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(New York Daily News)   World War II vet celebrates his 90th birthday with his first ever skydive. Because at 90 - why the hell not   (nydailynews.com) divider line 28
    More: Spiffy, World War II, skydiving, rescue missions, Bangor Daily News, George H. W. Bush, Matt Riendeau, celebrations  
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2055 clicks; posted to Main » on 17 Jul 2012 at 3:38 AM (2 years ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2012-07-16 09:14:33 PM
Now that takes some low swinging balls to do that.

Good for him.
 
2012-07-16 09:31:26 PM
images2.sina.com
 
2012-07-17 03:53:20 AM
images.wikia.com
 
2012-07-17 04:10:55 AM
Unsurprisingly not one of the WW2 veterans that spent the actual war doing this. I imagine most of them prefer to keep their feet on the ground nowadays.

//When he's lucid, my grandfather refers to the practice as "jumping out of a perfectly good plane and pretending to be munitions". Apparently the parachutes where you have even slight control over where you'll land were a post-war innovation.
 
2012-07-17 04:23:05 AM

Jim_Callahan: //When he's lucid, my grandfather refers to the practice as "jumping out of a perfectly good plane and pretending to be munitions". Apparently the parachutes where you have even slight control over where you'll land were a post-war innovation.


And the whole part where you have a high percentage chance of landing as a corpse.
 
2012-07-17 04:52:51 AM

Jim_Callahan: Unsurprisingly not one of the WW2 veterans that spent the actual war doing this. I imagine most of them prefer to keep their feet on the ground nowadays.

//When he's lucid, my grandfather refers to the practice as "jumping out of a perfectly good plane and pretending to be munitions". Apparently the parachutes where you have even slight control over where you'll land were a post-war innovation.


www.fsr-club2000.de

No doubt. The first chute with significant forward speed and steering capability was the ParaCommander (above), which wasn't produced until 1962. The PC was still a round chute, and had much lower forward speed and ability to "flare out" at the end compared to a modern square chute.

Still, it was a farking remarkable advance over the unsteerable, hard-landing chutes of WWII. Those, it was even common to land backwards. Prior to the advent of the PC in 1962, there basically wasn't any such thing as "sport" parachuting, it was simply too dangerous. The chance of a chute malfunction was hardly the only problem- rather, getting blown off wherever the wind takes you, breaking an ankle or rupturing a disk on landing, and/or getting dragged was not many people's idea of a fun sport.

And note there's not a lot of control you'd have over these factors. These risks would not only be significant, but persistent.
 
2012-07-17 05:07:07 AM
YOLO
 
2012-07-17 05:08:38 AM
If I reach 90 I'll do this sans parachute.
 
2012-07-17 05:10:38 AM

CaptainBeer: YOLO


We are now enemies
 
2012-07-17 06:44:59 AM
You can't flare a PC...
 
2012-07-17 07:06:14 AM
Why the hell not, subby?

This is why the hell not.

/Suddenly craving flapjacks for breakfast....
 
2012-07-17 07:27:03 AM
I realized I'm supposed to somehow be touched and inspired by this story, but I've got to admit that I'm not.
 
2012-07-17 08:13:59 AM
Because if the chute fails at 90 he would have lived a full life. Don't think it took balls but it was daring. To that, I give him credit.

I did it for 12 years in the Army but I did get paid for doing it although it wasn't generally at night with a ruck sack and weapon.

\ It is the most fun you can have with your pants on.
 
2012-07-17 08:46:54 AM

farkityfarker: I realized I'm supposed to somehow be touched and inspired by this story, but I've got to admit that I'm not.


WHY CAN'T YOU FEEL THE WAY I FEEL ABOUT THIS!?
 
2012-07-17 09:35:31 AM
Reading TFA reminds me of when I was a kid in the late 50's. There were still a small number of Civil War veterans still alive (mostly drummer boys and fifers, who joined the army as "non-combatants", but who still walked right into battle...). These few surviving soldiers occasionally appeared on TV to reminisce about their experiences, which made quite an impression on me.

In not much more than a decade, WW2 vets will be about as rare. This gives me a bit of a sad, as my dad was a WW2 vet, as were all of the significant men in my life as a child, including most of the male teachers I encountered through high school and into college.
 
2012-07-17 09:53:04 AM

CaptainBeer: YOLO


No.
 
2012-07-17 09:59:29 AM

Oznog: Jim_Callahan: Unsurprisingly not one of the WW2 veterans that spent the actual war doing this. I imagine most of them prefer to keep their feet on the ground nowadays.

//When he's lucid, my grandfather refers to the practice as "jumping out of a perfectly good plane and pretending to be munitions". Apparently the parachutes where you have even slight control over where you'll land were a post-war innovation.

[www.fsr-club2000.de image 473x825]

No doubt. The first chute with significant forward speed and steering capability was the ParaCommander (above), which wasn't produced until 1962. The PC was still a round chute, and had much lower forward speed and ability to "flare out" at the end compared to a modern square chute.

Still, it was a farking remarkable advance over the unsteerable, hard-landing chutes of WWII. Those, it was even common to land backwards. Prior to the advent of the PC in 1962, there basically wasn't any such thing as "sport" parachuting, it was simply too dangerous. The chance of a chute malfunction was hardly the only problem- rather, getting blown off wherever the wind takes you, breaking an ankle or rupturing a disk on landing, and/or getting dragged was not many people's idea of a fun sport.

And note there's not a lot of control you'd have over these factors. These risks would not only be significant, but persistent.


PLF!!
 
2012-07-17 10:01:58 AM
My 91 yo. Grandad though still lucid and living at home sometimes has trouble going outside to the deck much less jumping out of a plane. Good for this guy.

/enjoy ww2 vets while they are still with us. The number gets smaller every day. My grandad is the last in my family.
 
2012-07-17 10:10:21 AM

Oznog: Jim_Callahan: Unsurprisingly not one of the WW2 veterans that spent the actual war doing this. I imagine most of them prefer to keep their feet on the ground nowadays.

//When he's lucid, my grandfather refers to the practice as "jumping out of a perfectly good plane and pretending to be munitions". Apparently the parachutes where you have even slight control over where you'll land were a post-war innovation.

[www.fsr-club2000.de image 473x825]

No doubt. The first chute with significant forward speed and steering capability was the ParaCommander (above), which wasn't produced until 1962. The PC was still a round chute, and had much lower forward speed and ability to "flare out" at the end compared to a modern square chute.

Still, it was a farking remarkable advance over the unsteerable, hard-landing chutes of WWII. Those, it was even common to land backwards. Prior to the advent of the PC in 1962, there basically wasn't any such thing as "sport" parachuting, it was simply too dangerous. The chance of a chute malfunction was hardly the only problem- rather, getting blown off wherever the wind takes you, breaking an ankle or rupturing a disk on landing, and/or getting dragged was not many people's idea of a fun sport.

And note there's not a lot of control you'd have over these factors. These risks would not only be significant, but persistent.


I know you know this, but modern tandem canopies are far, far more advanced than the Paracommander. I jumped a Paracommander precisely once (Howard White had one at the DZ I often went to). Never again, because I like my ankles.

/I
 
2012-07-17 10:14:26 AM
4.bp.blogspot.com

Approves.
 
2012-07-17 10:14:57 AM

LesserEvil: Why the hell not, subby?

This is why the hell not.

/Suddenly craving flapjacks for breakfast....


That particular dropzone is notorious for having a wide variety of safety concerns. Personally, I avoid it.

The tandem instructor in the video had his rating yanked, as well.

/Old (more than a year) video.
 
2012-07-17 10:17:19 AM
Exeter? I just boarded 'er.
 
2012-07-17 10:18:50 AM
To be super clear, I'm talking about the dropzone in LesserEvil's video, not the one in TFA.
 
2012-07-17 10:30:59 AM

socoloco: \ It is the most fun you can have with your pants on.


Or not.

I don't have a link, and I can't search for one while at work, but someone should be able to post the video of the woman skydiving sans culottes with everything fluttering in the breeze.
 
2012-07-17 10:44:57 AM
DRTFA, but did he at least do his jump over Normandy?
 
2012-07-17 11:42:45 AM

theorellior: socoloco: \ It is the most fun you can have with your pants on.

Or not.

I don't have a link, and I can't search for one while at work, but someone should be able to post the video of the woman skydiving sans culottes with everything fluttering in the breeze.


Which one? There are lots of those... The relative wind at 126 mph is not flattering, though...
 
2012-07-17 12:25:50 PM
Quick... someone call a reporter!

images.wikia.com
 
2012-07-17 08:04:16 PM
"Old fall is old."

"Dust falling?"

P.S. Thank you, sir.
 
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