If you can read this, either the style sheet didn't load or you have an older browser that doesn't support style sheets. Try clearing your browser cache and refreshing the page.

(MSNBC)   Enterprise to make her NYC debut today. She is one well-endowed lady. I'd like to get my hands on her "ample nacelles," if you pardon the engineering parlance   (msnbc.msn.com) divider line 41
    More: Followup, Shuttle Enterprise, Enterprise, Fred Haise, reusable spacecraft, Space Museum, widebodies, wingspans, Kennedy Space Center  
•       •       •

3844 clicks; posted to Geek » on 19 Jul 2012 at 10:21 AM (2 years ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



41 Comments   (+0 »)
   
View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest

Archived thread
 
2012-07-19 10:30:22 AM
dvice.com
 
2012-07-19 10:41:22 AM
New York,

Hope you enjoy our sloppy seconds.

DC
 
2012-07-19 10:50:35 AM
Christ on a cracker...can we not have one picture in an article these days taken with a normal lens???
 
2012-07-19 10:56:40 AM
She's a beauty...

www.startrek.com

/In his bunk with a technical journal
 
2012-07-19 10:59:39 AM
iforce.co.nz

She's a beautiful ship alright! Shapely, seductive. I' m gonna fly her brains out.
 
2012-07-19 11:03:28 AM

Wellon Dowd: New York,

Hope you enjoy our sloppy seconds.

DC


Virgina is part of DC now?
 
2012-07-19 11:05:35 AM
ehh...
belongs in Houston

//bitter JSC kid

//Not really.. we have a real rocket, its cool... and we have a mock up of the shuttle people can actually get into and learn, not something they can just stare at

///yeah, we kept our rocket in an open field for years, but its got a new house now...
 
2012-07-19 11:25:41 AM

sararenne: ehh...
belongs in Houston

//bitter JSC kid

//Not really.. we have a real rocket, its cool... and we have a mock up of the shuttle people can actually get into and learn, not something they can just stare at

///yeah, we kept our rocket in an open field for years, but its got a new house now...


Or Dayton, where she would be treated with all the respect she deserves, in a brand new wing of a museum specifically built for air and space items, and not left to rot on the deck of a ship that kills every exhibit she gets, and be seen by people who have no sense of how important the space program is/was to mankind.
 
2012-07-19 11:26:53 AM
FTFA: When tests including the Enterprise began in 1977, the shuttle would sit atop a 747 carrier aircraft that helped get it off the ground. Once it reached an altitude of hundreds of thousands of feet, the Enterprise would separate from the plane, and two pilots would glide the shuttle for several minutes before making a smooth landing.

wait, what?
 
2012-07-19 11:28:22 AM

zenmhunter: Christ on a cracker...can we not have one picture in an article these days taken with a normal lens???


Ultra-wide/Fish-eye is probably the only way he could get the entire ship in the shot due to the confined space and limited shooting angles. Now, that said, there's no reason he couldn't take 5 minutes and do some correction on the fish-eye effect.
 
2012-07-19 11:28:58 AM

Iceman_Cometh: FTFA: When tests including the Enterprise began in 1977, the shuttle would sit atop a 747 carrier aircraft that helped get it off the ground. Once it reached an altitude of hundreds of thousands of feet, the Enterprise would separate from the plane, and two pilots would glide the shuttle for several minutes before making a smooth landing.

wait, what?


The 747 was strapped to a Saturn V.
 
2012-07-19 11:30:56 AM
That one should have been in the USAF Museum at Wright-Patt. All the rest went to historical places that made sense, except for this one going to New York. The only city to get a shuttle with no ties at all to aerospace history.

/Yes, I'm bitter.
//Lives 20 minutes from the AF museum and would have loved to see one of these up close...
 
2012-07-19 11:34:18 AM

tgambitg: sararenne: ehh...
belongs in Houston

//bitter JSC kid

//Not really.. we have a real rocket, its cool... and we have a mock up of the shuttle people can actually get into and learn, not something they can just stare at

///yeah, we kept our rocket in an open field for years, but its got a new house now...

Or Dayton, where she would be treated with all the respect she deserves, in a brand new wing of a museum specifically built for air and space items, and not left to rot on the deck of a ship that kills every exhibit she gets, and be seen by people who have no sense of how important the space program is/was to mankind.


agree completely...
 
2012-07-19 11:35:37 AM
We're going there on out band trip this year. 5 days, 4 nights in NYC with a shiat ton of high school kids.

The band is going to be performing on the Intrepid. Or..near it...I'm a little hazy on the details.
 
2012-07-19 11:36:06 AM
It belongs in a museum.

/amidoingitright?
 
2012-07-19 11:45:22 AM

tgambitg: sararenne: ehh...
belongs in Houston

//bitter JSC kid

//Not really.. we have a real rocket, its cool... and we have a mock up of the shuttle people can actually get into and learn, not something they can just stare at

///yeah, we kept our rocket in an open field for years, but its got a new house now...

Or Dayton, where she would be treated with all the respect she deserves, in a brand new wing of a museum specifically built for air and space items, and not left to rot on the deck of a ship that kills every exhibit she gets, and be seen by people who have no sense of how important the space program is/was to mankind.


Bwhahahahahahahahahahahahah!

You still think the space program is important to mankind. If it was we would still be funding it, instead of using it as corporate welfare.
 
2012-07-19 11:49:33 AM

tgambitg: in a brand new wing of a museum specifically built for air and space items, and not left to rot on the deck of a ship


The plan is to build a brand new museum for the shuttle on the other side of the West Side Hwy/12th Ave in a few years.
 
2012-07-19 11:51:20 AM

tgambitg: and be seen by people who have no sense of how important the space program is/was to mankind.


.... Isn't that the point?

CSB time - I saw STS-129 launch by sheer luck. I was going to be in Florida for my cousin's wedding, and the Shuttle was due to launch 2 days before I got there. Luckly, they pushed it back, and I went with my wife, my son, brother, mom, ect...

My son was hooked. I mean, seeing the Saturn 1, the various exhibits at KSC, and then the shuttle launch. That was 2 years ago, and he is 5 now. He asked for a telescope for his birthday, and we have been looking at Saturn, and he can't wait until the fall so Jupiter will be visible.

So, while there may be locations that will preserve the shuttle better, there are few that will expose the shuttle to more visitors than NYC. And getting more people exposure to the Space program is a good thing.
 
2012-07-19 11:52:48 AM

Iceman_Cometh: FTFA: When tests including the Enterprise began in 1977, the shuttle would sit atop a 747 carrier aircraft that helped get it off the ground. Once it reached an altitude of hundreds of thousands of feet, the Enterprise would separate from the plane, and two pilots would glide the shuttle for several minutes before making a smooth landing at 18 times the speed of light


Article left off that part.
 
2012-07-19 12:28:04 PM

Wellon Dowd: The 747 was strapped to a Saturn V.


...

WANT.
 
2012-07-19 12:29:20 PM

Slaves2Darkness: You still think the space program is important to mankind. If it was we would still be funding it, instead of using it as corporate welfare.


Truth will not be tolerated here. Private space and Mars condos will save the species.
 
2012-07-19 12:35:29 PM

Quantum Apostrophe: Slaves2Darkness: You still think the space program is important to mankind. If it was we would still be funding it, instead of using it as corporate welfare.

Truth will not be tolerated here. Private space and Mars condos will save the species.


I'm so glad you two found each other. I wish you both the best!
 
2012-07-19 12:37:59 PM
Science journalists are journalists.

When tests including the Enterprise began in 1977, the shuttle would sit atop a 747 carrier aircraft that helped get it off the ground. Once it reached an altitude of hundreds of thousands of feet, the Enterprise would separate from the plane, and two pilots would glide the shuttle for several minutes before making a smooth landing.

www.nobodygoeshere.com
 
2012-07-19 12:40:48 PM

Iceman_Cometh: FTFA: When tests including the Enterprise began in 1977, the shuttle would sit atop a 747 carrier aircraft that helped get it off the ground. Once it reached an altitude of hundreds of thousands of feet, the Enterprise would separate from the plane, and two pilots would glide the shuttle for several minutes before making a smooth landing.

wait, what?


I think it was one of those 747s that L Ron Hubbard was talking about in one of his Scoentology books. I thought the same thing.
 
2012-07-19 12:43:58 PM

FunkyBlue: That one should have been in the USAF Museum at Wright-Patt. All the rest went to historical places that made sense, except for this one going to New York. The only city to get a shuttle with no ties at all to aerospace history.

/Yes, I'm bitter.
//Lives 20 minutes from the AF museum and would have loved to see one of these up close...


BAE has an office nearby... in Wayne, NJ. For now....

/British Areospace, yeah, that's what they used to call it...
 
2012-07-19 12:44:04 PM

FunkyBlue: That one should have been in the USAF Museum at Wright-Patt. All the rest went to historical places that made sense, except for this one going to New York. The only city to get a shuttle with no ties at all to aerospace history.


Soooooo....

The prototype that tested the aerodynamics and avionics for the entire STS project (including being,
as I recall, the first application of lifting body principles to a large scale aircraft) has no ties at
all to aerospace history?

www.nobodygoeshere.com

/Used to work for NCR when it was in Dayton
//Couldn't get out of there fast enough (except for Wright-Pat, but that's half a day, tops)
 
2012-07-19 01:31:04 PM

The Bestest: I'm so glad you two found each other. I wish you both the best!


Send postcards when you're on Mars!
 
2012-07-19 01:35:39 PM

DjangoStonereaver: Soooooo....

The prototype that tested the aerodynamics and avionics for the entire STS project (including being,
as I recall, the first application of lifting body principles to a large scale aircraft) has no ties at
all to aerospace history?



Uhh, you think you maybe misread that? Like the "...with no ties at all to aerospace history" part modified "city" and not "shuttle"?

Sure, it could have been written better, but the meaning was still fairly clear.
 
2012-07-19 01:41:33 PM
I don't have an opinion about that shuttle either way but I will say this. I have been to NYC two times, and out of all the things I saw and did the USS Intrepid was probably the biggest tourist trap I went to. I mean sure an air craft carrier and a missle sub were cool. But I remember the admission price was expensive, and the exhibits in and on the carrier were pretty poorly presented.
 
2012-07-19 01:44:50 PM

mechgreg: I don't have an opinion about that shuttle either way but I will say this. I have been to NYC two times, and out of all the things I saw and did the USS Intrepid was probably the biggest tourist trap I went to. I mean sure an air craft carrier and a missle sub were cool. But I remember the admission price was expensive, and the exhibits in and on the carrier were pretty poorly presented.


The USAF Museum is free to all, climate controlled, actually has ties to the shuttle and space program, and is not literally right next to another shuttle.
 
2012-07-19 02:48:45 PM

Quantum Apostrophe: The Bestest: I'm so glad you two found each other. I wish you both the best!

Send postcards when you're on Mars!


I'm generally curious, are you just a very specific troll or is there some logic behind what you say?
 
2012-07-19 03:57:30 PM
FTA:

At 57 feet (17 meters) wide and 137 feet (42 meters) long - with a 78-foot (24-meter) wingspan to boot - the Enterprise is an imposing figure with quite a presence in its new home.

Whoa, I didn't realize the shuttle was that wide! So it only has 10' wings on each side to make a 78 feet wingspan? Or is it 135' wide over all?

That thing must truly have been a pleasure to work in with that much volume! 137' long by 135' wide? No wonder there weren't any replacement spacecraft with the amount of volume that it can lift!

This article matches the shuttle's current situation - written by someone who doesn't know about the shuttle and doesn't care to find out. It's nice for it to be in such a large city center that has no connection to aerospace. But at least the writer took the time to convert the wrong sizes to metric!
 
2012-07-19 04:07:27 PM
Wrong farking city. USAF museum or Houston were the correct places for it.
 
2012-07-19 04:08:14 PM
It's been a long road
Getting from there to here
It's been a long time
But my time is finally near...

/sorry, had to do it.
 
2012-07-19 05:01:09 PM

Publikwerks: tgambitg: and be seen by people who have no sense of how important the space program is/was to mankind.

.... Isn't that the point?

CSB time - I saw STS-129 launch by sheer luck. I was going to be in Florida for my cousin's wedding, and the Shuttle was due to launch 2 days before I got there. Luckly, they pushed it back, and I went with my wife, my son, brother, mom, ect...

My son was hooked. I mean, seeing the Saturn 1, the various exhibits at KSC, and then the shuttle launch. That was 2 years ago, and he is 5 now. He asked for a telescope for his birthday, and we have been looking at Saturn, and he can't wait until the fall so Jupiter will be visible.

So, while there may be locations that will preserve the shuttle better, there are few that will expose the shuttle to more visitors than NYC. And getting more people exposure to the Space program is a good thing.


That's farking awesome. I hope SpaceCamp is still around when he gets older, I always pestered my parents to take me (even more so after the movie came out) but alas, it was not to be. You win at parenting.
 
2012-07-19 07:22:45 PM
Doesn't New York already have enough unwanted plane parts laying around outside?

/I'll show myself out
 
2012-07-19 07:50:59 PM
Did they fix this yet?
bitterendblog.com

The initial "repair" was black paint.
 
2012-07-20 12:32:05 AM

change1211: I'm generally curious, are you just a very specific troll or is there some logic behind what you say?


I'm extremely curious about the religious fervor some people have about the delusional Space Age promises of colonies and asteroid mining.

I mock these people for their irrational beliefs, their logically-flawed arguments and their hysterical (in the classical sense) melodramatic world-view.

Read this.

From the blog's author:
"I never appreciated the almost cult-like religious fervor behind the assumption of a future in space."

That's exactly what it is. Space Nuttery. The belief that the next 100 years will progress at the same rate as the last 100, in space.

1.bp.blogspot.com
 
2012-07-20 01:51:27 PM

Quantum Apostrophe: change1211: I'm generally curious, are you just a very specific troll or is there some logic behind what you say?

I'm extremely curious about the religious fervor some people have about the delusional Space Age promises of colonies and asteroid mining.

I mock these people for their irrational beliefs, their logically-flawed arguments and their hysterical (in the classical sense) melodramatic world-view.

Read this.

From the blog's author:
"I never appreciated the almost cult-like religious fervor behind the assumption of a future in space."

That's exactly what it is. Space Nuttery. The belief that the next 100 years will progress at the same rate as the last 100, in space.

[1.bp.blogspot.com image 400x320]


The delusion is thinking if we don't invest in space the money will be spent more wisely on something else. In 2003 $12 billion in cash was physically flown from the U.S. to Iraq and handed out with no particular accounting, almost as much as NASA's entire budget that year, and that cash was more than the value of the contract (adjusted for inflation) to build the first three space shuttle orbiters.

Much of discovery and progress is accidental and unanticipated. It doesn't make sense to shut down something that a lot of bright people are passionate about. Especially if your alternative vision is doom and gloom.
 
2012-07-20 03:16:52 PM

Nem Wan: The delusion is thinking if we don't invest in space the money will be spent more wisely on something else.


What does that have to do with anything? The physics, economics and engineering is stacked against manned space exploration, space mining, Mars colonies, etc.. It doesn't matter how much money you toss at this, it will never, ever make sense. Ever. Yes, we could send astronauts back on the Moon. For what purpose?

"Especially if your alternative vision is doom and gloom."

That's your melodramatic view. The cheap energy sugar high is over. Life will go on. Right here. Nowhere else. It's doom and gloom if for you not having Mars colonies is doom and gloom.

Barring, of course, some fundamental breakthrough in physics that allows for the near-magical materials and energy sources required for the Space Age dreams.

I'll be waiting right here.
 
2012-07-21 08:41:42 AM

Quantum Apostrophe: change1211: I'm generally curious, are you just a very specific troll or is there some logic behind what you say?

I'm extremely curious about the religious fervor some people have about the delusional Space Age promises of colonies and asteroid mining.

I mock these people for their irrational beliefs, their logically-flawed arguments and their hysterical (in the classical sense) melodramatic world-view.

Read this.

From the blog's author:
"I never appreciated the almost cult-like religious fervor behind the assumption of a future in space."

That's exactly what it is. Space Nuttery. The belief that the next 100 years will progress at the same rate as the last 100, in space.


Those who stand around saying something can't be done are often interrupted by people who are doing it.
 
Displayed 41 of 41 comments

View Voting Results: Smartest and Funniest


This thread is archived, and closed to new comments.

Continue Farking
Submit a Link »






Report