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(InfoWorld)   The nine most endangered species in IT   (infoworld.com) divider line 94
    More: Amusing, endangered species  
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11900 clicks; posted to Geek » on 30 Jul 2012 at 11:49 AM (1 year ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2012-07-30 10:03:06 AM
I just read the titles, but it seems they're missing one. The sysadmins who think they're indispensable while everyone around them is, well, working around them.
 
2012-07-30 10:22:03 AM
All species of IT workers are about to become extinct. That's what's so exciting about computing in the cloud. Once everything is moved to the cloud, there will be no more need for IT on the ground, and everything will be seamless and 100 percent accessible from everywhere. In 10 years, nobody will even know what an "IT worker" is. There may be a cloud monitor or two -- I suspect they'll be called "angels" -- but that's it, and it'll mainly be to ensure that no information leaks out ("rain loss").
 
2012-07-30 10:42:32 AM
img.photobucket.com
 
2012-07-30 11:50:57 AM
10) One page articles

/One Page.
 
2012-07-30 11:55:05 AM

Babwa Wawa: I just read the titles, but it seems they're missing one. The sysadmins who think they're indispensable while everyone around them is, well, working around them.


First one:
Endangered IT species No. 1: The Brown-Nosed Naysayer (Negativitus infinitus)
For decades, the Naysayer held sway over all tech decisions, wielding the word "no" like a razor-sharp claw to slash all requests, citing security or budget concerns. But the BYOD revolution and the universe of public cloud services available to users have rendered the Naysayer as harmless as a newborn kitten.

"We all know this particular type of IT pro -- the ones who think the customer is never right and users are guilty until proven innocent," says Tyler Lessard, CMO of mobile risk management company Fixmo. "They're part of the reason people are now storing business documents on Dropbox and connecting their own iPads to the corporate network without informing IT
 
2012-07-30 12:00:38 PM
Ill-informed and whimsical article is ill-informed and whimsical.
 
2012-07-30 12:00:58 PM
11) any technology at all. It's sitting on business analysts. It's bus. Analls all the way down


/drtfa
 
2012-07-30 12:02:22 PM
Yeah, we don't need web designers anymore. Just fire up Geocities and build the new Twitter. Got it.
 
2012-07-30 12:02:32 PM

Pocket Ninja: All species of IT workers are about to become extinct. That's what's so exciting about computing in the cloud. Once everything is moved to the cloud, there will be no more need for IT on the ground, and everything will be seamless and 100 percent accessible from everywhere. In 10 years, nobody will even know what an "IT worker" is. There may be a cloud monitor or two -- I suspect they'll be called "angels" -- but that's it, and it'll mainly be to ensure that no information leaks out ("rain loss").


lol, that was about as stupid as the article, or anything else that InfoWorld pinches off.
 
2012-07-30 12:09:03 PM
But the BYOD revolution and the universe of public cloud services available to users have rendered the Naysayer as harmless as a newborn kitten.

Because cloud services (SaaS?) are free? So there's no nay-sayer? Right. *end sarcasm*

System Administrators have played a small but vital role in the IT ecosphere by keeping the lights on and the bits flowing. Now their numbers are in peril, as admin jobs that haven't been outsourced already may soon find a home in the cloud.

At one time they numbered in the millions; now there are only a handful left. Automated site-creation tools and increasing dependence on sophisticated marketing techniques has deprived millions of HTML and Flash designers of the natural Web lands they once called home.


LOL. This is the opinion of someone who is completely out of touch with the industry.

Once one of the dominant creatures in the enterprise biosphere, Unix servers -- and, by extension, the people paid to tend them -- are heading for the tar pits. Not because they can't still do the work, but because they're being replaced by more nimble and less expensive Linux boxes, says Anthony R. Howard, author of "The Invisible Enemy: Black Fox" and a technology consultant for Fortune 50 companies and the U.S. military.

ROFL! No. Just no. I work in a data center. I see thousands of production machines every single day. VERY few of them are running something other than a linux/bsd variant. Linux capable admins are very much in demand.

I guess the cloud systems administer themselves... What a dumb "article." I take back my single page link. This isn't even deserving of one page view.
 
2012-07-30 12:11:47 PM
Now, I've been in the trade for over 20 years, and I've been hearing variations of this article for...oh, about 20 years now?

There are some groups (who handle confidential and time-sensitive data) who cannot go to the cloud; and they'll always need people who really know their systems. Some organisations need a genuine "five-nines" (or better) environment because if the systems go down, there's the potential to lose a lot of money. There are systems which need big metal to run, and don't have the time or resources to switch to clusters.

I try to stay flexible for the simple reason that IT is in a state of continuous evolution, so there is nothing fixed in the way of work: but having seen several badly-handled outsourcing and cloudy experiments, I don't feel especially threatened. Yet.

/Lesser-Spotted System Administrator
//and Woolly Unix Mammoth
///ex-Mainframe
 
2012-07-30 12:13:18 PM
On the flip side, there's a population explosion of End-User Tech Support, because more and more people are using computers, and know less and less about the damn things.

"What version of Windows are you running?"
"Windows 2010"

/yes, I do this job.
//doing it right now, in fact.
 
2012-07-30 12:16:24 PM

Pocket Ninja: All species of IT workers are about to become extinct. That's what's so exciting about computing in the cloud. Once everything is moved to the cloud, there will be no more need for IT on the ground, and everything will be seamless and 100 percent accessible from everywhere. In 10 years, nobody will even know what an "IT worker" is. There may be a cloud monitor or two -- I suspect they'll be called "angels" -- but that's it, and it'll mainly be to ensure that no information leaks out ("rain loss").


Uh, who is going to manage the infrastructure in the cloud? There will still be servers, network and storage in the cloud and people that will need to know how to configure and maintain it.

A trend I've been seeing more of is a private cloud internal to a company that is reluctant to place it's proprietary data in the hands of a 3rd party.

"Endangered IT species No. 2: The Data Center Dinosaur (Tyrannoserver rex)
With deep knowledge of a particular type of hardware, coding language, or development methodology, these once-mighty creatures wore their expertise like a protective shell. Now they're being replaced in the evolutionary chain by flexible generalists with a broader skill set."

That is very true. The wider range of skills you have, the more valuable you are to a company and the more employable you are on the open market. It's not that companies usually want one guy to do everything, they just want to be able to have more cross-training so they can rely on smaller staffing to do the job.

I take positions based on what new skills I can learn while utilizing my old skills. Money is usually a secondary consideration to the new skills I can learn. In fact, I took a pay cut for my current gig because of the opportunity to do learn new stuff as I had completed most of my project work and was stagnating (though I'm still paid very well). The new skills ensure that I'm employable even in a tough market.
 
2012-07-30 12:18:57 PM

Pocket Ninja: All species of IT workers are about to become extinct. That's what's so exciting about computing in the cloud. Once everything is moved to the cloud, there will be no more need for IT on the ground, and everything will be seamless and 100 percent accessible from everywhere. In 10 years, nobody will even know what an "IT worker" is. There may be a cloud monitor or two -- I suspect they'll be called "angels" -- but that's it, and it'll mainly be to ensure that no information leaks out ("rain loss").


I was about to argue with you, then I noticed your username. Oh Pocket Ninja, why must you toy with me.

//Is it wrong that Pocket Ninja gets regular free passes for trolling?
 
2012-07-30 12:19:15 PM
Is this going to be one of those threads where someone like me says "is this going to be one of those threads"

I think so.

Everyone that works in IT becomes indignant with anecdotal examples of how the industry will remain the way it is, and it will have a need for their particular skill set many years into the future. Despite contrary evidence that no skill set has remained in consistent demand for very long in the short history of the industry.

More automation will happen, whatever you do will become less valuable, and over time there will be little need for most companies to have anything close to what is now an IT department.
 
2012-07-30 12:19:48 PM

Honest Bender:
Once one of the dominant creatures in the enterprise biosphere, Unix servers -- and, by extension, the people paid to tend them -- are heading for the tar pits. Not because they can't still do the work, but because they're being replaced by more nimble and less expensive Linux boxes, says Anthony R. Howard, author of "The Invisible Enemy: Black Fox" and a technology consultant for Fortune 50 companies and the U.S. military.

ROFL! No. Just no. I work in a data center. I see thousands of production machines every single day. VERY few of them are running something other than a linux/bsd variant. Linux capable admins are very much in demand.

I guess the cloud systems administer themselves... What a dumb "article." I take back my single page link. This isn't even deserving of one page view.


You're too close to the problem to see the article's writer is too ignorant to realize that Unix is in effect Linux, or close enough to trade job easily in that direction. "Posix-compliant" would mean nothing to them.
 
2012-07-30 12:24:04 PM
Apparently my company is a nature preserve for Endangered Species #1.
 
2012-07-30 12:25:32 PM
SwiftFox: You're too close to the problem to see the article's writer is too ignorant to realize that Unix is in effect Linux, or close enough to trade job easily in that direction. "Posix-compliant" would mean nothing to them.

That. Everyone on my team bears the "Unix Administrator" title, but we have a pretty good mix of Unix/Linux throughout our org, with conversions pending. The title will not change; I guarantee it.
 
2012-07-30 12:26:46 PM
That's funny. They say start to become an 'IT Generalist', Bullshiat! Granted, some locations in the midwest seem like late- trenders techwise, but the postings I find are for specific expertise, or an SA but with xx version VM tech on xxxx.x equipment.
 
2012-07-30 12:30:34 PM
They left out "pundit for IT web site that is the wreckage a formerly popular IT publication."
 
2012-07-30 12:31:15 PM

slayer199: "Endangered IT species No. 2: The Data Center Dinosaur (Tyrannoserver rex)
With deep knowledge of a particular type of hardware, coding language, or development methodology, these once-mighty creatures wore their expertise like a protective shell. Now they're being replaced in the evolutionary chain by flexible generalists with a broader skill set."

That is very true. The wider range of skills you have, the more valuable you are to a company and the more employable you are on the open market. It's not that companies usually want one guy to do everything, they just want to be able to have more cross-training so they can rely on smaller staffing to do the job.


I'll tell you this, though, as an IT consulting manager -- I HATE having generalists work for me. I'd much rather have someone really, really know one thing incredibly well than know a ton of things a little. I want my helpdesk guys to be helpdesk guys, my DBAs to be DBAs, my programmers to program, and my network guys to do whatever they do with Citrix something-or-others.

We were using generalists for everything before I came along and it took two generalists 50 hours each a week to service one client that we can do for a total of about 35 man-hours a week by using specialists.

/That said, keep your skills fresh. You won't be supporting Windows Server 2000 forever.
 
2012-07-30 12:33:21 PM

angry_scientist: That's funny. They say start to become an 'IT Generalist', Bullshiat! Granted, some locations in the midwest seem like late- trenders techwise, but the postings I find are for specific expertise, or an SA but with xx version VM tech on xxxx.x equipment.


I honestly expected to see "The IT Guy" listed as one of the endangered species. If you can't do something REALLY well, how are you useful?
 
2012-07-30 12:36:12 PM
We issued 80,000 H1-b visas this year. This article is way off. We are in the midst of a hi-tech worker shortage.
 
2012-07-30 12:36:59 PM

Theaetetus: Babwa Wawa: I just read the titles, but it seems they're missing one. The sysadmins who think they're indispensable while everyone around them is, well, working around them.

First one:
Endangered IT species No. 1: The Brown-Nosed Naysayer (Negativitus infinitus)
For decades, the Naysayer held sway over all tech decisions, wielding the word "no" like a razor-sharp claw to slash all requests, citing security or budget concerns. But the BYOD revolution and the universe of public cloud services available to users have rendered the Naysayer as harmless as a newborn kitten.

"We all know this particular type of IT pro -- the ones who think the customer is never right and users are guilty until proven innocent," says Tyler Lessard, CMO of mobile risk management company Fixmo. "They're part of the reason people are now storing business documents on Dropbox and connecting their own iPads to the corporate network without informing IT


How the fark are they the guys responsible for people connecting IPads to corp networks and using dropbox to store corp information.

If anything these are the guys that are trying to curb that behaviour, or are they causing it because the users are like "fark you nerd, I do what I want I home so I will do the same here."
 
2012-07-30 12:43:05 PM

meanmutton: angry_scientist: That's funny. They say start to become an 'IT Generalist', Bullshiat! Granted, some locations in the midwest seem like late- trenders techwise, but the postings I find are for specific expertise, or an SA but with xx version VM tech on xxxx.x equipment.

I honestly expected to see "The IT Guy" listed as one of the endangered species. If you can't do something REALLY well, how are you useful?


Honestly? I'd rather have a good generalist. They can do at least one thing really well--pick up and use new things. That said, a really good generalist is often more difficult to find, acquire, and retain than a really good specialist. Crappy generalists (read: about an eight-of-all-trades) are a dime a dozen, and even they often have mental or personality blocks that limit their ability to learn some skills/technologies.
 
2012-07-30 01:02:02 PM
Theaetetus: Babwa Wawa: I just read the titles, but it seems they're missing one. The sysadmins who think they're indispensable while everyone around them is, well, working around them.

First one:
Endangered IT species No. 1: The Brown-Nosed Naysayer (Negativitus infinitus)
For decades, the Naysayer held sway over all tech decisions, wielding the word "no" like a razor-sharp claw to slash all requests, citing security or budget concerns. But the BYOD revolution and the universe of public cloud services available to users have rendered the Naysayer as harmless as a newborn kitten.

"We all know this particular type of IT pro -- the ones who think the customer is never right and users are guilty until proven innocent," says Tyler Lessard, CMO of mobile risk management company Fixmo. "They're part of the reason people are now storing business documents on Dropbox and connecting their own iPads to the corporate network without informing IT

How the fark are they the guys responsible for people connecting IPads to corp networks and using dropbox to store corp information.

If anything these are the guys that are trying to curb that behaviour, or are they causing it because the users are like "fark you nerd, I do what I want I home so I will do the same here."


And, they will continue to do this until their unencrypted BYOD laptop/ipad full of confidential data is stolen and their company is sued into near non existance because they figured that noone would steal their laptop left out in the open in the back seat of their car in a back alley in the shady part of town.
 
2012-07-30 01:02:09 PM
I've been about 4 or 5 of those, to different degrees. I'm sure I'll fit a few more new definitions of almost-extinct IT guy before I retire.
 
2012-07-30 01:02:13 PM

darkmayo: How the fark are they the guys responsible for people connecting IPads to corp networks and using dropbox to store corp information.


Because they're not making it possible for users to use the tools they want or transfer documents to the place they want to work on them. IT is fundamentally a service occupation. All the data security in the world won't matter if the sales and marketing people can't do their jobs, or if the engineering staff have to fight around your roadblocks to make product. If you aren't serving, then you should be replaced.
 
2012-07-30 01:03:00 PM

mcreadyblue: We issued 80,000 H1-b visas this year. This article is way off. We are in the midst of a hi-tech worker shortage.


LOL. No. There's no shortage. Maybe a shortage of how many indentured servants we can bring over. oops. I'm sorry. I meant h1-b employees.
 
2012-07-30 01:04:35 PM

meanmutton: I'll tell you this, though, as an IT consulting manager -- I HATE having generalists work for me. I'd much rather have someone really, really know one thing incredibly well than know a ton of things a little. I want my helpdesk guys to be helpdesk guys, my DBAs to be DBAs, my programmers to program, and my network guys to do whatever they do with Citrix something-or-others.

We were using generalists for everything before I came along and it took two generalists 50 hours each a week to service one client that we can do for a total of about 35 man-hours a week by using specialists.

/That said, keep your skills fresh. You won't be supporting Windows Server 2000 forever.


Well, DBAs tend to be DBAs, network guys tend to be network guys, etc. in terms of being a DBA, being flexible means working with Oracle, MySQL, and MS-SQL.

I'm speaking more on the server/storage side of things. VMware, Linux, Windows, Citrix, and storage (in my case, EMC) are all inter-related. I'd hate to be only doing one of those things all the time. I'm fortunate in that I have experience in a wide-array of technologies that I get to use every day. The only technology I avoid in the datacenter is networking. Homey don't do routers and switches. I don't really do DBA work either, but I'm familiar with administrating MySQL and MS-SQL. I just wish I had some NetApp experience (and while I've had some experience with Dell EqualLogic, it isn't enough where I'd put it on a resume).
 
2012-07-30 01:04:59 PM

meanmutton: slayer199: "Endangered IT species No. 2: The Data Center Dinosaur (Tyrannoserver rex)
With deep knowledge of a particular type of hardware, coding language, or development methodology, these once-mighty creatures wore their expertise like a protective shell. Now they're being replaced in the evolutionary chain by flexible generalists with a broader skill set."

That is very true. The wider range of skills you have, the more valuable you are to a company and the more employable you are on the open market. It's not that companies usually want one guy to do everything, they just want to be able to have more cross-training so they can rely on smaller staffing to do the job.

I'll tell you this, though, as an IT consulting manager -- I HATE having generalists work for me. I'd much rather have someone really, really know one thing incredibly well than know a ton of things a little. I want my helpdesk guys to be helpdesk guys, my DBAs to be DBAs, my programmers to program, and my network guys to do whatever they do with Citrix something-or-others.

We were using generalists for everything before I came along and it took two generalists 50 hours each a week to service one client that we can do for a total of about 35 man-hours a week by using specialists.

/That said, keep your skills fresh. You won't be supporting Windows Server 2000 forever.


That works only when you have the man power to make it work. I'm a generalist, but only because I'm one Business Analyst supporting 4 applications. I don't have time to specialize or learn or do more then kick the god dam app back into play when it craps out. I have a fair amount of knowledge about Spring, Hibernate, Struts, J3EE, WebSphere, Oracle 11, Linux, and Web Services, but no real deep or solid grasp of any of them.

About six years ago the company I work for decided to do a hiring and promotion freeze and we are now down to seven people on a team that used to have nineteen. Four months ago I was about to leave the company, and had tendered my resignation when my boss asked me if there was anything they could do to get me to stay. I said a 50% pay increase and a promotion, the paper work was done the next day.
 
2012-07-30 01:06:43 PM
I think the "Unlikely" tag is more appropriate, subby.
 
2012-07-30 01:21:24 PM
wow, what a piece of shiat article. I'll save everyone 5 min of time.

"lol, thin clients and the CLOUUUUUD brought you buy an idiot who has never had to actually work for an enterprise"
 
2012-07-30 01:23:43 PM

Slaves2Darkness: meanmutton: slayer199: "Endangered IT species No. 2: The Data Center Dinosaur (Tyrannoserver rex)
With deep knowledge of a particular type of hardware, coding language, or development methodology, these once-mighty creatures wore their expertise like a protective shell. Now they're being replaced in the evolutionary chain by flexible generalists with a broader skill set."

That is very true. The wider range of skills you have, the more valuable you are to a company and the more employable you are on the open market. It's not that companies usually want one guy to do everything, they just want to be able to have more cross-training so they can rely on smaller staffing to do the job.

I'll tell you this, though, as an IT consulting manager -- I HATE having generalists work for me. I'd much rather have someone really, really know one thing incredibly well than know a ton of things a little. I want my helpdesk guys to be helpdesk guys, my DBAs to be DBAs, my programmers to program, and my network guys to do whatever they do with Citrix something-or-others.

We were using generalists for everything before I came along and it took two generalists 50 hours each a week to service one client that we can do for a total of about 35 man-hours a week by using specialists.

/That said, keep your skills fresh. You won't be supporting Windows Server 2000 forever.

That works only when you have the man power to make it work. I'm a generalist, but only because I'm one Business Analyst supporting 4 applications. I don't have time to specialize or learn or do more then kick the god dam app back into play when it craps out. I have a fair amount of knowledge about Spring, Hibernate, Struts, J3EE, WebSphere, Oracle 11, Linux, and Web Services, but no real deep or solid grasp of any of them.

About six years ago the company I work for decided to do a hiring and promotion freeze and we are now down to seven people on a team that used to have nineteen. Four months ago I was about to leave ...


One reason that good consulting companies have really good success selling to small and medium sized businesses and very poor success selling to large businesses.
 
2012-07-30 01:24:18 PM

Theaetetus: darkmayo: How the fark are they the guys responsible for people connecting IPads to corp networks and using dropbox to store corp information.

Because they're not making it possible for users to use the tools they want or transfer documents to the place they want to work on them. IT is fundamentally a service occupation. All the data security in the world won't matter if the sales and marketing people can't do their jobs, or if the engineering staff have to fight around your roadblocks to make product. If you aren't serving, then you should be replaced.


There is no work stoppage happening, people are still doing their jobs with out the BYOD. There has to be some give and take, I will agree with you there as IT is a service job but we are also there to ensure that an end users daily operations don't put the company at risk. As of right now that means having a more locked down environment, things are getting better, I have seen some really great VDI solutions that make the whole BYOD more and more of an option.
 
2012-07-30 01:28:57 PM

slayer199: meanmutton: I'll tell you this, though, as an IT consulting manager -- I HATE having generalists work for me. I'd much rather have someone really, really know one thing incredibly well than know a ton of things a little. I want my helpdesk guys to be helpdesk guys, my DBAs to be DBAs, my programmers to program, and my network guys to do whatever they do with Citrix something-or-others.

We were using generalists for everything before I came along and it took two generalists 50 hours each a week to service one client that we can do for a total of about 35 man-hours a week by using specialists.

/That said, keep your skills fresh. You won't be supporting Windows Server 2000 forever.

Well, DBAs tend to be DBAs, network guys tend to be network guys, etc. in terms of being a DBA, being flexible means working with Oracle, MySQL, and MS-SQL.

I'm speaking more on the server/storage side of things. VMware, Linux, Windows, Citrix, and storage (in my case, EMC) are all inter-related. I'd hate to be only doing one of those things all the time. I'm fortunate in that I have experience in a wide-array of technologies that I get to use every day. The only technology I avoid in the datacenter is networking. Homey don't do routers and switches. I don't really do DBA work either, but I'm familiar with administrating MySQL and MS-SQL. I just wish I had some NetApp experience (and while I've had some experience with Dell EqualLogic, it isn't enough where I'd put it on a resume).


In our world, DBAs spend the majority of their time taking care of both logical and physical database tasks, but they MUST be capable with every technology in our enterprise. From plumbing, to storage, to client and middle tier coding. We have to as we're the point where everything converges. Latency from a given app to a given table could be caused by almost anything.

If you pulled the databases out of the company, my team is still the most knowledgeable and capable team in the IT/IS environment.
 
2012-07-30 01:31:41 PM

wippit: On the flip side, there's a population explosion of End-User Tech Support, because more and more people are using computers, and know less and less about the damn things.

"What version of Windows are you running?"
"Windows 2010"

/yes, I do this job.
//doing it right now, in fact.


Hah! Stupid user doesn't know it's 2012 already.
 
2012-07-30 01:36:17 PM

Theaetetus: darkmayo: How the fark are they the guys responsible for people connecting IPads to corp networks and using dropbox to store corp information.

Because they're not making it possible for users to use the tools they want or transfer documents to the place they want to work on them. IT is fundamentally a service occupation. All the data security in the world won't matter if the sales and marketing people can't do their jobs, or if the engineering staff have to fight around your roadblocks to make product. If you aren't serving, then you should be replaced.


IT Director here. You are correct that ITs job is service. But that is for the business first, then the individual. I want you to be able to do your job and do it well. But I need to make sure that the other 1100 employees can do their job as well. So when you want to use the latest cool tool that you found, I need to make sure the data can be shared with others, that it will work within our environment and even read the license agreement. Hell, if it works for you, I might want to push it out to everyone else. But when you want to download and install whatever you want on the company's network and possibly interfere with or impede other employees work, well that's where I have an issue. Using your examples, Marketing won't do a very effective job if their competitors already know their marketing plans and put something out first. Engineering won't be able to make a very good product if the CAD server is unavailable because of a virus brought in on a laptop from home.
 
2012-07-30 01:40:12 PM

meanmutton: If you can't do something REALLY well, how are you useful?


It's not about "really well" it's about specialized experience. Where is a dude in a small/mid enterprise gonna get several years experience with HP or IBM blade clusters running certain VMs using specific management software?

To get into corporate the stuff, you gotta know it. To know it, you gotta already be into the corporate stuff. That is the issue around here, no specialized lower level/training stuff available.
 
2012-07-30 01:46:05 PM

CodeRedEd: Theaetetus: darkmayo: How the fark are they the guys responsible for people connecting IPads to corp networks and using dropbox to store corp information.

Because they're not making it possible for users to use the tools they want or transfer documents to the place they want to work on them. IT is fundamentally a service occupation. All the data security in the world won't matter if the sales and marketing people can't do their jobs, or if the engineering staff have to fight around your roadblocks to make product. If you aren't serving, then you should be replaced.

IT Director here. You are correct that ITs job is service. But that is for the business first, then the individual. I want you to be able to do your job and do it well. But I need to make sure that the other 1100 employees can do their job as well. So when you want to use the latest cool tool that you found, I need to make sure the data can be shared with others, that it will work within our environment and even read the license agreement. Hell, if it works for you, I might want to push it out to everyone else. But when you want to download and install whatever you want on the company's network and possibly interfere with or impede other employees work, well that's where I have an issue. Using your examples, Marketing won't do a very effective job if their competitors already know their marketing plans and put something out first. Engineering won't be able to make a very good product if the CAD server is unavailable because of a virus brought in on a laptop from home.


And if it takes you less than a half an hour to make that decision, then by all means. The problem is when someone asks IT, and it takes weeks before an unexplained "no" comes back. There's only one lesson there to the user - don't ask IT.
 
2012-07-30 01:49:07 PM

Honest Bender: I guess the cloud systems administer themselves... What a dumb "article." I take back my single page link. This isn't even deserving of one page view.


Sure, the cloud doesn't administer itself, but cloud providers are generally much more efficient at administration. I work in the storage industry. There's a high-level metric of "XX TB per storage administrator", It used to be administrators per TB. At any rate, I saw that metric from Google, and it's 100X of any private shop I've seen.

They just operate on a different scale and at a different level. People who think that a few years managing a couple hundred TB of NetApp is going to help them get a job at Azure are simply deluded.

darkmayo: How the fark are they the guys responsible for people connecting IPads to corp networks and using dropbox to store corp information.

If anything these are the guys that are trying to curb that behaviour, or are they causing it because the users are like "fark you nerd, I do what I want I home so I will do the same here."


This is how:

Manager: "I need 500GB of collaboration storage for my geographically distributed team. SharePoint, Jive, or something like it would be great, but a CIFS share would do as long as it's SMB 2.0, because as I mentioned, my team is geographically distributed."

10 months passes.

IT Team: "OK, here's your 500GB SMB 1.0 storage. Have fun."

Five years ago the manager might have either lived with it, or set up a server in his basement. Now, he can just go tell people to expense Dropbox Pro accounts. If it's blocked at the firewall, well, isn't that what WWLAN cards are for?

This got fixed when the company signed up for an account with a cloud provider that ties into AD, provides a dedicated infrastructure. The team no longer uses Dropbox, because the corporate solution works, but corporate had to bypass their own IT in order to make it work. The IT team is still there, managing a dwindling proportion of the company's IT. Everyone is literally working around them, while they're off thumping chests about security and policies.

Trying to get those types of people to actually use products capabilities to enable their users instead of just trying to shut them up is one of the harder jobs in IT. It's getting better, though, because the Brown-Nosed Naysayers are leaving the industry in droves.
 
2012-07-30 01:49:11 PM
as a laid off/retired COBOL programmer, i'm weeping
 
2012-07-30 01:52:09 PM

Captain_Ballbeard: Pocket Ninja: All species of IT workers are about to become extinct. That's what's so exciting about computing in the cloud. Once everything is moved to the cloud, there will be no more need for IT on the ground, and everything will be seamless and 100 percent accessible from everywhere. In 10 years, nobody will even know what an "IT worker" is. There may be a cloud monitor or two -- I suspect they'll be called "angels" -- but that's it, and it'll mainly be to ensure that no information leaks out ("rain loss").

lol, that was about as stupid as the article, or anything else that InfoWorld pinches off.


Thanks for letting us all know you "got it". No. Seriously. Thanks.
 
2012-07-30 01:53:38 PM

Theaetetus: And if it takes you less than a half an hour to make that decision, then by all means. The problem is when someone asks IT, and it takes weeks before an unexplained "no" comes back. There's only one lesson there to the user - don't ask IT.


I can see both sides of it. On one hand we have a customer whose IT department is god awful slow. If we need a VPN certificate from them it takes, at a minimum, 4 days to get. It's taken weeks in the past.

On the other hand if Joe user comes running in saying he wants to run a piece of software on his home laptop that connects to the company network, it suffers from a couple of problems. 1) it has to be vetted. This take time. Reading EULAs, gathering information about possible security issues, and testing. 2) If it isn't a directive from managent or is asked be a few or less users, it becomes low priority. Yes, running that software may be great for the individual, but the department may have its hands full with other projects at the moment and can't make time for Rick in accounts receivables for his request in that half hour.
 
2012-07-30 01:59:09 PM
So basically it's every kind at every organization and we all know the IT department is an enormous black hole you just throw your money into and never see any benefit from so who cares?

Let's all become increasingly dependent on technology we don't want to pay anyone to install, configure or maintain - it's a sure-fire way to immanentize the f*cking eschaton!
 
2012-07-30 02:03:37 PM

Honest Bender: 10) One page articles

/One Page.


THIS

/5 "pages" for a 9-item list? Fark you, InfoWorld.
 
2012-07-30 02:05:03 PM

Theaetetus: CodeRedEd: Theaetetus: darkmayo: How the fark are they the guys responsible for people connecting IPads to corp networks and using dropbox to store corp information.

Because they're not making it possible for users to use the tools they want or transfer documents to the place they want to work on them. IT is fundamentally a service occupation. All the data security in the world won't matter if the sales and marketing people can't do their jobs, or if the engineering staff have to fight around your roadblocks to make product. If you aren't serving, then you should be replaced.

IT Director here. You are correct that ITs job is service. But that is for the business first, then the individual. I want you to be able to do your job and do it well. But I need to make sure that the other 1100 employees can do their job as well. So when you want to use the latest cool tool that you found, I need to make sure the data can be shared with others, that it will work within our environment and even read the license agreement. Hell, if it works for you, I might want to push it out to everyone else. But when you want to download and install whatever you want on the company's network and possibly interfere with or impede other employees work, well that's where I have an issue. Using your examples, Marketing won't do a very effective job if their competitors already know their marketing plans and put something out first. Engineering won't be able to make a very good product if the CAD server is unavailable because of a virus brought in on a laptop from home.

And if it takes you less than a half an hour to make that decision, then by all means. The problem is when someone asks IT, and it takes weeks before an unexplained "no" comes back. There's only one lesson there to the user - don't ask IT.


Wow! A whole half an hour. I agree it shouldn't take weeks or in most cases more than a day or two, but think about the whole system. Do you want everyone in the company doing whatever the hell they want with your network? Your internet access? Your storage? Your data?
If most users would work with IT and explain what it is they need to do and why this new tool is the way to do it, IT will probably work with you (at least in my shop).

/ I will be the first to admit that IT can be seen as a block, but typically there are good reasons for it.
 
2012-07-30 02:09:53 PM

Theaetetus: darkmayo: How the fark are they the guys responsible for people connecting IPads to corp networks and using dropbox to store corp information.

Because they're not making it possible for users to use the tools they want or transfer documents to the place they want to work on them. IT is fundamentally a service occupation. All the data security in the world won't matter if the sales and marketing people can't do their jobs, or if the engineering staff have to fight around your roadblocks to make product. If you aren't serving, then you should be replaced.


Unless, of course, one of the things you're selling is data security. This shiat doesn't fly in a PCI DSS environment.
 
2012-07-30 02:25:11 PM

CodeRedEd: IT Director here. You are correct that ITs job is service. But that is for the business first, then the individual. I want you to be able to do your job and do it well. But I need to make sure that the other 1100 employees can do their job as well.


The thing is that you are competing with AWS and Dropbox. If users want AWS, they'll use it. One of the funniest stories I heard recently was where some engineering manager was outed by the CFO because he was charging $30k/month to Amazon. CFO saw Amazon and figured, "well, that's a lot of books".

If you don't want your users using AWS, set up a hypervised cluster of your choice, allow them to self-provision and charge them back for usage. If you don't want your users using Dropbox, set up a private cloud alternative. What you can't do is pretend that those alternatives don't exist, and pretend that you "forbidding them" from using cloud services is going to stop them.

Sometimes it's a simple matter of education and promotion of the services that are actually there. .But too often it's structural and relationship issues. After decades of being told "no" by their IT departments, many users simply don't bother checking anymore. And too often, IT has few if any allies in the company to help them maintain relevance in the face of competition from the likes of Azure, AWS, and dropbox.
 
2012-07-30 02:25:27 PM
This article basically says that there is or will be soon... no one to repair anything.. no one to code anything.. no one to support anything.. makes complete sense...
 
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