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(Fox News)   Interstellar travel may be possible using lasers and antimatter. If Gene Roddenberry were still alive, he'd be screaming "I TOLD YOU SO"   (foxnews.com) divider line 91
    More: Cool, interstellar travel, Gene Roddenberry, interstellar medium, quantum systems, ground states, classical physics, energy density, antimatters  
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4628 clicks; posted to Geek » on 23 Jul 2012 at 11:57 AM (2 years ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2012-07-23 03:50:49 PM  

Vegan Meat Popsicle: Here's something I've always wondered about...

If you have something that disassembles you, zaps the information across the stars at a substantial fraction of light speed and uses it to reassemble you on the other side of the interstellar conveyer belt.... are you dead and a new person exists somewhere else who just happens to pick up your life where you left off?


A more interesting question might involve what happens when technology allows us to "image" our brains in an analogous manner to what we do with hard drives now. In that case the original 'meat popsicle' (awesome Fark handle, btw...) that is *you* is still alive and conscious, as well as the image (in a sense).

To me this looks like a real-world, persistent space-time fork, there are now two of you, or three or however many are replicated. Put another way, real life is starting to resemble art...or more specifically, The 6th Day.
 
2012-07-23 03:53:27 PM  

babtras: It is just a matter of time before we send the first robotic explorer to another star. With Kepler and other projects finding so many extrasolar planets, it is probably just a matter of a couple of years before one of the habitable candidates is shown, through one method or another, to have an atmosphere containing molecules which, as far as we know, can only be the result of biological processes. We might get there and have inconclusive results that beg further study like the countless Mars rovers that are still finding evidence with no slam-dunk proof. But it is worth our while regardless.

Those who complain about the costs don't realize that money is an invention with an arbitrary perceived value and no true tangible value. All the money in the world isn't worth the knowledge we'd gain.


It isn't money, it is physics and our short lifespans. The nearest exoplanet system is 15 lightyears away...if you get to even 25% the speed of light (167,000,000 mph) you are talking about a mission that takes 60 years...and that is giving us a fantasitcal and impossible boost in our current top speed of 40,000 mph (0.00005% of the speed of light ) It would take something like 300,000 years to get there at our current top speeds...if we double our current top speed, (wow, that is awesome, right?) we would still be in for a 150,000 year journey.

How do we manage a project that is going to take centuries? It just isn't possible given our history of upheaval and short attention spans. War, disease, natural disaster all conspire to make such an undertaking fragile to say the lease with a likely success rate approaching zero.

This is before we consider the fact that it takes 15 years to recieve or send a signal to our probe...if we get a probe out there at the speed of light within 15 years, it takes 15 years to hear back...and if the message is 'circuit burned out, malfunction' we need to send a workaround...that send/reply cycle takes 30 years...the lifespan of a typical scientist on the project. It is 7 presidential terms and countless congressional budgets (and budget cuts) to survive. It isn't practical...we should stick to our neighborhood and build better telescopes.

/i like thinking about this stuff, sorry
 
2012-07-23 03:54:18 PM  

BroVinny: StoneColdAtheist: StrangeQ: A well-researched, scientifically plausible article on FoxNews? Where am I and who stole my internets?

*We apologize for the recent programming glitch which inadvertently went out over the airwaves.*

*The perpetrator has been identified and will be terminated with extreme prejudice.*

But will those responsible for his being sacked be sacked as well?


No. A Plausible Deniability clause is written into all contracts for senior personnel. ;)
 
2012-07-23 04:01:59 PM  
A MORE SERIOUS PROPOSOSAL:

JANEWAY SHOOTS A BIG GUN AT------------DEANA TROI
(we take her coffe to anger her)..............(we make her hormones think she is nursing)

( )
!
! !>
! !
! ! =[]====== -----------------> ( 0 ) ( 0 )
! !
! !
!!
!!
!
L

MAKE SURE THE THE BOOB PROPERLANT IS TURNED AFT. It will come out a high pressure.
nothing astern will survive the backblast so watch out.
 
2012-07-23 04:07:16 PM  

Vegan Meat Popsicle: Here's something I've always wondered about...

If you have something that disassembles you, zaps the information across the stars at a substantial fraction of light speed and uses it to reassemble you on the other side of the interstellar conveyer belt.... are you dead and a new person exists somewhere else who just happens to pick up your life where you left off?


I wonder about the arguments we'll have when we find that the government has been storing the digital copy of us, interpreting the state of our brain cells in the data, and mailing us a ticket for not wearing a seatbelt or speeding when no one was looking, or sending you a tax bill for the $10 your grandma sent you on your birthday and didn't report as income.

Or perhaps industrial espionage by hacking a storage device and creating a copy of the competition's CEO to torture and interrogate when he was teleported home after work.
 
2012-07-23 04:14:08 PM  
FTA-Although exciting, the primary challenges associated with any interstellar mission relate to the distances involved. Voyager 1, launched in 1977, is the furthest manmade object from Earth, and travels at over 10 miles per second (36,000 mph). Even traveling at this incredible speed, it would take just over 70,000 years to reach the closest star to our solar system

Dang, space is a big place.
 
2012-07-23 04:21:06 PM  
I don't think we'll have to worry about what happens to the "meat copy" of you when you get teleported. That's probably never gonna actually happen.

What is a whole lot more conceivable is the "digital copy" of you that will likely be able to be made within 20 years. Maybe Kurzweil will get to upload his mind after all, the crazy bastard. You know he takes like 100+ pills and supplements a day trying to survive until he can be the singularity? Crazy guy.
 
2012-07-23 04:29:34 PM  

asmodeus224: babtras: It is just a matter of time before we send the first robotic explorer to another star. With Kepler and other projects finding so many extrasolar planets, it is probably just a matter of a couple of years before one of the habitable candidates is shown, through one method or another, to have an atmosphere containing molecules which, as far as we know, can only be the result of biological processes. We might get there and have inconclusive results that beg further study like the countless Mars rovers that are still finding evidence with no slam-dunk proof. But it is worth our while regardless.

Those who complain about the costs don't realize that money is an invention with an arbitrary perceived value and no true tangible value. All the money in the world isn't worth the knowledge we'd gain.

It isn't money, it is physics and our short lifespans. The nearest exoplanet system is 15 lightyears away...if you get to even 25% the speed of light (167,000,000 mph) you are talking about a mission that takes 60 years...and that is giving us a fantasitcal and impossible boost in our current top speed of 40,000 mph (0.00005% of the speed of light ) It would take something like 300,000 years to get there at our current top speeds...if we double our current top speed, (wow, that is awesome, right?) we would still be in for a 150,000 year journey.

How do we manage a project that is going to take centuries? It just isn't possible given our history of upheaval and short attention spans. War, disease, natural disaster all conspire to make such an undertaking fragile to say the lease with a likely success rate approaching zero.

This is before we consider the fact that it takes 15 years to recieve or send a signal to our probe...if we get a probe out there at the speed of light within 15 years, it takes 15 years to hear back...and if the message is 'circuit burned out, malfunction' we need to send a workaround...that send/reply cycle takes 30 years...the lifespan of a ty ...


I don't disagree with you, but we're talking about two different excuses for inaction.

One of the common complaints is that "we need to solve world hunger first" and "that $6 billion price tag could solve poverty". While those problems are the result of us humans not giving a rats ass about our fellow humans, and not a matter of dollars.

The issue of timelines is a big technical hurdle but not insurmountable. 35 years after Voyager 1 & 2 were launched and the science team behind it has likely moved on to other things or retired by now, but their contribution to human knowledge is still providing returns long after. If there are different scientists on the project when it arrives at it's destination than the ones that launched the machine doesn't mean that it isn't worthwhile. And even if the probe fails half way between stars, it isn't counted as a failure unless we fail to learn from it and build a better probe for the next try. I'm sure we're all tired of hearing about how Thomas Edison reacted to a reporter asking him about his numerous failures to create a practical lightbulb before he finally succeeded. "If I find 10,000 ways something won't work, I haven't failed. I am not discouraged, because every wrong attempt discarded is another step forward."
 
2012-07-23 04:33:11 PM  

babtras: when it arrives at it's destination


Oh dear. I voluntarily submit for castration. No need to point out my grammatical error.
 
2012-07-23 04:46:48 PM  

Warriors Warriors Warriors: I don't think we'll have to worry about what happens to the "meat copy" of you when you get teleported. That's probably never gonna actually happen.

What is a whole lot more conceivable is the "digital copy" of you that will likely be able to be made within 20 years. Maybe Kurzweil will get to upload his mind after all, the crazy bastard. You know he takes like 100+ pills and supplements a day trying to survive until he can be the singularity? Crazy guy.


You can't move a consciousness. Even if you could know EVERYTHING that is going on in the brain, you could only duplicate it. So if this technology existed and a 'transporter' device was ever created, all it would do is kill you, create a clone of you, and that clone would continue on with its life - probably doing all the things that the now dead you would have done. I could probably even argue that every time you fall asleep you wake up a different person because the conscious stream is interrupted. Thinking about it is all very meta. I won't even try to factor in mental illness. I'll just say that we are still just animals - social and handy animals, but just animals.
 
2012-07-23 04:55:40 PM  

Vegan Meat Popsicle: Here's something I've always wondered about...

If you have something that disassembles you, zaps the information across the stars at a substantial fraction of light speed and uses it to reassemble you on the other side of the interstellar conveyer belt.... are you dead and a new person exists somewhere else who just happens to pick up your life where you left off?


This demonstrates one of the problems with human thought. We put a lot of baggage into words like "you" and "I", including the concept of identity, be it via a "soul", "mind", or whatever. In a situation like this, words like that break down. What if you aren't zapped across, but merely assembled from other, identical matter at the destination? Does this change anything? What if you aren't disassembled, but the copy is assembled anyway? Are they both "you"? What if the copy is imperfect? After all, from a molecular standpoint, I'm not the same person I was a few microseconds ago.

Fun questions to ponder, but good luck getting anywhere in the process.
 
2012-07-23 05:02:23 PM  

Basily Gourt: FTA-Although exciting, the primary challenges associated with any interstellar mission relate to the distances involved. Voyager 1, launched in 1977, is the furthest manmade object from Earth, and travels at over 10 miles per second (36,000 mph). Even traveling at this incredible speed, it would take just over 70,000 years to reach the closest star to our solar system

Dang, space is a big place.


No kidding. I mean, I thought it was a long way down the road to the chemist's, but that's just peanuts to space.
 
2012-07-23 05:07:17 PM  

Evil Twin Skippy: Shazam999: ZPE cranks go to hell please.

THIS.

It's like reading an High School senior's paper on how his perpetual energy machine will solve world hunger. Except for the whole "violating the laws of thermodynamics thing."


Not this. This has nothing to do with ZPE*, nor does it have anything to do with violating the laws of thermodynamics. As the article states, "vast solar panels, hundreds of square miles in area would unfurl, and capture energy from the star. This sunlight would be converted into laser energy which would then be used to create antimatter from the vacuum of space via the Schwinger pair production mechanism."
Do solar panels violate thermodynamics? No? Then there's no problem here either.

*except with regards to the fact that they both discuss quantum foam and spontaneous particle-antiparticle creation-annihilation, but that's as relevant as railing against fusion cranks, since the article discusses capturing energy from a big fusion source.
 
2012-07-23 05:28:41 PM  

Basily Gourt: FTA-Although exciting, the primary challenges associated with any interstellar mission relate to the distances involved. Voyager 1, launched in 1977, is the furthest manmade object from Earth, and travels at over 10 miles per second (36,000 mph). Even traveling at this incredible speed, it would take just over 70,000 years to reach the closest star to our solar system

Dang, space is a big place.


To help keep it all in perspective, Voyager's speed is fast enough to...

1) circle the Earth one-and-a-half times every hour,

2) travel from the Earth to the Moon in less than 6 hours (it took the Apollo' 3 days!),

3) travel from the Earth to the Sun in 4 months, and

4) every year, it gets three times the distance from Earth to the Sun further away from us.

Yet, even at that stupendous speed, it is just barely out of the solar system and will need another 70,000 years to get as far away as the nearest star.
 
2012-07-23 05:29:53 PM  

blahpers: Basily Gourt: FTA-Although exciting, the primary challenges associated with any interstellar mission relate to the distances involved. Voyager 1, launched in 1977, is the furthest manmade object from Earth, and travels at over 10 miles per second (36,000 mph). Even traveling at this incredible speed, it would take just over 70,000 years to reach the closest star to our solar system

Dang, space is a big place.

No kidding. I mean, I thought it was a long way down the road to the chemist's, but that's just peanuts to space.


And there's no kind of atmosphere.
 
2012-07-23 05:35:30 PM  

jfarkinB: Vegan Meat Popsicle: Here's something I've always wondered about...

If you have something that disassembles you, zaps the information across the stars at a substantial fraction of light speed and uses it to reassemble you on the other side of the interstellar conveyer belt.... are you dead and a new person exists somewhere else who just happens to pick up your life where you left off?

Depends on how many copies you print materialize.


Quote from the inventor: "Sure, it works, but no way in hell I'm climbing into it."
 
2012-07-23 06:36:16 PM  

Theaetetus: Evil Twin Skippy: Shazam999: ZPE cranks go to hell please.

THIS.

It's like reading an High School senior's paper on how his perpetual energy machine will solve world hunger. Except for the whole "violating the laws of thermodynamics thing."

Not this. This has nothing to do with ZPE*, nor does it have anything to do with violating the laws of thermodynamics. As the article states, "vast solar panels, hundreds of square miles in area would unfurl, and capture energy from the star. This sunlight would be converted into laser energy which would then be used to create antimatter from the vacuum of space via the Schwinger pair production mechanism."
Do solar panels violate thermodynamics? No? Then there's no problem here either.

*except with regards to the fact that they both discuss quantum foam and spontaneous particle-antiparticle creation-annihilation, but that's as relevant as railing against fusion cranks, since the article discusses capturing energy from a big fusion source.


Of course it's ZPE.

It doesn't violate thermodynamics, but if you could build solar panels big enough to make lasers that are so farking strong they can make enough anti-matter to power a ship across light years, perhaps we just stick those solar panels onto the farking ship itself and skip a few steps.

And how the fark do you capture and store the anti-matter? Pair production creates both matter and anti-matter, and they annihilate pretty quickly.
 
2012-07-23 07:00:51 PM  

Shazam999: Of course it's ZPE.

It doesn't violate thermodynamics,


... if it doesn't violate thermodynamics, then it's not ZPE, bub. It's kinda the defining characteristic.

.. but if you could build solar panels big enough to make lasers that are so farking strong they can make enough anti-matter to power a ship across light years, perhaps we just stick those solar panels onto the farking ship itself and skip a few steps.

Inverse-square law much?

And how the fark do you capture and store the anti-matter? Pair production creates both matter and anti-matter, and they annihilate pretty quickly.

Magnetic fields. Electrons and positrons don't have the same charge, y'know. If you didn't know, we've been able to generate and store small amounts of anti-matter (and even anti-atoms, and anti-molecules!) for a few decades now.
 
2012-07-23 07:31:50 PM  

Theaetetus: Shazam999: Of course it's ZPE.

It doesn't violate thermodynamics,

... if it doesn't violate thermodynamics, then it's not ZPE, bub. It's kinda the defining characteristic.


ZPE doesn't vioate thermodynamics. ZPE happens all the time. Capturing that energy is another story.

.. but if you could build solar panels big enough to make lasers that are so farking strong they can make enough anti-matter to power a ship across light years, perhaps we just stick those solar panels onto the farking ship itself and skip a few steps.

Inverse-square law much?


Newton's first law much? All you need is enough momentum to get the farking thing moving really fast. And then when you're near your destination, flip the spaceship around and use the new sun's energy to slow yourself down.

And how the fark do you capture and store the anti-matter? Pair production creates both matter and anti-matter, and they annihilate pretty quickly.

Magnetic fields. Electrons and positrons don't have the same charge, y'know. If you didn't know, we've been able to generate and store small amounts of anti-matter (and even anti-atoms, and anti-molecules!) for a few decades now.


Again, you need a fark-ton of energy to make a magnetic field strong enough to store all that anti-matter. Like a lot. So if you have that much energy in the first place, why not use THAT energy to move the spaceship?
 
2012-07-23 07:33:08 PM  

blahpers: Basily Gourt: FTA-Although exciting, the primary challenges associated with any interstellar mission relate to the distances involved. Voyager 1, launched in 1977, is the furthest manmade object from Earth, and travels at over 10 miles per second (36,000 mph). Even traveling at this incredible speed, it would take just over 70,000 years to reach the closest star to our solar system

Dang, space is a big place.

No kidding. I mean, I thought it was a long way down the road to the chemist's, but that's just peanuts to space.



/Leaves thread satisfied
 
2012-07-23 07:45:36 PM  

Shazam999: Again, you need a fark-ton of energy to make a magnetic field strong enough to store all that anti-matter. Like a lot. So if you have that much energy in the first place, why not use THAT energy to move the spaceship?


Why do hikers take a bunch of canteens when they take a 3 day hike through the desert? Why don't they just drink all the water they need at the beginning of the trip?
 
2012-07-23 07:51:35 PM  

Farker Soze: Shazam999: Again, you need a fark-ton of energy to make a magnetic field strong enough to store all that anti-matter. Like a lot. So if you have that much energy in the first place, why not use THAT energy to move the spaceship?

Why do hikers take a bunch of canteens when they take a 3 day hike through the desert? Why don't they just drink all the water they need at the beginning of the trip?


Hmm, I misread that. Using the energy you use to create the anti-matter bottle? You don't need all that much energy to create one, especially compared to how much you need for interstellar travel.
 
2012-07-23 08:01:31 PM  
Oh, positrons. Well, I guess that's what the dilithium is for.
 
2012-07-23 08:24:19 PM  

Shazam999:
Again, you need a fark-ton of energy to make a magnetic field strong enough to store all that anti-matter. Like a lot. So if you have that much energy in the first place, why not use THAT energy to move the spaceship?


That is the paradox of such things, it always seems you need a stupidly large power source to jump start the stupidly large power source.
 
2012-07-23 09:04:31 PM  

Shazam999: ... if it doesn't violate thermodynamics, then it's not ZPE, bub. It's kinda the defining characteristic.

ZPE doesn't vioate thermodynamics. ZPE happens all the time. Capturing that energy is another story.


"ZPE" specifically refers to methods of capturing that energy. If you wanted to talk about quantum fluctuations or the Casimir effect, by all means... but no one uses "ZPE" except to refer to perpetual motion machines based on it.
With it in mind that you're using the wrong term, I withdraw my objection.

.. but if you could build solar panels big enough to make lasers that are so farking strong they can make enough anti-matter to power a ship across light years, perhaps we just stick those solar panels onto the farking ship itself and skip a few steps.

Inverse-square law much?

Newton's first law much? All you need is enough momentum to get the farking thing moving really fast. And then when you're near your destination, flip the spaceship around and use the new sun's energy to slow yourself down.


As much as I hate to call you out for appearing to not understand what you're talking about, after the previous ZPE discussion, momentum equals mass times velocity. Momentum doesn't get something moving fast... it is something moving fast, by definition. Maybe you meant "energy" or perhaps "force", since you cited Newton's first law?
And the point about the inverse square law was referring to the fact that you said "power a ship across light years." That's light years of 1/r^2, y'know. You aren't going to be generating much energy at said halfway point.

Again, you need a fark-ton of energy to make a magnetic field strong enough to store all that anti-matter. Like a lot. So if you have that much energy in the first place, why not use THAT energy to move the spaceship?

Because antimatter has a 100% efficiency, but your storage batteries for your electromagnets probably don't. The sum of the two systems together, by definition, will have a higher efficiency than the batteries alone.
 
2012-07-23 09:07:24 PM  

Farker Soze: Hmm, I misread that. Using the energy you use to create the anti-matter bottle? You don't need all that much energy to create one, especially compared to how much you need for interstellar travel.


Yah. As noted above, we've made them. Even transported antimatter on a plane, so you're not talking giant power cables. I'm not quite sure what he's picturing.
tickateeboo.files.wordpress.com
... Perhaps some sort of black hole-containment system?
 
2012-07-23 09:33:15 PM  
Since when did "Star Trek" ever suggest using lasers for interstellar travel?
 
2012-07-23 10:04:08 PM  
If you want to be able to travel to other star systems within a human lifespan, the obvious path of attack is to increase the human lifespan.

Near-immortality is far more physically plausible than FTL travel.
 
2012-07-23 11:12:51 PM  

Skyrmion: If you want to be able to travel to other star systems within a human lifespan, the obvious path of attack is to increase the human lifespan.

Near-immortality is far more physically plausible than FTL travel.


Maybe true, but there's plenty of physicists who have no interest in biochemistry. We have more than 7 billion people on this planet, there's no harm in taking different approaches concurrently.
 
2012-07-23 11:15:46 PM  

Farker Soze: Oh, positrons. Well, I guess that's what the dilithium is for.


Maybe I'm misinterpreting, but you seem to be implying that positrons are fictional. They are not. They are the anti-matter counterpart to electrons.
 
2012-07-23 11:21:58 PM  
I'm a bit confused. The article talks about producing antimatter as a power source, which is all fine and good. But what is the reaction mass that we will accelerate with the antimatter? Or are we talking about using the minuscule mass of the photons produced during annihilation as a reaction mass? Are we using photons in the form of lasers to create antimatter, then using the antimatter to create photons? Seems redundant.

OTOH, I suppose storing antimatter as an energy source would be much less mass than carrying a giant capacitor or batteries to power a laser.
 
2012-07-23 11:25:04 PM  

babtras: Farker Soze: Oh, positrons. Well, I guess that's what the dilithium is for.

Maybe I'm misinterpreting, but you seem to be implying that positrons are fictional. They are not. They are the anti-matter counterpart to electrons.


They're positively charged, so they repel each other. The more you're trying to store together, the more powerful magnetic field you need, so I guessed Shazam is right about needing a shiat ton of energy to hold that much.
 
2012-07-23 11:26:03 PM  

Skyrmion: If you want to be able to travel to other star systems within a human lifespan, the obvious path of attack is to increase the human lifespan.

Near-immortality is far more physically plausible than FTL travel.


Methuselah's Ark?
 
2012-07-23 11:52:32 PM  

babtras: I'm a bit confused. The article talks about producing antimatter as a power source, which is all fine and good. But what is the reaction mass that we will accelerate with the antimatter? Or are we talking about using the minuscule mass of the photons produced during annihilation as a reaction mass? Are we using photons in the form of lasers to create antimatter, then using the antimatter to create photons? Seems redundant.

OTOH, I suppose storing antimatter as an energy source would be much less mass than carrying a giant capacitor or batteries to power a laser.


You park by the sun and unfurl your solar panels, then using solar energy Imma Charging ma Laser!, and then shoop da whoop the field vacuum to create Schwinger pairs of electrons/positrons for reaction mass, all of which is purely theoretical.

Artists Impression of Process:
t3.gstatic.com

You can't really use the solar panels between stars.

Don't knock the propulsion of photons from pure annihilation, if I recall correctly it's something like 300 times more efficient than fusion using the same amount of reaction mass.
 
2012-07-24 12:35:51 AM  
Transporting will never work, here's why.
www.scifiideas.com
 
2012-07-24 02:26:12 AM  
Uh, yeah, I heard about this earlier today while watching a 30 year-old episode of Cosmos on Netflix.

Of course, Sagan promised we'd have way cooler stuff by now. Pity our space entrepreneurship died around the same time as him.
 
2012-07-24 07:33:55 AM  

Theaetetus: Farker Soze: Hmm, I misread that. Using the energy you use to create the anti-matter bottle? You don't need all that much energy to create one, especially compared to how much you need for interstellar travel.

Yah. As noted above, we've made them. Even transported antimatter on a plane, so you're not talking giant power cables. I'm not quite sure what he's picturing.
tickateeboo.files.wordpress.com
... Perhaps some sort of black hole-containment system?


"Yeah but dickless here will want to turn it off."

"is that true?"

"yes, this man has no dick."
 
2012-07-24 10:46:39 AM  

babtras: Farker Soze: Oh, positrons. Well, I guess that's what the dilithium is for.

Maybe I'm misinterpreting, but you seem to be implying that positrons are fictional. They are not. They are the anti-matter counterpart to electrons.


I think he's implying that without a fictional material (in this case Dilithium) we've bugger all chance of taking a shortcut to a M/AM reactor. Same as fusion and the need for a fuel membrane that only releases on the second neutron hit AND can survive in, what amounts to, the heart of a star.
 
2012-07-24 11:24:32 AM  
"The Star Trek wars (not to be confused with the Star Wars trek) was a period of war on Earth, wherein the fandom of Star Trek had formed a major religion, which took over the control of most of the world's countries.
As a result of the conflict, Star Trek was forever banned, and the Trekkies were executed in the manner most befitting virgins (i.e. throwing them into a volcano).
When exactly this period of conflict took place remains unknown, but it was most likely during or after the 23rd century, wherein Star Trek had already become that major religion
. "
-Futurama FACT!

----this is where it starts! Gene was right! If a bunch of idiots are gonna believe the space stories that fat loser L.Ron Hubbard invented- Then Roddenberry deserves a religion when Star trek turns out to be real- BIG TIME! Get ready world- the BEST RELIGION EVER is about to be formed- IN SPACE!!!! Wait- I have to go- my communicator is ringing
 
2012-07-24 01:45:11 PM  

Farker Soze: babtras: I'm a bit confused. The article talks about producing antimatter as a power source, which is all fine and good. But what is the reaction mass that we will accelerate with the antimatter? Or are we talking about using the minuscule mass of the photons produced during annihilation as a reaction mass?

... Don't knock the propulsion of photons from pure annihilation, if I recall correctly it's something like 300 times more efficient than fusion using the same amount of reaction mass.


.5*m*v^2. Sure, the m is minimal, but when v=c, then v^2 is realllllly huge.
 
2012-07-24 03:57:59 PM  

Vegan Meat Popsicle: Here's something I've always wondered about...

If you have something that disassembles you, zaps the information across the stars at a substantial fraction of light speed and uses it to reassemble you on the other side of the interstellar conveyer belt.... are you dead and a new person exists somewhere else who just happens to pick up your life where you left off?


"Longer than you think, Dad! Longer than you think! Held my breath when they gave me the gas! Wanted to see! I saw! I saw! Longer than you think!...I saw! I saw! Long Jaunt! Longer than you think-"

/Screaming
//Gouging eyes
///End scene
 
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