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(CNN)   CNN asks the tough question no other site would dare to cover: Is knowing how to drive stick in America still essential?   (cnn.com) divider line 392
    More: Stupid, CNN, manual transmissions, impromptu  
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5337 clicks; posted to Main » on 20 Jul 2012 at 4:31 AM (2 years ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2012-07-20 01:12:49 PM  

Pitabred: The problem with using the parking brake is you can't ease off of it. It's basically on or off. And there are lots of cars with them down on the floor and not a handbrake. Easier to just use the regular brake you just used to stop anyway, just keep your foot half on it, half on the gas, and slide it all the way to the gas once you get the clutch engaging ;)


That doesn't seem easier to me!
Not talking about the floor type EB. That's just silly!!
I have to disagree with the on/off aspect. Mine eases quite nicely. I could use it for normal braking if I wanted.
Six of one/half dozen of another, I suppose!
:)
 
2012-07-20 01:14:00 PM  
Got 11 years and 108 thousand miles on the original clutch of my 01 prizm, but in all honesty, it's probably the last manual I'll buy.

Automatics have just gotten too good these days. MPG is pretty much equal, arguably better with the auto unless you drive the manual perfectly.

Durability too, you will burn out a clutch, eventually, no matter how well you drive it. A new, well-built automatic, maintained with modern synthetic ATF will last indefinitely.

Autos are even getting into the trucking industry
 
2012-07-20 01:14:55 PM  

kiwimoogle84: Do you believe everyone should know how to change a tire?

You may never need to use the skill, but if you find yourself in a pickle, it's good to know how.

That's all most of us are really saying. It's not a hobby, it's a life skill, like knowing how to use a washing machine or changing a tire


Just to add fun fuel to the fire... I don't have a spare tire in my car... it has run flat tires and also comes with an air compressor that also has a second hose for tire chemical fill.

But, I DO know how to drive stick and I DO know how to change a tired.. neither of which I need in my new car. ;)
 
2012-07-20 01:16:54 PM  

kiwimoogle84: Do you believe everyone should know how to change a tire?

You may never need to use the skill, but if you find yourself in a pickle, it's good to know how.

That's all most of us are really saying. It's not a hobby, it's a life skill, like knowing how to use a washing machine or changing a tire.


No, I don't. We live in a world with cell phones and tow trucks. For the majority of the US population, there is no need to learn how to change a tire; you just pull out you cell phone, call AAA, and wait a few minutes. People who live or drive in rural areas and other places without reliable cell phone coverage or tow truck service are the exception, not the rule. Times have changed, and the list of necessary/useful skills has changed.
 
2012-07-20 01:18:17 PM  
If you're not using one of these, you're not really doing calculations:
www.aerojockey.com

If you're not using one of these, you're not really writing:
www.aerojockey.com

If you're not using one of these, you're not really listening to music:
www.aerojockey.com
 
2012-07-20 01:20:44 PM  

literaldeluxe: D-Liver: If you are a self respecting man, you should know how to drive stick.

You don't want to be the guy who says "oh, is it stick? Because I can't drive that".

Why? I've never understood that argument. What exactly am I supposed to be afraid of? Is it presumed that my friends are uneducated and intolerant, and that I'm insecure enough that I need them to tell me I'm a man? How exactly does my preference in automobile transmissions impact my ability to live my life? Is there a list of all the features I should and should not have in my car? Am I free to get a car with a sunroof, or only cars with a roof rack? Why aren't women also expected to be able to drive a manual transmission? Do you believe that they're not smart enough to do so? What are the rules for gay men? Are males with disabilities not "real" men if it impacts their ability to drive a manual transmission?

You don't want to be the guy who says "oh, is it automatic? Because I won't drive that".

/I'm not trolling, but perhaps you are.


Holy shiat did you put a lot of words into my mouth. Women? Gay men? What the fark are you talking about?

It's not a matter of 'Oh, this is what I only drive, neh neh neh". It's a matter of being able to operate any car if you're in a situation where it needs to be done. Going fishing and need to back the truck up to hitch the boat? Can't do that. Girlfriend' father asks you to move his car for him? Can't do that. Driver has a heart attack and you need to get to the hospital? Can't do that.

My last girlfriend was a master on the manual, and I have 2 close gay friends who are as well.

It's not bravado, it's about having a skill that may need to be called upon. Jackass.
 
2012-07-20 01:29:44 PM  
My second car was a stick with no power steering. My arms got pretty strong after a while. I loved feeling so in-tune with my car. Driving a stick is pure enjoyment.

However, now that I'm in San Francisco living on one of the steepest hills in the city, I'm happy with an automatic.

As for learning how, the way I was taught was very effective: My brother parked me on a small hill, put me in the driver's seat, then told me to get us home. In the years that followed, I probably only stalled out once or twice. It really did "click" as others above have said.
 
2012-07-20 01:46:39 PM  

literaldeluxe: kiwimoogle84: Do you believe everyone should know how to change a tire?

You may never need to use the skill, but if you find yourself in a pickle, it's good to know how.

That's all most of us are really saying. It's not a hobby, it's a life skill, like knowing how to use a washing machine or changing a tire.

No, I don't. We live in a world with cell phones and tow trucks. For the majority of the US population, there is no need to learn how to change a tire; you just pull out you cell phone, call AAA, and wait a few minutes. People who live or drive in rural areas and other places without reliable cell phone coverage or tow truck service are the exception, not the rule. Times have changed, and the list of necessary/useful skills has changed.


...wooooowwww.

Do you have any idea how ignorant and selfish you sound? I remember my sister calling me two years ago because our stepdad was out of state and she had a flat tire and my mom didn't know how to change a tire and neither did she. She had a cell phone but not full coverage insurance, and no spare cash for a towtruck. Her car had a FULL size spare (as does my own). I drove an hour to go save her. Right then and there, I taught her how to use a jack, take out the bolts, put the new ones on, tighten in a star pattern, and be on her way.

Last month she had another flat, and fixed it herself. She called me later and thanked me for saving her thirty bucks and not making her late to work.

EVERYONE should know how to change a tire, because someday you might see a tiny old lady with a flat on the side of the road and you might be able to help her out, but no, I guess it just won't be your problem. And that's what 's wrong with this world. No personal responsibility.
 
2012-07-20 01:48:53 PM  

literaldeluxe: kiwimoogle84: Do you believe everyone should know how to change a tire?

You may never need to use the skill, but if you find yourself in a pickle, it's good to know how.

That's all most of us are really saying. It's not a hobby, it's a life skill, like knowing how to use a washing machine or changing a tire.

No, I don't. We live in a world with cell phones and tow trucks. For the majority of the US population, there is no need to learn how to change a tire; you just pull out you cell phone, call AAA, and wait a few minutes. People who live or drive in rural areas and other places without reliable cell phone coverage or tow truck service are the exception, not the rule. Times have changed, and the list of necessary/useful skills has changed.


OK, so what happens when you've blown a tire and you're in an area that has no cell phone coverage and it's 10 miles to the nearest pay phone?
 
2012-07-20 01:50:41 PM  

D-Liver: literaldeluxe: D-Liver: If you are a self respecting man, you should know how to drive stick.

You don't want to be the guy who says "oh, is it stick? Because I can't drive that".

Why? I've never understood that argument. What exactly am I supposed to be afraid of? Is it presumed that my friends are uneducated and intolerant, and that I'm insecure enough that I need them to tell me I'm a man? How exactly does my preference in automobile transmissions impact my ability to live my life? Is there a list of all the features I should and should not have in my car? Am I free to get a car with a sunroof, or only cars with a roof rack? Why aren't women also expected to be able to drive a manual transmission? Do you believe that they're not smart enough to do so? What are the rules for gay men? Are males with disabilities not "real" men if it impacts their ability to drive a manual transmission?

You don't want to be the guy who says "oh, is it automatic? Because I won't drive that".

/I'm not trolling, but perhaps you are.

Holy shiat did you put a lot of words into my mouth. Women? Gay men? What the fark are you talking about?

It's not a matter of 'Oh, this is what I only drive, neh neh neh". It's a matter of being able to operate any car if you're in a situation where it needs to be done. Going fishing and need to back the truck up to hitch the boat? Can't do that. Girlfriend' father asks you to move his car for him? Can't do that. Driver has a heart attack and you need to get to the hospital? Can't do that.

My last girlfriend was a master on the manual, and I have 2 close gay friends who are as well.

It's not bravado, it's about having a skill that may need to be called upon. Jackass.


Your original comment was: "If you are a self respecting man, you should know how to drive stick." The phrase "self respecting man" is used almost exclusively to contrast "manly men" with women and "girlie men." Using it will almost always get you labeled as a misogynist.
 
2012-07-20 01:55:09 PM  
Learning stick makes you a better driver. It means you have to pay attention to what you are doing. Automatic allows you to put on cruise control, park in the left lane and do a sudoku puzzle while your brats watch sponge bob in the back. Everyone I know who knows stick is a WAAY better driver than those who don't.

The first car I bought was a stick, and I didn't know how to drive it. My husband (boyfriend at the time) had to drive it home for me. But it took me about 2 days to learn.
 
2012-07-20 01:59:52 PM  

kiwimoogle84: literaldeluxe: kiwimoogle84: Do you believe everyone should know how to change a tire?

You may never need to use the skill, but if you find yourself in a pickle, it's good to know how.

That's all most of us are really saying. It's not a hobby, it's a life skill, like knowing how to use a washing machine or changing a tire.

No, I don't. We live in a world with cell phones and tow trucks. For the majority of the US population, there is no need to learn how to change a tire; you just pull out you cell phone, call AAA, and wait a few minutes. People who live or drive in rural areas and other places without reliable cell phone coverage or tow truck service are the exception, not the rule. Times have changed, and the list of necessary/useful skills has changed.

...wooooowwww.

Do you have any idea how ignorant and selfish you sound? I remember my sister calling me two years ago because our stepdad was out of state and she had a flat tire and my mom didn't know how to change a tire and neither did she. She had a cell phone but not full coverage insurance, and no spare cash for a towtruck. Her car had a FULL size spare (as does my own). I drove an hour to go save her. Right then and there, I taught her how to use a jack, take out the bolts, put the new ones on, tighten in a star pattern, and be on her way.

Last month she had another flat, and fixed it herself. She called me later and thanked me for saving her thirty bucks and not making her late to work.

EVERYONE should know how to change a tire, because someday you might see a tiny old lady with a flat on the side of the road and you might be able to help her out, but no, I guess it just won't be your problem. And that's what 's wrong with this world. No personal responsibility.


No, it wouldn't be my problem, but if I made it mine, I would call and pay for a tow truck (who can change the tire for her). I'm absolutely fortunate in that I can afford to do that, but you have no right to claim that my assistance is less valid or selfless than yours. At the very least, you're making the assumption that I am physically capable of rendering such aid to her.
 
2012-07-20 02:00:43 PM  

purple kool-aid and a jigger of formaldehyde: Tentacle: fluffy2097:
As a manual driver, I love to coast to a complete stop at a light using only engine braking, the roll about a foot back towards the tailgating asshole behind me before ever touching the brake pedal. Stops them from tailgating right quick. So does using engine braking. If they cant tell when you're decelerating because you don't use the brakes, they get very uncomfortable tailgating.


Not to mention that brake pads last longer

When I took my drivers test the evaluator dinged me for coasting in neutral and not staying in a gear the whole time. Even at a light you are apparently supposed to sit there in gear with the clutch in.
I said "You know brakes are a lot cheaper than a clutch right? Is it going to keep me from getting my license? She said no, so... hell no I'm not going sit at the light with my clutch in the whole time.


You sound like an hypermiler
 
2012-07-20 02:02:37 PM  

literaldeluxe: kiwimoogle84: literaldeluxe: kiwimoogle84: Do you believe everyone should know how to change a tire?

You may never need to use the skill, but if you find yourself in a pickle, it's good to know how.

That's all most of us are really saying. It's not a hobby, it's a life skill, like knowing how to use a washing machine or changing a tire.

No, I don't. We live in a world with cell phones and tow trucks. For the majority of the US population, there is no need to learn how to change a tire; you just pull out you cell phone, call AAA, and wait a few minutes. People who live or drive in rural areas and other places without reliable cell phone coverage or tow truck service are the exception, not the rule. Times have changed, and the list of necessary/useful skills has changed.

...wooooowwww.

Do you have any idea how ignorant and selfish you sound? I remember my sister calling me two years ago because our stepdad was out of state and she had a flat tire and my mom didn't know how to change a tire and neither did she. She had a cell phone but not full coverage insurance, and no spare cash for a towtruck. Her car had a FULL size spare (as does my own). I drove an hour to go save her. Right then and there, I taught her how to use a jack, take out the bolts, put the new ones on, tighten in a star pattern, and be on her way.

Last month she had another flat, and fixed it herself. She called me later and thanked me for saving her thirty bucks and not making her late to work.

EVERYONE should know how to change a tire, because someday you might see a tiny old lady with a flat on the side of the road and you might be able to help her out, but no, I guess it just won't be your problem. And that's what 's wrong with this world. No personal responsibility.

No, it wouldn't be my problem, but if I made it mine, I would call and pay for a tow truck (who can change the tire for her). I'm absolutely fortunate in that I can afford to do that, but you have no right to claim that my assi ...


you sound useless in practical matters
 
2012-07-20 02:04:15 PM  

Trance750: OK, so what happens when you've blown a tire and you're in an area that has no cell phone coverage and it's 10 miles to the nearest pay phone?


Flag down another car, read the car's manual and figure out how to do it, or start walking. Pretty much the same things I'd have to do with most other car problems in that situation.
 
2012-07-20 02:12:43 PM  

Tentacle: You sound like an hypermiler


18 MPG baby.
 
2012-07-20 02:13:09 PM  

392Zaphod: One argument that I will say for the Automatic OVER the Manual? I can play with my wife while she is in the passenger seat if I have an Automatic! :P


www.don.smith.net
 
2012-07-20 02:13:18 PM  

Girion47: you sound useless in practical matters


By your definition, yes, I am, and I'm comfortable with that. I'm sure that you're equally useless in most of the situations that I encounter daily, but I don't hold that against you. People have different strengths and weaknesses, and it's far better to live in a world where our abilities are complementary to the people around us, and not redundant.

Also note that some people have physical disabilities, so your expectations may not be relevant.
 
2012-07-20 02:18:04 PM  

Inflatable Rhetoric: fluffy2097: Zizzowop: Downshifting can really prolong your brakes.

Brakes are cheaper then a clutch.

That said, I've got 60k miles on my brakes and clutch and neither are due for a change yet.

If you do it right, there's zero clutch wear.


Hills!
 
2012-07-20 02:28:17 PM  

StoPPeRmobile: 392Zaphod: One argument that I will say for the Automatic OVER the Manual? I can play with my wife while she is in the passenger seat if I have an Automatic! :P

[www.don.smith.net image 500x410]


Awesome! And that front seat has PLENTY of room! ;)
 
2012-07-20 02:32:14 PM  
Ah yes, this is the thread where people come out of the woodwork who attempt to justify laziness and ignorance as a virtue. Got it.
 
2012-07-20 02:44:07 PM  

literaldeluxe: kiwimoogle84: literaldeluxe: kiwimoogle84: Do you believe everyone should know how to change a tire?

You may never need to use the skill, but if you find yourself in a pickle, it's good to know how.

That's all most of us are really saying. It's not a hobby, it's a life skill, like knowing how to use a washing machine or changing a tire.

No, I don't. We live in a world with cell phones and tow trucks. For the majority of the US population, there is no need to learn how to change a tire; you just pull out you cell phone, call AAA, and wait a few minutes. People who live or drive in rural areas and other places without reliable cell phone coverage or tow truck service are the exception, not the rule. Times have changed, and the list of necessary/useful skills has changed.

...wooooowwww.

Do you have any idea how ignorant and selfish you sound? I remember my sister calling me two years ago because our stepdad was out of state and she had a flat tire and my mom didn't know how to change a tire and neither did she. She had a cell phone but not full coverage insurance, and no spare cash for a towtruck. Her car had a FULL size spare (as does my own). I drove an hour to go save her. Right then and there, I taught her how to use a jack, take out the bolts, put the new ones on, tighten in a star pattern, and be on her way.

Last month she had another flat, and fixed it herself. She called me later and thanked me for saving her thirty bucks and not making her late to work.

EVERYONE should know how to change a tire, because someday you might see a tiny old lady with a flat on the side of the road and you might be able to help her out, but no, I guess it just won't be your problem. And that's what 's wrong with this world. No personal responsibility.

No, it wouldn't be my problem, but if I made it mine, I would call and pay for a tow truck (who can change the tire for her). I'm absolutely fortunate in that I can afford to do that, but you have no right to claim that my assi ...


I will always assume a person is physically capable until told otherwise- so my apologies on that front. However, I still think anyone who is driving a car should be prepared for basic circumstances that may arise- including having jumper cables and spare water/oil in the trunk.
 
2012-07-20 02:51:05 PM  

kiwimoogle84: EVERYONE should know how to change a tire, because someday you might see a tiny old lady smoking hot college girl with a flat on the side of the road and you might be able to help her out


Fixed this for me.
 
2012-07-20 02:54:40 PM  

neilbradley: Ah yes, this is the thread where people come out of the woodwork who attempt to justify laziness and ignorance as a virtue. Got it.


Yup and actively seeking to expand your abilities makes you a Luddite.
 
2012-07-20 03:04:03 PM  
As a cyclist who has to dodge asshole motorists daily, I can say from experience very few people know how to drive a manual or an automatic, yet they do it anyway.
 
2012-07-20 03:06:35 PM  

kiwimoogle84: However, I still think anyone who is driving a car should be prepared for basic circumstances that may arise- including having jumper cables and spare water/oil in the trunk.


I would argue that subscribing to a service like AAA can be seen as making appropriate preparations to deal with such circumstances, depending on where you live, where you tend to drive, and what kind of car you drive (some cars are more problem-prone than others, and some are more easily fixed).

/I have jumper cables in my car, but I still call AAA when I need a jump; that's what I pay them for.
 
2012-07-20 03:08:41 PM  

The First Four Black Sabbath Albums: As a cyclist who has to dodge asshole motorists daily, I can say from experience very few people know how to drive a manual or an automatic, yet they do it anyway.


Quit cycling on the sidewalks and won't have a problem!
 
2012-07-20 03:10:09 PM  

fluffy2097: neilbradley: Ah yes, this is the thread where people come out of the woodwork who attempt to justify laziness and ignorance as a virtue. Got it.

Yup and actively seeking to expand your abilities makes you a Luddite.


People don't like feeling dumb. If you can do something that they can't they see it as you calling them dumb and as a challenge to their sense of worth. So they attack those who are more able than themselves.

See - The South. "We need to stand up to these... experts!"

/It is hard to free fools from the chains they revere. - Voltaire
 
2012-07-20 03:24:27 PM  
Semi relevant story.

I inherited this car (well one exactly like the picture) from my dad when he passed away last year. Guy spent 50 years on the line at Chrysler and bought it as a gift to himself, sadly didn't get to use it much.

images.forbes.com

Anywho, I took it out a weekend or so back and went to valet it - the valet said "Is that a stick?" (Really?) and then when I said yes, he said "I can't drive a stick - you're going to have to park it".

I don't know if most folks should know how to drive a stick, but if your job involves parking cars, I'm gonna say you might want to pick up the skill.
 
2012-07-20 03:32:46 PM  
I went out of my way to get a stick shift when I bought my current car. Took some getting used to since I hadn't driven stick in nearly a decade, but re teaching myself was easy enough.
It may not be a relevant skill anymore, but it should be a required one nonetheless.

/female
//I think the salesman was a bit shocked when I requested a manual.
 
2012-07-20 03:33:14 PM  

KrispyKritter: violentsalvation: I learned on a '71 Jeepster Commando. I also learned how to use the other PITA stick, and lock and unlock the hubs with a rock. I still have the Jeep.

i had a 68 Commando, short metal top, w/ Buick V6. what a monster that was. custom headers into glass packs. it sounded like a 1/2 doz. Harleys starting at one time.



Mine is the same but quieter exhaust.
 
2012-07-20 03:37:02 PM  

URAPNIS: The First Four Black Sabbath Albums: As a cyclist who has to dodge asshole motorists daily, I can say from experience very few people know how to drive a manual or an automatic, yet they do it anyway.

Quit cycling on the sidewalks and won't have a problem!


Good one, Bro! I NEVER ride on the sidewalk. SideWALKS are for WALKING.
 
2012-07-20 03:37:27 PM  

popfreak: Semi relevant story.

I inherited this car (well one exactly like the picture) from my dad when he passed away last year. Guy spent 50 years on the line at Chrysler and bought it as a gift to himself, sadly didn't get to use it much.

[images.forbes.com image 420x257]

Anywho, I took it out a weekend or so back and went to valet it - the valet said "Is that a stick?" (Really?) and then when I said yes, he said "I can't drive a stick - you're going to have to park it".

I don't know if most folks should know how to drive a stick, but if your job involves parking cars, I'm gonna say you might want to pick up the skill.


"Why don't you get your manager out here to park it then?"
 
2012-07-20 03:37:44 PM  

popfreak: Semi relevant story.

I inherited this car (well one exactly like the picture) from my dad when he passed away last year. Guy spent 50 years on the line at Chrysler and bought it as a gift to himself, sadly didn't get to use it much.

[images.forbes.com image 420x257]

Anywho, I took it out a weekend or so back and went to valet it - the valet said "Is that a stick?" (Really?) and then when I said yes, he said "I can't drive a stick - you're going to have to park it".

I don't know if most folks should know how to drive a stick, but if your job involves parking cars, I'm gonna say you might want to pick up the skill.


THIS.

And, uh, can I borrow it?

/please?
//I has a cute, if that helps.
 
2012-07-20 03:44:54 PM  

The First Four Black Sabbath Albums: As a cyclist who has to dodge asshole motorists daily, I can say from experience very few people know how to drive a manual or an automatic, yet they do it anyway.


I bet you're one of those old people that uses a bike with gears, why don't you join the modern era and get a fixie you luddite?
 
2012-07-20 04:08:09 PM  

Chimpasaurus: Learning stick makes you a better driver. It means you have to pay attention to what you are doing. Automatic allows you to put on cruise control, park in the left lane and do a sudoku puzzle while your brats watch sponge bob in the back. Everyone I know who knows stick is a WAAY better driver than those who don't.

The first car I bought was a stick, and I didn't know how to drive it. My husband (boyfriend at the time) had to drive it home for me. But it took me about 2 days to learn.


That's nice, but that's not the question.
 
2012-07-20 04:09:32 PM  
I consider my manual transmission to be an augmentation of my car's security system.

I've seen quite a few of those "Carjacker/thief fail because they didn't know how to drive a stick" headlines on Fark.
 
2012-07-20 04:15:53 PM  
I owned a manual car for about a month before I gave my brother exclusive use of it. It's not difficult, it's just such a hassle in the traffic I normally drive in. Also, I have short, squat legs, so it's annoying to have my leg up in position for the clutch pedal all the time.
 
2012-07-20 05:11:00 PM  

popfreak: Semi relevant story.

I inherited this car (well one exactly like the picture) from my dad when he passed away last year. Guy spent 50 years on the line at Chrysler and bought it as a gift to himself, sadly didn't get to use it much.

[images.forbes.com image 420x257]

Anywho, I took it out a weekend or so back and went to valet it - the valet said "Is that a stick?" (Really?) and then when I said yes, he said "I can't drive a stick - you're going to have to park it".



I don't know if most folks should know how to drive a stick, but if your job involves parking cars, I'm gonna say you might want to pick up the skill.


Dang, but that's pretty.

Sorry about your dad, but he might have smacked you for letting a valet within 50 feet of that car!
 
2012-07-20 05:47:06 PM  

neilbradley: Ah yes, this is the thread where people come out of the woodwork who attempt to justify laziness and ignorance as a virtue. Got it.


This is just a warm up for the thread we'll have 20 years from now when "self driving" cars are all the rage. "Why should I learn to operate a vehicle when the computer does it all for me?"
 
2012-07-20 06:19:17 PM  
All of our cars are stick. Daughter freaked out the DMV tester by driving a stick.

Yes, I can change a tire. Had a 67 Spitfire and worked on that all the time. Did not like having guys trying to make out like I was ignorant, and then have them looking for lugs on knock-off wire wheels, or trying to put the scissors jack under the front or back bumper. Or feeling under the front of the hood for the latch.

We also took advantages. We had car inspections. OK. The state specified what had to work, the state did not specify how. Since the wiring fried, we just straight wired everything to a toggle switch on the dashboard. Nothing labeled, either. Stuff did work. Nobody else even wanted to attempt driving that Spitfire.

Drove the Tacoma with a walking cast on left foot. Used clutch cancel start. Clutch grabbed half way so could shift. The doc had a fit. Told him too bad. We don't have an automatic in the family.
 
2012-07-20 07:01:07 PM  
"I drive stick" must be the vehicular version of having to be at the gym in 26 minutes.
 
2012-07-20 07:14:31 PM  

pkellmey: purple kool-aid and a jigger of formaldehyde: When I took my drivers test the evaluator dinged me for coasting in neutral and not staying in a gear the whole time. Even at a light you are apparently supposed to sit there in gear with the clutch in.
I said "You know brakes are a lot cheaper than a clutch right? Is it going to keep me from getting my license? She said no, so... hell no I'm not going sit at the light with my clutch in the whole time.

I've had several police officers tell me it is illegal in my state because a vehicle is supposed to be in gear at stops for safety reasons. I really don't know if that is a law or if they are just spouting nonsense to be sound knowledgable. However, holding a clutch in to go to first gear anyway shouldn't overstress a clutch.

//My Honda had 150K miles on it when my mechanic asked when I last changed the clutch. I said never. He asked if I used the engine to slow down or brakes, and I said the engine. He shook his head in amazement and said the clutch looked brand new and the brakes were just on the verge of needing to be replaced, so I guess I must have been doing something right.


I got questioned for driving a (borrowed) stick properly when taking my US driving test, specifically for putting the handbrake on at traffic lights and balancing clutch and hanbrake when pulling off from a standing start. When I explained the examiner was like "oh, right, they teach you to drive properly over there". LoL.

For the curious, the correct procedure is as follows:

- At red light, handbrake on, car in neutral, no pedals
- As the light is about to turn**, clutch down and engage first
- Button in on handbrake, hold it up with your right hand (left in UK), bring clutch partly up and feel for the bite point
- When light goes green, release clutch, handbrake and feed in power all simultaneously

Doing this successfully on a steep hill with no rolling back is a pre-requisite to pass a driving test in the UK and most European countries

** having red-amber helps, but I driven manual cars in the USA for over a decade without a problem
 
2012-07-20 07:20:05 PM  

drxym: Driving a manual transmission is so hard that it is the default in virtually all of the rest of the world. It's worth learning to drive a manual if for no other reason than to avoid being screwed by car rental companies.

I'd add that it's not actually harder IMO to drive a manual over an automatic. Once you learn what the engine sounds like at various conditions you automatically switch gear without thinking too hard about it.

A bigger question for me is why diesel is so unpopular in the US when its an instant way to improve mileage by 30%.

1. The US consumer market had a number of very bad diesel passenger vehicles in the late '70s and early 80's (sluggish and put out a black nasty odoured smoke.) that ruined them for the older crowd add in that they were also bad in cold weather at that time and you have a lingering distrust.

2.There simply haven't been very many marketed since in the US this makes them unfamiliar to the younger people, cars aren't cheap going with something new and unknown Diesel or familiar, gas. They choose gas.

3. In the US diesel is commonly seen as the provenience of large heavy vehicles like semi's industrial trucks and vans. This isn't associated with gas mileage, or a fun sporty vehicles.

Now back to transmission types. I can drive stick, I learned as a kid on a small truck, have driven a number of buses with it, and a couple of sporty cars. I have only owned one out of 6 vehicles and that wasn't my daily driver. Why? Mainly because in many cars after the mid 90's anything built after 2005 you aren't getting a big gas mileage boost especially if you drive sensibly in the auto. It is a pain in the ass in stop and go traffic which unfortunately I see to much of, and I have a bad tendency to not really like driving the vast majority of the time because everyday trips are mind numbingly boring.
 
2012-07-20 07:33:52 PM  

Gough: Tell me again why we can't buy a vehicle like this in the states?


IIRC, most of those Euro diesel engines don't meet US diesel emissions standards.
 
2012-07-20 08:04:00 PM  
Husband drove an automatic, I had a VW beetle manual. The first time I drove his I put both feet on the brake pedal. I stopped fast! Even though I've driven an automatic for almost 12 years, I have sometimes found myself reaching for the shift. Old habits die hard.
 
2012-07-20 08:11:32 PM  
Um,

If you want to be able to drive anything after the Collapse Of Lies And Violence, or COLAV, the answer is unequivocally "Yes."

Drive stick, baby.

;)
 
2012-07-20 08:39:52 PM  

Smelly Pirate Hooker: "I drive stick" must be the vehicular version of having to be at the gym in 26 minutes.


...not really, dude. It's far more old school and far less douchey. It's practical.
 
2012-07-20 09:56:12 PM  
And may I just say...

Having JUST watched Batman Begins...

Batman asks commissioner Gordon if he can drive a stick.

If you don't know how, you wouldn't be able to drive the Batmobile.

If that ain't fire enough under yo' nerdy asses to learn, nothing is.

/end scene
//loves being right
 
2012-07-20 10:13:44 PM  

kiwimoogle84: And may I just say...

Having JUST watched Batman Begins...

Batman asks commissioner Gordon if he can drive a stick.

If you don't know how, you wouldn't be able to drive the Batmobile.

If that ain't fire enough under yo' nerdy asses to learn, nothing is.

/end scene
//loves being right


*Batman out*

;)
 
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