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(The New York Times)   Copenhagen has had enough, they have banned bicycles from some roads. By giving them their own superhighway   (nytimes.com ) divider line
    More: Spiffy, Copenhagen, bike trails, public hospital, city planners, commuters  
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8970 clicks; posted to Main » on 19 Jul 2012 at 1:20 AM (4 years ago)   |   Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2012-07-19 11:22:02 AM  

digistil: Eps05: The article isn't clear on the "superhighway" part. Are they wider (multi-lane) than regular bike paths? Because it sounds like a buzzword for dedicated bike path.. which are found in many places. A larger bike path would be nice since more crowded ones make it impossible to pass and people ride at incredibly variable speeds. Then again, considering how people tend to walk 2,3 or even 4 side by side it's probably a moot point as i don't expect any different on a bike.

I like biking, but I've rarely lived a decent distance from work, had somewhere safe to park my bike at work and I sweat - ALOT - even from minimal exercise. Even when I am "in shape" I consume about 1 liter of water per 15km (a pint every 4 miles)

The super highway bit is in reference to a lack of interaction with other forms of traffic. No stop lights, no pedestrians, etc.


And that it extends out into some of the more populous suburbs while being consistent in terms of paving, maintenance, etc. Lots of cities, including Copenhagen, have lots of bike trails/lanes in total but they don't necessarily extend very far out of the city in a consistent way. There aee breaks, overlaps with roads, etc.
 
2012-07-19 11:28:02 AM  

THX 1138: I've noticed that pedestrians also seem to be blind to bikes. This week alone I've nearly hit four people who stepped off the sidewalk in order to get a better view up the street to see if their bus was approaching. I mean, I know I'm not as big as a car, but with the hideous snapping noise my shiatty bottom bracket makes, I know I can be heard from a mile away.


Dude, don't you have a wrench for that? New bearings are a few cents each, and it's better than scoring the cone. Leave it go long enough and the core will loosens strangely and may have enough tension to cross-thread the shell. Then you'd have to mill it out again. I have a wrecked bike that I'm working on and have to do just that tonight. The bearing cage was crushed.
 
2012-07-19 11:31:45 AM  

the money is in the banana stand: 1.) You are incredibly lucky if you live extremely close to where you work.
2.) You are fortunate you live in either an area that has fair weather, your place of work has showers, you don't care if you stink and sweat.
3.) You are fortunate you do not have many responsibilities allowing you the additional time to commute via bicycle.
4.) You are either fortunate you do not need to commute ever during the day or have access to company vehicles.

I just don't understand how there can truly be that many people that meet all 4 of these criteria. I don't live very far from work, only 5 miles, but good f'ing luck making that ride by bike. If I lived next to work, it would be completely unaffordable. It is very hot here, but even if it wasn't I wouldn't ride by bicycle in my work clothes, I would never wear a suit and bike. We don't have showers here because we aren't downtown in some executive suite. We have our own property. Time is the most precious thing. Even if I could make the bike trip, I could get there way quicker by car. I am not going to arbitrarily add 15-30 minutes to my commute. Regularly, I have appointments to see clients, go on presentations, go out for lunch, or the unknown - things come up and I need a car to get me there. I can't have someone ride on my bike.

Seriously, how many people fit all 4 of these criteria? Even just not meeting 1 of those makes commute by bicycle not worth it. I guess if you worked in a flower shop downtown and lived in some hipster co-op apartment you could do this...


I carry 2 towels, a bar of soap, and a gallon of extra water in my back rack basket. And I usually take my shirt off when I ride, often covering my shoulders with the dampened smaller towel when it is very sunny and hot. Sports sandals or breathable cross-trainers sometimes, too.
 
2012-07-19 11:34:04 AM  

dbrunker: Portland, Oregon has nearly 140 miles car-free bike lanes but you say your town has 11? Yeah, that's cool.
[farm9.staticflickr.com image 500x332]


http://www.kk.dk/sitecore/content/Subsites/CityOfCopenhagen/SubsiteFr o ntpage/LivingInCopenhagen/CityAndTraffic/CityOfCyclists.aspx

Copenhagen has 218miles prior to opening these new "super highways".
 
2012-07-19 11:37:04 AM  

jiken: cyclists don't care if you build them a bike path. they always ride in traffic anyway. they want to feel like they're on a real vehicle or something. they have some strange psychology at work.


Motorists don't care if you build them a freeway. They always drive in traffic anyway. They want to feel like they're part of the cityscape or something. They have some strange psychology at work.

Yes, that statement is stupid for the same reason. Just because there's dedicated lanes for both types of vehicle doesn't mean they connect the first or last miles.
 
2012-07-19 11:37:58 AM  

Oznog: [media.treehugger.com image 468x412]

So now begins the bike-snob wars, where they get all uppity and claim electric bikes are cheating and capable of going too fast.


They're too slow. I dislike getting stuck behind 'em because I can crank faster on my own.
 
2012-07-19 11:39:34 AM  

Swoop1809: I wish I had a bike path to my office. Im only 3 miles away, but none of the roads have bike lanes and are far to busy for me to feel comfortable riding on them. I bet my office doesnt even have a bike path since they dont think anyone would be crazy enough to bike to a place that is accessed off of 4 lane heavy traffic roads.


If the traffic's heavy, it's probably not moving much faster than a bicycle anyway. Lefts are still fun mostly thanks to merging to the turn lane, though..
 
2012-07-19 11:44:00 AM  

Eps05: The article isn't clear on the "superhighway" part. Are they wider (multi-lane) than regular bike paths? Because it sounds like a buzzword for dedicated bike path.. which are found in many places. A larger bike path would be nice since more crowded ones make it impossible to pass and people ride at incredibly variable speeds.


In Portland, parts of the Springwater Corridor (particularly in Gresham) and the Willamette Greenway are multilane, but they forgot to mark the lanes.

Then again, considering how people tend to walk 2,3 or even 4 side by side it's probably a moot point as i don't expect any different on a bike.

I'm a firm believer that cycleways need sidewalks if cities are serious about getting people out of their car. Streets need bike lanes and sidewalks a heck of a lot more than on-street parking (save for downtown areas where speeds are low, intersections are frequent and parking lots are (thankfully) uncommon). Not just for pedestrians and cyclists, but for amateur motorists, since the amateurs seem to be the ones most likely to bust a fuse because they encounter slower traffic.
 
2012-07-19 11:44:10 AM  

THX 1138: I've noticed that pedestrians also seem to be blind to bikes. This week alone I've nearly hit four people who stepped off the sidewalk in order to get a better view up the street to see if their bus was approaching. I mean, I know I'm not as big as a car, but with the hideous snapping noise my shiatty bottom bracket makes, I know I can be heard from a mile away


PROTIP: Do NOT step into the cyclist lane in Amsterdam. They're all over the place around the train station, and if you don't read dutch you might not figure the system out immediately. I've never been sworn at in as many languages in such a short time in my life. Made me feel worldly ;) . But seriously, they'll run your @55 down.
 
2012-07-19 11:59:30 AM  

Cosmic J: I'm with Mr_Ectomy on this. Copenhagen has really great on-street cycling infrastructure that most cities in the US are severely lacking but off-street "freeway" paths are nothing new. Minneapolis re-purposed an unused rail trench into the Midtown Greenway - a bike/ped path spanning the length of the city with only a handful of street level intersections.

[i.imgur.com image 580x435]


I just noticed this...light traffic, and the one cyclist coming towards the camera is riding on the pedestrian shoulder. FAIL.
 
2012-07-19 12:01:22 PM  

the money is in the banana stand: I don't live very far from work, only 5 miles, but good f'ing luck making that ride by bike... Time is the most precious thing. Even if I could make the bike trip, I could get there way quicker by car. I am not going to arbitrarily add 15-30 minutes to my commute.


Even a non-fit person riding a bike won't typically take more than 30 minutes to go 5 miles, let alone add an extra 30 minutes to their commute.
 
2012-07-19 12:07:03 PM  

Teknowaffle: The thing is, Mission street is a State Highway! Hwy 1 (the PCH in SoCal) turns into it while going through Santa Cruz. The road is really narrow, the speed limit is high, and there is a crap load of traffic. But you still have idiots toodling along on their bikes on a dangerous street as though they own it. I was too scare to ride on it unless it was 6am, and I actually had a crapload of experience on dangerous roads.


Sounds like two factors are in play:

1) Streets aren't dangerous, it's the users. Get a bunch of amatuer motorists acting like they're not driving in urban traffic in an area open to multiple modes, it's going to happen. It's not the street's fault. It's not bicyclists fault. It's any road user that's not paying attention to the fact that they're in a city and need to adjust their behavior accordingly.

2) Maybe if your city got off it's ass and actually implemented the cycleway network instead of just proposing it, the number of cyclists on the northern segment of Mission would go down. You'd still have cyclists on the southern segment leaving town by Coast Road, though, since it's already California State Bike Route 1, and the same southern segment is proposed to be Santa Cruz Bike Route 814, 812 and 25, and United States Bike Route 95.
 
2012-07-19 12:08:34 PM  

dbrunker: Portland, Oregon has nearly 140 miles car-free bike lanes but you say your town has 11? Yeah, that's cool.
[farm9.staticflickr.com image 500x332]


Would be nice if they repainted the lane lines every now and then, though. And got some enforcement so you don't have some shiathead riding down the center in busy traffic making everyone swerve into the river or the fence.
 
2012-07-19 12:11:06 PM  

Izunbacol: When I left, they were building a bicycle/foot bridge across the Missouri to connect to Council Bluffs (Council-Tuckey) Iowa. Not bad for a Red State.


It's an easy sell in a red state. Bike infrastructure costs next to nothing, can often be paid for by USDOT programs like Safe Routes to Schools, lasts 3-6 times longer than motor vehicle infrastructure, and has that rugged independent quality to it that being dependent on some company to sell you gasoline or electricity or fix your shiat just doesn't have.
 
2012-07-19 12:14:03 PM  

This text is now purple: dickfreckle: You might have a point, but conveniently ignore the huge percentage of motorists who routinely break as many traffic laws as they can fit into a morning commute. Gets even worse after happy hour.

These bicycle threads wouldn't be so stupid if motorists ever bothered to admit that maybe they suck, too.

I've never seen a car avoid an intersection by driving on the sidewalk. That occurs about 50% of the time w/ bicycles in Philly.


You've never been to the west coast.
 
2012-07-19 12:22:19 PM  

thelordofcheese: City planning fail. They need signs directing bicycle traffic. You can't blame the citizens for being ignorant when the government doesn't do anything to make them aware.


Well, even then, there's businesses on Mission Street, which means people need to use Mission to get to addresses on Mission, regardless of mode.
 
2012-07-19 12:25:07 PM  

titwrench: zez: I bike a lot, and I do like how they mention in the article that they made the lanes so people could ride side by side and talk. I hate riding with someone and having to ride single file while yelling over my shoulder at the person behind me or verse-visa.

Nobody walks and talks that way, why should we have to bike that way?

Because you need to stay out of the farking street where cars are. The road isn't a good damn coffee shop where you can chit chat, people are trying to get somewhere and shouldn't have to do 20 in a 45 zone because you and your shiat eating friends can talk about what happened on The View yesterday. Stay in the bike lane you prick.


This cannot be said too many times. Titwrench is correct, and if you don't understand it, then you're an inconsiderate asshole.
 
2012-07-19 12:27:43 PM  

thelordofcheese: Coming on a Bicycle: That is the thing: you're in the middle of a transition. My country (NL) is fully made bicycle-aware, but there are strict rules: no bicycles on any roads where you can go faster then 50kph, and even then we make bicycle lanes mostly everywhere.

Come to PA. You can even ride on the interstates.


That's true in pretty close to every state unless otherwise posted. Notable exception that doesn't post it on the highway enterences is Kansas, which occasionally surprises I-70 cyclists from Colorado who are often not aware of Kansas being weird, since there's no signs indicating the permissiveness changes on the approach to the state line.
 
2012-07-19 12:36:57 PM  

the money is in the banana stand: 1.) You are incredibly lucky if you live extremely close to where you work.


Unless you just didn't bother to do some family planning and consider what that had to do with your finances, thus having some crotch droppings anchoring you to a location, or you live someplace that's damn near unlivable like Seattle, Portland, LA, Dallas or NYC, odds are you can work within a few miles of home, or move closer to work

2.) You are fortunate you live in either an area that has fair weather, your place of work has showers, you don't care if you stink and sweat.

Action Wipes and a change of clothes. Your argument is irrelevant.

3.) You are fortunate you do not have many responsibilities allowing you the additional time to commute via bicycle.

If we're talking in-city commutes, unless you have odd work hours or your city has no traffic, it's just as fast either way.

4.) You are either fortunate you do not need to commute ever during the day or have access to company vehicles.

You're pretty stupid if you're letting your company free use of your vehicle during the day. I'd expect compensation beyond the tax-writeoff and minimally required mileage credit, at least market rate for hiring a cab. Make it worth my while to use my car for business.

I just don't understand how there can truly be that many people that meet all 4 of these criteria.

Quit settling for less in life and making excuses for the situation you put yourself in? Worked for me.
 
2012-07-19 12:42:24 PM  

THX 1138: the money is in the banana stand: I don't live very far from work, only 5 miles, but good f'ing luck making that ride by bike... Time is the most precious thing. Even if I could make the bike trip, I could get there way quicker by car. I am not going to arbitrarily add 15-30 minutes to my commute.

Even a non-fit person riding a bike won't typically take more than 30 minutes to go 5 miles, let alone add an extra 30 minutes to their commute.


When I was in high school, I used to commute from Cedar Hills to Merlo Station via US 26 and West 158th Avenue. About six miles. By car? 50-75 minutes, typically. Longer if you were going alone and couldn't use the combined HOV/Motorcycle/Bicycle/Bus lane on the Cornell Road onramp. By bicycle? About 40 minutes, give or take, with the big delays of it being a steep hill climb near Greenbrier Parkway and red lights (particularly waiting on the ramp signal). Reserved bike lanes (or the above mentioned combined reserved lane) or wide open freeway shoulders open for all but three blocks of the entire trip. Granted, in places with no shoulders or bike lanes, you'll probably get stuck going as slow as the cars are unless you rat-run the side streets...
 
2012-07-19 01:23:10 PM  

Baloo Uriza: Swoop1809: I wish I had a bike path to my office. Im only 3 miles away, but none of the roads have bike lanes and are far to busy for me to feel comfortable riding on them. I bet my office doesnt even have a bike path since they dont think anyone would be crazy enough to bike to a place that is accessed off of 4 lane heavy traffic roads.

If the traffic's heavy, it's probably not moving much faster than a bicycle anyway. Lefts are still fun mostly thanks to merging to the turn lane, though..


In PA bicyclists can travel in the abutment or shoulder. I often surpass the commuting speed of motorized vehicles.

And if you're on a motorcycle, motorscooter or moped and use the abutment or shoulder then I hope you get in a wreck and become paralyzed before dying of pulmonary edema.

/and stay off the sidewalks, other bicyclists!
//AND QUIT RUNNING RED LIGHTS!!!
 
2012-07-19 01:27:38 PM  

Baloo Uriza: thelordofcheese: City planning fail. They need signs directing bicycle traffic. You can't blame the citizens for being ignorant when the government doesn't do anything to make them aware.

Well, even then, there's businesses on Mission Street, which means people need to use Mission to get to addresses on Mission, regardless of mode.


By that logic all business should have parking lots to accommodate all amounts of patronage. Parking garages a block or tow away are unacceptable. Can't expect people to leave their vehicle and walk a bit.
 
2012-07-19 01:41:00 PM  

thelordofcheese: By that logic all business should have parking lots to accommodate all amounts of patronage.


We're talking southern California. They already do.
 
2012-07-19 01:50:25 PM  

thelordofcheese: /and stay off the sidewalks, other bicyclists!


Thank you.

Cyclists on the sidewalk make the rest of us all look like asshats just by association. I wish it was worth the police's time to enforce it.
 
2012-07-19 01:53:31 PM  

Baloo Uriza: thelordofcheese: By that logic all business should have parking lots to accommodate all amounts of patronage.

We're talking southern California. They already do.


Eh, I wouldn't know. Only time I've been in SF was for a layover. LA isn't like that at all, and from what I've seen of Long beach there isn't enough.
 
2012-07-19 02:14:35 PM  

thelordofcheese: Baloo Uriza: thelordofcheese: By that logic all business should have parking lots to accommodate all amounts of patronage.

We're talking southern California. They already do.

Eh, I wouldn't know. Only time I've been in SF was for a layover. LA isn't like that at all, and from what I've seen of Long beach there isn't enough.


Over 50% of the land area within any city limits is taken up by streets or parking lots. The problem isn't that there isn't enough parking, but that there isn't enough alternatives to driving.
 
2012-07-19 02:15:50 PM  

zez: I bike a lot, and I do like how they mention in the article that they made the lanes so people could ride side by side and talk. I hate riding with someone and having to ride single file while yelling over my shoulder at the person behind me or verse-visa.

Nobody walks and talks that way, why should we have to bike that way?


I, on the other hand, hate being stuck behing chatty twats riding two-abreast.
 
2012-07-19 02:23:30 PM  

0Icky0: Kuroutesshin: Here in China I've seen a family of four on an electric moped- the wife in the biatch seat with her young son behind her, the husband driving the thing with a cell phone to his ear and a cigarette in the other hand, while their baby sits in his lap and works the tinny electric horn like it's going to turn into candy.

I always wonder why I see so many families in China with more than one child. Maybe they allow it for those moped families, because it's unlikely that more than one will live to breeding age.


There are a shiat ton of work arounds for the 1 child rule. Odds are this couple paid an extra fine for the kid. Or, something that will become more likely as time goes on, the two parents were both only children, and they were allowed to have another. Also, the government is allowing couples who have a girl first a chance to try for a boy.
 
2012-07-19 03:21:00 PM  

HailRobonia: zez: I bike a lot, and I do like how they mention in the article that they made the lanes so people could ride side by side and talk. I hate riding with someone and having to ride single file while yelling over my shoulder at the person behind me or verse-visa.

Nobody walks and talks that way, why should we have to bike that way?

I, on the other hand, hate being stuck behing chatty twats riding two-abreast.


So move a lane over. If I can do it in a big rig, you can do it in an air-conditioned gas-powered Rascal.
 
2012-07-19 03:33:07 PM  

THX 1138: I've noticed that pedestrians also seem to be blind to bikes. This week alone I've nearly hit four people who stepped off the sidewalk in order to get a better view up the street to see if their bus was approaching. I mean, I know I'm not as big as a car, but with the hideous snapping noise my shiatty bottom bracket makes, I know I can be heard from a mile away.


My front brake squeals like a banshee. A quick tap is all it takes to get their attention
 
2012-07-19 03:43:28 PM  

THX 1138: thelordofcheese: /and stay off the sidewalks, other bicyclists!

Thank you.

Cyclists on the sidewalk make the rest of us all look like asshats just by association. I wish it was worth the police's time to enforce it.


I agree but I will also say that for the most part the cyclists I see on the sidewalk are better off on the sidewalk. Kids, elderly and crazed homeless. If I'm driving and coming up on a cyclist riding a decent bike and looking the part I'm more confident they are not going to make some unexpected move, unlike the sidewalk riders just above.
 
2012-07-19 04:05:31 PM  

the money is in the banana stand: 1.) You are incredibly lucky if you live extremely close to where you work.
2.) You are fortunate you live in either an area that has fair weather, your place of work has showers, you don't care if you stink and sweat.
3.) You are fortunate you do not have many responsibilities allowing you the additional time to commute via bicycle.
4.) You are either fortunate you do not need to commute ever during the day or have access to company vehicles.

I just don't understand how there can truly be that many people that meet all 4 of these criteria. I don't live very far from work, only 5 miles, but good f'ing luck making that ride by bike. If I lived next to work, it would be completely unaffordable. It is very hot here, but even if it wasn't I wouldn't ride by bicycle in my work clothes, I would never wear a suit and bike. We don't have showers here because we aren't downtown in some executive suite. We have our own property. Time is the most precious thing. Even if I could make the bike trip, I could get there way quicker by car. I am not going to arbitrarily add 15-30 minutes to my commute. Regularly, I have appointments to see clients, go on presentations, go out for lunch, or the unknown - things come up and I need a car to get me there. I can't have someone ride on my bike.

Seriously, how many people fit all 4 of these criteria? Even just not meeting 1 of those makes commute by bicycle not worth it. I guess if you worked in a flower shop downtown and lived in some hipster co-op apartment you could do this...


Excuses, excuses, excuses

Bottom line is you either want to do something and find a way to do it or you don't want to do something and will search for reasons for not doing it
 
2012-07-19 04:10:56 PM  

Fark_Guy_Rob: Nothing has ever made me feel so satisfied as jogging slowly in the middle of a bicycle lane. It's amazing. I recommend everyone try it.


If you think you feel good doing that try taking the lane on a 2 lane arterial.
 
2012-07-19 04:12:54 PM  

digistil: Spongebob Plaid Pants: I have 2 observations to make:

Looks like all the bicyclists in Copenhagen are female,

and,

There's always the one beeyotch that has to text while driving.

Wait until you see a cyclist riding to work in the morning... While smoking... While talking on their cell... While holding an umbrella to stay dry... While wearing a three piece suit.

I guessed Japan.

/fairly common over here

 
2012-07-19 04:16:30 PM  

jurisenpai: I am a chick and a bike commuter, so I'm getting a kick, etc.

I ride to work on a road where the bike lane is slowly getting covered in a charming mix of broken beer bottles and kudzu. I would love a dedicated bike highway, but I'd settle for some goddamn street sweeping. And mowing. Or a herd of goats. I'm not picky.


^^^This. A wide shoulder full of tire popping debris is not a bike lane.
 
2012-07-19 04:40:22 PM  
"I am certain that the bicycle will once more fill a social role and again become a means of transport and not just an object of leisure. Once cars had chased it out of towns and, for several years, the concern of our leaders was to make it easier to drive cars by enlarging roads and leaving space for nobody else. Now they're in the process of undoing all that and, even if the change varies from country to country, I can see that there is a whole new way of political thinking. In Germany, Belgium and the countries of the north, the changes are already visible. In the Latin countries it's an idea that's making progress."

Eddy Merckx, 2006
 
2012-07-19 04:57:37 PM  

Baloo Uriza: the money is in the banana stand: 1.) You are incredibly lucky if you live extremely close to where you work.

Unless you just didn't bother to do some family planning and consider what that had to do with your finances, thus having some crotch droppings anchoring you to a location, or you live someplace that's damn near unlivable like Seattle, Portland, LA, Dallas or NYC, odds are you can work within a few miles of home, or move closer to work

2.) You are fortunate you live in either an area that has fair weather, your place of work has showers, you don't care if you stink and sweat.

Action Wipes and a change of clothes. Your argument is irrelevant.

3.) You are fortunate you do not have many responsibilities allowing you the additional time to commute via bicycle.

If we're talking in-city commutes, unless you have odd work hours or your city has no traffic, it's just as fast either way.

4.) You are either fortunate you do not need to commute ever during the day or have access to company vehicles.

You're pretty stupid if you're letting your company free use of your vehicle during the day. I'd expect compensation beyond the tax-writeoff and minimally required mileage credit, at least market rate for hiring a cab. Make it worth my while to use my car for business.

I just don't understand how there can truly be that many people that meet all 4 of these criteria.

Quit settling for less in life and making excuses for the situation you put yourself in? Worked for me.


1) 13 miles each way, with hills. That's only far until you've done it a few times.

2) Pacific northwest. Crappy weather is a specialty. We do have showers in the building, which has been common for me.

3) Biking adds a total of ~30-40 minutes per day to my commute, while providing nearly 2 hours of exercise. Unless you don't take any time each day to exercise, this is a huge win.

4) I save up errands by planning ahead. When I need to do something I can't walk to, I drive to work that day. It's usually not more than 1x/week.

Easy, unless you're really just trying to justify not riding, in which case "because I don't wanna" is equally convincing (but more honest).
 
2012-07-19 10:45:57 PM  

This text is now purple: dickfreckle: You might have a point, but conveniently ignore the huge percentage of motorists who routinely break as many traffic laws as they can fit into a morning commute. Gets even worse after happy hour.

These bicycle threads wouldn't be so stupid if motorists ever bothered to admit that maybe they suck, too.

I've never seen a car avoid an intersection by driving on the sidewalk. That occurs about 50% of the time w/ bicycles in Philly.


Dude, you're bringing up a bicycle on a sidewalk (douchey and irresponsible, yes) because you've never seen a car do it. I think you need to rethink this argument. I've never seen a bicyclist accelerate to 60 mph in a school zone! Therefore, my opinion is validated!

And I've spent plenty of time in Philly and other major cities. 50% is the sort of exaggeration these threads are known for. Someone pissed you off recently and now you want to extrapolate it to an entire segment of society.

/not even a bicyclist
//but I am a motorcyclist, so I'm particularly aware of insanely irresponsible drivers. I have to be, or I'll die.
 
2012-07-19 11:09:02 PM  

Werepig: THX 1138: I've noticed that pedestrians also seem to be blind to bikes. This week alone I've nearly hit four people who stepped off the sidewalk in order to get a better view up the street to see if their bus was approaching. I mean, I know I'm not as big as a car, but with the hideous snapping noise my shiatty bottom bracket makes, I know I can be heard from a mile away.

My front brake squeals like a banshee. A quick tap is all it takes to get their attention


Sounds like it need to be cleaned and/or adjusted so it's actually riding the rim properly.
 
2012-07-20 08:39:19 PM  

Werepig: THX 1138: thelordofcheese: /and stay off the sidewalks, other bicyclists!

Thank you.

Cyclists on the sidewalk make the rest of us all look like asshats just by association. I wish it was worth the police's time to enforce it.

I agree but I will also say that for the most part the cyclists I see on the sidewalk are better off on the sidewalk. Kids, elderly and crazed homeless. If I'm driving and coming up on a cyclist riding a decent bike and looking the part I'm more confident they are not going to make some unexpected move, unlike the sidewalk riders just above.


You'd be shocked if you saw my bike, then.

/but maybe those folding side baskets and that huge milk crate on an old mountain bike with bar-ends almost as long as my forearms and a red saddle would make you think I'm crazy enough to pull it off.
 
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