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(Ars Technica)   Google, Apple, Microsoft, T-Mobile, AT&T, Samsung, HTC, Palm, LG, Sprint and Verizon recently joined together in a Justice League of Patent Settlement   (arstechnica.com) divider line 22
    More: Interesting, Justice League, HTC, Verizon, Ars Technica, Samsung, NTP Inc., company, biggest companies  
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2648 clicks; posted to Geek » on 24 Jul 2012 at 12:53 PM (2 years ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2012-07-24 12:33:28 PM  
Google, Apple, Microsoft, T-Mobile, AT&T, Samsung, HTC, Palm, LG, Sprint and Verizon recently joined together in a Justice League of Patent Settlement sold their souls to the devil.

fixed that for everyone
 
2012-07-24 12:57:11 PM  
Would it be strange if everyone involved with NTP in any way just started to disappear?
 
2012-07-24 12:59:35 PM  
Justice *Lords*.
 
2012-07-24 01:01:06 PM  
If there ever IS a revolution, I vote we convert all USPTO offices into open latrines for the homeless.
 
2012-07-24 01:01:23 PM  

namatad: Google, Apple, Microsoft, T-Mobile, AT&T, Samsung, HTC, Palm, LG, Sprint and Verizon recently joined together in a Justice League of Patent Settlement sold their souls to the devil.

fixed that for everyone


Actually, several members of the Justice League did that too, so it still works.

/See Underworld, Unleashed! true believers.
 
2012-07-24 01:05:34 PM  
Which one is the female wonder twin?
 
2012-07-24 01:06:25 PM  
This probably won't be all that well-received here, but I thought it was interesting.

IAmA Patent Examiner... I want to answer questions and help people understand patents/the process a bit better. (self.Android)

Not sure I agree with the guy, but it's at least cool to see someone from the USPTO answering questions.
 
2012-07-24 01:16:51 PM  

illegal.tender: This probably won't be all that well-received here, but I thought it was interesting.

IAmA Patent Examiner... I want to answer questions and help people understand patents/the process a bit better. (self.Android)

Not sure I agree with the guy, but it's at least cool to see someone from the USPTO answering questions.


There are a few patent examiners on Fark, as well as a couple of us on the other side.
 
2012-07-24 01:44:02 PM  
Still no love for Aquaman.

Good.
 
2012-07-24 01:50:35 PM  
Now that's a real patent troll.
 
2012-07-24 01:54:09 PM  
First, it sounds like another stupid patent, X, but over radio. X, but over internet. X, but on the internet.

I wonder how specific the patent is to
1) SMTP like email
2) Cell phone transmissions

In 1992 I built for MCI/Systemhouse for the LAFD an email like system in which firemen in their trucks could send email-like messages to each other or to their base (or to a mainframe to answer a query).

It was sent via a Motorola radio system based above the Hollywood sign to Motoroloa mobile terminal (precursor the PCs now in cop cars).

We were of course, not the first, in fact, our system was modeled after the cops' radio terminals (who the firemen were jealous of).

For my purposes it would be prior art in that it was intended to send email like messages back and forth, even if it wasn't an RFC-822 based system.

But it had headers, from, to, subject, and message fields.
 
2012-07-24 02:00:35 PM  
What the fark. They didn't patent wireless ethernet. And 802.11 has a history going back to the late 80s. The fact that wireless ethernet exists makes the delivery of messages over it, and thus all delivery of wireless messages, not only obvious to anyone skilled in the art, but invisible to the layman! Everyone employed by NTP should be shot in the knees, dragged into the street, doused with gasoline and the assembled mob should be provided with matches to light and throw at them.
 
2012-07-24 02:04:09 PM  

Shazam999: Which one is the female wonder twin?


Microsoft and Apple are Zan and Jayna, Apple is obviously Jayna.
 
2012-07-24 02:32:17 PM  
Someone who did the carphones in the 1960s (which were just radiophones) should go patent troll NTP. We have one in our museum where the entire front passenger seat was a ticker tape machine that pulled data over the radiophone. So someone drove you and you sat in the back seat and read the ticket tape, with a second phone so you could call in stock trade orders. So that's text data over a network.
 
2012-07-24 02:34:26 PM  

Theaetetus: illegal.tender: This probably won't be all that well-received here, but I thought it was interesting.

IAmA Patent Examiner... I want to answer questions and help people understand patents/the process a bit better. (self.Android)

Not sure I agree with the guy, but it's at least cool to see someone from the USPTO answering questions.

There are a few patent examiners on Fark, as well as a couple of us on the other side.


And then there are those of use who clean up/capitalize on your mistakes . . . the soulless, cawing vultures of the Patent world if you will . . .
 
2012-07-24 02:55:50 PM  
Kind of think they "settled" but aren't actually paying anything significant, and then this troll gets to say he won the settlement in order to scare other vendors.
 
2012-07-24 03:07:05 PM  
Google: Superman

Sprint: Flash (nyuk nyuk nyuk)

Apple: Green Lantern

AT&T: Wonder Woman

Microsoft: Martian Manhunter

Samsung: Samurai (yeah, that's more Superfriends than JLA)

Palm: Atom (too small for anyone to give a f*ck)

I have no idea who the goddamn Batman should be
 
2012-07-24 03:25:09 PM  

Parthenogenetic: I have no idea who the goddamn Batman should be


Microsoft. Wealthy as fark, willing to go outside the law, and not quite right in the head.
 
2012-07-24 03:33:25 PM  

Theaetetus: Parthenogenetic: I have no idea who the goddamn Batman should be

Microsoft. Wealthy as fark, willing to go outside the law, and not quite right in the head.



As a Microsoft employee, I enjoyed this comment greatly. I would only add, may not be the most original hero ever, but is known for kicking ass at what he's good at.

/Don't fire me, Microsoft... I didn't say I *agreed*...
//Opinions above are mine, not Microsoft's, etc., disclaimer, etc.
 
2012-07-24 03:53:10 PM  

Bloody Templar: I would only add, may not be the most original hero ever, but is known for kicking ass at what he's good at.


cache.lifehacker.com
 
2012-07-24 03:59:46 PM  

Theaetetus: Bloody Templar: I would only add, may not be the most original hero ever, but is known for kicking ass at what he's good at.

[cache.lifehacker.com image 640x360]



Touche. Stay tuned, though. I suspect it will catch on. I'm a fan of it, anyway.
 
2012-07-24 11:03:09 PM  

ha-ha-guy: Someone who did the carphones in the 1960s (which were just radiophones) should go patent troll NTP. We have one in our museum where the entire front passenger seat was a ticker tape machine that pulled data over the radiophone. So someone drove you and you sat in the back seat and read the ticket tape, with a second phone so you could call in stock trade orders. So that's text data over a network.


Hell, I'd think there'd be prior art on this (email over wireless), if from nothing else than the fact that people were known to use KA9Q's packet radio client on the HP100x and HP200x "pocket computers", much less PalmOS packet radio apps and people using the KA9Q packet radio client on laptop computers.

(Yes, amateur radio operators actually pretty much invented the entire concept of email over wireless, including Internet email over wireless. KA9Q's packet radio app ran on MS-DOS (even some fairly early versions such as MS-DOS v3.3), ran tCP/IP over amateur radio packet networks, and the TCP/IP capability was sufficiently robust to the point it was actually used by at least one Internet service provider to provide PPP and SLIP service to MS-DOS users (Demon Internet in the UK).

(And yes, email capability was specifically used--amateur radio operators were probably the first non-governmental, non-university clients allowed on the Internet and were the first to receive allocated DNS blocks for Internet-to-packet (and vice versa) gateways; 44.128.0.0/16 is still to this day reserved for AMPRnet, the amateur radio packet network (which still exists; gateways to the larger Internet at large are still being operated by a small number of enthusiasts though far fewer than in past) and typically email addresses routable by the Internet were (and are) in the general form of (user's callsign)@(callsign of station operating packet radio BBS).ampr.org.)

(At any rate, amateur radio networks (including field-day operations for a loose definition of "portable") are known to have connected to the wider Internet back in the early 80s, being quite possibly not only the first mobile "email users" but quite possibly the first non-university "civvie" users of the Internet as a whole.)

(For that matter, there's a very good argument that amateur radio operators essentially invented TCP/IP in the process of establishing early packet radio networks in the mid-70s (it actually was originally used in amateur radio packet experimentation, and was later tested by ARPAnet as a replacement for the old NCP protocol--the switchover to what we know now as IPV4 didn't occur until 1983). If memory serves me right, there's even TCP/IP-able packet radio clients that were written for CP/M and could run on the old Kaypro and Osborne "luggables" with a suitable serial-based TNC.)
 
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