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(PCWorld)   Idioms lost to Tech. I didn't even know they were playing each other   (pcworld.com) divider line 106
    More: Interesting, tech, technology change, Lenovo, Kodak, instant gratification, ThinkPad, high-techs, polaroid  
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10245 clicks; posted to Geek » on 21 Jul 2012 at 11:29 AM (2 years ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2012-07-21 08:13:57 AM
2.bp.blogspot.com

Extinct, are they? Methinks the author hasn't been outside in forever.

EVERYONE KNOWS WHAT RECORDS ARE! DJs brought them back. Even little kids can tell you what one is because gasp they're still in wide circulation both in real life and media.
 
2012-07-21 08:30:12 AM

doglover: [2.bp.blogspot.com image 400x302]

Extinct, are they? Methinks the author hasn't been outside in forever.

EVERYONE KNOWS WHAT RECORDS ARE! DJs brought them back. Even little kids can tell you what one is because gasp they're still in wide circulation both in real life and media.


Also, a lot of hipster music is only released to vinyl, or as digital media. It's not dead yet.
 
2012-07-21 08:41:02 AM
This one is kind of dubious, too:

4. "On the same wavelength"

Status: At Risk

Being on the same wavelength refers to two (or more) people listening to a radio transmission on one wavelength. But tell anyone under the age of 20 that you're "on the same wavelength" and you're likely to find that you're suddenly not (on the same wavelength). The closest thing to a radio that young 'uns get to these days is their iHeartRadio App.


The author must not realize that everything transmitted over the air (TV, cell phones, satellite etc.) is a form of radio, and has a wavelength associated with it.
 
2012-07-21 09:09:19 AM
The guy who penned this article is an idiot.
 
2012-07-21 09:26:49 AM

Mike_LowELL: The guy who penned this article is an idiot.


If the article was titled "Kids say the dumbest things" it may have been more palatable.
 
2012-07-21 09:29:43 AM

St_Francis_P: Mike_LowELL: The guy who penned this article is an idiot.

If the article was titled "Kids say the dumbest things" it may have been more palatable.


Eh, I'm actually not that upset about the piece (there's far, far worse out there on the internet), I just wanted to say "guy who penned this article" to make a point.
 
2012-07-21 09:37:10 AM

Mike_LowELL: St_Francis_P: Mike_LowELL: The guy who penned this article is an idiot.

If the article was titled "Kids say the dumbest things" it may have been more palatable.

Eh, I'm actually not that upset about the piece (there's far, far worse out there on the internet), I just wanted to say "guy who penned this article" to make a point.


Touché. I'm a little disappointed because this guy is supposedly a techie.
 
2012-07-21 10:01:34 AM
How about anything involving "rewind"
 
2012-07-21 10:10:47 AM
It was a pretty lopsided game:
img843.imageshack.us
 
2012-07-21 10:19:19 AM
FTFA:
"13. "The boob tube"

Status: At Risk

When I think of hot summer days back in the 1980s, I think of lying on the couch, listening to the deafening roar of what was, at that time, a state-of-the-art air conditioning unit, and watching whatever was the best that the three TV stations were offering. Back in those days, we called the TV "the boob tube"--"boob" meant "stupid person" (because TV supposedly makes you stupid), and "tube" referred to the old vacuum tubes that TVs used to have inside them. Now that there are no more vacuum-tube TVs--and mostly just flat-screen HDTVs--I guess we'll have to come up with a new name. Idiot box it is, then."

For a guy that started at St. Mark's School in 1989, I'm calling bullshiat on the back story in this one from the three channels (MTV started in 81) to the lack of 'state-of-the-art' (snicker) central air. And the tube in question was the one you were looking at, not the little ones inside, Boob.
 
2012-07-21 10:25:46 AM
Holy crap that article sucked. It's like the author had 15 minutes to deadline and hadn't even started a column yet.

Why the hell is Fark greenlighing this dogshiat?
 
2012-07-21 10:32:25 AM

Riche: Holy crap that article sucked. It's like the author had 15 minutes to deadline and hadn't even started a column yet.

Why the hell is Fark greenlighing this dogshiat?


I got the impression this daily columnist should be contributing weekly. But I think you are right.
 
2012-07-21 10:39:37 AM
I thought "holding the line" referred to a military standing their ground instead of retreating?
 
2012-07-21 10:41:31 AM

serial_crusher: I thought "holding the line" referred to a military standing their ground instead of retreating?


If you start seriously picking at this article, there won't be much left.
 
2012-07-21 10:55:56 AM

zedster: How about anything involving "rewind"


Be kind.
 
2012-07-21 10:57:33 AM

zedster: How about anything involving "rewind"


Ironically (of course), hipsters are into cassettes, although the fad seems to be fading
 
2012-07-21 11:20:24 AM
"roll up the window"
 
2012-07-21 11:38:08 AM

St_Francis_P: zedster: How about anything involving "rewind"

Ironically (of course), hipsters are into cassettes, although the fad seems to be fading


I can understand records, being that they are analogue and full range, but unless you are going to a full size magnetic reel of the original recording there is no reason to save any other magnetic tape medium that doesn't include LTO in the name
 
2012-07-21 11:39:53 AM
t0.gstatic.com
 
2012-07-21 11:54:55 AM

sno man: I'm calling bullshiat on the back story in this one from the three channels (MTV started in 81)


Without cable you had three commercial networks and PBS. And no MTV.
 
2012-07-21 11:59:24 AM

zedster: St_Francis_P: zedster: How about anything involving "rewind"

Ironically (of course), hipsters are into cassettes, although the fad seems to be fading

I can understand records, being that they are analogue and full range, but unless you are going to a full size magnetic reel of the original recording there is no reason to save any other magnetic tape medium that doesn't include LTO in the name


www.hiwtc.com
 
2012-07-21 12:06:42 PM
I think the only one that's extinct is "Ringing off the hook". It seems the phrase "My phone is blowing up" has replaced it.
 
2012-07-21 12:23:48 PM

Mike_LowELL: St_Francis_P: Mike_LowELL: The guy who penned this article is an idiot.

If the article was titled "Kids say the dumbest things" it may have been more palatable.

Eh, I'm actually not that upset about the piece (there's far, far worse out there on the internet), I just wanted to say "guy who penned this article" to make a point.


I'm saddened that I totally missed that when I saw your post.
 
2012-07-21 12:24:08 PM

wildstarr: I think the only one that's extinct is "Ringing off the hook". It seems the phrase "My phone is blowing up" has replaced it.


I don't know, I think he was right about "Drop a Dime", when was the last time you ever heard someone say that?

/I generally don't hear many of these anymore, but that one stuck out as particularly gone.
 
2012-07-21 12:27:48 PM
I don't think they even did something as primitive as googling these idioms and counting the results to see how common they are. Those "statuses" in the article are completely pulled out of the author's ass.
 
2012-07-21 12:27:55 PM
Bullshiat article.

He's equating the pervasiveness of a technology to its use in the language as a metaphor.

One thing has zero to do with the other since once an idiom develops, it has its own meaning independent of the original source.

That's why we use the phrase "OK" or "Uncle Sam" yet we don't know for sure how they started. The accepted theories are that OK comes from "0 killed" and Uncle Sam from the "Courtesy of the U.S." from the rations boxes.

Then there's stuff even older, like the biblical classic "It's easier for a camel to go through the eye of a needle".

Still, people don't need to know the origin to actually use the phrases.
 
2012-07-21 12:33:09 PM

sno man: For a guy that started at St. Mark's School in 1989, I'm calling bullshiat on the back story in this one from the three channels (MTV started in 81) to the lack of 'state-of-the-art' (snicker) central air. And the tube in question was the one you were looking at, not the little ones inside, Boob.


Is that a college? I started college in 1994, and I remember not having cable. However, the "three channels" thing is BS, as UHF was around for all my tv-watching life. So it was more like 12 channels, before we got cable in 1984. Also, cable wasn't as pervasive in the house as it is today. I never had cable in my room. I had a tiny black and white TV with said 12 OTA channels as late as 1990-ish.

You're right about the tube part. Until flat screens, TVs (and monitors) used cathode ray tubes. That's where the "tube" part comes from.
 
2012-07-21 12:33:32 PM

rocky_howard: Bullshiat article.

He's equating the pervasiveness of a technology to its use in the language as a metaphor.

One thing has zero to do with the other since once an idiom develops, it has its own meaning independent of the original source.

That's why we use the phrase "OK" or "Uncle Sam" yet we don't know for sure how they started. The accepted theories are that OK comes from "0 killed" and Uncle Sam from the "Courtesy of the U.S." from the rations boxes.

Then there's stuff even older, like the biblical classic "It's easier for a camel to go through the eye of a needle".

Still, people don't need to know the origin to actually use the phrases.




DING DING DING!

Nailed it, you have. You win (1) ARPANETs.
 
2012-07-21 12:38:38 PM
Ones I'd like to see go extinct:

Cyber-anything
Cloud-anything
"More after the jump"
 
2012-07-21 12:40:23 PM
Oh right and "Continued on Page 2"...you're using a farking medium that doesn't need multiple instances to display information and we know that you're not doing it for 'style'.
 
2012-07-21 12:42:05 PM
I must have old friends, because they seem to use most of these....

Have a Belgian friend who couldn't seem to master American idioms. Several of my favorites:

"They were selling like pancakes."

"I was so concerned, I was next to myself"

"You bet my boots"

And my most favoritest "You can say that twice."

...what a Walloon....
 
2012-07-21 12:45:25 PM
2.bp.blogspot.com

No, it's not right for my idiom.
 
2012-07-21 12:46:27 PM
"Let's see how this develops" was definitely not from Polaroid.
 
2012-07-21 12:48:02 PM

BumpInTheNight: Oh right and "Continued on Page 2"...you're using a farking medium that doesn't need multiple instances to

(more)
 
2012-07-21 12:48:43 PM
7. "Got our wires crossed"

Status: At Risk

So, way back in the day we had something called wires.


Yeah, nothing uses wires anymore.
 
2012-07-21 12:50:13 PM

downstairs: sno man: For a guy that started at St. Mark's School in 1989, I'm calling bullshiat on the back story in this one from the three channels (MTV started in 81) to the lack of 'state-of-the-art' (snicker) central air. And the tube in question was the one you were looking at, not the little ones inside, Boob.

Is that a college? I started college in 1994, and I remember not having cable. However, the "three channels" thing is BS, as UHF was around for all my tv-watching life. So it was more like 12 channels, before we got cable in 1984. Also, cable wasn't as pervasive in the house as it is today. I never had cable in my room. I had a tiny black and white TV with said 12 OTA channels as late as 1990-ish.

You're right about the tube part. Until flat screens, TVs (and monitors) used cathode ray tubes. That's where the "tube" part comes from.


Where I grew up, so far out in the sticks that there STILL isn't cable service....I had an ABC channel, a CBS, occasionally an NBC (depending on the weather), and that was it. No PBS, no UHF, nada else.
 
2012-07-21 12:50:21 PM
Dial the phone
 
2012-07-21 12:54:22 PM
"I'll page him"

"Send me a fax" (still exists in the corporate world)
 
2012-07-21 01:04:05 PM

BumpInTheNight: "More after the jump"


I actually don't even understand what that means. Perhaps due to its misuse? It seems like some internet articles have that in them, and its just like, there....like scroll past it and keep reading...others seem to use it in reference to a link.

diannaeanderson.net
 
2012-07-21 01:04:09 PM

jaytkay: cable


At my old job I was the only person under 30 and one guy I worked with would go into rants on a near-weekly basis about "you don't know how is was back in the day" mostly directed at me. One day he went on the rant about having no cable and only 3 channels, and I just about fell out of my seat laughing when I told him that didn't have cable at home as he was telling me this story.

Other great topics: Having no idea about records (sorry I actually own a ton of LPs), having to listen to baseball on the radio (the Orioles didn't have a great TV deal in the late 80s when I started watching, so yeah, I spent quite a few nights listening to them on the radio), not having call waiting (yeah I remember that too)
 
2012-07-21 01:04:49 PM
What about "Loose gun"? Cannons on todays ships are not secured with ropes.
 
2012-07-21 01:15:17 PM

machodonkeywrestler: "Let's see how this develops" was definitely not from Polaroid.


This was the most stupid of the lot. "develops" is still a meaningful, somewhat generic term. It doesn't have its roots in photography at all.

We're trying to secure a contract with a company to develop a mobile app for them. My business partner developed the relationship, and I'm waiting to see how the sales process develops... so hopefully we can develop a new revenue stream.

"develop" is not an idiom, its a.... word.
 
2012-07-21 01:18:10 PM

23FPB23: BumpInTheNight: "More after the jump"

I actually don't even understand what that means. Perhaps due to its misuse? It seems like some internet articles have that in them, and its just like, there....like scroll past it and keep reading...others seem to use it in reference to a link.

[diannaeanderson.net image 330x282]


Without adblock installed it'd make much more sense to you. ;)
 
2012-07-21 01:20:15 PM
Dialing a phone number, blah blah blah.

images.wikia.com
 
2012-07-21 01:20:34 PM
I suspected that might be it. Thank you.
 
2012-07-21 01:28:12 PM

balki1867: having to listen to baseball on the radio (the Orioles didn't have a great TV deal in the late 80s when I started watching, so yeah, I spent quite a few nights listening to them on the radio)


With the right announcers, baseball on radio is far superior to baseball on television.
 
2012-07-21 01:30:15 PM

ApeShaft: What about "Loose gun"? Cannons on todays ships are not secured with ropes.


I thought that was loose canon.
 
2012-07-21 01:43:16 PM
"in the groove" and "groovy" come from records.

The last thing motivating "don't touch that dial" was before it was default for a TV to come with a remote. Before that car radios mostly had preset buttons, though cheap home radios today still use a dial for tuning.
 
2012-07-21 02:01:23 PM

St_Francis_P: This one is kind of dubious, too:

4. "On the same wavelength"

Status: At Risk

Being on the same wavelength refers to two (or more) people listening to a radio transmission on one wavelength. But tell anyone under the age of 20 that you're "on the same wavelength" and you're likely to find that you're suddenly not (on the same wavelength). The closest thing to a radio that young 'uns get to these days is their iHeartRadio App.

The author must not realize that everything transmitted over the air (TV, cell phones, satellite etc.) is a form of radio, and has a wavelength associated with it.


Yeah. I suspect this one is going to go thru a pole reversal rather than extinction. It's going to mean the opposite of what it means now. These days, being on the same wavelength sounds like neighbors who have their wireless routers on the same channel, reducing performance for both.
 
2012-07-21 02:21:04 PM

jaytkay: sno man: I'm calling bullshiat on the back story in this one from the three channels (MTV started in 81)
Without cable you had three commercial networks and PBS. And no MTV.


downstairs: sno man: For a guy that started at St. Mark's School in 1989, I'm calling bullshiat on the back story in this one from the three channels (MTV started in 81) to the lack of 'state-of-the-art' (snicker) central air. And the tube in question was the one you were looking at, not the little ones inside, Boob.

Is that a college? I started college in 1994, and I remember not having cable. However, the "three channels" thing is BS, as UHF was around for all my tv-watching life. So it was more like 12 channels, before we got cable in 1984. Also, cable wasn't as pervasive in the house as it is today. I never had cable in my room. I had a tiny black and white TV with said 12 OTA channels as late as 1990-ish.

You're right about the tube part. Until flat screens, TVs (and monitors) used cathode ray tubes. That's where the "tube" part comes from.



If his parents could afford his high school, they had cable and central air.
 
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