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(Fox News)   Interstellar travel may be possible using lasers and antimatter. If Gene Roddenberry were still alive, he'd be screaming "I TOLD YOU SO"   (foxnews.com) divider line 91
    More: Cool, interstellar travel, Gene Roddenberry, interstellar medium, quantum systems, ground states, classical physics, energy density, antimatters  
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4626 clicks; posted to Geek » on 23 Jul 2012 at 11:57 AM (1 year ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2012-07-23 08:59:04 AM
Unless he was suddenly honest, in which case it would be "GENE COON TOLD YOU SO"
 
2012-07-23 09:03:21 AM
FTFA: One possibility for in-situ refueling that we introduce in this proposal is a quantum effect known as Schwinger pair production.

media.comicvine.com
 
2012-07-23 09:26:52 AM
I think he'd be screaming, "LET ME OUT OF HERE! IT'S DARK AND IT'S HARD TO BREATHE!"

Actually, didn't they cremate him and shoot his ashes into space?
 
2012-07-23 10:06:36 AM

Nabb1: Actually, didn't they cremate him and shoot his ashes into space?


I think that was Scotty.
 
2012-07-23 12:06:50 PM
Since subby threadjacked us into Star Trek:

I always found it amusing that the Borg were ST:TNG's biggest villain considering that what they represented was, essentially, the Federation -- The assimilated cultures, blended them together, wiped out native culture and language, created a socialist paradigm where the group was more important than the individual, etc.
 
2012-07-23 12:15:17 PM

unlikely: Unless he was suddenly honest, in which case it would be "GENE COON TOLD YOU SO"


'zactly. Why do people believe that Roddenberry was the brains behind all this? Roddenberry was the Lucas of his time. Good with an idea and selling the hell out of it, but it was everyone else who did all the work. Roddenberry only really, really had the reins of the show during those first couple seasons of TNG when he was alive. and we saw how well that worked.
 
2012-07-23 12:17:42 PM
Is this old news? I remember reading about the Daedalus project 30 years ago when I was a kid.

/get off my lawn
//unless you intend to mow it
 
2012-07-23 12:18:08 PM

meanmutton: I always found it amusing that the Borg were ST:TNG's biggest villain considering that what they represented was, essentially, the Federation -- The assimilated cultures, blended them together, wiped out native culture and language, created a socialist paradigm where the group was more important than the individual, etc.


You sound Maquis.
 
2012-07-23 12:19:19 PM

meanmutton: Since subby threadjacked us into Star Trek:

I always found it amusing that the Borg were ST:TNG's biggest villain considering that what they represented was, essentially, the Federation -- The assimilated cultures, blended them together, wiped out native culture and language, created a socialist paradigm where the group was more important than the individual, etc.


What?

Did you even watch the shows? Did you recall Picard going back to his family's estate? Or Cisco going to New Orleans? Just because the military and administration sets that we see most of the time were dull and bland doesn't mean everything looked like that on every planet in the Federation. When you were a child did a Hippy touch you inappropriately or give you some bad acid?
 
2012-07-23 12:19:59 PM
Oh so we are gonna just skip the whole manned interplanetary missions and go straight to the interstellar stuff? Sure why not? It isn't like we can do interplanetary (manned) at this point and likely never will (in our lifetime or our children's lifetime) considering the funding and cooperation we see today.

Wake me up when we get a manned vehicle (or potentially manned experimental vehicle) up to 1% of the speed of light - which would be like, 6 million mph or so - and that would still be virtually standing still with regard to interstellar travel.
 
2012-07-23 12:21:50 PM
Sure. Of course. We'll just open the antimatter mines on Venus and start building launch lasers on Mercury. While eating McDonald's on the private space bus that commutes the workers from their condos on Mars.
 
2012-07-23 12:28:44 PM
ZPE cranks go to hell please.
 
2012-07-23 12:28:48 PM

Quantum Apostrophe: Sure. Of course. We'll just open the antimatter mines on Venus and start building launch lasers on Mercury. While eating McDonald's on the private space bus that commutes the workers from their condos on Mars.


didn't W Bush already build those colonies on the moon?

/oh man, he musta been soooooo high!
 
2012-07-23 12:46:54 PM

asmodeus224: Oh so we are gonna just skip the whole manned interplanetary missions and go straight to the interstellar stuff? Sure why not? It isn't like we can do interplanetary (manned) at this point and likely never will (in our lifetime or our children's lifetime) considering the funding and cooperation we see today.

Wake me up when we get a manned vehicle (or potentially manned experimental vehicle) up to 1% of the speed of light - which would be like, 6 million mph or so - and that would still be virtually standing still with regard to interstellar travel.


We're never going to get a 10-year mission to Alpha Centauri unless we can master a 6-month trip to Mars.

Right now, a trip to Mars would be about 12-18 months (6 going, 0-6 learning, 6 returning). We need faster propulsion systems.
 
2012-07-23 01:01:24 PM
The day I go to Arxiv for all my Snooki news, I will trust physics information from Fox News.
 
2012-07-23 01:06:09 PM

xanadian: Schwinger pair production.


Tits or gtfo?
 
2012-07-23 01:07:46 PM
No, he wouldn't.

He was an entertainment writer, not a visionary futurist.
 
2012-07-23 01:10:08 PM
A well-researched, scientifically plausible article on FoxNews? Where am I and who stole my internets?
 
2012-07-23 01:23:44 PM

StrangeQ: A well-researched, scientifically plausible article on FoxNews? Where am I and who stole my internets?


*We apologize for the recent programming glitch which inadvertently went out over the airwaves.*

*The perpetrator has been identified and will be terminated with extreme prejudice.*
 
2012-07-23 01:24:41 PM

asmodeus224: Oh so we are gonna just skip the whole manned interplanetary missions and go straight to the interstellar stuff?


Why do we have to skip manned missions to other local planets? I'd be equally (if not more) interested in interstellar probes. Imagine sending probes to our nearest neighboring systems. Probes that could reach their target and send back data within a lifetime... That would be AWESOME!
 
2012-07-23 01:24:53 PM
Can anybody provide a link from a credible news source?
 
2012-07-23 01:29:52 PM

MadUncleEoin: Is this old news? I remember reading about the Daedalus project 30 years ago when I was a kid.

/get off my lawn
//unless you intend to mow it


The Bajorans did it first.
 
2012-07-23 01:30:11 PM

asmodeus224: Oh so we are gonna just skip the whole manned interplanetary missions and go straight to the interstellar stuff? Sure why not? It isn't like we can do interplanetary (manned) at this point and likely never will (in our lifetime or our children's lifetime) considering the funding and cooperation we see today.

Wake me up when we get a manned vehicle (or potentially manned experimental vehicle) up to 1% of the speed of light - which would be like, 6 million mph or so - and that would still be virtually standing still with regard to interstellar travel.


I'M AFRAID I CAN'T DO THAT. THIS MISSION IS TOO IMPORTANT TO ALLOW YOU TO JEOPARDIZE IT.
 
2012-07-23 01:48:36 PM
I can`t forsee any problems at all with collecting large amounts of antimatter in one place and then mixing it with normal matter...
 
2012-07-23 01:51:31 PM
laserpointerforums.com
 
2012-07-23 02:04:42 PM

meanmutton: I always found it amusing that the Borg were ST:TNG's biggest villain considering that what they represented was, essentially, the Federation -- The assimilated cultures, blended them together, wiped out native culture and language, created a socialist paradigm where the group was more important than the individual, etc.


Watch out, guys. We're dealing with someone who's been assimilated over here.
 
2012-07-23 02:13:22 PM

Dr Dreidel: Right now, a trip to Mars would be about 12-18 months (6 going, 0-6 learning, 6 returning). We need faster propulsion systems.


We seemed to be able to explore the Earth at much slower speeds and without much hope of making it through the trip without dying.
It's funny the things we won't accept anymore.
 
2012-07-23 02:14:53 PM
What about the DOE's Z-machine?

Earth to Mars in three hours...
Earth to the stars in a matter of months...
(Earth to the counter at the motor vehicle department: Still years away.)
 
2012-07-23 02:19:13 PM
Here's something I've always wondered about...

If you have something that disassembles you, zaps the information across the stars at a substantial fraction of light speed and uses it to reassemble you on the other side of the interstellar conveyer belt.... are you dead and a new person exists somewhere else who just happens to pick up your life where you left off?
 
2012-07-23 02:25:26 PM

0Icky0: Dr Dreidel: Right now, a trip to Mars would be about 12-18 months (6 going, 0-6 learning, 6 returning). We need faster propulsion systems.

We seemed to be able to explore the Earth at much slower speeds and without much hope of making it through the trip without dying.
It's funny the things we won't accept anymore.


Part of it is because back then that was the only way. We didn't have unmanned schooners we could just send out to take arial reconnaissance ahead of time. Exploration was also much more personally driven. Sure, missions were often funded by the monarchies, but they were led by individuals who mostly hoped to gain financially from the endeavors. Give Virgin Galactic or the Space-X guys a few more years and we'll start to hear more rumblings about a manned mission to Mars.
 
2012-07-23 02:26:07 PM

meanmutton: Since subby threadjacked us into Star Trek:

I always found it amusing that the Borg were ST:TNG's biggest villain considering that what they represented was, essentially, the Federation -- The assimilated cultures, blended them together, wiped out native culture and language, created a socialist paradigm where the group was more important than the individual, etc.


Yeah too droll for words dearie.
 
2012-07-23 02:32:21 PM

asmodeus224: Oh so we are gonna just skip the whole manned interplanetary missions and go straight to the interstellar stuff? Sure why not? It isn't like we can do interplanetary (manned) at this point and likely never will (in our lifetime or our children's lifetime) considering the funding and cooperation we see today


The idea is to shoot an unmanned probe out to a distant star system and have it report back what it sees.

Voyager 1 is expected to "officially" be in interstellar space in the next year or two, so it's totally appropriate to start missions launching some probes to go exploring beyond our solar system.
 
2012-07-23 02:36:31 PM

Vegan Meat Popsicle: Here's something I've always wondered about...

If you have something that disassembles you, zaps the information across the stars at a substantial fraction of light speed and uses it to reassemble you on the other side of the interstellar conveyer belt.... are you dead and a new person exists somewhere else who just happens to pick up your life where you left off?


Yes...any questions? ;^)
 
2012-07-23 02:36:55 PM

Vegan Meat Popsicle: Here's something I've always wondered about...

If you have something that disassembles you, zaps the information across the stars at a substantial fraction of light speed and uses it to reassemble you on the other side of the interstellar conveyer belt.... are you dead and a new person exists somewhere else who just happens to pick up your life where you left off?


Yes, but the new you doesn't know the difference.
 
2012-07-23 02:43:28 PM

MusicMakeMyHeadPound: Voyager 1 is expected to "officially" be in interstellar space in the next year or two, so it's totally appropriate to start missions launching some doing practical research on propulsion methods for probes to go exploring beyond our solar system.


Well, on second thought, I want to amend that.

We'll have a pretty good idea in 40 - 60 years whether or not there's radio-using intelligent life in Gliese 581. That's kind of a haul at 20 ly (and change) but it would be pretty damned awesome to be able to send them a tangible message in a bottle
 
2012-07-23 02:43:30 PM

meanmutton: Since subby threadjacked us into Star Trek:

I always found it amusing that the Borg were ST:TNG's biggest villain considering that what they represented was, essentially, the Federation -- The assimilated cultures, blended them together, wiped out native culture and language, created a socialist paradigm where the group was more important than the individual, etc.


Kinda like Root Beer really isn't it?

/Has the lobes for business.
 
2012-07-23 02:49:06 PM
As long as they reverse the polarity on the coherent tachyon beam, they should be fine.
 
2012-07-23 02:56:41 PM
It is just a matter of time before we send the first robotic explorer to another star. With Kepler and other projects finding so many extrasolar planets, it is probably just a matter of a couple of years before one of the habitable candidates is shown, through one method or another, to have an atmosphere containing molecules which, as far as we know, can only be the result of biological processes. We might get there and have inconclusive results that beg further study like the countless Mars rovers that are still finding evidence with no slam-dunk proof. But it is worth our while regardless.

Those who complain about the costs don't realize that money is an invention with an arbitrary perceived value and no true tangible value. All the money in the world isn't worth the knowledge we'd gain.
 
2012-07-23 03:02:18 PM

Vegan Meat Popsicle: Here's something I've always wondered about...

If you have something that disassembles you, zaps the information across the stars at a substantial fraction of light speed and uses it to reassemble you on the other side of the interstellar conveyer belt.... are you dead and a new person exists somewhere else who just happens to pick up your life where you left off?


Your soul is cast screaming into the void as punishment for violating the laws of nature and your body is cursed to become a soulless space zombie, doomed to forever roam the void between worlds, hungering after the life force of sentient beings.
 
2012-07-23 03:05:28 PM

meanmutton: Since subby threadjacked us into Star Trek:

I always found it amusing that the Borg were ST:TNG's biggest villain considering that what they represented was, essentially, the Federation -- The assimilated cultures, blended them together, wiped out native culture and language, created a socialist paradigm where the group was more important than the individual, etc.


the individual was more important than the group in TNG. The group was more important than the individual when on away missions, which is standard military practice, and when representing the Federation to non-federated planets, which is also pretty standard for any polity ever. But at home, the individual was more important than the group. As for languages, the show was using English to abbreviate the universal translator.
 
2012-07-23 03:09:01 PM

MusicMakeMyHeadPound: MusicMakeMyHeadPound: Voyager 1 is expected to "officially" be in interstellar space in the next year or two, so it's totally appropriate to start missions launching some doing practical research on propulsion methods for probes to go exploring beyond our solar system.

Well, on second thought, I want to amend that.

We'll have a pretty good idea in 40 - 60 years whether or not there's radio-using intelligent life in Gliese 581. That's kind of a haul at 20 ly (and change) but it would be pretty damned awesome to be able to send them a tangible message in a bottle


Yes, that would be way cool. But it would cost a fraction to fire up a bevawatt* laser in slow binary first. By the time they answer we can send them emissaries in a coke can**.

* - not a real wattage
** - may be obscure, but I doubt it
 
2012-07-23 03:15:32 PM

Vegan Meat Popsicle: Here's something I've always wondered about...

If you have something that disassembles you, zaps the information across the stars at a substantial fraction of light speed and uses it to reassemble you on the other side of the interstellar conveyer belt.... are you dead and a new person exists somewhere else who just happens to pick up your life where you left off?


Depends on how many copies you print materialize.
 
2012-07-23 03:19:28 PM

Shazam999: ZPE cranks go to hell please.


Pretty sure this doesn't have much to do with the cranky aspects of ZPE. Pair production is pretty well understood, and easy* to demonstrate in the lab.

* for certain values of "easy", as defined by the standards of high-energy physics
 
2012-07-23 03:19:40 PM

jfarkinB: Vegan Meat Popsicle: Here's something I've always wondered about...

If you have something that disassembles you, zaps the information across the stars at a substantial fraction of light speed and uses it to reassemble you on the other side of the interstellar conveyer belt.... are you dead and a new person exists somewhere else who just happens to pick up your life where you left off?

Depends on how many copies you materialize.


And that depends on whether the subject is hot, and whether I'm the guy operating the equipment on the receiving end.
"Ooops! Equipment malfunction. Now we have supermodels enough for everyone!"
 
2012-07-23 03:38:49 PM
On an episode of the old CBS Radio Mystery Theater from the 1970's they had an episode where a guy meets aliens who transport themselves across the galaxy by shrinking themselves to atomic level and riding a laser beam to their destination.

Interesting that forty years later the idea is not so implausible anymore.

/ Why YES I AM old! What's it to ya?
 
2012-07-23 03:38:59 PM

Shazam999: ZPE cranks go to hell please.


THIS.

It's like reading an High School senior's paper on how his perpetual energy machine will solve world hunger. Except for the whole "violating the laws of thermodynamics thing."

E=MC^2. Even if you could produce matter directly from energy, the amount of energy to produce a unit of matter is immense. More immense than simply using that energy to power the space craft.

Ok... ok, the scheme isn't to produce antimatter on demand, but us it as a sort of energy storage mechanism.

Well storing antimatter is a bit involved. They have to be confined in a magnetic field, that requires an immense amount of energy to maintain. Fermilab made anti-protons every day. They had to use a particle accelerator to store them. Link
 
2012-07-23 03:42:03 PM

babtras: "Ooops! Equipment malfunction. Now we have supermodels enough for everyone!"


cache.gawkerassets.com
 
2012-07-23 03:42:36 PM

Delawheredad: On an episode of the old CBS Radio Mystery Theater from the 1970's they had an episode where a guy meets aliens who transport themselves across the galaxy by shrinking themselves to atomic level and riding a laser beam to their destination.

Interesting that forty years later the idea is not so implausible anymore.

/ Why YES I AM old! What's it to ya?


Um... no. That's still 100% implausible. Kevin Spacey isn't really from KPAX.
 
2012-07-23 03:46:23 PM

Vegan Meat Popsicle: Here's something I've always wondered about...

If you have something that disassembles you, zaps the information across the stars at a substantial fraction of light speed and uses it to reassemble you on the other side of the interstellar conveyer belt.... are you dead and a new person exists somewhere else who just happens to pick up your life where you left off?


The real head-scratcher is, of you disassemble and re-assemble someone, will they still be alive at all.

Life is an active process. The very movement of signals and material through our bodies IS life. The cessation of that activity IS death.

Even an animal in suspended animation still has active metabolic processes, albeit slow ones. The only organisms that can completely shut down all metabolic activity are single celled bacterium. And they actually modify their body into a spore, a sort of storage form, that has to be converted back before they will "live" again.
 
2012-07-23 03:50:00 PM

StoneColdAtheist: StrangeQ: A well-researched, scientifically plausible article on FoxNews? Where am I and who stole my internets?

*We apologize for the recent programming glitch which inadvertently went out over the airwaves.*

*The perpetrator has been identified and will be terminated with extreme prejudice.*


But will those responsible for his being sacked be sacked as well?
 
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