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(CNN)   CNN asks the tough question no other site would dare to cover: Is knowing how to drive stick in America still essential?   (cnn.com) divider line 392
    More: Stupid, CNN, manual transmissions, impromptu  
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5337 clicks; posted to Main » on 20 Jul 2012 at 4:31 AM (2 years ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2012-07-20 11:15:04 AM

Inflatable Rhetoric: fluffy2097: Zizzowop: Downshifting can really prolong your brakes.

Brakes are cheaper then a clutch.

That said, I've got 60k miles on my brakes and clutch and neither are due for a change yet.

If you do it right, there's zero clutch wear.


I prefer sticks, so does my wife.

I lived in Michigan, and they're much better on ice and snow. I still find the subject less than exciting, tho.
 
2012-07-20 11:15:29 AM

Prattle Assassin:
Quick question: does anyone out there regularly push-start a stick on a regular basis? Glad it hasn't come up in my case.


Not since I sold the 71 Super Beetle
(she went to a good home to someone who totally restored her. I still her driving around sometimes. I loved that car, but needed the money)
 
2012-07-20 11:15:56 AM

purple kool-aid and a jigger of formaldehyde: Girion47: Lawnchair: Girion47: You live anywhere near Louisville? I have an A4 I can teach you on.

Not particularly. Thanks for the offer though. It's annoying to have people simultaneously laugh at you for not knowing then chicken out on letting you try.

it's 12 years old, has a relatively new clutch and needs 5K in repairs. If I can't fix most of it myself we're junking it. A lot of younger family members are getting their chance to learn stick.

I've been trying to teach my son and it has been a painful experiance. He really needs someone who is not me and not in my car :)

VW's and Audi's have the best feeling clutches. The clutch pedal feels like its actually connected to the clutch. I don't know how else to explain it. Every Japanese manual car I have driven the clutch feels like it works by a switch or something. Like the only choice is engaged or not.

02 jetta and an 03 A4 at my house


I actually learned stick on my wife's 04 Jetta.

My Audi is an 01 1.8T Quattro. My in-laws had it imported brand new from Germany, still has the first aid kit with all german instructions in the back seat armrest. You can tell it's Euro because it has a sock to hold your skis when they come through the seat from your trunk. We got it when they decided to buy a Cayman.

My WRX doesn't feel off/on to me but the mazdaspeed 3 I test drove did.

I just remembered, snow driving, a manual is far superior for driving in slippery conditions when absolute control of engine revolutions is important. I can slow my car by downshifting and letting off the gas, I still have power pulling me so no brakes to induce sliding.
 
2012-07-20 11:16:16 AM

purple kool-aid and a jigger of formaldehyde: When I took my drivers test the evaluator dinged me for coasting in neutral and not staying in a gear the whole time. Even at a light you are apparently supposed to sit there in gear with the clutch in.
I said "You know brakes are a lot cheaper than a clutch right? Is it going to keep me from getting my license? She said no, so... hell no I'm not going sit at the light with my clutch in the whole time.


I've had several police officers tell me it is illegal in my state because a vehicle is supposed to be in gear at stops for safety reasons. I really don't know if that is a law or if they are just spouting nonsense to be sound knowledgable. However, holding a clutch in to go to first gear anyway shouldn't overstress a clutch.

//My Honda had 150K miles on it when my mechanic asked when I last changed the clutch. I said never. He asked if I used the engine to slow down or brakes, and I said the engine. He shook his head in amazement and said the clutch looked brand new and the brakes were just on the verge of needing to be replaced, so I guess I must have been doing something right.
 
2012-07-20 11:20:29 AM

URAPNIS: This new Scion FR-S gets better mpg's with an automatic than its manual counterpart.
I Haz a sad.

[graphics8.nytimes.com image 480x276]


This is very often due to a different final drive ratio. The car we had before this one was an automatic that we leased (couldn't find a stick to lease!) and it got 1-2 mpg better than the manual transmission car we've driven for the past 5 years. The reason is that the automatic is of a later design, more optimized to the engine's power curve. The design of the 5-speed manual in this car is ancient, automotively speaking.
 
2012-07-20 11:32:17 AM

purple kool-aid and a jigger of formaldehyde: VW's and Audi's have the best feeling clutches. The clutch pedal feels like its actually connected to the clutch. I don't know how else to explain it. Every Japanese manual car I have driven the clutch feels like it works by a switch or something. Like the only choice is engaged or not.


I drive a Mazda 6 5-speed and recently had to move a friends Jetta for her.. There was much WTFing and cursing at the clutch briefly while I figured it out. I know what you mean, but I definitely don't know if I like it. Some Japanese cars are waaay to "on/off" with the clutch but I like that my 6 goes from fully disengaged to engaged in maybe two inches of pedal movement.

On the greater subject of the thread, it's totally unnecessary to know how to drive a manual transmission these days, but refusing to do so renders all of your opinions on the subject of driving meaningless. If you know how to drive one and prefer automatic, I respect that. If you don't know how, you can't form an opinion on it. It's nearly impossible to describe why driving a stick is enjoyable to someone who doesn't know how to do it.
 
2012-07-20 11:32:43 AM

doglover: If you can't drive stick, you can't drive yet.


Uh, yeah. You can.
 
2012-07-20 11:34:21 AM
Bah. Learn to shift a manual without clutching and then come talk to me.
 
2012-07-20 11:37:00 AM

Peki: Bah. Learn to shift a manual without clutching and then come talk to me.


Do you perchance sell rebuilt transmissions?

Lando Lincoln: doglover: If you can't drive stick, you can't drive yet.

Uh, yeah. You can.


No, you don't drive an automatic. You tell it where to go.
 
2012-07-20 11:38:33 AM

Peki: Bah. Learn to shift a manual without clutching and then come talk to me.


the secret is blipping the rev's before you upshift.
 
2012-07-20 11:42:46 AM
Driving a stick
Writing cursive

Welcome to America's most useless tasks
 
2012-07-20 11:44:58 AM

pkellmey: I've had several police officers tell me it is illegal in my state because a vehicle is supposed to be in gear at stops for safety reasons. I really don't know if that is a law or if they are just spouting nonsense to be sound knowledgable. However, holding a clutch in to go to first gear anyway shouldn't overstress a clutch.

//My Honda had 150K miles on it when my mechanic asked when I last changed the clutch. I said never. He asked if I used the engine to slow down or brakes, and I said the engine. He shook his head in amazement and said the clutch looked brand new and the brakes were just on the verge of needing to be replaced, so I guess I must have been doing something right.


There's on-purpose downshifting, and there's accidental downshifting, especially with unfamiliar vehicles; the effect being like stomping on the brakes without the taillights shining -damn dangerous, and an excellent reminder to ease into every gear.

As for that law, if you were idling in neutral with your foot on the brake and got rear-ended, you might be pushed further into traffic than otherwise. Admittedly it's a pain to keep the clutch pressed in for several minutes behind a slow intersection. If I'm boxed in, I break that law.
 
2012-07-20 11:45:24 AM
If you are a self respecting man, you should know how to drive stick.

You don't want to be the guy who says "oh, is it stick? Because I can't drive that".
 
2012-07-20 11:48:55 AM

doglover: If you can't drive stick, you can't drive yet.


Also:
If you don't start your car with a crankshaft, you're not really driving.


You crotchety old farts and your obsolete technology amuse me.
 
2012-07-20 11:53:35 AM
The smug is strong in this thread.

You're shifting gears in a motor vehicle, not taking the space shuttle in for a dead-stick landing.

/get over yourselves
 
2012-07-20 11:53:50 AM

aerojockey: doglover: If you can't drive stick, you can't drive yet.

Also:
If you don't start your car with a crankshaft, you're not really driving.


You crotchety old farts and your obsolete technology amuse me.


Considering automatics were introduced in the 1930's you can't really use the "OMG MANUAL IS OLD TECH" argument.

Your insistence on ignorance amuses me.
 
2012-07-20 12:02:34 PM

MythDragon: Cewley: hell no! but it's more fun when you have a fun stick shift car, e.g MazdaSpeed 3!

Just bought one 3 weeks ago. 263hp. Farking awesome.


It's almost awesome. I test drove one a few weeks ago along side a WRX. The boost lag on that Speed3 is awful. For the approximate price range you'd be far better off getting a WRX, in this farker's opinion. The WRX has a better trans too.

/and AWD
 
2012-07-20 12:05:52 PM

CtrlAltDestroy: MythDragon: Cewley: hell no! but it's more fun when you have a fun stick shift car, e.g MazdaSpeed 3!

Just bought one 3 weeks ago. 263hp. Farking awesome.

It's almost awesome. I test drove one a few weeks ago along side a WRX. The boost lag on that Speed3 is awful. For the approximate price range you'd be far better off getting a WRX, in this farker's opinion. The WRX has a better trans too.

/and AWD


That's the exact reason I bought my subie, make sure you check out NASIOC, they can answer any question you have about the car.
 
2012-07-20 12:07:30 PM
My father was adamant that all four of his children would learn how to drive a stick. Our mother has always driven stick; still does. He took us each out to the nearby state park in her car for lessons before we earned our licenses. One of the best tests was to park the car at an intersection, facing up a ~40-degree incline. Then making us get in and, in his words, "Go. Forward."

Two of us kid still retain our ability to drive stick; my sister has often owned manuals and I have on occasion owned one. i take my mom's car out often on errands just so/because I can.
 
2012-07-20 12:07:45 PM

aerojockey: You crotchety old farts and your obsolete technology amuse me.


One day, you will be faced with a classic muscle car, and an owner willing to let you drive it.

You will have to decline the chance to drive an awesome classic car, because 3 pedals confuses you.

On that day, you will have to hand in your man card.

/I know how to sail a boat too.
//And ride a horse
///I MIGHT even be able to fly a plane. (As long as I don't have to take off or land)
////Will I ever use this shiat? Probably not.
//Will I ever have to hand in my man card? Nope.
 
2012-07-20 12:08:42 PM

fluffy2097: No, you don't drive an automatic. You tell it where to go.


Just shut up until you know how to DRIVE a Cugnot Steam Trolley. All other cars you just tell them where to go.

upload.wikimedia.org

Yes, that's how dumb you guys sound.
 
2012-07-20 12:10:23 PM

Lando Lincoln: Just shut up until you know how to DRIVE a Cugnot Steam Trolley. All other cars you just tell them where to go.


Give me one and the manual. I'll take you out for lunch with it in an hour or so.

/You are so proud of your ignorance...
 
2012-07-20 12:14:27 PM

fluffy2097: //Will I ever have to hand in my man card? Nope.


Whatever you say, fluffy.
 
2012-07-20 12:17:01 PM

fluffy2097: Lando Lincoln: Just shut up until you know how to DRIVE a Cugnot Steam Trolley. All other cars you just tell them where to go.

Give me one and the manual. I'll take you out for lunch with it in an hour or so.

/You are so proud of your ignorance...


No, idiot. I know how to drive stick. I'm not in love with it like you guys are.
 
2012-07-20 12:18:04 PM

D-Liver: If you are a self respecting man, you should know how to drive stick.

You don't want to be the guy who says "oh, is it stick? Because I can't drive that".


Why? I've never understood that argument. What exactly am I supposed to be afraid of? Is it presumed that my friends are uneducated and intolerant, and that I'm insecure enough that I need them to tell me I'm a man? How exactly does my preference in automobile transmissions impact my ability to live my life? Is there a list of all the features I should and should not have in my car? Am I free to get a car with a sunroof, or only cars with a roof rack? Why aren't women also expected to be able to drive a manual transmission? Do you believe that they're not smart enough to do so? What are the rules for gay men? Are males with disabilities not "real" men if it impacts their ability to drive a manual transmission?

You don't want to be the guy who says "oh, is it automatic? Because I won't drive that".

/I'm not trolling, but perhaps you are.
 
2012-07-20 12:21:20 PM

aerojockey: fluffy2097: //Will I ever have to hand in my man card? Nope.

Whatever you say, fluffy.


Well, I'm not going to have to hand it in over an inability to operate a mode of transportation.
 
2012-07-20 12:23:03 PM

literaldeluxe: Why? I've never understood that argument. What exactly am I supposed to be afraid of? Is it presumed that my friends are uneducated and intolerant, and that I'm insecure enough that I need them to tell me I'm a man? How exactly does my preference in automobile transmissions impact my ability to live my life?


Because someday, you might be in a situation where you will NEED to drive a stick shift.

If you can't when that day comes, you're going to be in trouble.

/always be prepared and such.
 
2012-07-20 12:24:34 PM

Peki: Bah. Learn to shift a manual without clutching and then come talk to me.


I can do it :)
 
2012-07-20 12:28:01 PM

kiwimoogle84: Peki: Bah. Learn to shift a manual without clutching and then come talk to me.

I can do it :)


I've done it. Once out of gear, once into gear.

I understand the principle but I'm going to wait until my syncro's die and I need a rebuild anyways to try operations almost sure to grind up the dogteeth. Messing up that kind of shift is too expensive a mistake.
 
2012-07-20 12:30:46 PM
In America? Clearly it's not necessary. However, there are 2 really good reasons I can think of off the top of my head:

1. It's a great theft-deterrent since most asshat car thieves can't drive one
2. If you want to rent a car in Europe, it can be difficult to find an automatic, plus automatics cost more to rent

In reference to #2, I once witnessed a totally amusing scene where an angry and distraught American woman was screaming at the staff of the Sixt rental desk at Frankfurt airport because they no longer had the A/T car she reserved and she was unable to drive a stick. Classic Ugly American rant that made me embarrassed to be from the same country!
 
2012-07-20 12:32:20 PM
I prefer stick. Not only is the mileage better, but it's cheaper to fix a clutch than an automatic transmission. I learned on one and then I was a truck driver for a while, so it's second nature to me. My poor husband doesn't know how, though, and he won't let me teach him because then he would feel unmanly or something. One would think it's more unmanly to not know how to drive a standard vehicle.
 
2012-07-20 12:33:28 PM

fluffy2097: literaldeluxe: Why? I've never understood that argument. What exactly am I supposed to be afraid of? Is it presumed that my friends are uneducated and intolerant, and that I'm insecure enough that I need them to tell me I'm a man? How exactly does my preference in automobile transmissions impact my ability to live my life?

Because someday, you might be in a situation where you will NEED to drive a stick shift.

If you can't when that day comes, you're going to be in trouble.

/always be prepared and such.


What exactly do you think the odds of that are? Given that the majority of cars in the country in which I live are automatic transmissions, it's not even statistically likely that if I were in a situation in which I had to drive a car not of my choosing it would be a manual. And, quite frankly, there is pretty much no chance of me ever having to drive a car not of my choosing. See, not only do car dealers have automatic transmissions, car rental companies do, too. I don't steal cars, and I don't live in a disaster-prone area (nor do I plan for ridiculously unlikely doomsday scenarios that would require me stealing cars). Whose car am I supposed to be driving, and why? While I'm sure there are some people that find themselves in such circumstances with regularity, I'm not one of them. Should I mock them for being unprepared for problems that I am more prepared to deal with, yet are unlikely to ever confront them?

"Always be prepared" is a logical absurdity. That's the whole joke of Batman: he's magically prepared for everything, even though that's impossible. "Always try to be reasonably prepared for situations that are beyond a certain threshold of likelihood" has less ring to it, but it's far less silly.
 
2012-07-20 12:39:20 PM
I won't buy a car without a manual transmission. Is driving stick an "essential" skill? Not really, unless you want to be a truck driver.
 
2012-07-20 12:42:13 PM

farkityfarker: Nightjars: farkityfarker: I enjoyed driving with manual transmission when I lived in an area where all the roads were flat.

Once I moved to where I live now, where there's almost no such thing as a road that isn't on an upgrade or downgrade, I gave it up and bought a car with automatic transmission.

That's where you can let your skills really shine! Where I live, the steep hills in Downtown Seattle are like driving in hard mode, once you master it, you get to claim your bragging rights.

LOL, that's where I live.

I got tired of worrying about backing into the car behind me every time the light turns green.


Drive with 3 feet ;) Foot on the brake, turn it toward the gas as you let go of the clutch. Once you feel the clutch grabbing, you can let your foot off the brake. Start up any hill with no slip back, really easy.
 
2012-07-20 12:43:48 PM

literaldeluxe: What exactly do you think the odds of that are? Given that the majority of cars in the country in which I live are automatic transmissions, it's not even statistically likely that if I were in a situation in which I had to drive a car not of my choosing it would be a manual. And, quite frankly, there is pretty much no chance of me ever having to drive a car not of my choosing. See, not only do car dealers have automatic transmissions, car rental companies do, too. I don't steal cars, and I don't live in a disaster-prone area (nor do I plan for ridiculously unlikely doomsday scenarios that would require me stealing cars). Whose car am I supposed to be driving, and why? While I'm sure there are some people that find themselves in such circumstances with regularity, I'm not one of them. Should I mock them for being unprepared for problems that I am more prepared to deal with, yet are unlikely to ever confront them?

"Always be prepared" is a logical absurdity. That's the whole joke of Batman: he's magically prepared for everything, even though that's impossible. "Always try to be reasonably prepared for situations that are beyond a certain threshold of likelihood" has less ring to it, but it's far less silly.


you sound fun at parties, hell you can come over and fark my sister

/bla bla bla, stuff sounds hard, why should I ever try or learn anything new
 
2012-07-20 12:43:50 PM

yellow_shark: In America? Clearly it's not necessary. However, there are 2 really good reasons I can think of off the top of my head:

1. It's a great theft-deterrent since most asshat car thieves can't drive one
2. If you want to rent a car in Europe, it can be difficult to find an automatic, plus automatics cost more to rent

In reference to #2, I once witnessed a totally amusing scene where an angry and distraught American woman was screaming at the staff of the Sixt rental desk at Frankfurt airport because they no longer had the A/T car she reserved and she was unable to drive a stick. Classic Ugly American rant that made me embarrassed to be from the same country!


That's funny, my mother-in-law went to Australia and they refused to rent her a manual transmission car until she sat there and argued with them for an hour.
 
2012-07-20 12:45:15 PM

craig328: Learned to drive on a 1948 Willys Jeep when I was 12. We owned a summer camp in West Virginia and pop took me out to the middle of probably a 30 acre field with a single solitary tree in the center of it.

You bet yer ass I hit that tree. :)

Anyway, at the time, pop told me that if I can drive stick I can drive any personal passenger vehicle, a semi truck, a tractor, and be able to prolly figure out how to drive nearly anything else. It IS one of those skills you don't HAVE to have but is nice having.

Since then I've driven a 1980 Chevy Citation (pop's car when I was old enough to drive legally), a 1983 Nissan Sentra and today I drive a 1991 Jeep Wrangler:

[a7.sphotos.ak.fbcdn.net image 850x508]

...that just turned 270K miles a couple months back. It's at around 272K now. Nice thing about a manual transmission: they're easier to fix/work on than an automatic. Less things to go wrong with them.


Plus since most people don't like driving a stick (especially in the 'big city') you can get them cheaper than you can an automatic
 
2012-07-20 12:46:41 PM

Pitabred: farkityfarker: Nightjars: farkityfarker: I enjoyed driving with manual transmission when I lived in an area where all the roads were flat.

Once I moved to where I live now, where there's almost no such thing as a road that isn't on an upgrade or downgrade, I gave it up and bought a car with automatic transmission.

That's where you can let your skills really shine! Where I live, the steep hills in Downtown Seattle are like driving in hard mode, once you master it, you get to claim your bragging rights.

LOL, that's where I live.

I got tired of worrying about backing into the car behind me every time the light turns green.

Drive with 3 feet ;) Foot on the brake, turn it toward the gas as you let go of the clutch. Once you feel the clutch grabbing, you can let your foot off the brake. Start up any hill with no slip back, really easy.


This type of parking brake is always handy for that too.
 
2012-07-20 12:47:57 PM

MindStalker: miss diminutive: The My Little Pony Killer: miss diminutive: One of my few regrets is that I never learned how to drive stick. An ex-bf tried to teach me once, but he got so pissy with me when I stalled it once that I just decided it wasn't worth the hassle.

It's incredibly worth it. You should try again with somebody who isn't an impatient sissy. Stalling out is just part of the deal when you're learning.

That's what I figured, stalling is just part of the learning experience. Apparently he learned to drive without stalling (so he claimed). He was kind of a douche when it came to things like that, not surprisingly we didn't last very long after that.

I would ask my dad, since he was the one who taught me to drive in the first place, but he's got the worst case of invisible brake syndrome* that just makes me tense up and forget what I'm doing.

*while in the passenger seat his foot slams the floorboard instinctively, looking for the brake pedal that isn't there

That's why I love that my car has an emergency brake in the middle. So I can yank it while my daughter is driving! (Got her learners license a few weeks ago, I haven't had to yank the e-brake yet!, though I did yank it on a friend whom I was teaching to drive my stick a few months ago just to test his clutch reaction time! )


That would've gotten you backhanded in my car. It has gotten one of my friends backhanded because he didn't believe me. Rule one in my car: You do not touch the controls while I am driving. Rule 2: You do NOT touch the farkING controls while I am driving.
 
2012-07-20 12:48:18 PM

URAPNIS: Pitabred: farkityfarker: Nightjars: farkityfarker: I enjoyed driving with manual transmission when I lived in an area where all the roads were flat.

Once I moved to where I live now, where there's almost no such thing as a road that isn't on an upgrade or downgrade, I gave it up and bought a car with automatic transmission.

That's where you can let your skills really shine! Where I live, the steep hills in Downtown Seattle are like driving in hard mode, once you master it, you get to claim your bragging rights.

LOL, that's where I live.

I got tired of worrying about backing into the car behind me every time the light turns green.

Drive with 3 feet ;) Foot on the brake, turn it toward the gas as you let go of the clutch. Once you feel the clutch grabbing, you can let your foot off the brake. Start up any hill with no slip back, really easy.

This type of parking brake is always handy for that too.


Oops.

autoraiders.com
 
2012-07-20 12:49:30 PM

literaldeluxe: What exactly do you think the odds of that are?


It will happen at least once in your life and it will be embarrassing.

It only takes an hour or so to learn how to do. Why not learn something instead of watching TV?
 
2012-07-20 12:49:50 PM

kiwimoogle84: MoronLessOff: So...how would one go about learning to drive a stick if one were interested? I don't have any friends or family to teach me.

Honey, I learned to drive a stick because my first car was one- I bought it from a family member and just had to drive it from Colorado to California to get it home.

Uh, surprise.

After 12 hours and several stalls, I was a pro.

Come out for GenCon, I'll teach ya :)


A tempting offer.
 
2012-07-20 12:51:13 PM

fluffy2097: literaldeluxe: What exactly do you think the odds of that are?

It will happen at least once in your life and it will be embarrassing.

It only takes an hour or so to learn how to do. Why not learn something instead of watching TV?


Probably afraid to get Cheeto dust on the shifter.

/i keed
 
2012-07-20 01:01:03 PM

Voiceofreason01: literaldeluxe: What exactly do you think the odds of that are? Given that the majority of cars in the country in which I live are automatic transmissions, it's not even statistically likely that if I were in a situation in which I had to drive a car not of my choosing it would be a manual. And, quite frankly, there is pretty much no chance of me ever having to drive a car not of my choosing. See, not only do car dealers have automatic transmissions, car rental companies do, too. I don't steal cars, and I don't live in a disaster-prone area (nor do I plan for ridiculously unlikely doomsday scenarios that would require me stealing cars). Whose car am I supposed to be driving, and why? While I'm sure there are some people that find themselves in such circumstances with regularity, I'm not one of them. Should I mock them for being unprepared for problems that I am more prepared to deal with, yet are unlikely to ever confront them?

"Always be prepared" is a logical absurdity. That's the whole joke of Batman: he's magically prepared for everything, even though that's impossible. "Always try to be reasonably prepared for situations that are beyond a certain threshold of likelihood" has less ring to it, but it's far less silly.

you sound fun at parties, hell you can come over and fark my sister

/bla bla bla, stuff sounds hard, why should I ever try or learn anything new


Most people don't drive a manual because they have no need to, not because it "sounds hard." Most people have no reason to invest their time and energy into something that will not improve their life, and isn't something they're passionate about. Many people just drive because they need to get from point A to point B, and it's the best option available, not because driving is their hobby or interest.

I'm not sure why you think not knowing how to drive a manual transmission is in any way related to whether or not someone is open to new things. Should everyone mock you for not taking up their hobbies? Have you tried every possible activity on Earth? How did you choose which ones to try? There are lots of amazing things that people can learn and explore; let everyone decide which ones they want to invest their time and energy into. Encouraging exploration is great, and most people need to broaden their horizons and skills, but forcing everyone to try the same things makes for a dull world.
 
2012-07-20 01:02:26 PM

URAPNIS: URAPNIS: Pitabred: farkityfarker: Nightjars: farkityfarker: I enjoyed driving with manual transmission when I lived in an area where all the roads were flat.

Once I moved to where I live now, where there's almost no such thing as a road that isn't on an upgrade or downgrade, I gave it up and bought a car with automatic transmission.

That's where you can let your skills really shine! Where I live, the steep hills in Downtown Seattle are like driving in hard mode, once you master it, you get to claim your bragging rights.

LOL, that's where I live.

I got tired of worrying about backing into the car behind me every time the light turns green.

Drive with 3 feet ;) Foot on the brake, turn it toward the gas as you let go of the clutch. Once you feel the clutch grabbing, you can let your foot off the brake. Start up any hill with no slip back, really easy.

This type of parking brake is always handy for that too.

Oops.

[autoraiders.com image 482x393]


The problem with using the parking brake is you can't ease off of it. It's basically on or off. And there are lots of cars with them down on the floor and not a handbrake. Easier to just use the regular brake you just used to stop anyway, just keep your foot half on it, half on the gas, and slide it all the way to the gas once you get the clutch engaging ;)
 
2012-07-20 01:04:01 PM

Pitabred: That would've gotten you backhanded in my car. It has gotten one of my friends backhanded because he didn't believe me. Rule one in my car: You do not touch the controls while I am driving. Rule 2: You do NOT touch the farkING controls while I am driving.


You missed that it was MY car and I was teaching them to drive, etc. Of course I would never do this normally.
 
2012-07-20 01:04:58 PM
All of my family's cars were stick.
I was taught on stick.
All of my cars have been stick.

Stick shift (as of 2011) was worth $1500 at the dealer where I bought my mazda. (1500 more for automatic).

I 100% believe that driving stick makes you a better driver for a multitude of reasons. Mostly cause you cant be farking around with your phone and shifting and steering at the same time. Also it makes you very aware of how you are driving and others. Speed control.

Stick shift. May it live forever.
 
2012-07-20 01:05:40 PM

literaldeluxe: And, quite frankly, there is pretty much no chance of me ever having to drive a car not of my choosing.


Since college, this scenario has pretty much not happened one time that I can think of. And, no, US/Canadian car rental companies don't have stick shift vehicles either (I did ask around once, again, looking to learn).

In college, though, it came up at least four times (road trips, being the sober one at the party, etc), but, again, "I've never actually driven a stick but would like to try" was, while embarrassing to admit, also met with "err, um... nah... that's alright" every time.
 
2012-07-20 01:07:40 PM

fluffy2097: literaldeluxe: What exactly do you think the odds of that are?

It will happen at least once in your life and it will be embarrassing.

It only takes an hour or so to learn how to do. Why not learn something instead of watching TV?


Why would it be embarrassing? Are you embarrassed every time you encounter an unexpected situation that you're not perfectly prepared for?
 
2012-07-20 01:08:59 PM

literaldeluxe: Voiceofreason01: literaldeluxe: What exactly do you think the odds of that are? Given that the majority of cars in the country in which I live are automatic transmissions, it's not even statistically likely that if I were in a situation in which I had to drive a car not of my choosing it would be a manual. And, quite frankly, there is pretty much no chance of me ever having to drive a car not of my choosing. See, not only do car dealers have automatic transmissions, car rental companies do, too. I don't steal cars, and I don't live in a disaster-prone area (nor do I plan for ridiculously unlikely doomsday scenarios that would require me stealing cars). Whose car am I supposed to be driving, and why? While I'm sure there are some people that find themselves in such circumstances with regularity, I'm not one of them. Should I mock them for being unprepared for problems that I am more prepared to deal with, yet are unlikely to ever confront them?

"Always be prepared" is a logical absurdity. That's the whole joke of Batman: he's magically prepared for everything, even though that's impossible. "Always try to be reasonably prepared for situations that are beyond a certain threshold of likelihood" has less ring to it, but it's far less silly.

you sound fun at parties, hell you can come over and fark my sister

/bla bla bla, stuff sounds hard, why should I ever try or learn anything new

Most people don't drive a manual because they have no need to, not because it "sounds hard." Most people have no reason to invest their time and energy into something that will not improve their life, and isn't something they're passionate about. Many people just drive because they need to get from point A to point B, and it's the best option available, not because driving is their hobby or interest.

I'm not sure why you think not knowing how to drive a manual transmission is in any way related to whether or not someone is open to new things. Should everyone mock you for not taking up t ...


Do you believe everyone should know how to change a tire?

You may never need to use the skill, but if you find yourself in a pickle, it's good to know how.

That's all most of us are really saying. It's not a hobby, it's a life skill, like knowing how to use a washing machine or changing a tire.
 
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