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(Washington Post)   Netflix shares fall 15% after Wall St. dislikes the upcoming attraction of subscribers   (washingtonpost.com) divider line 28
    More: Fail, Wall St, Netflix, Netflix shares, subscribers, account of profits, Los Gatos  
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1279 clicks; posted to Business » on 25 Jul 2012 at 10:29 AM (1 year ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2012-07-25 08:37:58 AM
I remember back when you ordered little plastic disks in the mail, and in a few days they arrived. We would gather around the family television set and all watch the contents of the disks, all at once! It was really fun. A stack of those red envelopes on the end table meant there'd be disks to watch for days.

I wonder whatever became of the post office delivering movies in the mail. That seems like years ago since I've seen one be delivered that way.
 
2012-07-25 08:53:13 AM
Is this company in any business school textbooks yet? What a way to screw up something that was awesome.
 
2012-07-25 09:03:29 AM
I quit these farkers two months ago and switched to Amazon, and only wish I could quit them again.
 
2012-07-25 09:11:05 AM

Generation_D: I remember back when you ordered little plastic disks in the mail, and in a few days they arrived. We would gather around the family television set and all watch the contents of the disks, all at once! It was really fun. A stack of those red envelopes on the end table meant there'd be disks to watch for days.

I wonder whatever became of the post office delivering movies in the mail. That seems like years ago since I've seen one be delivered that way.



That's still how I use the service. Works great for me.
 
2012-07-25 09:46:50 AM
I'd pay them $35/month if they'd stream their entire library

/yeah, I know 10,000 obstacles stand in the way of that, but it would be great
 
2012-07-25 09:49:33 AM
Since you can run Watch Instantly on a half-dozen appliances off the same account, they've lost three subscriptions in my family. Multiply that out across the country and it's easy to understand how much of their market has evaporated.

Well, that, and the crapfest of recycled History Channel shows they're offering. No, I don't want to watch "Modern Marvels: Monster Trucks."
 
2012-07-25 10:19:11 AM
In the latest quarter, for instance, Netflix added just 420,000 Internet video and DVD-by-mail subscribers in the U.S. That compared with an increase of 1.8 million U.S. subscribers at the same time last year, a period that was completed before the company boosted its prices.

I hate this kind of thinking in business. There is a finite number of possible subscribers. To judge the health of your business by how many new subscribers you have sets you up for inevitable failure.
 
2012-07-25 10:30:07 AM

jaylectricity: In the latest quarter, for instance, Netflix added just 420,000 Internet video and DVD-by-mail subscribers in the U.S. That compared with an increase of 1.8 million U.S. subscribers at the same time last year, a period that was completed before the company boosted its prices.

I hate this kind of thinking in business. There is a finite number of possible subscribers. To judge the health of your business by how many new subscribers you have sets you up for inevitable failure.


Well, maybe if women stopped having abortions, there'd be more future subscribers, which means more money, which means Netflix can hire more people.

See? Republican social conservatism creates jobs. QED.
 
2012-07-25 10:34:57 AM

jaylectricity: In the latest quarter, for instance, Netflix added just 420,000 Internet video and DVD-by-mail subscribers in the U.S. That compared with an increase of 1.8 million U.S. subscribers at the same time last year, a period that was completed before the company boosted its prices.

I hate this kind of thinking in business. There is a finite number of possible subscribers. To judge the health of your business by how many new subscribers you have sets you up for inevitable failure.


There might be a reason behind the 76.7% drop in new subscribers, and I don't think the reason is market saturation.
 
2012-07-25 11:20:04 AM
Netflix is doomed not because of any customer service mistakes but because they don't own the content they are selling. This makes it so they have no real control over pricing or availability of the products they are offering to customers.
 
2012-07-25 12:03:57 PM

Pocket Ninja: I quit these farkers two months ago and switched to Amazon, and only wish I could quit them again.


I browsed Amazon instant, and was a little discouraged by the prices. Some titles were available to Prime members for no additional cost, but many were still a couple bucks per episode or $15 per season to "rent" it. Am I missing something?
 
2012-07-25 12:20:21 PM

Bruxellensis: Pocket Ninja: I quit these farkers two months ago and switched to Amazon, and only wish I could quit them again.

I browsed Amazon instant, and was a little discouraged by the prices. Some titles were available to Prime members for no additional cost, but many were still a couple bucks per episode or $15 per season to "rent" it. Am I missing something?


Amazon Prime's selection isn't horrible. But their interface is. The interface that works for trying to buy something is totally different from what I want when I am browsing possible movies to watch.
 
2012-07-25 12:33:16 PM
I often wonder why I still subscribe to Netflix. I can't tell you how many times my wife and I will sit and scroll through everything available only to turn it off and watch porn (or whatever).

I'm halfway through season 2 of Breaking Bad. Let me finish this shiat, then I'm out.
 
2012-07-25 12:33:41 PM

Carth: Netflix is doomed not because of any customer service mistakes but because they don't own the content they are selling. This makes it so they have no real control over pricing or availability of the products they are offering to customers.


Same thing is going to happen to cable & satellite companies.

I have DIsh network, and they just dropped AMC because of a dispute over money (or so they say)

If you got your complaint in early to dish about missing the "breaking bad" premiere, dish would give you a refurbed roku box, and $10 month credit, so you could buy the episodes on amazon.
 
2012-07-25 12:34:51 PM
The following is a list of reasons I keep my subscription to Netflix:

1. Trailer Park Boys
 
2012-07-25 12:36:35 PM

Carth: Netflix is doomed not because of any customer service mistakes but because they don't own the content they are selling. This makes it so they have no real control over pricing or availability of the products they are offering to customers.


This is more or less true, which is why the industry is so screwed up. The content creators don't want to be in the business of online distribution (why re-invent the wheel ten more times?) and the distributors (e.g. Netflix) are at their mercy over pricing.

The real problem is the greedy farking studios. Netflix can get their product out to millions of people with no effort on their part, and all they have to do is sit back and collect the royalties. But somehow that's not enough for them, they want more money. I do believe that if it were possible for them to bill you every time you pop in the DVD you already paid for, they would.

I guess I don't get the hysteria over streaming. Yeah, it means you don't have to wait for the DVD, and you can watch movies on your iPhone (which I don't - too small) but the content is limited, the quality is awful compared to even a DVD (forget Blu-Ray) and it's a pain - if you back up a few seconds, it has to stop to re-stream, you can't advance frame-by-frame, and the quality is too low to pause and take a good look at something (never mind zooming in). Maybe these problems are lessened with a better quality connection, but my DSL line sucks.
 
2012-07-25 12:38:30 PM

Bruxellensis: The following is a list of reasons I keep my subscription to Netflix:

1. Trailer Park Boys


I made it through one episode. If you tell me it gets better, I'll revisit.
 
2012-07-25 01:03:56 PM

ImpendingCynic: Carth: Netflix is doomed not because of any customer service mistakes but because they don't own the content they are selling. This makes it so they have no real control over pricing or availability of the products they are offering to customers.

This is more or less true, which is why the industry is so screwed up. The content creators don't want to be in the business of online distribution (why re-invent the wheel ten more times?) and the distributors (e.g. Netflix) are at their mercy over pricing.

The real problem is the greedy farking studios. Netflix can get their product out to millions of people with no effort on their part, and all they have to do is sit back and collect the royalties. But somehow that's not enough for them, they want more money. I do believe that if it were possible for them to bill you every time you pop in the DVD you already paid for, they would.

I guess I don't get the hysteria over streaming. Yeah, it means you don't have to wait for the DVD, and you can watch movies on your iPhone (which I don't - too small) but the content is limited, the quality is awful compared to even a DVD (forget Blu-Ray) and it's a pain - if you back up a few seconds, it has to stop to re-stream, you can't advance frame-by-frame, and the quality is too low to pause and take a good look at something (never mind zooming in). Maybe these problems are lessened with a better quality connection, but my DSL line sucks.


I was gonna quote you to make fun of your internet connection, but I see you have that covered.
 
2012-07-25 01:08:59 PM

NashMcNash: Bruxellensis: The following is a list of reasons I keep my subscription to Netflix:

1. Trailer Park Boys

I made it through one episode. If you tell me it gets better, I'll revisit.


It gets pretty damn good, and very funny. The problem is you really should watch it in order, but the 1st season is when they were trying to get of the ground and the series really starts taking hold in the 2nd and 3rd season. After that, you'll wish they had made more than 7 seasons. There are also 2 movies out that are really funny, and are a pretty good way to an idea if you'll like the series or not.

Once you get to know the characters, it gets better. Ricky is known for his "Ricky-isms" and Julian always has a rum & coke in his hands. Always. Even during robberies, or interviews in jail, etc.

It's worth a second look, IMO.
 
2012-07-25 01:14:08 PM

ImpendingCynic: Carth: Netflix is doomed not because of any customer service mistakes but because they don't own the content they are selling. This makes it so they have no real control over pricing or availability of the products they are offering to customers.

This is more or less true, which is why the industry is so screwed up. The content creators don't want to be in the business of online distribution (why re-invent the wheel ten more times?) and the distributors (e.g. Netflix) are at their mercy over pricing.

The real problem is the greedy farking studios. Netflix can get their product out to millions of people with no effort on their part, and all they have to do is sit back and collect the royalties. But somehow that's not enough for them, they want more money. I do believe that if it were possible for them to bill you every time you pop in the DVD you already paid for, they would.

I guess I don't get the hysteria over streaming. Yeah, it means you don't have to wait for the DVD, and you can watch movies on your iPhone (which I don't - too small) but the content is limited, the quality is awful compared to even a DVD (forget Blu-Ray) and it's a pain - if you back up a few seconds, it has to stop to re-stream, you can't advance frame-by-frame, and the quality is too low to pause and take a good look at something (never mind zooming in). Maybe these problems are lessened with a better quality connection, but my DSL line sucks.


Yea, that's a problem that's wholy on your end. I get un-interupted HD(for titles that have it) streaming on netflix.

DSL sucks.
 
2012-07-25 01:15:32 PM

Thoguh: Bruxellensis: Pocket Ninja: I quit these farkers two months ago and switched to Amazon, and only wish I could quit them again.

I browsed Amazon instant, and was a little discouraged by the prices. Some titles were available to Prime members for no additional cost, but many were still a couple bucks per episode or $15 per season to "rent" it. Am I missing something?

Amazon Prime's selection isn't horrible. But their interface is. The interface that works for trying to buy something is totally different from what I want when I am browsing possible movies to watch.


this.

I have a kindle fire though (yea, whatever, laugh), and its great on there. I swear I've pulled out my fire before to find a movie to watch on the tv.
 
2012-07-25 01:41:40 PM

dchurch0: I was gonna quote you to make fun of your internet connection, but I see you have that covered.


Yeah, well, not much I can do about that. Every time I'm about to move somewhere else, I decide to stay, so I don't want to get my service upgraded, lest they force me into a new contract.

Besides, I live in Silicon Valley. All the cool stuff might be invented here, but we're the last to get it. Up until 8 or so years ago, our cable system had a farking A/B switch box. Maybe Nashville or Richmond have 50 Mbit cable Internet, but we don't.
 
2012-07-25 02:51:08 PM

ImpendingCynic: The real problem is the greedy farking studios. Netflix can get their product out to millions of people with no effort on their part, and all they have to do is sit back and collect the royalties. But somehow that's not enough for them, they want more money. I do believe that if it were possible for them to bill you every time you pop in the DVD you already paid for, they would.


Modern Family just sold into syndication for $1.5 million per episode. The Big Bang Theory sold a couple of years ago for $2 million per episode. They also got about $2 million per episode in free advertising from TBS. That's close to half a billion dollars so far. Netflix's entire budget for TV shows is $1 billion. There's no way Netflix could even come close to matching that amount. If somebody came to you and said "we'll give you $500 million for your product" why would you turn around and sell it to somebody else for significantly less?
 
2012-07-25 04:55:27 PM

Bruxellensis: Pocket Ninja: I quit these farkers two months ago and switched to Amazon, and only wish I could quit them again.

I browsed Amazon instant, and was a little discouraged by the prices. Some titles were available to Prime members for no additional cost, but many were still a couple bucks per episode or $15 per season to "rent" it. Am I missing something?


I think it probably depends. I love Amazon and have been a Prime member since the only thing that gave you was 2 day free delievery. That said, they could do a much better job of organizing their stuff. You basically have the following categories:

1. Free to stream instantly for as along as you want if you're a prime member. There's an ever changing array of movies and shows that fall under this category. Typically the catelog keeps growing, but then stuff will drop off then reappear. For example, Contact and The Fugitive (movie) were both originally on Prime. Then they disappeared, but now they are back and showing up under the "Recently added to Prime" category. You can also stream to two seperate devices under the same Prime account at the same time. Anyway, if you're not Prime then....

2. You can purchase a movie or TV show (episode or season) which allows you to stream it as often as you want, and gives you two licences to download it. But deleting that download renews the license so you can download it on another device. You can manage all that within your account on the website as well.

3. You can rent some movies or shows, but they typically have multiple renting options...both in terms of length of rental and whether or not it's HD which all obviously have different price points. I'm fairly certain the newness of the release probably drives those prices as well.

Furthermore, you may not see all these options depending on the device. For example, I can be looking at the same movie on my fire and I'll typically have less options (particularly to buy) then you'll see when viewing the exact same thing online with your PC.

They've gotten better, but they have a ways to go. And the organization of the titles is pretty bad. You can search by category and you'll see the same movie pop up in 3 different categories, or show up in one that it shouldn't. Also, they certainly dont' have the same amount of 'free' content (with membership) that Netflix has, but they do seem to be closing that gap.

For my wife and I we like the Prime Instant Video for one reason: It's all bonus material from our perspective. We were paying the $80 annually before it was even available, and the haven't changed the cost at all and added the entire video service and more recently free monthly kindle book rentals. It's all gravy for us.
 
2012-07-25 06:30:46 PM

jaylectricity: In the latest quarter, for instance, Netflix added just 420,000 Internet video and DVD-by-mail subscribers in the U.S. That compared with an increase of 1.8 million U.S. subscribers at the same time last year, a period that was completed before the company boosted its prices.

I hate this kind of thinking in business. There is a finite number of possible subscribers. To judge the health of your business by how many new subscribers you have sets you up for inevitable failure.


Thats probably some kid fresh out of business skool. Or some asshat who is going to short a particular stock in their portfolio. Would not surprise me if investment banks were in on this.
 
2012-07-25 08:34:51 PM
Good, fark those guys.
 
2012-07-26 07:19:48 AM
Better than the other streaming competition.
Better than cable.

Hard to comprehend the netflix-hate.
Boo-hoo they raised their rates?
 
2012-07-26 03:24:30 PM
I may just go back to buying DVDs. Netflix streaming is nice but you never know when they're going to yank the show due to studios pulling their licensing and I don't have to worry about bandwidth issues playing a disc.
 
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