. Yup they have the right to complain as far as I'm concerned.

Oh totally, it's just funny to hear my Uncle complain about grain prices as if the bank might swoop in at any moment to take the farm and then go on to talk about his new holiday trailer or snowmobiles.

Maybe that's just my family though.

Has he considered becoming a pirate?

Nah, they're too far from the North Saskatchewan to make that work.


Americans are totally confused by that lol! I know the arrogant worms made the song but I have a soft spot for the captain tractor version of last Saskatchewan pirate
 
2012-08-01 10:03:28 PM

Ummon: You can grow things in Canada?


You sure can. In fact, in certain parts, good things grow.
 
2012-08-01 11:50:17 PM

Representative of the unwashed masses: dallylamma: onibara: dallylamma: Representative of the unwashed masses: dallylamma: unyon: As an Albertan with a family background of farmers and ranchers, this is a pretty big deal. Of course, it'll once again benefit the large producers at the expense of the small, who see the greatest advantage from economies of scale.

Yet more pressure on the existence of the family farm. And those farmers that want the gummint out of their lives will once again be screaming for help when drought or flood or wind or some other catastrophe levels their crops, leaving them high and dry. The CWB was a shining institution of collective bargaining of their own creation, one that farmers are now willingly giving away.

But hey, they're also the ones that will benefit or lose from the loss of market certainty. At least their fate is now entirely in their own hands.

/anyone want to discuss the Crow rate?

I'm an Albertan with farming family background too and it's good to see that the farmers can now switch it up and complain about not having the CWB.

/An Albertan farmer can and will complain about anything and everything.
// too much/not enough rain, wind, sun, clouds, bees, weeds, herbicides, equipment, fuel, coffee time....and on and on and on

That's pretty much any farmer. But when you consider how many different variables have to line up in place to be successful every year. Yup they have the right to complain as far as I'm concerned.

Oh totally, it's just funny to hear my Uncle complain about grain prices as if the bank might swoop in at any moment to take the farm and then go on to talk about his new holiday trailer or snowmobiles.

Maybe that's just my family though.

Has he considered becoming a pirate?

Nah, they're too far from the North Saskatchewan to make that work.

Americans are totally confused by that lol! I know the arrogant worms made the song but I have a soft spot for the captain tractor version of last Saskatchewan pirate


I moved to Regina from Fredericton in 2009. You can imagine my disappointment upon finding out there isn't an actual river here!
 
2012-08-01 11:54:51 PM

Spadababababababa Spadina Bus: Ummon: You can grow things in Canada?

You sure can. In fact, in certain parts, good things grow.


And by "good things" he means...

boards.cannabis.com
 
2012-08-02 12:05:23 AM

Big_Thumb: Representative of the unwashed masses: dallylamma: onibara: dallylamma: Representative of the unwashed masses: dallylamma: unyon: As an Albertan with a family background of farmers and ranchers, this is a pretty big deal. Of course, it'll once again benefit the large producers at the expense of the small, who see the greatest advantage from economies of scale.

Yet more pressure on the existence of the family farm. And those farmers that want the gummint out of their lives will once again be screaming for help when drought or flood or wind or some other catastrophe levels their crops, leaving them high and dry. The CWB was a shining institution of collective bargaining of their own creation, one that farmers are now willingly giving away.

But hey, they're also the ones that will benefit or lose from the loss of market certainty. At least their fate is now entirely in their own hands.

/anyone want to discuss the Crow rate?

I'm an Albertan with farming family background too and it's good to see that the farmers can now switch it up and complain about not having the CWB.

/An Albertan farmer can and will complain about anything and everything.
// too much/not enough rain, wind, sun, clouds, bees, weeds, herbicides, equipment, fuel, coffee time....and on and on and on

That's pretty much any farmer. But when you consider how many different variables have to line up in place to be successful every year. Yup they have the right to complain as far as I'm concerned.

Oh totally, it's just funny to hear my Uncle complain about grain prices as if the bank might swoop in at any moment to take the farm and then go on to talk about his new holiday trailer or snowmobiles.

Maybe that's just my family though.

Has he considered becoming a pirate?

Nah, they're too far from the North Saskatchewan to make that work.

Americans are totally confused by that lol! I know the arrogant worms made the song but I have a soft spot for the captain tractor version of last Saskatchewan pirat ...


That's your first problem! At least go to Saskatoon. For me 1000x the city Regina is, apart from Rider games that is!
 
2012-08-02 04:01:05 PM

Ummon: You can grow things in Canada? I thought it was just a vast tundra full of snow and Ice


It was, global warming is making it the bread basket of the world.
 
2012-08-02 04:34:01 PM

Ummon: You can grow things in Canada? I thought it was just a vast tundra full of snow and Ice


Of course you can! Haven't you heard of winter wheat?

I remember August 1, 1987 - I was working for the Saskatchewan Wheat Pool and rapeseed became known as canola that day.
 
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