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(New York Daily News)   Sanity returns to the Garden as the Knicks decide not to pay $25M for a point guard who was released by two teams and then only played 35 games for them   (nydailynews.com) divider line 207
    More: Spiffy, Knicks, Jeremy Lin, offer sheet, rockets, New York, Mike Woodson, Marcus Camby, luxury tax  
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1196 clicks; posted to Sports » on 18 Jul 2012 at 2:20 PM (1 year ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2012-07-18 12:42:52 PM
This is dumb. So dumb.

Lin's the only thing that's made being a Knicks fan legitimately exciting since about 2000 or so. I've hadn't seen this city so excited for them in years. Sure he's not exactly proven and his turnovers were high, but he was in an aggressive system and was essentially a rookie learning on the job. Even with the turnovers he had a good PER, and the Knicks immediately started winning more often when he started playing.

The first two years of the contract were cheap, so there really isn't much of a risk for those years. Maybe Lin plays well and maybe he doesn't, but it's a relatively inexpensive gamble. And yes, there's the luxury tax issue in the 3rd year. But in the worst case scenario he's an expiring contract that can be used in a trade at that point. Supposedly there's even a provision that would have allowed them to spread out that year's cap hit if they chose. And besides, since when do the Knicks care about spending? After years of throwing around money like crazy, you draw the line here, when it's a guy who was immediately beloved?

And now we replace him with Raymond Felton. We know what we're getting from Raymond Felton, and there's no chance it's better than meh.

I don't see a reason for this beyond Dolan making a (misguided) point.
 
2012-07-18 12:43:59 PM
Yup. Sanity equals "Refusing to pay eight million dollars per season for a player whose potential market cap could go into the billions and provided upside and hope that the franchise has rarely seen in the last decade." Sanity equals "leaving the team with a drunk-driver and competitive eater as its point guards." Sanity equals "limiting your potential to win it all with a team designed to win it all because you didn't want to hit the luxury tax". Sanity equals "billionaire owner was upset that the organization turned Lin into a marketable commodity (by placing him in the lineup as part of a desperation move by a coach to save his own ass) and then watched Lin honor his league-given right to free agency".

Sanity is "not this headline". In-fact, this headline is trolling, I do believe.
 
2012-07-18 01:19:53 PM

FreakinB: This is dumb. So dumb.

Lin's the only thing that's made being a Knicks fan legitimately exciting since about 2000 or so. I've hadn't seen this city so excited for them in years. Sure he's not exactly proven and his turnovers were high, but he was in an aggressive system and was essentially a rookie learning on the job. Even with the turnovers he had a good PER, and the Knicks immediately started winning more often when he started playing.

The first two years of the contract were cheap, so there really isn't much of a risk for those years. Maybe Lin plays well and maybe he doesn't, but it's a relatively inexpensive gamble. And yes, there's the luxury tax issue in the 3rd year. But in the worst case scenario he's an expiring contract that can be used in a trade at that point. Supposedly there's even a provision that would have allowed them to spread out that year's cap hit if they chose. And besides, since when do the Knicks care about spending? After years of throwing around money like crazy, you draw the line here, when it's a guy who was immediately beloved?

And now we replace him with Raymond Felton. We know what we're getting from Raymond Felton, and there's no chance it's better than meh.

I don't see a reason for this beyond Dolan making a (misguided) point.


can you trade a player you match? read somewhere that you can't.
 
2012-07-18 01:23:46 PM
Lin is a slightly above average basketball player who had a handful of standout games, which were notable only because he is one of the few Asians in the NBA
 
2012-07-18 01:33:24 PM

SpikeStrip: can you trade a player you match? read somewhere that you can't


Teams are banned from trading a player signed in the offseason until December 15 of the first year of the contract. After that, do what you will. I don't think the rules are different for players with matched offer sheets but I'm not positive. But assuming I'm right, there's no way the Knicks would have looked into trading him that early. It's really only a concern for that last year.
 
2012-07-18 01:38:21 PM
I listen to a LOT of sports radio (i'm getting old and slow) and there have been many talking heads that had stats on the awesome financial impact Lin had on that team.. everything pointed to "great".. even if he had a bad game, the next game.. as much coverage/merch/viewership .. he was doing everything the ownership needed him to do.

Oh well..
 
2012-07-18 02:09:37 PM
I don't know. It's been 5 months and my memory has dimmed a bit, but he seemed to be fading before he was injured, as if the rest of the league was starting to figure him out. I think the NY media made more out of him than there was because there wasn't much else going on (aside from the NHL) during his great run, basically the weeks between the Giants won the Superbowl and the start of the Yankees preseason, and that he was this kid came out of nowhere (the media loves the underdog). He brought excitement but was that really going to continue?

I can't really blame Lin for bailing on NY. We're usually not too nice to our stars (we've booed Mantle, Ewing, Strawberry, A-Rod etc). If Lin was just average for the Knicks after signing such a huge contract the fans would have been all over his ass faster than some writer on ESPN can make a Lin-sanity joke.

And looking at this from Dolan's view, if Lin was a bust we would all be yelling and screaming about another sucky move that will set back the franchise for years while our cable bills went up to pay the luxury tax. I dislike Knicks ownership for many reasons but paying $25M based on 6 weeks does seem insane. Now that will be Houston's problem/great investment.
 
2012-07-18 02:24:39 PM
I was excited for a while, as a casual Knicks fan, that Lin was here.

Now that he's gone, I'm sure I'll lose interest.

/whatever
 
2012-07-18 02:25:29 PM

FreakinB: This is dumb. So dumb.


The Knicks are dead to me now. Fark 'em; they could win 5 straight NBA titles and I still wouldn't give a crap.

Lin's the only thing that's made being a Knicks fan legitimately exciting since about 2000 or so. I've hadn't seen this city so excited for them in years. Sure he's not exactly proven and his turnovers were high, but he was in an aggressive system and was essentially a rookie learning on the job. Even with the turnovers he had a good PER, and the Knicks immediately started winning more often when he started playing.

The first two years of the contract were cheap, so there really isn't much of a risk for those years. Maybe Lin plays well and maybe he doesn't, but it's a relatively inexpensive gamble. And yes, there's the luxury tax issue in the 3rd year. But in the worst case scenario he's an expiring contract that can be used in a trade at that point. Supposedly there's even a provision that would have allowed them to spread out that year's cap hit if they chose. And besides, since when do the Knicks care about spending? After years of throwing around money like crazy, you draw the line here, when it's a guy who was immediately beloved?

And now we replace him with Raymond Felton. We know what we're getting from Raymond Felton, and there's no chance it's better than meh.

I don't see a reason for this beyond Dolan making a (misguided) point.


Jim Dolan is the Vince McMahon of the NBA. 'nuff said.
 
2012-07-18 02:27:49 PM

damageddude: And looking at this from Dolan's view, if Lin was a bust we would all be yelling and screaming about another sucky move that will set back the franchise for years while our cable bills went up to pay the luxury tax. I dislike Knicks ownership for many reasons but paying $25M based on 6 weeks does seem insane. Now that will be Houston's problem/great investment.


Well maybe if Dolan had gotten out of his fat ass and offered Lin a "shut up and take my money" contract within the first minute of FA, it wouldn't have come to that.
 
2012-07-18 02:29:06 PM

Mike_LowELL: Yup. Sanity equals "Refusing to pay eight million dollars per season for a player whose potential market cap could go into the billions and provided upside and hope that the franchise has rarely seen in the last decade." Sanity equals "leaving the team with a drunk-driver and competitive eater as its point guards." Sanity equals "limiting your potential to win it all with a team designed to win it all because you didn't want to hit the luxury tax". Sanity equals "billionaire owner was upset that the organization turned Lin into a marketable commodity (by placing him in the lineup as part of a desperation move by a coach to save his own ass) and then watched Lin honor his league-given right to free agency".

Sanity is "not this headline". In-fact, this headline is trolling, I do believe.


This is why I have you favorited.
 
2012-07-18 02:30:30 PM
I guess I'll be watching the Rockets instead of the Knicks next season.
 
2012-07-18 02:30:41 PM

mainstreet62: I was excited for a while, as a casual Knicks fan, that Lin was here.

Now that he's gone, I'm sure I'll lose interest.

/whatever


I've really gone from diehard to casual over the past 10-or-so years. And I say that as someone who hasn't become any less intense about the Mets, and has become more intense about the farking Islanders. I don't even feel as antagonized by their owners as I do by Dolan.

/thank you, Giants
 
2012-07-18 02:32:20 PM
If they matched Houston's offer, they would have had TWO years of cheap to decide whether they wanted to keep or trade Lin. But to just let him leave like that, with no strings attached?

The basketball gods, in their questionable wisdom, bestowed a GIFT upon the New York Knicks - they knowingly and purposefully squandered it. They had plenty of time to figure something out regarding the luxury tax - that's a valid but insufficient excuse for why they let Lin leave. Regardless of whether they decided to retain Lin in year 3, they could have traded for some talent to fill out their team, they could have signed him at a bargain, they had so many options. There was only ONE losing move - which is exactly what they decided to do.
 
2012-07-18 02:33:37 PM
We've seen it all before. A player gets hot or a rookie comes up and blows away the competition. The NY fans are ready to anoint him king of the city, then he starts to decline or sometimes drops off the face of the earth. Kevin Maas, Sam Militello. If we had a bigger sample size, then maybe he was worth it. But I don't know if the Asian population is going to follow him just because he's Asian if he comes back to earth.
 
2012-07-18 02:34:16 PM

Mike_LowELL: Yup. Sanity equals "Refusing to pay eight million dollars per season for a player whose potential market cap could go into the billions and provided upside and hope that the franchise has rarely seen in the last decade." Sanity equals "leaving the team with a drunk-driver and competitive eater as its point guards." Sanity equals "limiting your potential to win it all with a team designed to win it all because you didn't want to hit the luxury tax". Sanity equals "billionaire owner was upset that the organization turned Lin into a marketable commodity (by placing him in the lineup as part of a desperation move by a coach to save his own ass) and then watched Lin honor his league-given right to free agency".

Sanity is "not this headline". In-fact, this headline is trolling, I do believe.


The Knicks have absolutely zero chance to win a title in the next three years with or without Lin.

The rest of your post I agree with though, and I'm strongly in favor of spending someone else's money to make Carmelo Anthony angry.
 
2012-07-18 02:35:28 PM
I'm sorry this is just audio.

ESPN sports business analyst Darren Rovell dishes on the financial impact of Jeremy Lin's move to Houston and more.
 
2012-07-18 02:37:01 PM

Dr.Knockboots: I listen to a LOT of sports radio (i'm getting old and slow) and there have been many talking heads that had stats on the awesome financial impact Lin had on that team.. everything pointed to "great".. even if he had a bad game, the next game.. as much coverage/merch/viewership .. he was doing everything the ownership needed him to do.

Oh well..


Well, speaking as someone on the other side of the continent, in another country entirely and who is not much of a basketball fan, I heard a lot about Linsanity for a few weeks. Peaked up here with the game against Toronto (naturally), then... well... I never heard of him again until this thread.

Sports history is littered with stories like this. When I read about Jeremy Lin, I keep thinking about NHL goaltender Jim Carey. Had a solid rookie year - including a record winning streak to open his career. He won the Vezina Trophy in year two, then fell completely off the face of the earth.

The Knicks are obviously betting Lin was a flash in the pan, which means his marketability is likely to nosedive (it will already since he's no longer in New York). Add in that the contract Lin did sign would have put the team into luxury tax territory, and the Knicks may have made the right call. But only time will tell on that one.
 
2012-07-18 02:40:05 PM

robbiex0r: I'm sorry this is just audio.

ESPN sports business analyst Darren Rovell dishes on the financial impact of Jeremy Lin's move to Houston and more.


Summary:
Merchandise - They made about enough to pay Lin for 5-6 games
Knicks on TV in Asia - Intl money split between 30 teams
Stock was boosted by $600M and MSG tv - winning team will draw viewers anyway
Tickets - brokers made money on tickets, not Knicks. Tix are already highly priced off $1B renovation project
 
2012-07-18 02:44:01 PM

tortilla burger: If they matched Houston's offer, they would have had TWO years of cheap to decide whether they wanted to keep or trade Lin. But to just let him leave like that, with no strings attached?


exactly at worst lin turns into a great expiring contract. instead they have old man kidd and fatty felton and lose a ton of revenue/marketability.

also, the stories about players potentially being jealous if lin returned to the knicks with a large contract seemed odd to me. actually, they seemed some what racist to me, or at least partially motivated by race.

/or has this all can be summarized; dolan being dolan.
 
2012-07-18 02:44:46 PM

damageddude: I can't really blame Lin for bailing on NY.


He didn't. Matched offer meant if the Knick's said no he was forced to go to Houston.
 
2012-07-18 02:45:08 PM

damageddude: I can't really blame Lin for bailing on NY. We're usually not too nice to our stars (we've booed Mantle, Ewing, Strawberry, A-Rod etc).


How dare you include Rodriguez in this list? He's a former star playing in New Yorlk, but never really an NY star.

Besides, it's been well established that Lin in a Taiwanese-American in the Knicks' armour, no?

...

(Did I read that old story right?)
 
2012-07-18 02:46:41 PM
The only real case you can make for letting Lin go is because they're all in on Mike Woodson, who in Atlanta pretty much neutered the PG position and ran the offense to let the Joe Johnsons and Josh Smiths dominate the ball and do whatever they felt like, and obviously Carmello is just happy to do the same.

So, you don't trade for Felton and sign Kidd. You sign two complete sh*tbums instead who are literally just capable of dribbling a ball past half court on the inbound and get the hell out of the way.
 
2012-07-18 02:46:57 PM

FreakinB: I've hadn't seen this city so excited for them in years. Sure he's not exactly proven and his turnovers were high, but he was in an aggressive system and was essentially a rookie learning on the job.


Jay Caspian Kang put this in perspective nicely in his Grantland article:

It's true - of those same 259 players who used over 300 possessions, Lin ranked 252nd with a 21.4 turnover percentage. Raymond Felton ranked 244th at 19.6 percent. Jason Kidd? 257th at 24.2 percent. Guess who was 256th? Rajon Rondo. 258th? Steve Nash.

/I tuned in to my first Knicks game in years just to see what all this Linsanity stuff was about.
//Not even a little surprised Dolan managed to fark this one up.
 
2012-07-18 02:47:01 PM

hbk72777: We've seen it all before. A player gets hot or a rookie comes up and blows away the competition. The NY fans are ready to anoint him king of the city, then he starts to decline or sometimes drops off the face of the earth. Kevin Maas, Sam Militello. If we had a bigger sample size, then maybe he was worth it. But I don't know if the Asian population is going to follow him just because he's Asian if he comes back to earth.


Fans in Asia and China specifically will follow him no matter what. And so will their money.
 
2012-07-18 02:50:37 PM
$25 Million in salary. This doesn't even count the likely luxury tax hits. The 3rd year alone would have cost them $60 million.
 
2012-07-18 02:51:06 PM
Let's all just say what's really going on here: Lin is not worth 15 million because Asian guys like him need to know their place and meekly accept lower rewards for what they contribute.
 
2012-07-18 02:52:14 PM

FreakinB: And now we replace him with Raymond Felton. We know what we're getting from Raymond Felton, and there's no chance it's better than meh.


Hey, Raymond Felton spent many years training with the likes of Sean May and Boris Diaw... so he's got that going for him...

Anyways, Houston could have a young but good team in a few years. Their summer league team is really solid in positions 2 through 5.
 
2012-07-18 02:53:46 PM

Killer Cars: The only real case you can make for letting Lin go is because they're all in on Mike Woodson, who in Atlanta pretty much neutered the PG position and ran the offense to let the Joe Johnsons and Josh Smiths dominate the ball and do whatever they felt like, and obviously Carmello is just happy to do the same.

So, you don't trade for Felton and sign Kidd. You sign two complete sh*tbums instead who are literally just capable of dribbling a ball past half court on the inbound and get the hell out of the way.


The Kidd signing only makes sense if they were going to keep Lin and use Kidd as the Vinny Testaverde of the NBA. Sign him as essentially a position coach and, at best, an emergency option in a game.

Or, if you're Dolan and you just want to fill up the roster already, so you can get back to playing jazz flute.
 
2012-07-18 02:54:17 PM

Levarien: $25 Million in salary. This doesn't even count the likely luxury tax hits. The 3rd year alone would have cost them $60 million.


Since when have the Knicks worried about the luxury tax?

FireZs: Let's all just say what's really going on here: Lin is not worth 15 million because Asian guys like him need to know their place and meekly accept lower rewards for what they contribute.


Let's all just say what is really going on here: Dolan is a moron.
 
2012-07-18 02:55:30 PM
also, the way this all happened is insane. the knicks never make an offer of any size to lin. tell him to discover his value on the open market. woodson then meets with lin to stay he's coming back to be the starting point guard. and says so publicly. meanwhile the knicks sign old drunkard kidd and trade for fatty felton. then there's the hiding from the offer sheet weirdness. then not matching, when they would get two years to see who lin is for just 10 million. this is just insane. dolan being dolan is great to watch as i'm not a fan of the knicks. must be just terrible for the knick fans though...
 
2012-07-18 02:56:02 PM

FireZs: Let's all just say what's really going on here: Lin is not worth 15 million because Asian guys like him need to know their place and meekly accept lower rewards for what they contribute.Jim Dolan could fark up a cup of coffee


FTFY
/the gospel according to Joe Pesci
 
2012-07-18 02:56:04 PM
Can someone explain why the backloaded contract is considered to be a poison pill? When you get to the last year of the contract, he'll be making a ton of money, but it will only be for one year. Back when I gave a shiat about the NBA, an expiring contract was a valuable commodity. The bigger the better. If a player turned out to be good enough to earn that salary, great. If not, he became a chip to trade to a team that wanted to clear cap room. It was a way to pry valuable players from rebuilding teams. Does it not work that way anymore with the current CBA?
 
2012-07-18 02:57:41 PM

Gunny Highway: Levarien: $25 Million in salary. This doesn't even count the likely luxury tax hits. The 3rd year alone would have cost them $60 million.

Since when have the Knicks worried about the luxury tax?


and expiring contracts always have trade value. or use it to match the salaries in a blockbuster trade for someone good if it turns out lin does suck.
 
2012-07-18 02:58:41 PM

Super Chronic: Can someone explain why the backloaded contract is considered to be a poison pill? When you get to the last year of the contract, he'll be making a ton of money, but it will only be for one year. Back when I gave a shiat about the NBA, an expiring contract was a valuable commodity. The bigger the better. If a player turned out to be good enough to earn that salary, great. If not, he became a chip to trade to a team that wanted to clear cap room. It was a way to pry valuable players from rebuilding teams. Does it not work that way anymore with the current CBA?


Who the hell knows what the new CBA has done. The offers made this off season have been outrageous.
 
2012-07-18 02:59:20 PM

Super Chronic: Can someone explain why the backloaded contract is considered to be a poison pill? When you get to the last year of the contract, he'll be making a ton of money, but it will only be for one year. Back when I gave a shiat about the NBA, an expiring contract was a valuable commodity. The bigger the better. If a player turned out to be good enough to earn that salary, great. If not, he became a chip to trade to a team that wanted to clear cap room. It was a way to pry valuable players from rebuilding teams. Does it not work that way anymore with the current CBA?


The issue is that the luxury tax is much bigger now, and Lin's contract could cause an issue given the other contracts already on the books. But like I said before, my response to that is 1) what you just said and 2) since when do the Knicks care? This is the team that broke the bank for Eddy Curry, FFS. You can't deal with one year on a guy that people might actually like?
 
2012-07-18 03:00:48 PM

Super Chronic: Can someone explain why the backloaded contract is considered to be a poison pill? When you get to the last year of the contract, he'll be making a ton of money, but it will only be for one year. Back when I gave a shiat about the NBA, an expiring contract was a valuable commodity. The bigger the better. If a player turned out to be good enough to earn that salary, great. If not, he became a chip to trade to a team that wanted to clear cap room. It was a way to pry valuable players from rebuilding teams. Does it not work that way anymore with the current CBA?


Short version: The Knicks have a giant payroll and are above the NBA's salary cap. Teams above the cap have to pay luxury tax penalties. Those penalties can accumulate over time and there's a bit of a multiplier penalty for years spent over the cap, so the $14 million year could end up costing $60 million (those are the numbers thrown around).

That's how I understand it anyway.
 
2012-07-18 03:02:30 PM

FreakinB: Super Chronic: Can someone explain why the backloaded contract is considered to be a poison pill? When you get to the last year of the contract, he'll be making a ton of money, but it will only be for one year. Back when I gave a shiat about the NBA, an expiring contract was a valuable commodity. The bigger the better. If a player turned out to be good enough to earn that salary, great. If not, he became a chip to trade to a team that wanted to clear cap room. It was a way to pry valuable players from rebuilding teams. Does it not work that way anymore with the current CBA?

The issue is that the luxury tax is much bigger now, and Lin's contract could cause an issue given the other contracts already on the books. But like I said before, my response to that is 1) what you just said and 2) since when do the Knicks care? This is the team that broke the bank for Eddy Curry, FFS. You can't deal with one year on a guy that people might actually like?


Since all the talk about Lin usually gets to the hundreds of millions of dollars in marketing potential, I'd think the luxury tax is a minor concern for them, so yeah. I guess I agree with the conventional wisdom here.
 
2012-07-18 03:03:31 PM
good article with lots of the details of what was going on behind the screens of the linsanity free agency:

Lin opens up about leaving Knicks: 'Honestly, I preferred New York'

/i submitted it, but the mods dislike me, or so i assume.
 
2012-07-18 03:03:33 PM

Ham Sandvich: Short version: The Knicks have a giant payroll and are above the NBA's salary cap. Teams above the cap have to pay luxury tax penalties. Those penalties can accumulate over time and there's a bit of a multiplier penalty for years spent over the cap, so the $14 million year could end up costing $60 million (those are the numbers thrown around).


They are the New York freaking Knicks, they have the money.
 
2012-07-18 03:03:47 PM

Ham Sandvich: Short version: The Knicks have a giant payroll and are above the NBA's salary cap. Teams above the cap have to pay luxury tax penalties. Those penalties can accumulate over time and there's a bit of a multiplier penalty for years spent over the cap, so the $14 million year could end up costing $60 million (those are the numbers thrown around).

That's how I understand it anyway.


Same here, but the biggest counter is just how much additional interest and money came (and would continue, to some degree) by Lin's mere presence.

Lin being Lin more than pays for any luxury taxes.
 
2012-07-18 03:04:14 PM

robertus: Jay Caspian Kang put this in perspective nicely in his Grantland article:

It's true - of those same 259 players who used over 300 possessions, Lin ranked 252nd with a 21.4 turnover percentage. Raymond Felton ranked 244th at 19.6 percent. Jason Kidd? 257th at 24.2 percent. Guess who was 256th? Rajon Rondo. 258th? Steve Nash.

/I tuned in to my first Knicks game in years just to see what all this Linsanity stuff was about.
//Not even a little surprised Dolan managed to fark this one up.


He's misusing the hell out of the stat to not really make a point. Lin had an assist/TO ratio of less than 2 to 1 and had more turnovers per minute than anyone else in the NBA by a fair bit.
 
2012-07-18 03:06:21 PM

Mike_LowELL: Sanity is "not this headline". In-fact, this headline is trolling, I do believe.


But you have to admit that it's impressive that dropping the word "sanity" into an NBA-related headline now can be seen as referring exclusively to Jeremy Lin. I, knowing nothing about the current Knicks, read the headline and assumed it was about their not having signed him.

If only worldwide name recognition among even casual fans were bankable in some way.
 
2012-07-18 03:06:33 PM

Gunny Highway: Ham Sandvich: Short version: The Knicks have a giant payroll and are above the NBA's salary cap. Teams above the cap have to pay luxury tax penalties. Those penalties can accumulate over time and there's a bit of a multiplier penalty for years spent over the cap, so the $14 million year could end up costing $60 million (those are the numbers thrown around).

They are the New York freaking Knicks, they have the money.


Yes. But they are not managed by a rational actor. Its a 3 year contract. Even if Lin sucks after the first year, there will probably still be teams willing to trade for him and see if he fits their system better. In that scenario, the Knicks don't get burned by the final $14 million anyway.
 
2012-07-18 03:07:21 PM

Ham Sandvich: Super Chronic: Can someone explain why the backloaded contract is considered to be a poison pill? When you get to the last year of the contract, he'll be making a ton of money, but it will only be for one year. Back when I gave a shiat about the NBA, an expiring contract was a valuable commodity. The bigger the better. If a player turned out to be good enough to earn that salary, great. If not, he became a chip to trade to a team that wanted to clear cap room. It was a way to pry valuable players from rebuilding teams. Does it not work that way anymore with the current CBA?

Short version: The Knicks have a giant payroll and are above the NBA's salary cap. Teams above the cap have to pay luxury tax penalties. Those penalties can accumulate over time and there's a bit of a multiplier penalty for years spent over the cap, so the $14 million year could end up costing $60 million (those are the numbers thrown around).

That's how I understand it anyway.


Well, I can see that being an impediment to wanting to pay out the total value of the deal (though see above re making it back via marketing opportunities). But my question was really about the backloading aspect of it. Based on what you said, if anything, I'd think the backloading would also help with the luxury tax: pay more of it later and thus negate the cumulative effect/"multiplier penalty" from having paid it earlier. Or am I misunderstanding it?
 
2012-07-18 03:12:00 PM
I hope that when Lin comes back to the Garden, he drops 38 on the Knicks and does a Spreewell on Dolan (not choking him, just staring at him).
 
2012-07-18 03:14:48 PM

FreakinB: This is dumb. So dumb.

Lin's the only thing that's made being a Knicks fan legitimately exciting since about 2000 or so. I've hadn't seen this city so excited for them in years. Sure he's not exactly proven and his turnovers were high, but he was in an aggressive system and was essentially a rookie learning on the job. Even with the turnovers he had a good PER, and the Knicks immediately started winning more often when he started playing.

The first two years of the contract were cheap, so there really isn't much of a risk for those years. Maybe Lin plays well and maybe he doesn't, but it's a relatively inexpensive gamble. And yes, there's the luxury tax issue in the 3rd year. But in the worst case scenario he's an expiring contract that can be used in a trade at that point. Supposedly there's even a provision that would have allowed them to spread out that year's cap hit if they chose. And besides, since when do the Knicks care about spending? After years of throwing around money like crazy, you draw the line here, when it's a guy who was immediately beloved?

And now we replace him with Raymond Felton. We know what we're getting from Raymond Felton, and there's no chance it's better than meh.

I don't see a reason for this beyond Dolan making a (misguided) point.


Whats really dumb is this gives knicks fans yet another reason to jump on the Brooklyn bandwagon.

I hate basketball, but lin got even me interested for a bit last season.
 
2012-07-18 03:17:37 PM

Super Chronic: But my question was really about the backloading aspect of it.


i think the backloading was required. iirc, the gilbert arenas rule limited the size of the first two years of the contract the rockets could offer. ok, i was bored and found it.

Teams are now limited in the salary they can offer in an offer sheet to a restricted free agent with one or two years in the league. The first-year salary in the offer sheet cannot be greater than the Non-Taxpayer Mid-Level exception...The second-year salary in such an offer sheet is limited to the standard 4.5% raise. The third-year salary can jump considerably -- it is allowed to be as high as it would have been had the first-year salary not been limited by this rule...


thus, to offer lin 24 million over 3 years, the rockets had to make the last year huge. sure, it had the added bonus of farking with the knicks luxury tax numbers in year 3, but the contract had to be backloaded to reach that total value under the cba.
 
2012-07-18 03:21:04 PM

you have pee hands: robertus: Jay Caspian Kang put this in perspective nicely in his Grantland article:

It's true - of those same 259 players who used over 300 possessions, Lin ranked 252nd with a 21.4 turnover percentage. Raymond Felton ranked 244th at 19.6 percent. Jason Kidd? 257th at 24.2 percent. Guess who was 256th? Rajon Rondo. 258th? Steve Nash.

/I tuned in to my first Knicks game in years just to see what all this Linsanity stuff was about.
//Not even a little surprised Dolan managed to fark this one up.

He's misusing the hell out of the stat to not really make a point. Lin had an assist/TO ratio of less than 2 to 1 and had more turnovers per minute than anyone else in the NBA by a fair bit.


Fair point. I'm not much of a basketball guy. It struck me as interesting to see him in similar company as Nash and Rondo, but I was looking at the tree instead of the forest.
 
2012-07-18 03:26:08 PM

Gunny Highway: They are the New York freaking Knicks, they have the money.


Lin isn't worth $60 million/year. Everyone's assuming he'll continue to tear everything up and are writing off the fact that his bad games were against good defenses. Well, all his good games were against sh*t teams or sh*t PG play, too.

He's far more likely to be a non-entity than he is to be worth $8 million a year (before considering luxury tax costs).

But hey, let's keep talking about idiot things like Simmons about how the Knicks fans should jump ship to the Nets, who are a much worse team. (though if the two teams combined, they'd have a starting rotation of Williams, Johnson, Anthony, Stoudemire, and Chandler with Kidd and Humphries and such coming off the bench...that team might be a contender).
 
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