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(Science Daily)   Researchers link anxiety to accelerated aging, so if you fear death, you probably should   (sciencedaily.com) divider line 47
    More: Scary, accelerated aging, Brigham and Women's Hospital, Nurses' Health Study, Women's Hospital, anxiety disorders, study design, psychological stress, nucleic acid sequence  
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3588 clicks; posted to Main » on 16 Jul 2012 at 2:40 PM (2 years ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2012-07-16 01:35:38 PM
Bravo, +1...
 
2012-07-16 02:41:12 PM
thepoliticalcarnival.net
 
2012-07-16 02:42:36 PM
Winner of a headline, subby.
 
2012-07-16 02:44:37 PM
That explains my youthful looks: I'm too stupid to give a shiat.

/ignorance is not only bliss, but longevity
 
2012-07-16 02:46:54 PM
Oh great. Guess I'm on my way out. Well, I always felt I would die younger than most. I have been anxious and worried all day as it is, and I don't know why. Now I have something more concrete to worry about, I suppose.
 
2012-07-16 02:49:38 PM
Y uno, el subbo
 
2012-07-16 02:50:53 PM
Timor Mortis Conturbat Me
 
2012-07-16 02:51:35 PM
Im fked
 
2012-07-16 02:55:48 PM
I"m worried about overdosing of Farkitrol and running out of booze at home. So far, only the latter happens. Usually the day before payday. Funny how that works out.
 
2012-07-16 03:00:30 PM
Thanks. The anxiety this article caused helps because now I can worry that my lack of worrying would cause me to live longer.
 
2012-07-16 03:01:35 PM
How about social anxiety disorder that Paxil was marketed to "treat?" How'd that turn out?
 
2012-07-16 03:07:39 PM
HAHA - that's why I drink! I'll live forever. Or at least until my liver falls out.
 
2012-07-16 03:16:58 PM

Hector Felix: Oh great. Guess I'm on my way out. Well, I always felt I would die younger than most. I have been anxious and worried all day as it is, and I don't know why. Now I have something more concrete to worry about, I suppose.


Nah, the trick is to have Death be afraid of you. He comes near you, rip his nipples off. Then he'll wait until you're old and feeble.

GOOD TO SEE YOU AGAIN, THEMAGNI. YOU LOOK TIRED.

"Not today!"
 
2012-07-16 03:19:54 PM
Paging Quantum Apostrophe to the thread...
 
2012-07-16 03:27:44 PM
What if you hope you die before you get old?
 
2012-07-16 03:29:53 PM
So I'm better off drinking to combat anxiety?
 
2012-07-16 03:31:06 PM
At least I'm not a claustrophobic agoraphobic.
 
2012-07-16 03:33:56 PM

Sticky Hands: What if you hope you die before you get old?


You'll end up like Keith Richards, who is in his SEVENTH freaking decade by the way
 
2012-07-16 03:36:44 PM

ArcadianRefugee: That explains my youthful looks: I'm too stupid to give a shiat.

/ignorance divorce is not only bliss, but longevity


FTFM - still looking pretty good.
 
2012-07-16 03:38:42 PM
Mother Nature is like a grocer with her thumb on the scale.

If you are stressed it probably means that you are doing something wrong, so you are punished with rapid aging. If you are stress-free, it may not mean that you are doing anything right, but obviously somebody is running interferance for you or you have things fairly well sussed out. Nature rewards success just like everybody else. As the cruel old song says, "You are nobody until somebody loves you". Being looked after is a kind of success isn't it? A lot of guys living in their mother's basement certainly hope so.

The "grandmother" (and presumably "grandfather") phenomenon is well-known to geneticists: they believe that having elders alive during the child-rearing years takes some of the burden of child-care off of parents and shares it out to relations with a genetic interest in the survival of the children. The genes which tend to encourage "grandmothering" or "grandfathering" of children would thus be selected for, as would genes that prolongue the useful life of those who nurture and care for the young.

At the same time, it is helpful to weed out the types that are too stupid, stressed out or mean to look after their own offspring and grandchildren. Nature would select for genes that shut the non-contributors down unless they are merely putting off reproduction, in which case they might dry up but they will never, never blow away.

The same selection process is believed to promote the survival of paradoxical traits such as homosexuality. A homosexual should logically not be a reproducer, but not only genetic but social studies seem to show that being same-sex oriented leads to MORE, not less reproduction because maiden aunts and queer uncles contribute to the survival and well-belling of their nieces and nephews.

I don't know if the ghey is involved, but many of the ancestors on my Mother's side of the family were celebate. You might say that celebacy runs in families. My genealogical research has found large families where many never married (for social, economic or simple practical reasons--it isn't easy to find a bride or groom in the country sometimes).

My great aunt tended my cousins once and twice and possibly three times removed, serving as a sort of Nanny or grandmother to the whole family. In fact, one of my "great aunts" was the Nanny. They always called her "aunt" so I assumed she was related to the family. And looking after other people's children was not uncommon in her generation or in the family, so I assumed she was just another maiden aunt, devoting a life to other people's happiness like some sort of passive-aggressive saint (that runs in the family as well). To tell the truth, I am always being surprised by my family. They are either very good at keeping family secrets or I am a little dim at finding them out until nobody cares to conceal them any more. My genealogical research has left me some hard nuts to crack, but then any family tree will have people who leave extraordinary paper trails and others who leave nary a trace of their passing.

As an example of a paper trail you could build a high way on, I added Sir Charles Tupper, Baronett, PM, MP, PC, etc., etc., to my family tree on the weekend. He was not only a Father of Canadian Confederation but also Premier of Nova Scotia, a diplomat, Prime Minister of Canada, a diplomat, and occupied any number of Cabinet positions, not to mention much-honoured.

On the other hand, I am stilling struggling to keep the various people of the same name straight long enough to hook them up with parents, children, dates, and places. Quite a few people seem to leave nothing behind but their name on a Census, even if they live long, presumably full lives.

It's nice to have family in Wikipedia. Saves a heap of research.

Of course, it helps when you write the article and add it yourself. I won't name names, but a few of my articles have grown into something quite respectable with a little help from friends and family of the subject. I planted the seed of a number of articles on subjects I thought worthy of inclusion and left them to their fate. I am impressed with the work that has been put into them by whoever it was that licked them into shape.

I see there is a WikiFamily Tree that aims to be the Wikipedia of genealogy. I'd like to see that succeed. One giant family tree would save a lot of duplication of work and wasted time and effort. On the other hand, there are downsides to order and efficiency. Not enough room for innovation and change.
 
2012-07-16 03:41:47 PM
I have a fridge magnet that says "The more you complain, the longer God makes you live."

Mind you, the longevity may simply be the result of enjoying complaining. Little old ladies who attend funerals seem to have a great time. Once they are dried up and half dead themselves, they seem to think that the best place to hide from death is in plain sight. They make longevity into a competitive sport, though, which spoils it for us lazy folks.
 
2012-07-16 03:45:23 PM
So thats why I look like an elf.
 
2012-07-16 04:00:09 PM

theorellior: Paging Quantum Apostrophe to the thread...


AHHHHHHHHHH! AHHHHHH! AHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHH!
 
2012-07-16 04:02:35 PM
Stress is also a "great" way to lose weight. Try being 57 male with no knowledge if he will be reading this site from the library or a shelter in the next few weeks. 8 weeks from 177 to 150. (showers at the "Y' because I live in my shop) The 3AM puking and sweating is another treat.

Customers see me at the "Y" and assume I am there to work out and be healthy .Lots of compliments and people assuming my healthy look is from exposure to the sun.

One guy figured it out and has helped me a bit.

/ignore this pity party and focus on real folks that have real problems

stress can Really affect people to look older accentuating their already farkedup self-esteem. Ladies of my age (I am a male) have had bad reactions to the loss of loved ones. One woman really lost it when her grandchild went away to College. She had taken care of the child since grammar school. She is very cool but seems to have aged inappropriately. She has some support network but.... It will probably die off as the kid is no longer with her.

I wish her the best and try to keep contact.

All you folks on this site----------Take a look around your neighborhood and try to watch the older folks and do something simple for them, shovel the sidewalk, cut grass or just talk to them. The lady I mentioned would appreciate it. She also has some wonderfully wacked stories.

/self absorbed poster is out.
 
2012-07-16 04:12:11 PM
OTOH, I have had times in my life when I had problems with anxiety, and, at the age of 37, I still regularly get carded when I buy beer, so YMMV.



/I guess if I didn't have the anxiety, I'd get carded for R-rated movies.
 
2012-07-16 04:22:21 PM

brantgoose: Mother Nature is like a grocer with her thumb on the scale.

If you are stressed it probably means that you are doing something wrong, so you are punished with rapid aging. If you are stress-free, it may not mean that you are doing anything right, but obviously somebody is running interferance for you or you have things fairly well sussed out. Nature rewards success just like everybody else. As the cruel old song says, "You are nobody until somebody loves you". Being looked after is a kind of success isn't it? A lot of guys living in their mother's basement certainly hope so.

The "grandmother" (and presumably "grandfather") phenomenon is well-known to geneticists: they believe that having elders alive during the child-rearing years takes some of the burden of child-care off of parents and shares it out to relations with a genetic interest in the survival of the children. The genes which tend to encourage "grandmothering" or "grandfathering" of children would thus be selected for, as would genes that prolongue the useful life of those who nurture and care for the young.

At the same time, it is helpful to weed out the types that are too stupid, stressed out or mean to look after their own offspring and grandchildren. Nature would select for genes that shut the non-contributors down unless they are merely putting off reproduction, in which case they might dry up but they will never, never blow away.

The same selection process is believed to promote the survival of paradoxical traits such as homosexuality. A homosexual should logically not be a reproducer, but not only genetic but social studies seem to show that being same-sex oriented leads to MORE, not less reproduction because maiden aunts and queer uncles contribute to the survival and well-belling of their nieces and nephews.

I don't know if the ghey is involved, but many of the ancestors on my Mother's side of the family were celebate. You might say that celebacy runs in families. My genealogical research has found large families where many never married (for social, economic or simple practical reasons--it isn't easy to find a bride or groom in the country sometimes).

My great aunt tended my cousins once and twice and possibly three times removed, serving as a sort of Nanny or grandmother to the whole family. In fact, one of my "great aunts" was the Nanny. They always called her "aunt" so I assumed she was related to the family. And looking after other people's children was not uncommon in her generation or in the family, so I assumed she was just another maiden aunt, devoting a life to other people's happiness like some sort of passive-aggressive saint (that runs in the family as well). To tell the truth, I am always being surprised by my family. They are either very good at keeping family secrets or I am a little dim at finding them out until nobody cares to conceal them any more. My genealogical research has left me some hard nuts to crack, but then any family tree will have people who leave extraordinary paper trails and others who leave nary a trace of their passing.

As an example of a paper trail you could build a high way on, I added Sir Charles Tupper, Baronett, PM, MP, PC, etc., etc., to my family tree on the weekend. He was not only a Father of Canadian Confederation but also Premier of Nova Scotia, a diplomat, Prime Minister of Canada, a diplomat, and occupied any number of Cabinet positions, not to mention much-honoured.

On the other hand, I am stilling struggling to keep the various people of the same name straight long enough to hook them up with parents, children, dates, and places. Quite a few people seem to leave nothing behind but their name on a Census, even if they live long, presumably full lives.

It's nice to have family in Wikipedia. Saves a heap of research.

Of course, it helps when you write the article and add it yourself. I won't name names, but a few of my articles have grown into something quite respectable with a little help from friends and family of the subject. I planted the seed of a number of articles on subjects I thought worthy of inclusion and left them to their fate. I am impressed with the work that has been put into them by whoever it was that licked them into shape.

I see there is a WikiFamily Tree that aims to be the Wikipedia of genealogy. I'd like to see that succeed. One giant family tree would save a lot of duplication of work and wasted time and effort. On the other hand, there are downsides to order and efficiency. Not enough room for innovation and change.


Your rambling really stressed me out.
 
2012-07-16 04:22:41 PM
I wasn't worried, but now I'm worried that maybe I should be worried.

Thanks a lot, subby.
 
2012-07-16 04:32:51 PM
what the hell does this have to do with JoePa
 
2012-07-16 04:34:56 PM

Magorn: Sticky Hands: What if you hope you die before you get old?

You'll end up like Keith Richards, who is in his SEVENTH freaking decade by the way


Keith Richards is a god so the rules of mortality don't apply to him!
 
2012-07-16 04:54:47 PM
cache.boston.com
 
2012-07-16 05:20:02 PM

Jon iz teh kewl: what the hell does this have to do with JoePa


I realize you're being snarky, but think of this: JoePa, at 84, seemed substantially younger than his age. Then the scandal hit, and within a year he was dead from a supposedly treatable form of lung cancer. Not that I feel sorry for that horrible man (in some ways I think he was actually worse than Sandusky), but it shows that stress can rapidly age you. So, the story may be relevant to JoePa.
 
2012-07-16 05:28:28 PM
I have no anxiety, so I guess I'll live forever.

Come to think of it, I have a worry-free mother (aged 71) and a worry-free grandmother (aged 96), so maybe there IS something to this theory.
 
2012-07-16 05:44:53 PM
hmm... I'm extremely high-anxiety and look 14 years younger than my actual age, so I'm getting a kick...
 
2012-07-16 05:50:54 PM

Gyrfalcon: I have no anxiety, so I guess I'll live forever.

Come to think of it, I have a worry-free mother (aged 71) and a worry-free grandmother (aged 96), so maybe there IS something to this theory.


maybe you should see a psychiatrist.
sometimes they can diagnose an underlying psychiatric disorder where there is none
 
2012-07-16 05:57:56 PM

Jon iz teh kewl: Gyrfalcon: I have no anxiety, so I guess I'll live forever.

Come to think of it, I have a worry-free mother (aged 71) and a worry-free grandmother (aged 96), so maybe there IS something to this theory.

maybe you should see a psychiatrist.
sometimes they can diagnose an underlying psychiatric disorder where there is none


Why, do I need one to be properly anxious? Now I'm worried.
 
2012-07-16 06:08:10 PM

readbot42: How about social anxiety disorder that Paxil was marketed to "treat?" How'd that turn out?


i take paxil and a crapload of other meds. there has been some improvement. at least now i don't feel like i'm going to piss my pants just because i know i have to leave the house. keep in mind you're supposed to be working things out with counselors & psychiatrist, you can't expect miracles from a pill. mental health can be a long slow road one has to work their way down.
 
2012-07-16 06:13:56 PM

Gyrfalcon: Jon iz teh kewl: Gyrfalcon: I have no anxiety, so I guess I'll live forever.

Come to think of it, I have a worry-free mother (aged 71) and a worry-free grandmother (aged 96), so maybe there IS something to this theory.

maybe you should see a psychiatrist.
sometimes they can diagnose an underlying psychiatric disorder where there is none

Why, do I need one to be properly anxious? Now I'm worried.


i didn't really feel anxiety until i was on meds.
now that i'm off meds i don't feel anxiety

maybe you need meds!

if you can't afford your prescription astra zeneca can HELP!
 
2012-07-16 06:16:14 PM
I've been a worry-wart all my life. Got my first gray hair when I was 13, and my hair had sufficiently thinned by 28 that I started shaving my head bald. I guess it's true to a certain extent
 
2012-07-16 07:12:04 PM

reillan: hmm... I'm extremely high-anxiety and look 14 years younger than my actual age, so I'm getting a kick...


You can still die early and just be an extremely young looking corpse.

/you're welcome
 
2012-07-16 09:17:49 PM

Nidiot: reillan: hmm... I'm extremely high-anxiety and look 14 years younger than my actual age, so I'm getting a kick...

You can still die early and just be an extremely young looking corpse.

/you're welcome


That's true, and I know of people that happened to. But, this article wasn't about early death, it was about accelerated chromosomal aging. IANAD, but I suspect that you can have long telomeres and still have clogged arteries, for instance, because that involves issues with deposits within arteries, rather than with the cells themselves.
 
2012-07-16 09:31:22 PM
www.appscout.com

Do you fear death?
 
2012-07-16 11:04:41 PM

LMark: Nidiot: reillan: hmm... I'm extremely high-anxiety and look 14 years younger than my actual age, so I'm getting a kick...

You can still die early and just be an extremely young looking corpse.

/you're welcome

That's true, and I know of people that happened to. But, this article wasn't about early death, it was about accelerated chromosomal aging. IANAD, but I suspect that you can have long telomeres and still have clogged arteries, for instance, because that involves issues with deposits within arteries, rather than with the cells themselves.


So have you had your telomeres measured? (lab tech lol)
 
2012-07-17 12:44:53 AM
Too much stress has been known to be bad for people for ages now. It directly links with anxiety, which is known to be bad at high levels and directly related to heart disease, age related dementia, depression, a version of Crones Disease or Irritable Bowel Syndrome along with asthma and even the increase in chances of contracting cancer.

Anxiety triggers adrenaline from the adrenaline glands and keys the body up for fight or flight. This is not like adrenaline junkies, who get a high from the rush of the chemical flooding their blood streams. This is that gnawing, stomach hurting, blood pressure rising type that a kid feels when going to a Dr where he might have to get a shot. That dread many feel when going to the dentist. The sickening feeling you get when you fear you may get fired from your job or suspect your girl friend is cheating on you.

There's a condition called 'anxiety affective disorder' where a person has faced so much stress or so long, that even in a relaxed environment, they can't fully relax. There's always a background feeling of anxiety or something minor can trigger it.

You might know some of these people. They're chronic worriers.

I didn't think it would go so far as to affect the genes though.

One of the most common signs is an ulcer. After that, heart problems can develop in the form of cardiomyopathy. The walls of the heart can thicken -- which, while incurable, can cause no major problem if treated. Untreated, it can cause irregular heartbeats, high blood pressure and trigger a heart attack.

Then, you get into the maze of psychological disorders which can be triggered by chronic stress.

Interestingly enough, stress levels went up among the general population as cities grew more and more crowded. Stress levels were lowest in rural communities with low populations and a small town.

Remember that when you rent a closet sized NYC apartment for $1000 a month, can hear the neighbors music and squabbles through the walls and get to be serenaded all night long by the traffic, sirens and gunshots.
 
2012-07-17 01:43:14 AM

Oneofthesedays: LMark: Nidiot: reillan: hmm... I'm extremely high-anxiety and look 14 years younger than my actual age, so I'm getting a kick...

You can still die early and just be an extremely young looking corpse.

/you're welcome

That's true, and I know of people that happened to. But, this article wasn't about early death, it was about accelerated chromosomal aging. IANAD, but I suspect that you can have long telomeres and still have clogged arteries, for instance, because that involves issues with deposits within arteries, rather than with the cells themselves.

So have you had your telomeres measured? (lab tech lol)


Perhaps you should ask reillan that question. But seriously, I would think that things like skin elasticity, ability to recover from sun damage, and other factors that make you look older or younger, may have something to do with telomere length, again IANAD. But, there are many factors that make someone look older or younger. For instance, I otherwise look 10-15 years younger than I am, but I have prematurely grey hair, so i look my age when it's not dyed. Are the telomeres in the melanocytes in my hair follicles shorter than the telomeres elsewhere in my body? Does that even make sense? And does this have any predictive value regarding longevity? I suspect we're not even close to answering any of these questions.
 
2012-07-17 03:11:48 AM

Rik01: Too much stress has been known to be bad for people for ages now. It directly links with anxiety, which is known to be bad at high levels and directly related to heart disease, age related dementia, depression, a version of Crones Disease or Irritable Bowel Syndrome along with asthma and even the increase in chances of contracting cancer.

Anxiety triggers adrenaline from the adrenaline glands and keys the body up for fight or flight. This is not like adrenaline junkies, who get a high from the rush of the chemical flooding their blood streams. This is that gnawing, stomach hurting, blood pressure rising type that a kid feels when going to a Dr where he might have to get a shot. That dread many feel when going to the dentist. The sickening feeling you get when you fear you may get fired from your job or suspect your girl friend is cheating on you.

There's a condition called 'anxiety affective disorder' where a person has faced so much stress or so long, that even in a relaxed environment, they can't fully relax. There's always a background feeling of anxiety or something minor can trigger it.

You might know some of these people. They're chronic worriers.

I didn't think it would go so far as to affect the genes though.


It's funny, Seems to be an anxiety theme going on on Fark lately. I posted this in another thread yesterday:

"Technically, we, as a society, are running at an anxiety baseline that should be reserved for those I'm-'bout-to-get-eaten-by-a-bear-fight-or-flight moments. The stress hormone, cortisol, is a neurotoxin, and should not be sustained in the blood stream for extended periods of time. In a state of constant anxiety, cortisol is prevalent in the bloodstream until we're asleep (providing you're relaxed enough to sleep). This is especially a concern for pregnant women, who expose their undeveloped child to daily surges of cortisol if constantly stressed out. In-utero cortisol exposure has been linked to all kinds of birth defects, developmental disabilities, a predisposition to schizophrenia, etc....

So.... I guess my point is, chill the fark out. Otherwise you're just going to eat away at your brain with cortisol. Do some yoga. Meditate, don't medicate: Just as effective as prozac, but FREE! (Big Pharma would LOVE that!)"

/relevant.
 
2012-07-17 03:18:06 AM
Also, +1 subby, I def chortled.
 
2012-07-17 06:41:46 AM

LMark: And does this have any predictive value regarding longevity?


For some reason I had it stored in my head that once the telomeres run out you are ready to push up daisies. But I think that I merely extrapolated from the fact that cells die once their telomeres get too short.
 
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