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(CNN)   ♫A, B, C, D, E, F, G ♫Root access belongs to me   (cnn.com) divider line 38
    More: Interesting, legal assistance, US Cyber Command  
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10693 clicks; posted to Geek » on 01 Aug 2012 at 1:47 PM (2 years ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



38 Comments   (+0 »)
   
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2012-08-01 12:57:45 PM  
"At 13, his father brought home an IBM computer for the family. By 14, Moss was online creating a new identity for himself, conversing with adults who were oblivious to his real age and spoke to him like an equal."

"I couldn't drive a car, but I could have conversations about politics with people in Russia," he said.

That explains a lot about the general writing level and world knowledge of farkers.
 
2012-08-01 01:18:11 PM  
en.webfail.net

Screw that, I'm hacking the neighbor's router.
 
2012-08-01 01:53:31 PM  
Some little sheet bag figured out computers.. wow.

tl;dr
 
2012-08-01 01:58:58 PM  
Is it Bobby Tables?
 
2012-08-01 02:01:21 PM  

Arkanaut: Is it Bobby Tables?


Is his mom Sudo 'make me a sandwich'?
 
2012-08-01 02:07:01 PM  
i need to see if the boy or girl want arduino boards for christmas
 
2012-08-01 02:10:37 PM  
They're right, if I were growing up now I would be in so much shiat for the rest of my life.
 
2012-08-01 03:01:12 PM  
"U.S. Cyber Command"

No.
 
2012-08-01 03:12:13 PM  
The fact that the head of the NSA is on stage giving the keynote at DefCon is HUGE. 30 years ago, no government agency of any kind would be talking to the kind of people who attend DefCon unless said person was in handcuffs. That the US Government understands what's going on there, the kind of people who attend, and want to pull them into their spheres is on one hand cool as shiat, and the other, freaking scary as hell.

I love that finally people understand the hacker culture enough to know they need to be part of the conversation, but Stuxnet shows what happens after they get the right people in the room.

//Old enough to remember Operation Sundevil and was PISSED when my copy of GURPS Cyberpunk took so damn long to ship.
 
2012-08-01 03:50:41 PM  
ABCDEFG? That's the stupidest password I've heard in my life! That's the kind of thing an idiot would have on his luggage!
 
2012-08-01 04:05:32 PM  

Irving Maimway: The fact that the head of the NSA is on stage giving the keynote at DefCon is HUGE. 30 years ago, no government agency of any kind would be talking to the kind of people who attend DefCon unless said person was in handcuffs. That the US Government understands what's going on there, the kind of people who attend, and want to pull them into their spheres is on one hand cool as shiat, and the other, freaking scary as hell.


Cyber Engineering (IO/IA) is one of the largest growing areas of hiring in country. In 2010, the DoD announced their intention to hire over 10,000 of them in the following years. The growth in this area is immense, and is only accelerating.
 
2012-08-01 04:28:08 PM  

Ambitwistor: ABCDEFG? That's the stupidest password I've heard in my life! That's the kind of thing an idiot would have on his luggage Imac!


FTFY
 
2012-08-01 04:45:33 PM  

Arkanaut: Is it Bobby Tables?


Dade Murphy.
 
2012-08-01 04:47:41 PM  
Wouldn't you prefer a good game of chess?
 
2012-08-01 04:48:04 PM  
"You're calling every number in Sunnyvale? Isn't that expensive?"
"There's ways around that."
"You could go to jail for that!"
"Only if you're over 18."
 
zez
2012-08-01 04:52:00 PM  
My 8 year old has more than a huge interest in computers (probably due to his parents' background) and while nowhere near the kids' level in the article has more than a passing fancy on how the magic box works. I've been trying to redirect his efforts into something more productive and was wondering if there was a way to run BASIC on a modern system so at least he can make some simple programs and start to get a grasp on how everything works.
 
2012-08-01 04:57:41 PM  

zez: My 8 year old has more than a huge interest in computers (probably due to his parents' background) and while nowhere near the kids' level in the article has more than a passing fancy on how the magic box works. I've been trying to redirect his efforts into something more productive and was wondering if there was a way to run BASIC on a modern system so at least he can make some simple programs and start to get a grasp on how everything works.


GW-BASIC in DOSBOX.
http://www.dosbox.com/comp_list.php?showID=4158&letter=G (copypasta)
 
2012-08-01 05:03:01 PM  

zez: My 8 year old has more than a huge interest in computers (probably due to his parents' background) and while nowhere near the kids' level in the article has more than a passing fancy on how the magic box works. I've been trying to redirect his efforts into something more productive and was wondering if there was a way to run BASIC on a modern system so at least he can make some simple programs and start to get a grasp on how everything works.


Python for kids perfect for an 8 year old future hacker.........
 
2012-08-01 05:17:58 PM  

Krowdaddy Chixdiggit: Python for kids


[have_a_seat_over_there.jpg]
 
2012-08-01 05:21:52 PM  

Ambitwistor: ABCDEFG


ABCDEFG? Hey, that's the password to my luggage.
 
2012-08-01 05:31:01 PM  

BKITU: Krowdaddy Chixdiggit: Python for kids

[have_a_seat_over_there.jpg]


(snort) +1
 
2012-08-01 05:34:53 PM  
I read the headline to the tune of Aretha Franklin's "Respect." Not sure why, exactly.

/Been singing the Alphabet Song a lot lately.
 
2012-08-01 06:28:21 PM  

zez: I've been trying to redirect his efforts into something more productive and was wondering if there was a way to run BASIC on a modern system so at least he can make some simple programs and start to get a grasp on how everything works.


I've got a 7 year old, and I've been teaching him a bit of Visual Basic. It's a good programming language for a child, since Visual Studio makes setting things up drag-and-drop, but he can learn how variables and such work.

It's really the only practical use I've found for VB,
 
2012-08-01 07:09:50 PM  
The children and teens, who must be accompanied by a parent, learned how to pick locks

Are we training the kids to be hackers or burglars?
 
2012-08-01 07:45:44 PM  

fusillade762: The children and teens, who must be accompanied by a parent, learned how to pick locks

Are we training the kids to be hackers or burglars?


The only differences are in motive, method, and target.
 
2012-08-01 08:16:23 PM  
It's Jim Henson's Hacker Babies YAAAAAAAAYYY!!
 
2012-08-01 08:17:29 PM  
Also,

groups.csail.mit.edu
 
2012-08-01 08:30:46 PM  

Ambitwistor: ABCDEFG? That's the stupidest password I've heard in my life! That's the kind of thing an idiot would have on his luggage!


Quote it correctly - ♫A, B, C, D, E, F, G ♫ - I think the music notes, spaces and commas make it much more secure of a password.
 
2012-08-01 08:39:40 PM  

lostcat: I read the headline to the tune of Aretha Franklin's "Respect." Not sure why, exactly.

/Been singing the Alphabet Song a lot lately.


For some reason, I read it to the tune of "Shake You Down" by Gregory Abbott

/a true baby-makin' song
 
2012-08-01 09:39:16 PM  

zez: My 8 year old has more than a huge interest in computers (probably due to his parents' background) and while nowhere near the kids' level in the article has more than a passing fancy on how the magic box works. I've been trying to redirect his efforts into something more productive and was wondering if there was a way to run BASIC on a modern system so at least he can make some simple programs and start to get a grasp on how everything works.


Might wanna try Scratch, created by MIT
 
2012-08-01 09:44:44 PM  
♫A, B, C, D, E, F, G
♫1, 2, 3, 4, Fight
♫Stick to the B.E.A.T.
♫Get ready to ignite
♫You were such a P.Y.T.
♫Catching all the light
♫Just easy as A.B.C.
♫That's how we make it right
 
2012-08-01 10:17:29 PM  

fusillade762: The children and teens, who must be accompanied by a parent, learned how to pick locks

Are we training the kids to be hackers or burglars?


I learned how to hack a combo lock. Mostly because I forgot my combination and I'm cheap, but I was curious how to do it.

It was strangely fun, an experience I definitely recommend. And now I know the combination to my lock!

/Hacking isn't evil, misapplication of knowledge is
 
zez
2012-08-02 12:33:12 AM  

Nowhereman: zez: My 8 year old has more than a huge interest in computers (probably due to his parents' background) and while nowhere near the kids' level in the article has more than a passing fancy on how the magic box works. I've been trying to redirect his efforts into something more productive and was wondering if there was a way to run BASIC on a modern system so at least he can make some simple programs and start to get a grasp on how everything works.

Might wanna try Scratch, created by MIT


Thanks for all the ideas everyone! I might try scratch first.
 
2012-08-02 10:38:49 AM  
Man that Hackers movie was dead on!

"Hackers of the world, UNITE!"

*typpity typptyppity typpitytyppity typpitytyppity typpitytyppity typpit*
 
2012-08-02 11:21:02 AM  
N-E-S-T-L-E-S Nestles makes the very best...
 
2012-08-02 01:14:55 PM  

Hey kids, remember to get permission from a parent or guardian before hacking our system!

 
2012-08-02 02:02:11 PM  

zez: My 8 year old has more than a huge interest in computers (probably due to his parents' background) and while nowhere near the kids' level in the article has more than a passing fancy on how the magic box works. I've been trying to redirect his efforts into something more productive and was wondering if there was a way to run BASIC on a modern system so at least he can make some simple programs and start to get a grasp on how everything works.


May I also recommend the Petit Computer download for the DSi/3DS? Look it up, check it out, and see what you think.
 
zez
2012-08-03 02:06:36 AM  

Optimal_Illusion: zez: My 8 year old has more than a huge interest in computers (probably due to his parents' background) and while nowhere near the kids' level in the article has more than a passing fancy on how the magic box works. I've been trying to redirect his efforts into something more productive and was wondering if there was a way to run BASIC on a modern system so at least he can make some simple programs and start to get a grasp on how everything works.

May I also recommend the Petit Computer download for the DSi/3DS? Look it up, check it out, and see what you think.


That sounds interesting as well since we do have a DSi, but I can't imagine typing out a program with a stylus and touch screen. probably will download it anyway.
 
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