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(Gizmodo)   The evolution of the English language over 500 years.. lol wut   (gizmodo.com ) divider line 98
    More: Interesting, evolution, English language, Internet meme  
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6756 clicks; posted to Geek » on 25 Jul 2012 at 2:16 PM (3 years ago)   |   Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2012-07-25 09:37:37 AM  
 
2012-07-25 10:44:33 AM  
Verily, doth give me a sad
 
2012-07-25 10:46:53 AM  
English is the Borg of languages. Takes what it wants and makes it it's own.
 
2012-07-25 10:49:11 AM  

GAT_00: English is the Borg of languages. Takes what it wants and makes it it's own.


Yeah, English doesn't borrow from other other languages. It mugs them and steals their stuff.
 
2012-07-25 10:52:31 AM  
i3.squidoocdn.com
 
2012-07-25 11:09:36 AM  
Olde English filled my mind.
 
2012-07-25 11:35:29 AM  
One of the best parts of English is how acceptable it is among English speakers to just invent new words at will. We verbize nouns, we nounize verbs, we pillage everything we can find in other languages, and word order is more of a suggestion than an absolute requirement.

Between being the lingua franca of two world-spanning imperial powers, and being the most promiscuous and flexible language in the world, it's no surprise that English is such a common language.
 
2012-07-25 11:41:57 AM  

t3knomanser: One of the best parts of English is how acceptable it is among English speakers to just invent new words at will. We verbize nouns, we nounize verbs, we pillage everything we can find in other languages, and word order is more of a suggestion than an absolute requirement.

Between being the lingua franca of two world-spanning imperial powers, and being the most promiscuous and flexible language in the world, it's no surprise that English is such a common language.


imgace.com
 
2012-07-25 11:49:37 AM  

doglover: t3knomanser: One of the best parts of English is how acceptable it is among English speakers to just invent new words at will. We verbize nouns, we nounize verbs, we pillage everything we can find in other languages, and word order is more of a suggestion than an absolute requirement.

Between being the lingua franca of two world-spanning imperial powers, and being the most promiscuous and flexible language in the world, it's no surprise that English is such a common language.

[imgace.com image 300x303]


That's the quote I was looking for!
 
2012-07-25 11:57:51 AM  

t3knomanser: One of the best parts of English is how acceptable it is among English speakers to just invent new words at will.


Indeed. Webster's Dictionary describes the language, while L'Académie française (par example) prescribes the language.
 
2012-07-25 12:05:03 PM  
English is a stripped down language. We dropped the formal and informal noun and verb forms that many other languages kept. We don't even bother with teaching direct and indirect objects. We dropped many indicators. As such, it is a vague language.
C.f. the works of Groucho Marx.
"Last night I shot an elephant in my pajamas."
 
2012-07-25 12:07:33 PM  
Ye gods.
 
2012-07-25 12:50:53 PM  
Incidentally, there was a linguistic project aimed towards stripping down all non-English influences and loanwords from modern English. Anyone remember what it was called?
 
2012-07-25 12:56:02 PM  

RexTalionis: Incidentally, there was a linguistic project aimed towards stripping down all non-English influences and loanwords from modern English. Anyone remember what it was called?


The Sisyphus Project? Good luck undoing the Norman invasion.
 
2012-07-25 01:24:53 PM  
This study does NOT measure how the English language has changed. It measures how the content of books has changed.

Of course there was a lot of talk of the Church in books from 1520. Most books were religious in nature. This tells us absolutely nothing about the actual general use of the language at that time.
 
2012-07-25 02:14:12 PM  
Extend the length of phrase to five letters, and a similar pattern emerges. Favorites from the 1520s remain heavily religious, including "the Pope and his followers", "the laws of the Church" and "the body and blood of Christ"

the fails, there are many.
 
2012-07-25 02:14:55 PM  
One last little nugget: over the last century the words "United States" have become increasingly common

thank you Subby Romero for this insightful piece.
 
2012-07-25 02:17:53 PM  

RexTalionis: Incidentally, there was a linguistic project aimed towards stripping down all non-English influences and loanwords from modern English. Anyone remember what it was called?


What would the point of that be?
 
2012-07-25 02:25:28 PM  
Still no explanation for why I go to the bathroom in order to go to the bathroom.
 
2012-07-25 02:27:14 PM  
English is for pansies. I speak American.

USA USA USA!
 
2012-07-25 02:27:16 PM  

Angry Drunk Bureaucrat: What would the point of that be?


Seems like the sort of thing to teach the "We're in America, speak American!" crowd. Well, not so much "teach" as "throw in the face of" but you get my point.
 
2012-07-25 02:28:02 PM  

RexTalionis: Incidentally, there was a linguistic project aimed towards stripping down all non-English influences and loanwords from modern English. Anyone remember what it was called?


doubleplus ungood
 
2012-07-25 02:33:05 PM  
Send us bright one, light one, Horhorn, quickening and wombfruit. Send
us bright one, light one, Horhorn, quickening and wombfruit. Send us
bright one, light one, Horhorn, quickening and wombfruit.
Hoopsa boyaboy hoopsa! Hoopsa boyaboy hoopsa! Hoopsa boyaboy
hoopsa!

/not obscure to English majors
 
2012-07-25 02:34:43 PM  

doglover: [i3.squidoocdn.com image 590x775]


Does anyone here know the name of the original artwork for the "Loquacious Country Squire" guy?
 
2012-07-25 02:40:13 PM  

t3knomanser: One of the best parts of English is how acceptable it is among English speakers to just invent new words at will. We verbize nouns, we nounize verbs, we pillage everything we can find in other languages, and word order is more of a suggestion than an absolute requirement.

Between being the lingua franca of two world-spanning imperial powers, and being the most promiscuous and flexible language in the world, it's no surprise that English is such a common language.


Yeah, this is how I can see English remaining the lingua franca for a long time, no matter who the dominant world power is. For example, Chinese is nowhere near as flexible as English, as far as I can tell.

Also, English is batshiat crazy. Why else would it call itself "the French language" in Latin to describe it's worldwide dominance? You don't want to mess with a language that crazy.
 
2012-07-25 02:44:56 PM  

simplicimus: RexTalionis: Incidentally, there was a linguistic project aimed towards stripping down all non-English influences and loanwords from modern English. Anyone remember what it was called?

The Sisyphus Project? Good luck undoing the Norman invasion.


They could at least get rid of Old French words like "official" and replace them with patriotic American words.

i105.photobucket.com
 
2012-07-25 02:45:04 PM  

ClintonKun: For example, Chinese is nowhere near as flexible as English, as far as I can tell.


It's flexible enough. Words that aren't originally in Chinese are translated with a close-enough description. For example - computers = "Electric Brain."
 
2012-07-25 02:48:17 PM  

buckler: doglover: [i3.squidoocdn.com image 590x775]

Does anyone here know the name of the original artwork for the "Loquacious Country Squire" guy?



Portrait de l'artiste sous les traits d'un moqueur (1793) by Joseph, Baron Ducreux
 
2012-07-25 02:49:21 PM  
therealmeaningof.com
 
2012-07-25 02:50:56 PM  

FloydA: buckler: doglover: [i3.squidoocdn.com image 590x775]

Does anyone here know the name of the original artwork for the "Loquacious Country Squire" guy?


Portrait de l'artiste sous les traits d'un moqueur (1793) by Joseph, Baron Ducreux


Hat-tip, sir!
 
2012-07-25 02:57:21 PM  
The English language didn't evolve....IT WAS CREATED!
 
2012-07-25 02:58:13 PM  

simplicimus: English is a stripped down language. We dropped the formal and informal noun and verb forms that many other languages kept. We don't even bother with teaching direct and indirect objects. We dropped many indicators. As such, it is a vague language.
C.f. the works of Groucho Marx.
"Last night I shot an elephant in my pajamas."


Bzzzzzzt.
That's still ambiguous in Russian, which has explicit case and two forms of second person.
Deixis, on the other hand, is still a biatch.
 
2012-07-25 03:03:03 PM  

Angry Drunk Bureaucrat: RexTalionis: Incidentally, there was a linguistic project aimed towards stripping down all non-English influences and loanwords from modern English. Anyone remember what it was called?

What would the point of that be?


Stone him dead!
 
2012-07-25 03:07:34 PM  
I like how he says þe language is more boring now because we use less religious derp.
 
2012-07-25 03:15:03 PM  

Angry Drunk Bureaucrat: t3knomanser: One of the best parts of English is how acceptable it is among English speakers to just invent new words at will.

Indeed. Webster's Dictionary describes the language, while L'Académie française (par example) prescribes the language.


"Describes" pronounced with a short i or a long e?
 
2012-07-25 03:23:24 PM  

Angry Drunk Bureaucrat: RexTalionis: Incidentally, there was a linguistic project aimed towards stripping down all non-English influences and loanwords from modern English. Anyone remember what it was called?

What would the point of that be?


Fix old, no new
 
2012-07-25 03:34:48 PM  
English is incredibly flexible and is equally suitable for a curse, a technical manual, a scientific treatise or a love poem.

When I buy electronic stuff and look at the multilingual manual it always strikes me how the English pages convey the relevant information in a shorter space than any other language.
 
2012-07-25 03:35:06 PM  
Buffalo buffalo buffalo Buffalo buffalo Buffalo buffalo.
 
2012-07-25 03:38:08 PM  

SlothB77: One last little nugget: over the last century the words "United States" have become increasingly common

thank you Subby Romero for this insightful piece.


They also very rarely mentioned internets, smartphones, large hadron colliders, blu-rays and Kim Kardashian.
 
2012-07-25 03:41:29 PM  
I've been trying to wrap my mind around the english in The Canterbury Tales ately, so I'm getting a kick.
 
2012-07-25 04:00:13 PM  

Suede head: English is incredibly flexible and is equally suitable for a curse, a technical manual, a scientific treatise or a love poem.

When I buy electronic stuff and look at the multilingual manual it always strikes me how the English pages convey the relevant information in a shorter space than any other language.


To be fair, that is mostly because it was written originally in English, and the foreign language translations have to bend around sideways to try and match what the English was trying to say. If you were going from a foreign language back to English, you'd see the same deal.
 
2012-07-25 04:01:26 PM  

demaL-demaL-yeH: simplicimus: English is a stripped down language. We dropped the formal and informal noun and verb forms that many other languages kept. We don't even bother with teaching direct and indirect objects. We dropped many indicators. As such, it is a vague language.
C.f. the works of Groucho Marx.
"Last night I shot an elephant in my pajamas."

Bzzzzzzt.
That's still ambiguous in Russian, which has explicit case and two forms of second person.
Deixis, on the other hand, is still a biatch.


I think Hebrew also retains that ambiguity (depending on how you construct the sentence, obviously). I'm pretty sure there's still semantic ambiguity surrounding other languages' turns of phrase, though.
 
2012-07-25 04:09:44 PM  

demaL-demaL-yeH: simplicimus: English is a stripped down language. We dropped the formal and informal noun and verb forms that many other languages kept. We don't even bother with teaching direct and indirect objects. We dropped many indicators. As such, it is a vague language.
C.f. the works of Groucho Marx.
"Last night I shot an elephant in my pajamas."

Bzzzzzzt.
That's still ambiguous in Russian, which has explicit case and two forms of second person.
Deixis, on the other hand, is still a biatch.


OK, how about this parallel construction, again from Groucho "Time flies like an arrow; Fruit flies like a banana".
 
2012-07-25 04:22:14 PM  

RexTalionis: Incidentally, there was a linguistic project aimed towards stripping down all non-English influences and loanwords from modern English. Anyone remember what it was called?


What would they say is the proper English for taco?
 
2012-07-25 04:22:49 PM  
I find the English of the 18th Century to be a moft excellent Language, with more Perfonality and Charachter than the English of Today.
 
2012-07-25 04:26:17 PM  

doosh: RexTalionis: Incidentally, there was a linguistic project aimed towards stripping down all non-English influences and loanwords from modern English. Anyone remember what it was called?

What would they say is the proper English for taco?


Hardshell hamburger.

Oh wait, damnit
 
2012-07-25 04:33:57 PM  

GAT_00: English is the Borg of languages. Takes what it wants and makes it it's own.


Grammar is futile. You will be apostophied.
 
2012-07-25 04:34:12 PM  

doosh: RexTalionis: Incidentally, there was a linguistic project aimed towards stripping down all non-English influences and loanwords from modern English. Anyone remember what it was called?

What would they say is the proper English for taco?


Vincent: And know'st thou what the French name cottage pie?
Julius: Say they not cottage pie, in their own tongue?
Vincent: But nay, their tongues, for speech and taste alike
Are strange to ours, with their own history:
Gaul knoweth not a cottage from a house.
Julius: What say they then, pray?
Vincent: Hachis Parmentier.
Julius: Hachis Parmentier! What name they cream?
Vincent: Cream is but cream, only they say la crème.
Julius: What do they name black pudding?
Vincent: I know not;
I visited no inn where't could be bought.
 
2012-07-25 04:34:46 PM  

Ned Stark: doosh: RexTalionis: Incidentally, there was a linguistic project aimed towards stripping down all non-English influences and loanwords from modern English. Anyone remember what it was called?

What would they say is the proper English for taco?

Hardshell hamburger.

Oh wait, damnit



Freedom fajita.

Oh wait, damnit.
 
2012-07-25 04:36:52 PM  

simplicimus: demaL-demaL-yeH: simplicimus: English is a stripped down language. We dropped the formal and informal noun and verb forms that many other languages kept. We don't even bother with teaching direct and indirect objects. We dropped many indicators. As such, it is a vague language.
C.f. the works of Groucho Marx.
"Last night I shot an elephant in my pajamas."

Bzzzzzzt.
That's still ambiguous in Russian, which has explicit case and two forms of second person.
Deixis, on the other hand, is still a biatch.

OK, how about this parallel construction, again from Groucho "Time flies like an arrow; Fruit flies like a banana".


I'd bet that wordplay of some form (not necessarily homophony) and ambiguity are universal to natural languages.
 
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