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(The Gazette)   So, 40 pounds of liquid mercury walk into a bar   (thegazette.com) divider line 144
    More: Dumbass, Iowa, emergency managers, CRP, respiratory failure, construction workers, kidney diseases, liquid mercury  
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16452 clicks; posted to Main » on 25 Jul 2012 at 1:20 PM (1 year ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2012-07-25 02:43:51 PM

gopher321: Reekers says the worker took the mercury to a bar to show friends. Someone dropped the bottle and exposed 10-12 people at the bar.

Reekers says the worker took the remaining mercury to the house and hid the bottle in a sandbox where four children later found it.



Guy just doesn't know when to stop the asshattery. I'm surprised he didn't take the bottle of mercury out dancing later and mixed a few cocktails with it.


Nothing like a little Quecksilberwasser on a cold day.
 
2012-07-25 02:44:20 PM
So a seal walks into a club
 
2012-07-25 02:49:09 PM

snocone: xl5150: Rich Cream: Can we even assume he knew it was mercury? Probably thought he found an alien nucular fuel.

That's actually a good point. With a job as a workman I think it's safe to assume that he's probably not that knowledgeable about the periodic table (or really anything at all, for that matter). He likely didn't know what it was.

Is workman a job title.
Having trouble finding,,,



I was just basing it on humanity in general.

/as I've experienced it
 
2012-07-25 02:51:15 PM

JudgeItoBox: Just a reminder that only one generation ago, your parents regularly played with mercury in their science classes. Like held it in their cupped hands and jiggled it around.

You're welcome.


Hell, I did that when I was a kid. Got it out of a chemistry set.

/Get off my lawn
 
2012-07-25 02:51:27 PM
Could be worse:
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Goi%C3%A2nia_accident
 
2012-07-25 02:52:31 PM
I bet half of those reading this have that old round thermostat on the wall....

/panpanic?
 
2012-07-25 02:54:02 PM

xl5150: Dreyelle: How big would the bottle have to be to hold 40 pounds of liquid mercury?

Probably not that big. 40 pounds of mercury is a lot heavier than 40 pounds of feathers.


I'l disagree with that; I'll say 40 pounds of mercury weighs exactly the same amount as 40 pounds of feathers. The volume on the other hand...
 
2012-07-25 02:54:42 PM

HailRobonia: What sort of moron hides anything in a sandbox?


My cat used to hide things in the sandbox outside. No one wanted to find them though.

Someone brought some mercury to school back in the day when officials weren't hand-wringing over what students brought all the time. We poured it into our hands and watched it roll around. One girl, though, became very upset when she discovered a property of mercury; it can absorb gold. It rolled over a gold ring she had on and the mercury stripped the gold plating right off the ring, leaving the base metal exposed.
 
2012-07-25 03:05:43 PM
Before PC's were invented, we used to play with mercury on the kitchen table.
 
2012-07-25 03:06:44 PM

grandma's famous pot pie recipe: xl5150: Dreyelle: How big would the bottle have to be to hold 40 pounds of liquid mercury?

Probably not that big. 40 pounds of mercury is a lot heavier than 40 pounds of feathers.

I'l disagree with that; I'll say 40 pounds of mercury weighs exactly the same amount as 40 pounds of feathers. The volume on the other hand...


I think you missed what he was trying to say. If you weighed out 40 pounds of Mercury, and then put it next to 40 pounds of feathers, you would find that the Mercury actually scientifically and psychologically weighs less. The reason for this is the mental phenomenon known as "that's the joke"
 
2012-07-25 03:13:37 PM

Mikeyworld: So, ya got a GED in Chemistry from Wiki University?


Straight A's in AP Chem in high school, and a few years of Chemical Engineering in college before I went a different route. I stand by my assertions. Just because Wikipedia states the same thing doesn't make it or me wrong.

/I bow to your "prollys" and "abouts" and folk tales.
//The mercury vapor in a CFL is contained completely within the sealed container that is the bulb.
///The word you're looking for is "cumulative".
 
2012-07-25 03:25:07 PM

jigger: eas81: Dreyelle: How big would the bottle have to be to hold 40 pounds of liquid mercury?

The density of Mercury is 13,593 kg/m3 (kilograms per cubic meter). That is equivalent to 113.4 lb/gal [US].(pounds per gallon).

Compare that to water, which is about 8.34 pounds per gallon.

[www.colloidalsilverhowto.com image 500x441]

That's why you use it in barometers instead of water or oil. If you used water, the column would have to be 33 meters tall instead of 760 mm.


Actually, they used mercury in thermometers and barometers because it remains in liquid form through a wider range of temperatures, and the amount it expands or contracts due to temperature is more linear than water or liquid compounds.

TLDR version: Mercury-based thermometers and barometers are more accurate.
 
2012-07-25 03:25:18 PM

sexy-fetus: If I was the owner of that bar I'd be mad as a hatter right now.


What you did there...I see it.
 
2012-07-25 03:28:25 PM

GWSuperfan: Quantum Apostrophe: As opposed to what? Solid mercury?

I came here to ask this.


and me. It would be a cold day in hell before he walked in with solid mercury...

jfivealive: grandma's famous pot pie recipe: xl5150: Dreyelle: How big would the bottle have to be to hold 40 pounds of liquid mercury?

Probably not that big. 40 pounds of mercury is a lot heavier than 40 pounds of feathers.

I'l disagree with that; I'll say 40 pounds of mercury weighs exactly the same amount as 40 pounds of feathers. The volume on the other hand...

I think you missed what he was trying to say. If you weighed out 40 pounds of Mercury, and then put it next to 40 pounds of feathers, you would find that the Mercury actually scientifically and psychologically weighs less. The reason for this is the mental phenomenon known as "that's the joke"


a pound of feathers weighs more than a pound of gold because precious metals such as gold are measured in troy weight. A troy pound is 12 troy ounces, and each troy ounce is 480 grains, making a total of 5760 grains to the pound of gold.

Most materials use pounds and ounces from the avoirdupois system, and such a standard pound is made up of 16 ounces, where each ounce is 437.5 grains, making a total of 7000 grains to the pound of feathers.

THAT is the joke.
 
2012-07-25 03:28:28 PM
The liquid has little hazard. Like handling lead fish weights or getting gasoline on your hands (all carcinogens). Its the Vapor and some compounds (Dimethylmercury) that'll get ya.
 
2012-07-25 03:29:46 PM
Mix it with red fuming nitric acid and run like hell?
 
2012-07-25 03:34:19 PM
At least it wasn't fulminated....

blogs.amctv.com
 
2012-07-25 03:34:51 PM
This is why we can't have nice things!

/ total fail
 
2012-07-25 03:48:24 PM
HailRobonia

What sort of moron hides anything in a sandbox?

www.odorlesscatlitter.com



satanorsanta

about 1.34 liters. Less than 3/4 of a 2 L pop bottle

1.3 is less than 2?
Whew, thanks for the clarification there. I was confused there for a moment since it was all metric-y and stuff.
 
2012-07-25 03:59:10 PM

Gecko Gingrich: Mikeyworld: So, ya got a GED in Chemistry from Wiki University?

Straight A's in AP Chem in high school, and a few years of Chemical Engineering in college before I went a different route. I stand by my assertions. Just because Wikipedia states the same thing doesn't make it or me wrong.

/I bow to your "prollys" and "abouts" and folk tales.
//The mercury vapor in a CFL is contained completely within the sealed container that is the bulb.
///The word you're looking for is "cumulative".


I'm glad you can grade punctuation. But My point was:

Mercury is dangerous, not (as you said) immediately, but over the years. With Mercury, a little goes a long way, that's why a CFL is dangerous when broken, not when you're changing blubs, Bub. I hold an electrical BS, long time EE...so there. Have worked with them Hammerites.
 
2012-07-25 03:59:26 PM

show me: JudgeItoBox: Just a reminder that only one generation ago, your parents regularly played with mercury in their science classes. Like held it in their cupped hands and jiggled it around.

You're welcome.

Hell, I did that when I was a kid. Got it out of a chemistry set.

/Get off my lawn


My grandmother was a doctor and she would bring small bottles of mercury from the hospital for me to play with. I have no lli stceffe morf ti rehto than the occasional backwards typing thing
 
2012-07-25 04:02:19 PM

LazarusLong42: Elemental mercury is impressively inert, especially in large quantities with a low surface area to volume ratio. Drinkable, in fact, though not more than a few milliliters because of its density.

Mercury droplets in the 1 mm range, though, have a high enough surface area to volume ratio that they can create a significant amount of vapor even at room temperature.

That thing was safe until he spilled it. Even better, store it in a sturdy container and covered in water to completely prevent vapor formation.


I have never heard of surface area to volume ratio as mattering. All I thought that matters is surface area. A pan of mercury that is 6 inches deep and 12 inches wide will release vapors at the same rate as one that is 24 inches deep and 12 inches wide.

Only difference with the 'droplet' example is that you have a curved space. A curved space may have an entirely different evaporation rate, but its not a function of volume.

Although I did find this paper which seems to back up your statement (although I didn't see an explanation for it):

http://www.urbanwateralliance.org.au/publications/UWSRA-tr8.pdf

That last thing part was cool though, I forgot about hydraulic tables, old school chemistry is the bomb.
 
2012-07-25 04:16:49 PM
3.bp.blogspot.com
 
2012-07-25 04:18:14 PM
dammit. one of these days I'll learn skim the whole thread...
 
2012-07-25 04:35:41 PM

Mikeyworld: Gecko Gingrich: Mikeyworld: So, ya got a GED in Chemistry from Wiki University?

Straight A's in AP Chem in high school, and a few years of Chemical Engineering in college before I went a different route. I stand by my assertions. Just because Wikipedia states the same thing doesn't make it or me wrong.

/I bow to your "prollys" and "abouts" and folk tales.
//The mercury vapor in a CFL is contained completely within the sealed container that is the bulb.
///The word you're looking for is "cumulative".

I'm glad you can grade punctuation. But My point was:

Mercury is dangerous, not (as you said) immediately, but over the years. With Mercury, a little goes a long way, that's why a CFL is dangerous when broken, not when you're changing blubs, Bub. I hold an electrical BS, long time EE...so there. Have worked with them Hammerites.


Builder be praised!
 
2012-07-25 04:43:48 PM
So a dyslexic walks into a bra
 
2012-07-25 04:45:50 PM

MythDragon: When I was in Iraq , I was changing the oil on a humvee. I looked at the pan of old, dirty oil, looked over 3 feet to my right, grabbed a shovel dug a 1 ft pit, and hucked in the oil. My platoon SGT saw this and started biatching. Who cares? I said. It's farking Iraq. This place is lousy with oil anyway. He then said how it was bad for the environment. I explained that it would simply soak into the ground and rejoin the natural oil table. My scientific knowledge must have really impressed him, because he just walked away, pinching the bridge of his nose.


Meanwhile when we were in Europe, if a vehicle dripped a drop of oil on the ground we had to dig it up, box it, and bring it back to the US for disposal.
 
2012-07-25 05:04:45 PM
A few months back I cleaned up a school in Birmingham where the kids found a mason jar full of mercury. They threw it at each other, poured it in their pockets, took that shiat home, and the school staff/admins sent the janitor in to mop up the spill when it was discovered the kids had spread it all over. I can't really blame the kids, stupid though they are; the adults in charge had no farking clue what to do, from properly storing this shiat to dealing with the exposure/cleanup.

This guy is no different. He is quite simply a goddamn moran. Make him pay for all associated costs.
 
2012-07-25 05:08:46 PM
Man, a thread like this really brings out the nerds, doesn't it?
 
2012-07-25 05:13:31 PM

Necronic: LazarusLong42: Elemental mercury is impressively inert, especially in large quantities with a low surface area to volume ratio. Drinkable, in fact, though not more than a few milliliters because of its density.

Mercury droplets in the 1 mm range, though, have a high enough surface area to volume ratio that they can create a significant amount of vapor even at room temperature.

That thing was safe until he spilled it. Even better, store it in a sturdy container and covered in water to completely prevent vapor formation.


I have never heard of surface area to volume ratio as mattering. All I thought that matters is surface area. A pan of mercury that is 6 inches deep and 12 inches wide will release vapors at the same rate as one that is 24 inches deep and 12 inches wide.

Only difference with the 'droplet' example is that you have a curved space. A curved space may have an entirely different evaporation rate, but its not a function of volume.

Although I did find this paper which seems to back up your statement (although I didn't see an explanation for it):

http://www.urbanwateralliance.org.au/publications/UWSRA-tr8.pdf

That last thing part was cool though, I forgot about hydraulic tables, old school chemistry is the bomb.


Sorry, I guess the SA/V ratio thing isn't as obvious. In a large container, of course, you're correct. The SA/V problem comes into play when you divide the mercury into droplets; it's not the SA/V of each droplet but the SA/V of the entire sample. I was unclear.

Consider a single droplet of mercury with a radius of 1 mm. It has SA ~ 12 mm2 and V ~ 4 mm3. Now, cut it in half. You'll get two spheres, each with a volume of ~2 mm3. Each of these spheres has a surface area of ~7.5 mm2, so you've increased the SA by ~3 mm2, and increased evaporation rate by ~25%.

A mercury spill has a much larger surface area than a container of mercury. When the spill gets divided into droplets, which is to say almost always, things get progressively worse the more droplets. And of course a mercury spill on a soft surface like carpet is just... well, expect to replace the carpet, it's done for, you can't get it out.
 
2012-07-25 05:17:01 PM

Kygz: Why are we discussing a liquid in weight and not volume?


Why are we discussing a liquid with words and not teaspoons?
 
2012-07-25 05:19:33 PM

Weaver95: Emmet County emergency manager Terry Reekers says a construction worker remodeling a house found a plastic bottle with about 40 pounds of liquid mercury on Friday.

Reekers says the worker took the mercury to a bar to show friends.

[i0.kym-cdn.com image 292x302]


Um...


Reekers says the worker took the remaining mercury to the house and hid the bottle in a sandbox where four children later found it.
 
2012-07-25 05:21:11 PM

HailRobonia: What sort of moron hides anything in a sandbox?


Cats.
 
2012-07-25 06:15:29 PM
What mercury might look like enjoying a golden shower in the bar's men's room:
ramblingsofatvwhore.raelee.com
tvmedia.ign.com
 
2012-07-25 06:21:38 PM
i.imgur.com
I thought he weighed more at the end.
 
2012-07-25 06:30:26 PM
Dude will find more than 40 pounds of rape in prison.

/they better charge that dumbass.
 
2012-07-25 07:27:04 PM

chuggernaught: Dude will find more than 40 pounds of rape in prison.

/they better charge that dumbass.


£40 of rape
 
2012-07-25 08:20:14 PM
They found his piss jar.
i.annihil.us
 
2012-07-26 12:27:33 AM

Mikeyworld: Hay now! These unsuccessful people can command up to $35/hr. Total that out to a year's wages and you'll see who the 'successful' people really are. And they don't have a student loan hangin' over their heads. Who's the dumb ape now?


They are the dumb apes, since their job can be done by a monkey. I make much more than them and I never have to break a sweat.
 
2012-07-26 03:26:17 AM
I love any thread that brings the geeks out of the woodwork.

:)
 
2012-07-26 08:19:53 AM

Resident Muslim: I love any thread that brings the geeks out of the woodwork.

:)


So...every thread on Fark then?
 
2012-07-26 10:18:36 AM

urbangirl: If I were that stupid, I'd want to be referred to as "the worker" too.


/thread over
//lol'd
///would lol again
 
2012-07-26 12:55:33 PM

Quantum Apostrophe: As opposed to what? Solid mercury?


It would have to be pretty cold outside.
 
2012-07-26 01:15:15 PM

danno_to_infinity: urbangirl: If I were that stupid, I'd want to be referred to as "the worker" too.

/thread over
//lol'd
///would lol again


my first "thread over".
life is good.
 
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