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(Daily Mail)   Rare audio recording (w/ video) of an above ground nuclear bomb test - circa 1953   (dailymail.co.uk) divider line 101
    More: Interesting, Nevada Test, Yucca Mountain, nuclear weapons, Alex Wellerstein, archive footage, rfk jr., ambient noise, American Institute of Physics  
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5571 clicks; posted to Geek » on 17 Jul 2012 at 2:51 AM (2 years ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2012-07-17 09:47:14 AM

Crocodilly_Pontifex: SoupJohnB: I wonder how many Farkers remember "head between your knees/kiss your ass good-bye" drills in grade school?

/you can play on my lawn

//just don't micturate on it

Duck and cover! What was the turtle's name?

/living less than 20 miles from Tinker AFB, we still did these in the 1990's


There was a turtle by the name of Bert, and Bert the turtle was very alert. When danger threatened him he never got hurt, he knew just what to do.

conelrad.com
 
2012-07-17 09:50:43 AM
No sound, but seemed relevant.

(starts at 2:55, stay for about a minute for the full effect)
 
2012-07-17 10:29:17 AM

cretinbob: The EMP was awesome. That was ....whoa...........


I don't think that was caused by the EMP. While there is a short-ranged EMP created by a ground burst, and the camera was close enough to maybe be affected by it, it only lasts a few milliseconds.

I think it's more likely that the camera simply didn't have perfect isolation between the image track and the sound track, and the sound track got bleached by the massive overexposure.
 
2012-07-17 11:09:35 AM
3:17: "Holy shiat!"
 
2012-07-17 11:15:12 AM

Crocodilly_Pontifex: /living less than 20 miles from Tinker AFB, we still did these in the 1990's


Um no.
They were absolutely not popping nukes anywhere near Oklahoma City in the 1990s.
 
2012-07-17 11:22:25 AM
Was recently re-reading a Cold War era novel, and the passage that struck me was people in the city watching planes fall out of the sky after the EMP took out their electronics. I always thought about the cars, but never really gave a thought to what it would be like living in the flight path of a major metropolitan airport.
 
2012-07-17 11:24:23 AM

dittybopper: /it's upshot-knothole grable

I wouldn't mind an upshot up GrablesDaughter's knothole, if you know whut I mean.


One could say that I would, given proper clearance and opportunity to engage same, ride my Chariot Argus to her Plumbob, at which point I'd Crossroads her Tumbler-Snapper and Greenhouse her Castle until her Buster Jangle went Wigwam all over my Sandstone and we both saw the Trinity. Afterward, we would munch on Operations Hardtack I & II in our Castle while musing over Projects 56, 57, 58, and 58A.

Ducking and covering would probably happen in some form or other.
 
2012-07-17 11:47:46 AM
Oh c'mon, subby. If you find it on the Internet, it is definitely not a rare audio recording.
 
2012-07-17 11:50:07 AM
CSB: The tables at my wedding reception were named after significant nuclear detonations. I tried to be very clever in naming them; the Party table was Castle-Bravo, while my parents were at Trinity and hers were at Ivy Mike. The extended family from Seattle was at Ranier, hers was at Cherokee, etc.
 
2012-07-17 11:52:47 AM

grinding_journalist: CSB: The tables at my wedding reception were named after significant nuclear detonations. I tried to be very clever in naming them; the Party table was Castle-Bravo, while my parents were at Trinity and hers were at Ivy Mike. The extended family from Seattle was at Ranier, hers was at Cherokee, etc.


Heh heh you echelon-whacked your own wedding. Cool!
 
2012-07-17 12:01:27 PM

grinding_journalist: CSB: The tables at my wedding reception were named after significant nuclear detonations. I tried to be very clever in naming them; the Party table was Castle-Bravo, while my parents were at Trinity and hers were at Ivy Mike. The extended family from Seattle was at Ranier, hers was at Cherokee, etc.


My wedding reception table CSB is a friend-of-a-friend sorta thing...

My sister's best friend is the cousin of Jeremy and Jason Giambi. She told me that, at Jeremy's wedding, all the tables were different MLB ballparks. Wrigley Field, Yankee Stadium, Candlestick Park...
 
2012-07-17 12:03:22 PM

DVDave: Oh c'mon, subby. If you find it on the Internet, it is definitely not a rare audio recording.


It is rare in the fact that very few other recordings have the original sound at the original timing. RTFA.
 
2012-07-17 12:05:06 PM
Ahh, the Atomic Age...
4.bp.blogspot.com
 
2012-07-17 12:07:36 PM
I saw a turtle! Wasn't that from the FARK Mesozoic?

/tortoise, I know
 
2012-07-17 12:09:59 PM
HotIgneous Intruder: Crocodilly_Pontifex: /living less than 20 miles from Tinker AFB, we still did these in the 1990's

Um no.
They were absolutely not popping nukes anywhere near Oklahoma City in the 1990s.



I'm pretty sure he meant the "duck and cover" drills, not nuke testing...
 
2012-07-17 12:27:13 PM

Jim DiGriz: HotIgneous Intruder: Crocodilly_Pontifex: /living less than 20 miles from Tinker AFB, we still did these in the 1990's

Um no.
They were absolutely not popping nukes anywhere near Oklahoma City in the 1990s.



I'm pretty sure he meant the "duck and cover" drills, not nuke testing...


Ah, gotcha. My bad.
/But were were still popping nukes into the early 1990s out west.

To atone for my stupid, I'll give this link to an animated map of all nuclear explosions in the history of the world to the thread. via BoingBoing.
 
2012-07-17 12:32:16 PM

Tobin_Lam: DVDave: Oh c'mon, subby. If you find it on the Internet, it is definitely not a rare audio recording.

It is rare in the fact that very few other recordings have the original sound at the original timing. RTFA.


I will concede that it was rare, but it certainly isn't anymore.
 
2012-07-17 12:40:11 PM

HotIgneous Intruder: dittybopper: /it's upshot-knothole grable

I wouldn't mind an upshot up GrablesDaughter's knothole, if you know whut I mean.

One could say that I would, given proper clearance and opportunity to engage same, ride my Chariot Argus to her Plumbob, at which point I'd Crossroads her Tumbler-Snapper and Greenhouse her Castle until her Buster Jangle went Wigwam all over my Sandstone and we both saw the Trinity. Afterward, we would munch on Operations Hardtack I & II in our Castle while musing over Projects 56, 57, 58, and 58A.

Ducking and covering would probably happen in some form or other.


In other words, Bally Jerry, pranged his kite right in the how's-your-father; hairy blighter, dicky-birded, feathered back on his sammy, took a waspy, flipped over on his Betty Harpers and caught his can in the Bertie.
 
2012-07-17 12:42:43 PM
Or the origin story of the Daily Fail

Born of a radioactive explosion
Established in the UK
To bring you news that Americans already know!
 
2012-07-17 12:45:50 PM

DVDave: Tobin_Lam: DVDave: Oh c'mon, subby. If you find it on the Internet, it is definitely not a rare audio recording.

It is rare in the fact that very few other recordings have the original sound at the original timing. RTFA.

I will concede that it was rare, but it certainly isn't anymore.


I don't think you got my point. It will be easy to access now but it is one of the only videos of its kind. "One of the only videos of its kind" is what makes it rare.
 
2012-07-17 12:46:06 PM

Professor Science: cretinbob: The EMP was awesome. That was ....whoa...........

I don't think that was caused by the EMP. While there is a short-ranged EMP created by a ground burst, and the camera was close enough to maybe be affected by it, it only lasts a few milliseconds.

I think it's more likely that the camera simply didn't have perfect isolation between the image track and the sound track, and the sound track got bleached by the massive overexposure.


Yes, I'm talking about the noise that shows up with the flash, not the mechanical wave that his several seconds afterwards. I'll agree that it may not be an EMP, or only the EMP, but a rush of charged particles, X-Rays, Y-Rays , etc. EMP was an over simplification.
 
2012-07-17 01:06:56 PM
I was expecting it to be dubbed to Muderfarkin Bootleg Fireworks.
 
2012-07-17 03:38:53 PM

HotIgneous Intruder: Jim DiGriz: HotIgneous Intruder: Crocodilly_Pontifex: /living less than 20 miles from Tinker AFB, we still did these in the 1990's

Um no.
They were absolutely not popping nukes anywhere near Oklahoma City in the 1990s.



I'm pretty sure he meant the "duck and cover" drills, not nuke testing...

Ah, gotcha. My bad.
/But were were still popping nukes into the early 1990s out west.

To atone for my stupid, I'll give this link to an animated map of all nuclear explosions in the history of the world to the thread. via BoingBoing.


I believe that the last US underground test was in 1992, and they were setting up one for 1993 when the treaty went through. And I do love that vid you posted. kinda reminds me of the big scene from War games..

AngryPoet: vrax: For anyone unfamiliar with it, make sure to check out "Trinity & Beyond: The Atomic Bomb Movie" on DVD and Netflix. A great documentary that everyone should see.

And if you have good speakers, the sub harmonics of the blasts will carry down the block....


I have the whole series of those documentaries, And why yes.. I do have a very large home theater setup :D

Shatner did the narration for all of them except the last one... for some reason they got Adam West for it.. He was a little distracting.

If y'all haven't seen all of them, I highly recommend you do.
 
2012-07-17 04:05:54 PM
2.bp.blogspot.com
 
2012-07-17 05:33:29 PM

Sylvia_Bandersnatch: ClintonKun: Kinda surprised by how simple the bang sounded. I guess I kind of expected it to sound more like what you'd expect "harnessing the power of the cosmos for mass destruction, fun and profit" to sound like.

Yeah, well, you're also hearing that awesome power release conveyed through a cheap microphone of half a century ago. Ever heard anyone yell into a telephone? Overmodulation. It would have sounded a lot different if you'd been there. Anyway, the release is extremely rapid, only a fraction of a second, so it really is much more of a bang than a boom -- followed, of course, by the endless rumble of everything else in the world trying to get out of the way or being crushed in the attempt.


"And even as he spoke the earth rocked beneath their feet. Then rising swiftly up, high above the Towers of the Black Gate, far above the mountains, a vast soaring darkness sprang into the sky, flickering with fire. The earth groaned and quaked. The Towers of the Teeth swayed, tottered, and fell down; the mighty rampart crumbled; the Black Gate was hurled in ruin; and now dim, now growing, now mounting to the clouds, there came a drumming rumble, a roar, a long, echoing roll of ruinous noise."

That's how I imagine it would be in person.
 
2012-07-17 06:06:48 PM

skodabunny: vrax: For anyone unfamiliar with it, make sure to check out "Trinity & Beyond: The Atomic Bomb Movie" on DVD and Netflix. A great documentary that everyone should see.

Don't skip past "Trinity is Still My Name" though or you won't have a clue what's going on.

\lame, I know



Hey, I Liked those Trinity movies.
...ok, not the weird one where he's at a circus.
....ok, not "All the Way, Boys," either.
.......but, the Bambino was an Olympic swimmer IRL!
 
2012-07-17 06:29:07 PM
considering how many above ground, below ground, in the ocean & in the atmosphere nuclear tests we and other countries have conducted over the years, it's hard for me to understand why everyone was freaking the fark out over fukishima - or cherynoble (sorry for spelling) - or three mile island -

don't get me wrong, i don't think what happened in japan was GOOD for us as a planet, just that we've been dosed with far worse over and over for decades.

am curious as to what dosage of radiation people received from reactor meltdown in comparison to any tests done over the last 50 years.

/any science loving farks here handy with pie charts and graphs?
 
2012-07-17 06:30:15 PM

ClintonKun: Kinda surprised by how simple the bang sounded. I guess I kind of expected it to sound more like what you'd expect "harnessing the power of the cosmos for mass destruction, fun and profit" to sound like.


You might like the bangs, shockwaves, and delayed sounds in this explosion:
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=8cy0bd-TdmA
especially around 1:10
 
2012-07-17 08:02:56 PM
 
2012-07-17 10:11:33 PM

Bonanza Jellybean: Cool. I actually have a favorite nuclear test, aesthetically speaking.

/it's upshot-knothole grable


Tsar Bomba for me, hands down. It's 50 Megatons of Fun!
 
2012-07-17 10:20:20 PM

inner ted: considering how many above ground, below ground, in the ocean & in the atmosphere nuclear tests we and other countries have conducted over the years, it's hard for me to understand why everyone was freaking the fark out over fukishima - or cherynoble (sorry for spelling) - or three mile island -

don't get me wrong, i don't think what happened in japan was GOOD for us as a planet, just that we've been dosed with far worse over and over for decades.

am curious as to what dosage of radiation people received from reactor meltdown in comparison to any tests done over the last 50 years.

/any science loving farks here handy with pie charts and graphs?


No charts or graphs. The big deal is that radiation isn't that dangerous unless you are really close to it. Tests were done in mostly uninhabited areas. Chernobyl and Fukushima were accidents in populated areas where a large number of people and animals were/are affected. That's why they are a big deal.
 
2012-07-17 11:51:24 PM

Darth Invictus: Bonanza Jellybean: Cool. I actually have a favorite nuclear test, aesthetically speaking.

/it's upshot-knothole grable

Tsar Bomba for me, hands down. It's 50 Megatons of Fun!


Sorry guys, Crossroads Baker wins this race.

yglesias.thinkprogress.org
 
2012-07-17 11:58:01 PM
Damn, I love these threads because all of my fellow nuke connoisseurs come out to post.

/favorite still is, and always will be, the spectacular Crossroads Bikini Baker
 
2012-07-18 12:33:30 AM

inner ted: considering how many above ground, below ground, in the ocean & in the atmosphere nuclear tests we and other countries have conducted over the years, it's hard for me to understand why everyone was freaking the fark out over fukishima - or cherynoble (sorry for spelling) - or three mile island -

don't get me wrong, i don't think what happened in japan was GOOD for us as a planet, just that we've been dosed with far worse over and over for decades.

am curious as to what dosage of radiation people received from reactor meltdown in comparison to any tests done over the last 50 years.

/any science loving farks here handy with pie charts and graphs?


Part of it is the location, as Tobin_Lam said. In addition to the remote locations of the tests, underground detonations keep the radioactive crap underground (unless somebody screws up, which did happen), and high-altitude air bursts spread everything so finely that a lot of it doesn't get back to the surface until it's had some time to spread out and cool off. A meltdown, on the other hand, dumps crap right near ground level.

Most of the rest of it is the amount of fission involved. A typical reactor will burn a few kilotons-equivalent of uranium every hour (1 kT/hour is about 1100 MW thermal, which would produce 300 or 400 MW electric; common reactors produce 600-1400 MW electric). The long-lived fission products (stuff like cesium-137) build up in the fuel rods over months and years, so a single meltdown has the potential to release 20 or 30 megatons' worth of Cs-137, in the same ballpark as the entire fission yield of all the Operation Castle tests. The short-lived isotope inventory will be lower, but still very significant.

There's also the fact that people downwind of some of those tests should have freaked out a lot more than they did, but had no idea what they were breathing. Nuclear testing in the US is estimated to have caused tens of thousands of cases of cancer, so even something much smaller than the historical total is a serious thing.

And then, of course, there's the fact that some people will freak out over any damn thing they hear about, whether or not it can possibly affect them. Words like "nuclear" and "radioactive" set these people off immediately. A significant portion of the post-Fukushima hysteria fell under this, but would have been much more justified if the wind hadn't been blowing everything out over the ocean.
 
2012-07-18 01:57:15 AM

Professor Science: And then, of course, there's the fact that some people will freak out over any damn thing they hear about, whether or not it can possibly affect them. Words like "nuclear" and "radioactive" set these people off immediately


Or worse: "radiation."

OMG! My cell phone emits radiation!!!!
 
2012-07-18 02:02:08 AM

JH3675: Tsar Bomba for me, hands down. It's 50 Megatons of Fun!

Sorry guys, Crossroads Baker wins this race.


FTFA: Crossroads consisted of two detonations, each with a yield of 23 kilotons

Combined, they are 1/100th the Tsar bomb. Imagine that water column being over 10 times wider - i.e. the entire width of that picture would be the water column.
 
2012-07-18 02:21:48 AM

JH3675:
Sorry guys, Crossroads Baker wins this race.


FTFA: Chemist Glenn Seaborg, the longest-serving chairman of the Atomic Energy Commission, called Baker "the world's first nuclear disaster."

Betcha there's some people from Hiroshima who would beg to differ.
 
2012-07-18 02:22:17 AM

Darth Invictus: Bonanza Jellybean: Cool. I actually have a favorite nuclear test, aesthetically speaking.

/it's upshot-knothole grable

Tsar Bomba for me, hands down. It's 50 Megatons of Fun!




Actually it was closer to 47 according to the Soviets.

Also subs this isn't rare and was on either the Trinity & Beyond BluRay or on the last SD version VCE put out.
 
2012-07-18 02:29:58 AM

JH3675: Darth Invictus: Bonanza Jellybean: Cool. I actually have a favorite nuclear test, aesthetically speaking.

/it's upshot-knothole grable

Tsar Bomba for me, hands down. It's 50 Megatons of Fun!

Sorry guys, Crossroads Baker wins this race.

[yglesias.thinkprogress.org image 500x262]




Can't remember which carrier it is... but that little black spot on the right side of the water column is a boat that is completely vertical.

I think the best looking test was Licorne...

farm1.staticflickr.com
farm1.staticflickr.com
farm1.staticflickr.com
farm1.staticflickr.com
 
2012-07-18 08:02:42 AM
csb time

When I was nine, I heard a TV broadcast reference Mutually Assured Destruction. Having no idea what the tube was talking about. I asked my dad (who was a conscientious objector in the 60s/70s and was shanghaied into fatherhood during the 80's) what it meant. Dad took my hand and marched me outside and told me to look around.

"Son, that means you're just going to see a bright flash, and then nothing. You'll be vaporized."

He stumbled back inside, leaving his stunned son in silence.

Thanks, dad.
 
2012-07-18 08:26:49 AM

impaler: Combined, they are 1/100th the Tsar bomb. Imagine that water column being over 10 times wider - i.e. the entire width of that picture would be the water column.


Blast effects don't scale linearly, so no.
 
2012-07-18 09:07:47 AM

HotIgneous Intruder: impaler: Combined, they are 1/100th the Tsar bomb. Imagine that water column being over 10 times wider - i.e. the entire width of that picture would be the water column.

Blast effects don't scale linearly, so no.


The Tsar bomb is 200 times more powerful than that one. I said 10 times wider...

That's not linear.
 
2012-07-18 10:07:03 AM

Cerebral Knievel: If y'all haven't seen all of them, I highly recommend you do.


I wasn't aware that there were more. What are the names of the other ones? This is highly relevant to my interests.
 
2012-07-18 10:24:00 AM

Tobin_Lam: inner ted: considering how many above ground, below ground, in the ocean & in the atmosphere nuclear tests we and other countries have conducted over the years, it's hard for me to understand why everyone was freaking the fark out over fukishima - or cherynoble (sorry for spelling) - or three mile island -

don't get me wrong, i don't think what happened in japan was GOOD for us as a planet, just that we've been dosed with far worse over and over for decades.

am curious as to what dosage of radiation people received from reactor meltdown in comparison to any tests done over the last 50 years.

/any science loving farks here handy with pie charts and graphs?

No charts or graphs. The big deal is that radiation isn't that dangerous unless you are really close to it. Tests were done in mostly uninhabited areas. Chernobyl and Fukushima were accidents in populated areas where a large number of people and animals were/are affected. That's why they are a big deal.


except for the military guys they had stand real close, just to see what would happen.

but i see what you are saying, however, if it's only dangerous when you are close to it, then all the people here on the west coast (u.s.) are freaking out over nothing. all the talk of 'prevailing winds and currents" is of no consequence? (not trolling... just unsure)
 
2012-07-18 10:40:14 AM

Tsar_Bomba1: JH3675: Darth Invictus: Bonanza Jellybean: Cool. I actually have a favorite nuclear test, aesthetically speaking.

/it's upshot-knothole grable

Tsar Bomba for me, hands down. It's 50 Megatons of Fun!

Sorry guys, Crossroads Baker wins this race.

[yglesias.thinkprogress.org image 500x262]



Can't remember which carrier it is... but that little black spot on the right side of the water column is a boat that is completely vertical.

I think the best looking test was Licorne...

[farm1.staticflickr.com image 850x649]
[farm1.staticflickr.com image 850x566]
[farm1.staticflickr.com image 850x574]
[farm1.staticflickr.com image 782x1024]


Beautiful and frightening.
 
2012-07-18 10:40:48 AM

Professor Science: inner ted: considering how many above ground, below ground, in the ocean & in the atmosphere nuclear tests we and other countries have conducted over the years, it's hard for me to understand why everyone was freaking the fark out over fukishima - or cherynoble (sorry for spelling) - or three mile island -

don't get me wrong, i don't think what happened in japan was GOOD for us as a planet, just that we've been dosed with far worse over and over for decades.

am curious as to what dosage of radiation people received from reactor meltdown in comparison to any tests done over the last 50 years.

/any science loving farks here handy with pie charts and graphs?

Part of it is the location, as Tobin_Lam said. In addition to the remote locations of the tests, underground detonations keep the radioactive crap underground (unless somebody screws up, which did happen), and high-altitude air bursts spread everything so finely that a lot of it doesn't get back to the surface until it's had some time to spread out and cool off. A meltdown, on the other hand, dumps crap right near ground level.

Most of the rest of it is the amount of fission involved. A typical reactor will burn a few kilotons-equivalent of uranium every hour (1 kT/hour is about 1100 MW thermal, which would produce 300 or 400 MW electric; common reactors produce 600-1400 MW electric). The long-lived fission products (stuff like cesium-137) build up in the fuel rods over months and years, so a single meltdown has the potential to release 20 or 30 megatons' worth of Cs-137, in the same ballpark as the entire fission yield of all the Operation Castle tests. The short-lived isotope inventory will be lower, but still very significant.

There's also the fact that people downwind of some of those tests should have freaked out a lot more than they did, but had no idea what they were breathing. Nuclear testing in the US is estimated to have caused tens of thousands of cases of cancer, so even something much small ...



encrypted-tbn3.google.com
think your post should end with that. thanks for dropping the science.

i still have reservations about how 'contained' any of the underground tests were / are as there had to be some impact on the water tables.

/csb - my old man was in the navy in the 50's & 60's and was one of the many lab rats they had stand on the deck of the ship as they lit those things off. not sure if his cancer was from that or from 7 decades of smokes.... maybe the radiation fought off the cigarettes ?? science. ??
 
2012-07-18 10:48:35 AM

grinding_journalist: Cerebral Knievel: If y'all haven't seen all of them, I highly recommend you do.

I wasn't aware that there were more. What are the names of the other ones? This is highly relevant to my interests.


trinity and beyond.

nukes in space, the rainbow bombs ( that was about the upper atmospheric testing)

Hollywood's secret film studio ( about lookout mountain and the guys who documented everything)

Nuclear rescue 911 ( about accidents involving nuclear weapons, narrated by Adam West, a little strange)

Atomic journeys.( about various test sites that can be visited and their historical significance.)
 
2012-07-18 11:17:37 AM

Cerebral Knievel: grinding_journalist: Cerebral Knievel: If y'all haven't seen all of them, I highly recommend you do.

I wasn't aware that there were more. What are the names of the other ones? This is highly relevant to my interests.

trinity and beyond.

nukes in space, the rainbow bombs ( that was about the upper atmospheric testing)

Hollywood's secret film studio ( about lookout mountain and the guys who documented everything)

Nuclear rescue 911 ( about accidents involving nuclear weapons, narrated by Adam West, a little strange)

Atomic journeys.( about various test sites that can be visited and their historical significance.)


Cool. Something to drag me away from Skyrim. Are they all done by the people who did Trinity? That's probably my current favorite nuke-doc, I was disappointed by Countdown: Zero, and the other ones Netflix recommends are actually just fiction movies, and shiatty ones at that. (How is "Damnation Alley" a nuclear war documentary?)

I've also already made the rounds on semifiction "day after" movies; The Day After, Threads, and A Boy and His Dog. (Threads is by far and away the most depressing movie I've ever seen; this includes such heartwarming fare as Requiem for a Dream and Schindler's List.) So, if you have any recommendations there other than one's I've noted, I'm always game.

I'm not including "mainstream" stuff in this list because I've already seen them all, stretching all the way out to where Terminator 2 is a "nuclear war" movie.

I'm curious about the "Atomic Journeys" one, I've been out to Trinity site (haven't taken the twice-a-year tour though) and got past the second security gate at Nevada Test Site before the guards realized I wasn't one of the bosses (same make/model/color of car. Being "asked to step out of the car" with 4 assault rifles pointed at you is an...interesting experience.) Still wanna visit Oak Ridge even though there really isn't anything to see outside, and Chernobyl/Pripyat is on the bucket list.
 
2012-07-18 11:34:33 AM

grinding_journalist: Cerebral Knievel: grinding_journalist: Cerebral Knievel: If y'all haven't seen all of them, I highly recommend you do.

I wasn't aware that there were more. What are the names of the other ones? This is highly relevant to my interests.

trinity and beyond.

nukes in space, the rainbow bombs ( that was about the upper atmospheric testing)

Hollywood's secret film studio ( about lookout mountain and the guys who documented everything)

Nuclear rescue 911 ( about accidents involving nuclear weapons, narrated by Adam West, a little strange)

Atomic journeys.( about various test sites that can be visited and their historical significance.)

Cool. Something to drag me away from Skyrim. Are they all done by the people who did Trinity? That's probably my current favorite nuke-doc, I was disappointed by Countdown: Zero, and the other ones Netflix recommends are actually just fiction movies, and shiatty ones at that. (How is "Damnation Alley" a nuclear war documentary?)

I've also already made the rounds on semifiction "day after" movies; The Day After, Threads, and A Boy and His Dog. (Threads is by far and away the most depressing movie I've ever seen; this includes such heartwarming fare as Requiem for a Dream and Schindler's List.) So, if you have any recommendations there other than one's I've noted, I'm always game.

I'm not including "mainstream" stuff in this list because I've already seen them all, stretching all the way out to where Terminator 2 is a "nuclear war" movie.

I'm curious about the "Atomic Journeys" one, I've been out to Trinity site (haven't taken the twice-a-year tour though) and got past the second security gate at Nevada Test Site before the guards realized I wasn't one of the bosses (same make/model/color of car. Being "asked to step out of the car" with 4 assault rifles pointed at you is an...interesting experience.) Still wanna visit Oak Ridge even though there really isn't anything to see outside, and Chernobyl/Pripyat is on the bucket list.


Yep, they are all by the same people that did Trinity and Beyond and they're all narrated by the Shatner except the Nuclear Rescue 911 one which is narrated by Adam West, who just doesn't seem to be able to turn Adam West off. other than that its very good.

I eventually want to get out to Bikini Atoll personally, and i would love to be able to finagle a way to Johnston Island.

if you haven't yet seen Fat man and little boy yet, its the dramatization of the lead up to the trinity test and you get to see John Cusak die of acute radiation poisoning!
 
2012-07-18 03:11:20 PM

Oafmeel: csb time

When I was nine, I heard a TV broadcast reference Mutually Assured Destruction. Having no idea what the tube was talking about. I asked my dad (who was a conscientious objector in the 60s/70s and was shanghaied into fatherhood during the 80's) what it meant. Dad took my hand and marched me outside and told me to look around.

"Son, that means you're just going to see a bright flash, and then nothing. You'll be vaporized."

He stumbled back inside, leaving his stunned son in silence.

Thanks, dad.


no sugar coating there. he was correct, you know.
 
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