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(Mediabistro)   Donald J. Sobol, Encyclopedia Brown author, dead at 87. Killer last seen running away putting the murder weapon in his left pants pocket with his right hand   (mediabistro.com) divider line 184
    More: Sad, Encyclopedia Brown, Donald J. Sobol, New York Public Library, deductive reasonings  
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4441 clicks; posted to Main » on 16 Jul 2012 at 2:13 PM (2 years ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



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2012-07-16 01:18:36 PM
This makes me sad. I may have to find Bugs Meany and kick his ass.

/puts my quarter down
 
2012-07-16 01:25:35 PM
+1 for the headline
-1 for the sad
0 for the fact that as of this morning I wouldn't have bet $1000 on him still being alive
 
2012-07-16 01:29:41 PM
His cemetery plot will cost 25 cents a day, plus expenses.
 
2012-07-16 01:37:02 PM
The police have two minutes to solve it
 
2012-07-16 02:08:01 PM
This makes me sad, too. The Encyclopedia Brown books are some of the earliest books I can remember reading as a kid. Damn, I loved those things. Probably while I still love detective stories...
 
2012-07-16 02:14:27 PM
upload.wikimedia.org
 
2012-07-16 02:15:14 PM
If he'd run up the American flag from the fort in a rainstorm we could pin the blame on him.
 
2012-07-16 02:16:29 PM
encrypted-tbn3.google.com
The Highlander of children's authors
 
2012-07-16 02:16:53 PM

Beaver1224: This makes me sad. I may have to find Bugs Meany and kick his ass.

/puts my quarter down


I'll call Frank and Joe.
 
2012-07-16 02:17:29 PM
 
2012-07-16 02:18:48 PM
I loved Encyclopedia Brown and now have a sad.
 
2012-07-16 02:19:01 PM
Sally Kimball was hawt.
 
2012-07-16 02:19:23 PM
Because as you know, hard boiled eggs spin better than uncooked.
 
2012-07-16 02:19:43 PM
Bravo subby
 
2012-07-16 02:20:30 PM
I... has a sad.

(Encyclopedia Brown was a hack for half the time, anyhow - the puzzles were set up 'just so', and I could easily see a few differing scenarios)
 
2012-07-16 02:20:44 PM

Inigo: Idaville Detective 'Encyclopedia' Brown Found Dead In Library Dumpster


thats trashy
 
2012-07-16 02:21:02 PM
Don't look at me. I was hiking from Rome to Sicily all last week.
 
2012-07-16 02:21:03 PM
Man, I read the crap out of those books when I was a kid. I'm convinced that they, in some way, helped develop the problem solving skills I have today.
 
2012-07-16 02:21:29 PM
Now would be a good time to post Wikipedia Brown, for fans who haven't read this parody.
 
2012-07-16 02:21:30 PM
I loved reading his books in early elementary school. They introduced me to deductive reasoning and lateral thinking. Excellent tools for instilling curiosity in young children.
 
2012-07-16 02:22:49 PM
Now I'm waiting for McGurk to kick the bucket. Those were more "edgy" mysteries for an older, wiser reader.
 
2012-07-16 02:24:48 PM
Does this mean we have an author death trifecta in play?
 
2012-07-16 02:25:08 PM
Found the books in 5th grade. Read all the library had. Then read Sword of Shannara which led to LoTR in 6th grade.

I read way too much.

When's the movie coming out?

/still do
//fort in a junkyard
///awesome
 
2012-07-16 02:25:21 PM
So happy I got the headline. Can't wait to get them all for for my two young boys.
 
2012-07-16 02:27:07 PM
I'm drinking a bottle of root beer that I opened with my teeth, so getting a kick, etc.

/not really. has a literary sad.
 
2012-07-16 02:27:40 PM

theorellior: Sally Kimball was hawt.


She was also an good example of a strong female supporting character, which wasn't all that common in children's literature.
 
2012-07-16 02:27:58 PM
fark!!!
 
2012-07-16 02:28:43 PM
Wow, that name brought up some memories. I remember reading those in grade school along with the Three Investigators Mysteries books.
 
2012-07-16 02:31:01 PM
It was Encyclopedia Brown's two minute mysteries that spurred me on to read The Three Investigators books by Robert Arthur Jr.

Jupiter Jones could kick Encyclopedia Brown's ass!

Hell, even one of his sidekicks Bob, who wore a leg brace because he rolled down a hill and broke his leg in umpteen places could kick Brown's butt..
 
2012-07-16 02:31:47 PM
These and The Great Brain were some of my favorites. Made me feel stupid, though.
 
2012-07-16 02:32:25 PM
Loved me some Three Investigators Mysteries.
 
2012-07-16 02:32:37 PM
Encycopedia Brown, The Three Investigators, Choose Your Own Adventure

The Holy Trinity of taking up 88% of my leisure time between ages 7 and 14.
 
2012-07-16 02:34:44 PM
The headline sums up the one and only thing I remember about those books. Excellent job!
 
2012-07-16 02:34:55 PM

docmattic: theorellior: Sally Kimball was hawt.

She was also an good example of a strong female supporting character, which wasn't all that common in children's literature.


Well the good news is that she and Peppermint Patty were one of the first people to be granted a marriage license after North Carolina recently legalized same-sex marriage
 
2012-07-16 02:35:27 PM
And now I'm sad. And I remembered more stuff to add to the list of books I'm going to buy for my son when he's old enough.

/Indian in the Cupboard
//Scott Corbett's Trick series
 
2012-07-16 02:35:41 PM

Inigo: Idaville Detective 'Encyclopedia' Brown Found Dead In Library Dumpster


"It's true that Detective Brown and I didn't see eye to eye, but I would never do something so downright dirty rotten as murder him," Meany said. "Besides, it's a matter of public record that, at the time the crime was committed, I was at the North Pole watching the penguins."


Heh.
 
2012-07-16 02:36:31 PM
He will be buried with his beloved stuffed Arctic penguin and his sword commemorating his ancestor's achievement at the First Battle of Bull Run.
 
2012-07-16 02:38:33 PM

findthefish: Loved me some Three Investigators Mysteries.


Me, too. They were basically more interesting Hardy Boys mysteries that didn't feel quite so cookie-cutter. They were probably also ghost-written by a stable of hacks-for-hire but had a higher quality standard.
 
2012-07-16 02:38:48 PM

BunkoSquad: Encycopedia Brown, The Three Investigators, Choose Your Own Adventure

The Holy Trinity of taking up 88% of my leisure time between ages 7 and 14.


Yep.
 
2012-07-16 02:38:49 PM

CyberDave: This makes me sad, too. The Encyclopedia Brown books are some of the earliest books I can remember reading as a kid. Damn, I loved those things. Probably while I still love detective stories...


I remember reading them. Very strange in hindsight.

I mean, "Bugs Meany". The guy's obviously guilty, with a name like that, so all you gotta do is come up with some trumped-up logic to justify an accusation. This isn't an auspicious premise for a book about meaningful, objective logic.

I guess I do remember a plot- a loaf of garlic bread was "stolen". This is a rather strange, minor crime for bad guys to be "into", even for the 70's. But Meany and his gang had used mouthwash and invited Brown to inspect them. (pause for reader question of what Brown might do) ... but Brown smelled their hands, because they didn't wash under their nails.

Well la-dee-freakin' da. I mean, how much of a tattler do you have to be to go to an adult and tell them that they stole a loaf of bread, and that you "found them out", with proof? Bugs would just wash his hands before being re-inspected by an adult, or just tell Brown to fark off and they're not going anywhere... and beat the crap out of him, if such a thing actually mattered.

Of course, Bugs "never learns" and must spend like 80% of his life being punished and learning nothing from that punishment. Doesn't sound like there's very effective punishment here. So Encyclopedia is really just coming up with logic to result in their torment, and they hate him all the much more, that's all they take from it.

This whole thing is a creepy Asperger's fantasy world. In hindsight, very disturbing IMHO.
 
2012-07-16 02:39:01 PM
UPDATE: If you wish to donate in memory of this great author, follow this link: "Gifts made in remembrance of Donald J. Sobol, author of the beloved Encyclopedia Brown Series, will benefit Children's Services at The New York Public Library. The New York Public Library will send The Sobol Family a card acknowledging your generosity."

How about if I send a charity money, then they send the freaking thank-you card to me, instead of to a family that didn't give money?
 
2012-07-16 02:40:03 PM
I loved Encyclopedia Brown when I was a kid. Still love mysteries.

I need to dig out my old books and take 'em down to the nephews.
 
2012-07-16 02:40:04 PM

BunkoSquad: Encycopedia Brown, The Three Investigators, Choose Your Own Adventure

The Holy Trinity of taking up 88% of my leisure time between ages 7 and 14.


Ahem, what about Danny Dunn?
 
2012-07-16 02:40:49 PM
Wow. This really...



For the rest of this post, turn to page 34
 
2012-07-16 02:41:07 PM
CSB. I read quite a few of the EB books in my day, which were illustrated by the same guy in a very straight-edged manner, which kinda matched the feel of the books. I got another one from Scholastic Books through my school and they'd gone with this new, flowery, sketchy illustrator, which I didn't much care for. It almost ruined the book for me.
 
2012-07-16 02:41:21 PM

LDM90: The headline sums up the one and only thing I remember about those books. Excellent job!


Squirrels don't back down trees.
 
2012-07-16 02:42:08 PM
Oh yeah, Encyclopedia Brown, The Three Investigators, and The Great Brain were the staples of my childhood reading. Well, I also read every Hardy Boys book, most of the Nancy Drew books, and some Trixie Belden and Bobsey Twins thrown in for good measure.

/Penguins are at the south pole and don't belong in a diorama with polar bears
 
2012-07-16 02:42:32 PM
My childhood was mostly Encyclopedia Brown and that Alfred Hitchcock mystery series.
 
2012-07-16 02:42:43 PM

CyberDave: The Encyclopedia Brown books are some of the earliest books I can remember reading as a kid


This. And Tom Swift.
 
2012-07-16 02:43:54 PM

StoPPeRmobile: Found the books in 5th grade. Read all the library had. Then read Sword of Shannara which led to LoTR in 6th grade.

I read way too much.

When's the movie coming out?

/still do
//fort in a junkyard
///awesome


Here you go:

Mystery Team on hulu.
 
2012-07-16 02:46:38 PM
Rest in peace, sir.

For the rest of my sentiments, turn to page 87.
 
2012-07-16 02:48:47 PM

Secret Polish Boyfriend: Ahem, what about Danny Dunn?


Danny Dunn had some reeeeeeeealy sketchy science, even as a kid I was a little leery of those. Although the one with the VR dragonfly drone was pretty cool.
 
2012-07-16 02:48:55 PM
loved these books in grade school think I read everyone the school library had.
 
2012-07-16 02:49:29 PM
 
2012-07-16 02:51:12 PM

rugman11: LDM90: The headline sums up the one and only thing I remember about those books. Excellent job!

Squirrels don't back down trees.


The hood of a car will be hot immediately after a 100-mile drive.
Birds take off flying into the wind.
The calves of a marathon runner will be measurably larger immediately after the race than they are normally. (This last one is complete bullshiat, by the way.)
 
2012-07-16 02:51:13 PM

Secret Polish Boyfriend: BunkoSquad: Encycopedia Brown, The Three Investigators, Choose Your Own Adventure

The Holy Trinity of taking up 88% of my leisure time between ages 7 and 14.

Ahem, what about Danny Dunn?


Ooooh, I loved Danny Dunn. All of the dated technology was like a window to the past. Ditto for Miss Pickerel who was always solving environmental crises with mid-50's technology mixed with futurism, and pluck--terribly written books but a window into the mindset of a different era.

I was also a sucker for Daniel Manus Pinkwater books, especially "Alan Mendelsohn, the Boy from Mars" (which, upon reading as an adult, I realized was spoofing Scientology, among other things) and "The Worms of Kukumlima".
 
2012-07-16 02:51:48 PM
Ready for a trip down memory lane, you 70s latchkey kids?


Wherever there's trouble, we're there on the double!
 
2012-07-16 02:52:02 PM
Did any of you start your own detective agency as a kid? Mine lasted about a day and a half, and it was my brother who "broke the case..." he found mom's hairbrush or whatever it was. I think we each got a quarter.
 
2012-07-16 02:52:21 PM

rickycal78: Wow, that name brought up some memories. I remember reading those in grade school along with the Three Investigators Mysteries books.


Thanks...I was trying to remember the name of the *other* series of detective books I read voraciously growing up.

Wonder if any of these are available on Kindle, for old time's sake...
 
2012-07-16 02:54:22 PM

theorellior: Secret Polish Boyfriend: Ahem, what about Danny Dunn?

Danny Dunn had some reeeeeeeealy sketchy science, even as a kid I was a little leery of those. Although the one with the VR dragonfly drone was pretty cool.


The sketchy science was the best part. It was entertaining to see what the authors imagined scientists would think up next--I think reading them decades after they were published was a window on the way people at the time saw science as almost magical.
 
2012-07-16 02:54:58 PM

rugman11: LDM90: The headline sums up the one and only thing I remember about those books. Excellent job!

Squirrels don't back down trees.


the case of the missing violin, iirc. Bugs stole the violin and claimed be found it in a tree.
 
2012-07-16 02:58:18 PM
I loved the books growing up and got a couple of them for my son to read when he was old enough. He didn't understand a lot of the solutions because he had no frame of reference for them, such as the one where an alleged criminal had given a phone number to someone that had letters in it that didn't appear on a rotary dial phone but are on all of the touch-tone and cell phones we use today. There was no way he could solve them so he lost interest.
 
2012-07-16 02:58:37 PM

findthefish: Loved me some Three Investigators Mysteries.


I wanted to visit their clubhouse in the junkyard so bad as a kid!
 
2012-07-16 02:59:10 PM
Encyclopedia Brown author Donald J. Sobol has passed away.

"That's where you're wrong," said semiotix. "He's as alive as you or me."

WHAT DID SEMIOTIX MEAN?

.spǝǝs ǝʌɐɥ ʇou op sǝƃuɐɹo lǝʌɐN .uoʇlıW ɹo ǝɹɐǝdsǝʞɐɥS uɐɥʇ ,,pɐǝp,, ǝɹoɯ ou sı loqoS .sǝıɹoɯǝɯ ɹno uı uo ǝʌıl sɹoɥʇnɐ s,uǝɹplıɥɔ pǝʌolǝq
 
2012-07-16 02:59:19 PM
Encyclopedia Brown taught me about the butterfly valve on a carburetor. Also that animals eyes reflect light, while human eyes do not.
 
2012-07-16 03:00:15 PM

Maechyll: Encyclopedia Brown taught me about the butterfly valve on a carburetor.


LOL. You too?
 
2012-07-16 03:00:52 PM

Mrbogey: I loved reading his books in early elementary school. They introduced me to deductive reasoning and lateral thinking. Excellent tools for instilling curiosity in young children.


My daughter's reading them now. It's weird to remember the stories from almost 30 years ago.

"It's just a n arrow flight away..."
 
2012-07-16 03:04:43 PM
While I remember reading Encyclopedia Brown, at some point I switched over to his Two Minute Mysteries. I think I still have them in a box somewhere...

/So very old
 
2012-07-16 03:10:42 PM
How about the Great Brain?

It was my first exposure to different religions (the family is Catholic in a primarily Mormon town). Up 'til that point, I assumes that all religions were a single lump of "people going to Church and something something about God I guess."
 
2012-07-16 03:12:56 PM

upload.wikimedia.org

RIP

 
2012-07-16 03:14:36 PM
Well, I'll be damned.....
 
2012-07-16 03:15:42 PM

HailRobonia: How about the Great Brain?

It was my first exposure to different religions (the family is Catholic in a primarily Mormon town). Up 'til that point, I assumes that all religions were a single lump of "people going to Church and something something about God I guess."


My mom always expressed a vague sense of disapproval over The Great Brain because of the shenanigans he'd pull and would tell us not to emulate him. Though, because my parents never were into censoring our reading material all we got was that vague disapproval while we kept on reading away.

Oh, anybody else read the "Soup" books?
 
2012-07-16 03:17:07 PM

theorellior: Secret Polish Boyfriend: Ahem, what about Danny Dunn?

Danny Dunn had some reeeeeeeealy sketchy science, even as a kid I was a little leery of those. Although the one with the VR dragonfly drone was pretty cool.


Yeah, that VR drone is all I remember of DD... it was way ahead of its time, for 1974. Not just because such a thing hadn't been created, but because I can't place any preceding works of fiction describing similar technology. Tiny cameras and recording devices were typical James Bond fare. The concept of a realtime VR, self-mobile/controllable, tiny drone- flying insect, nonetheless- was all-new AFAIK. No idea where the author got that from. Also wasn't picked up in popular work after that. As such, this work stands out, alone.

Plenty of things are unrealistic about it, but pop scifi is full of plenty of unrealistic things. No reason to be especially critical of the drone being unrealistically small, for example.
 
2012-07-16 03:18:25 PM
While we're on the subject of kid detective fiction, here's a decent parody of the genre, starring Donald Glover:

dvdmedia.ign.com
 
2012-07-16 03:20:08 PM
i196.photobucket.com

RIP Hebert Sobel
 
2012-07-16 03:20:13 PM
Because of him I never bought that coin that was minted in 500 BC.
 
2012-07-16 03:21:53 PM
Sobol is dead??

Will they bury the sadistic jerk on Currahee?

Three miles up, three miles down.
 
2012-07-16 03:23:26 PM
I wonder who will inherit his prized collection of antiquity coins labeled 500 B. C.?
 
2012-07-16 03:24:01 PM

knbwhite: Because of him I never bought that coin that was minted in 500 BC.


dammit!
 
2012-07-16 03:26:03 PM
I like to think of the show Psych as being what happens when Encyclopedia Brown grows up and stops being a goody two shoes.
 
2012-07-16 03:26:50 PM
I has a sad. RIP
 
2012-07-16 03:28:10 PM

theorellior: Danny Dunn had some reeeeeeeealy sketchy science, even as a kid I was a little leery of those.


The Fossil Cave book in the series had the equation for working out distance fallen as a function of time (parabolic motion). It was the only fiction book I'd ever read with an equation in it. I thought that was so cool and went around dropping things and timing them to work out how far they'd fallen.
 
2012-07-16 03:28:24 PM
Thanks to the Encyclopedia Brown books I learned what ambergris was.
 
2012-07-16 03:28:38 PM

whyRpeoplesostupid: RIP Hebert Sobel


Blerg! Beat me by 60 seconds.

Good one.

Ya think the men would like spaghetti for lunch?
 
2012-07-16 03:28:46 PM

Ambitwistor: Now would be a good time to post Wikipedia Brown, for fans who haven't read this parody.


We are amused.
 
2012-07-16 03:29:04 PM

Secret Polish Boyfriend: BunkoSquad: Encycopedia Brown, The Three Investigators, Choose Your Own Adventure

The Holy Trinity of taking up 88% of my leisure time between ages 7 and 14.

Ahem, what about Danny Dunn?


I immediately think of Danny Dunn whenever I think of EB.

Ever been to Kraddo Spinz?
 
2012-07-16 03:29:49 PM

Nogale: Thanks to the Encyclopedia Brown books I learned what ambergris was.


Precious hamburgers?

/ya ok I do remember something about that now that you mention it
 
2012-07-16 03:33:46 PM
I had nothing to do with it - I was busy in my Northern Hemisphere bathtub watching the water circle the drain in a clockwise fashion.
 
2012-07-16 03:36:43 PM
I'm innocent, I've been hitchhiking and was waiting in the sun all day waiting for someone to stop. Now excuse me while I snap of a square of this chocolate bar.
 
2012-07-16 03:38:37 PM

theorellior: Maechyll: Encyclopedia Brown taught me about the butterfly valve on a carburetor.

LOL. You too?


Oh yeah. My 9 year old son has started reading the books too--seems to love them as much as I did.
 
2012-07-16 03:39:43 PM
This bums me out.
 
2012-07-16 03:40:13 PM
Some of the solutions are anachronisms.

There's one which a guy said he found an elephant looking through his bedroom window on April Fools Day, then offered to buy it, but said the seller wouldn't cash the check later because it was Friday the 13th.

Encyclopedia called the buyer a liar because banks aren't open on Sundays.

This was before ATMs and before TD Bank.
 
2012-07-16 03:40:20 PM
Loved these as a kid. Haven't read one in over 15 years, but they were good stuff.

I actually have a recording of myself reading one of them from when I was about 7. I think I was trying to make my own audiobook for a car trip.
 
2012-07-16 03:44:25 PM

theorellior: Danny Dunn had some reeeeeeeealy sketchy science, even as a kid I was a little leery of those. Although the one with the VR dragonfly drone was pretty cool.


I remember the VR dragonfly! The control unit actually transmits pain for some damn reason. Also, freaking anti-gravity paint FTW.

We know the culprit was a man in drag because when a man and a woman dine at a restaurant, the woman always sits where she can see out and be seen whereas the man sits facing the wall. Unless he's a cad. Thanks for everything Sobol!

"They called themselves the Tigers. They should have called themselves the Mountaineers. They were never on the level."
 
2012-07-16 03:45:07 PM
All right, I loved the Encyclopedia Brown books as well, but the author's name always struck me as strange.
Seeing it in print now, I realize it has to be an anagram of something.

Best I got was:

sold lad on job
 
2012-07-16 03:49:08 PM
Awwww.
Encyclopedia and others, like The Happy Hollisters (Jerry West), and The Mad Scientists' Club were a big part of my kid reading.
:(
 
2012-07-16 03:53:13 PM

CyberDave: Wonder if any of these are available on Kindle, for old time's sake...


Holy balls. 34 book e-collection for $4.99. 3313 pages long, and a free borrow for Prime users. If books are often this cheap on Kindle, I might have to consider purchasing one.

/I normally spend $5 a month on late fees at my library anyway.
 
2012-07-16 03:54:06 PM
I was just thinking about these books on a long car ride I had this weekend. I can't count the number of 'Encyclopedia Brown' books I read as a child. They were my favorite for quite a few years.
 
2012-07-16 03:55:33 PM
I learned from reading EB that Chinese teacups don't have handles.
 
2012-07-16 03:56:28 PM
25.media.tumblr.com

ecx.images-amazon.com
 
2012-07-16 03:56:52 PM
BKITU: He will be buried with his beloved stuffed Arctic penguin and his sword commemorating his ancestor's achievement at the First Battle of Bull Run.

rugman11: Squirrels don't back down trees.

theMagni: "It's just a n arrow flight away..."


This is why I come to Fark, to remind myself that many of my childhood memories actually happened, and that others experienced them, too.
 
2012-07-16 04:00:41 PM

theorellior: Ready for a trip down memory lane, you 70s latchkey kids?


Wherever there's trouble, we're there on the double!


YES!!!!!
 
2012-07-16 04:01:12 PM
Encyclopedia Brown, The Great Brain, Henry Reed Inc. And they all had a significant chunk of my reading time when I was a kid. EB and Henry both had strong supporting female characters, and looking back on it now, probably influenced my taste in women, somewhat- smart and tough: not what you were thinking...Have a seat over there.
 
2012-07-16 04:01:37 PM
www.theatreworksusa.org

RIP
 
2012-07-16 04:09:27 PM

Forsythe P. Jones: The Happy Hollisters (Jerry West),


YES!!! I've been trying for decades to remember that name!! Many Thanks!
 
2012-07-16 04:10:39 PM

Mrbogey: I loved reading his books in early elementary school. They introduced me to deductive reasoning and lateral thinking. Excellent tools for instilling curiosity in young children.


Little did we know that it was all a plot by a dirty, nerdy little Jew from New York who went to Ethical Culture and Oberlin. Of course those people push intellectual achievement for its own sake - their people lead the world in it. Back in the real world, any 10yo kid with a total-recall memory is too busy getting wedgied and swirlied to have any detective adventures.

So when you see someone encouraging kids to think and reason, remember it's part of the Great International Jew Yorker Conspiracy and go read wholesome literature. Like Chick tracts or any of the last several Glenn Beck books.
 
2012-07-16 04:15:05 PM

under a mountain: BunkoSquad: Encycopedia Brown, The Three Investigators, Choose Your Own Adventure

The Holy Trinity of taking up 88% of my leisure time between ages 7 and 14.

Yep.


A thousand times YES!
 
2012-07-16 04:32:29 PM

luvtinayothers: under a mountain: BunkoSquad: Encycopedia Brown, The Three Investigators, Choose Your Own Adventure

The Holy Trinity of taking up 88% of my leisure time between ages 7 and 14.

Yep.

A thousand times YES!


Add in Matt Christopher's sports books and the Great Brain and you've got me too.

Now if you'll excuse me, I have to get back to counting a million pesos in one-peso bills.
 
2012-07-16 04:34:05 PM
and on the night stand was the clue 789-1011

JASON DID IT!!
 
2012-07-16 04:35:11 PM

BunkoSquad: Encycopedia Brown, The Three Investigators, Choose Your Own Adventure

The Holy Trinity of taking up 88% of my leisure time between ages 7 and 14.


There was a another "boy detectives/adventurers" series I read as a kid, featuring an entire team of boys, who each had a pair of magic (or high-tech) shoes, that gave each one a unique power (jump high, run fast, etc.)

NOBODY has ever known what the hell I'm talking about.
 
2012-07-16 04:38:59 PM
Another series that I loved as a kid was The Bagthorpes by Helen Cresswell. It was kinda like Monty Python crossed with Butterflies for the tween set. I loved it. It was like an introduction to this weird funny alien world named "Britain".
 
2012-07-16 04:39:59 PM
Also:

PIG IRON.
 
2012-07-16 04:41:13 PM
I wonder if anyone reads those books anymore.

Loved them...back in that mysterious decade nearly 40 years ago...
 
2012-07-16 04:42:28 PM

ModernLuddite: My childhood was mostly Encyclopedia Brown and that Alfred Hitchcock mystery series.


The Three Investigators ruled!

/as did The Mad Scientists' Club
 
2012-07-16 04:46:04 PM

rynthetyn: Oh yeah, Encyclopedia Brown, The Three Investigators, and The Great Brain were the staples of my childhood reading. Well, I also read every Hardy Boys book, most of the Nancy Drew books, and some Trixie Belden and Bobsey Twins thrown in for good measure.

/Penguins are at the south pole and don't belong in a diorama with polar bears


Throw in some Asterix and Tintin and you've got my childhood reading list too... also the same list that I used to read in order to make $$$ for the MS Read-A-Thon.
 
2012-07-16 04:46:22 PM
www.e-reading.org.ua
 
2012-07-16 04:46:38 PM

Oznog: Yeah, that VR drone is all I remember of DD... it was way ahead of its time, for 1974. Not just because such a thing hadn't been created, but because I can't place any preceding works of fiction describing similar technology. Tiny cameras and recording devices were typical James Bond fare. The concept of a realtime VR, self-mobile/controllable, tiny drone- flying insect, nonetheless- was all-new AFAIK. No idea where the author got that from. Also wasn't picked up in popular work after that. As such, this work stands out, alone.


Yeah, that's one of the reason it stuck in my mind. The plot also did a pretty good job of racking up positives and negatives of the technology. I read it in 1979, it wasn't until 1995 when VR became The Next Big Thing that anything like it came down the pike.

Actually, the DD where they go to England and receive a message from another star system sticks in my head because it had prime numbers, one-bit bitmap image encoding, and extraterrestrial life. The original technology setup was really lame, even for me at 10, but the payoff was good.
 
2012-07-16 04:48:01 PM

Tetsujin Chico: [Nate-the-Great.jpg]

RIP


Oh HELL yes. NtG was (and still is) a household name (in my folks' house, anyway).

And EB was awesome. He taught me that washing machines are top-loaders and dryers are side-loaders (the tale of the two-headed toothbrush) - hmmm. Chalk that up as another anachronism.

// how will NFL Films recover from this loss?!
 
2012-07-16 04:49:40 PM

sabreWulf07: "They called themselves the Tigers. They should have called themselves the Mountaineers. They were never on the level."


The Tigers will grow up to be nothing but career thieves, rapists, and murderers. They are proudly unrepentant, and look to the future only as a progression to the day when they are too big to spank nor ground, presuming they will then own the world. And capable of stealing larger stuff. And the raping, which I presume will be gang-style between all of them.

If Encyclopedia really WAS that smart, he would have foreseen the consequences of allowing their existence, and forming a clever plan to "end" them all, for good. No one in their right mind would suspect a nerdy kid of this, and no one would accuse the son of the Chief of Police.

epguides.com

In fact, due to Encyclopedia's status, he will no doubt be called upon to investigate the circumstances of their deaths, in which case he can uncovered clever clues he himself planted, indicating it was either an accident, suicide, or due to the actions of another Tiger member.

I think the best plan is to set up a fabricated narrative of a fight over Sally. Bugs wants her all to himself, and angrily burns down the clubhouse, killing everyone else inside. Then, realizing the consequences of his actions as Encyclopedia tracks him down, he's found dead by his own hand. If there are any ancillary members who escape the fire alive, they can be set up as part of Bugs' plot to murder the others. The police and public will be hungry for someone to blame, and the burden of proof will be a very low bar indeed. Long terms in prison is an acceptable outcome, but would not be realistic to get for the whole group- not without deaths involved. And it's not good enough for Bugs- I fear Bugs has enough ambition that his skills of deceit and cruelty in prison, only to create a more wordly evil when he finally gets out. When that happens, he will not be resigned to petty theft of baked goods, nor will he carelessly leave around evidence, nor will he spare the amateur investigator out of some sort of respect for his elders. No, Bugs must be die.

So all the Tigers are effectively ended, and there are no loose ends- except Sally. She's clever, too clever for such a clean plan. I'll try to account for that baiting her with a clue that proves my initial investigation is going in the wrong direction, a clue for HER to find showing that I was wrong, and use to redirect the investigation onto my planned course. Then, she should be utterly committed to the planned story, as she thinks it's her baby.

Still, I'm concerned- the ongoing, overt aggression between Sally and Bugs may be indications of an underlying latent mutual attraction. Sally could be unwilling to let Bugs' death story lie in its well-architected grave. She can't be raking over the coals of this sad-but-necessary project once it's done, those coals need to grow cold, die off, and be absorbed by the earth. Sally wouldn't even need to hit home with some factually correct contradiction- her status as a smart woman and former relation of Bugs alone renders her dangerous. If she professes that Bugs' death was a murder, even with specious logic and not a fault in my careful planning, people may listen. I shall have to keep tabs on Sally. It's very very unlikely, but if she ever gets too close to the truth, what must be done must be done.

And I'm prepared for that. I don't think it'll happen, but this hanging over me is nothing compared to the horror of letting Bugs Meany or any of his criminal Tiger cabal enter the adult world, due to my defaulting on the moral obligations bestowed upon me by my tremendous brain.
 
2012-07-16 05:03:55 PM

theorellior: Oznog: Yeah, that VR drone is all I remember of DD... it was way ahead of its time, for 1974. Not just because such a thing hadn't been created, but because I can't place any preceding works of fiction describing similar technology. Tiny cameras and recording devices were typical James Bond fare. The concept of a realtime VR, self-mobile/controllable, tiny drone- flying insect, nonetheless- was all-new AFAIK. No idea where the author got that from. Also wasn't picked up in popular work after that. As such, this work stands out, alone.

Yeah, that's one of the reason it stuck in my mind. The plot also did a pretty good job of racking up positives and negatives of the technology. I read it in 1979, it wasn't until 1995 when VR became The Next Big Thing that anything like it came down the pike.

Actually, the DD where they go to England and receive a message from another star system sticks in my head because it had prime numbers, one-bit bitmap image encoding, and extraterrestrial life. The original technology setup was really lame, even for me at 10, but the payoff was good.


Oh god I remember that one too... vaguely.

Now that I think about it, Danny Dunn seems to have been the prototype plot formula for the ORIGINAL crappy drafts of Back to the Future. The original draft had Marty going to his good friend Doc' Brown's lab where he was fiddling with a totally nonworking time-travel experiment and somehow Marty breaks the thing in a way that vicariously makes it work. IIRC the first write was that Marty pours a Coke over the time machine out of some sort of inexplicable disgust with it. It didn't make sense except for product placement, and the actual brand of soda could be opened up to the highest bidder.

In fact it was rejected for overall crappiness over a number of rewrites, all of which featured Marty breaking Doc's experiment in different ways to make it work, and Doc being some kind of wise mentor hanging over him in his life.
 
2012-07-16 05:12:22 PM

docmattic: ModernLuddite: My childhood was mostly Encyclopedia Brown and that Alfred Hitchcock mystery series.

The Three Investigators ruled!>

THIS.

/as did The Mad Scientists' Club


How on earth did I miss the MSC?

Sounded cool!
 
2012-07-16 05:13:52 PM
And am I the only one who used to get "Bad Bad Leroy Brown" stuck in my head everytime I read Donald J. Sobol?
 
2012-07-16 05:28:15 PM

AdolfOliverPanties: It was Encyclopedia Brown's two minute mysteries that spurred me on to read The Three Investigators books by Robert Arthur Jr.

Jupiter Jones could kick Encyclopedia Brown's ass!

Hell, even one of his sidekicks Bob, who wore a leg brace because he rolled down a hill and broke his leg in umpteen places could kick Brown's butt..


Well, duh! Why do you think he had Sally?
 
2012-07-16 05:40:53 PM
CSS:

In 4th grade, my teacher was trying to get the class to estimate how a raw egg would effect the spinning ability versus a hard boiled egg.

He spun both eggs, and had the class vote on which egg they thought was hard boiled, and chose a volunteer to have the egg cracked open over their head.

The brainy kid in class guessed that the wobbly egg was the hard boiled one. I disagreed with him, based on what I'd learned from EB. The class voted, and *every single kid* voted to go with the brainy kid's idea. I refused to change my mind.

GUESS WHAT, ASSHOLES?? IIIII WWWWAAAASSSSS RRRIIIGGGHHHTTT!!!!!! :p

The only detail that managed to smear my ultimate smugness was the fact that the volunteer was a friend of mine; a sweet, shy girl with pretty red hair that had to deal with the embarrassment of having egg yolk dripping off her head.

So thanks, EB. R.I.P.
 
2012-07-16 05:44:41 PM
I read a bunch of these books when I was a kid. I even read those "weird and wacky facts" books.

In addition to the ones mentioned here, I liked the ones with the birds eating fermented berries and the time he dropped the book so it would open to the page where the spine was bent.

I also liked the HBO show. Check out Encyclopedia Brown's outfit. Chuck Taylors, jeans, jacket, Def Leppard t-shirt. He's the original hipster.

RIP Mr. Sobol.
 
2012-07-16 05:47:19 PM
mongolrally07.theadventurists.com

Wanted for questioning
 
2012-07-16 05:49:13 PM
read every gdamn one of them. Prolly the only reason I can quote faulkner and O.S. Card equally well. Fuarck godspeed. Let's have lightspeed at a 2.11 fraction and a 1/8 mil. kil. twist.. lalm
 
2012-07-16 05:59:06 PM

BunkoSquad: +1 for the headline
-1 for the sad
0 for the fact that as of this morning I wouldn't have bet $1000 on him still being alive


Likewise.
 
2012-07-16 06:00:01 PM

laurens: read every gdamn one of them. Prolly the only reason I can quote faulkner and O.S. Card equally well. Fuarck godspeed. Let's have lightspeed at a 2.11 fraction and a 1/8 mil. kil. twist.. lalm


I highly recommend seeking medical attention for that stroke you had mid-post.
 
2012-07-16 06:16:01 PM
wait you can't access your left pocket with your right hand unless your a normal person (not a book character)!
 
2012-07-16 06:25:15 PM
I was stuck between loving Encyclopedia Brown and wanting to kick his stuffy know it all ass.
 
2012-07-16 06:25:43 PM
Dr. Haledjian heard a rapping on his office door. It was Nick the Nose, the luckless would-be tipster, no doubt trying to sell another yarn. "Didja hear about the Sobol fella who snuffed it?" he began...
 
2012-07-16 06:32:19 PM

teeny: the volunteer was a friend of mine; a sweet, shy girl with pretty red hair that had to deal with the embarrassment of having egg yolk dripping off her head.


Change the setting of this story from 4th grade to college and you've got a best-selling XXX parody.
 
2012-07-16 06:36:54 PM
Just tossing in my two bits (per day, plus expenses):

Encyclopedia Brown
The Three Investigators
Mad Scientists Club
Danny Dunn
Nancy Drew
Trixie Belden
The Great Brain
and of course 3-2-1 Contact, including The Bloodhound Gang

/As Barricaded Gunman said, having the particulars of my childhood validated by my random peers is one of the great perks of Fark.

//Boobies are the other.
 
2012-07-16 06:53:00 PM
So sad. I'll take my $7.19 and hide it under an eraser before writing 7-8-9-10-11 on my calendar.
 
2012-07-16 07:02:49 PM
Sally used to throw down with the best of them, but she was also there to solve cases involving table manners or how women are supposed to sit at a table when Encyclopedia could not.

Good times.

/Also enjoyed Two-Minute Mysteries and that one Ashur Fine book I read which I think was supposed to be the start of a series.
 
2012-07-16 07:03:31 PM
Bunnicula

Another good 'detective' series.
 
2012-07-16 07:06:15 PM

Here Comes Everybody: luvtinayothers: under a mountain: BunkoSquad: Encycopedia Brown, The Three Investigators, Choose Your Own Adventure

The Holy Trinity of taking up 88% of my leisure time between ages 7 and 14.

Yep.

A thousand times YES!

Add in Matt Christopher's sports books and the Great Brain and you've got me too.

Now if you'll excuse me, I have to get back to counting a million pesos in one-peso bills.


I am determined to find The Great Brain Goes to the Academy, the last one that I need, in the wild. Tom catching the dude on the train cheating at poker is awesome. Tom running an illicit candy store is even better than that.

I also have about fifty of the original CYOA books, among other things. Does anyone remember reading Thomas Dygard as a kid? I enjoyed his sports books even more than Matt Christopher's.

/Christopher's Ice Magic is still my favorite EVER though.
 
2012-07-16 07:09:11 PM
I loved that one! I used to love reading Encyclopedia Brown books.
 
2012-07-16 07:14:31 PM
These were my gateway mystery books. Still love puzzle mysteries. (Not a fan of carve-em-up procedurals where we know who did it and how they did it right away. Those are like watching gory paint dry.)
 
2012-07-16 07:24:05 PM
I couldn't possibly have done it, I was too busy folding a piece of paper in half 10 times.
 
2012-07-16 07:31:09 PM
Wasn't me. I was waiting all night in a dark room to win a bet. The prize is my priceless violin!

/Now I'm going to let my toddler walk across the hood of the car I was driving all day.
 
2012-07-16 07:31:37 PM
Funny that a few commenters are surprised that the various crime solving premises don't hold up to close scrutiny.

They're books meant for children. We don't need airtight logic here; we don't need this to hold up to a Cochran cross-examination.
 
2012-07-16 07:48:32 PM

Tanthalas39: Funny that a few commenters are surprised that the various crime solving premises don't hold up to close scrutiny.

They're books meant for children. We don't need airtight logic here; we don't need this to hold up to a Cochran cross-examination.


If the balloon wouldn't float, you must acquit!
 
2012-07-16 07:49:47 PM

docmattic: theorellior: Sally Kimball was hawt.

She was also an good example of a strong female supporting character, which wasn't all that common in children's literature.


My favorite female sidekick was always Midge Glass.
 
2012-07-16 07:53:57 PM
how sad.

i read all those books. devoured them. chose a life of crime because of them. profited. thanks for the mammaries, mr. sobol!
 
2012-07-16 07:54:00 PM
And now the nostalgia kicks in.

Happy Hollisters was one of the first books I read. Then all the Hardy Boys (there were what, three different series?) and some of my mom's Nancy Drews...then my sister's bookcase, with Sweet Valley High and The Baby-Sitter's Club...good times.
 
2012-07-16 08:06:24 PM
...the man who drove for hours on a hot day, and a baby was playing on the hood of said car.
 
2012-07-16 08:13:39 PM
Last I heard Bugs Meany was doing a dime in federal prison for selling junk bonds to senior citizens...

And then eating them.
 
2012-07-16 08:16:10 PM

Here Comes Everybody: Now if you'll excuse me, I have to get back to counting a million pesos in one-peso bills.


Use TWO-peso bills. They're more fun in Taco Bells.
 
2012-07-16 08:25:19 PM
I loved these books as a kid, and I even read encyclopedias to be as smart as ole Leroy! Thanks, Mr. Sobol, you made reading enjoyable!
 
2012-07-16 08:31:22 PM

Sgt Otter: NOBODY has ever known what the hell I'm talking about.


I don't know what the hell you're talking about.
 
2012-07-16 08:34:39 PM
I am going to strike a match on my shoe after my morning walk in the park.
 
2012-07-16 08:40:03 PM

whidbey: And am I the only one who used to get "Bad Bad Leroy Brown" stuck in my head everytime I read Donald J. Sobol?


The Three Investigators were meaner than a junkyard dog, but ... well ... they were in a junkyard, anyway. Does that count?
 
2012-07-16 08:55:07 PM
Can we have a img37.imageshack.us tag? I, myself, do not find the death of everyone who dies to be a sad occasion. If you live over 80, I usually think you've had a good run.

On a side note:

Encyclopedia Brown: Dad, it has to be Jimmy. Johnny only masturbates other guys with his right hand. He pleasures himself solely with his left hand. Jimmy is lying about the Johnny burgling the turds!
 
2012-07-16 09:31:51 PM
Loved Encyclopedia Brown.

I remember very clearly a spelling bee in Grade 3 when I thought I had them all beat by spelling "encyclopedia", which I knew from reading the books.

Then, I was given the word "newspaper" and forgot the "s".
/sadface
 
2012-07-16 09:39:19 PM

Magorn: docmattic: theorellior: Sally Kimball was hawt.

She was also an good example of a strong female supporting character, which wasn't all that common in children's literature.

Well the good news is that she and Peppermint Patty were one of the first people to be granted a marriage license after North Carolina recently legalized same-sex marriage


You owe me a new keyboard, you magnificent bastard.

/somewhere I think I still have my encyclopedia brown collection
 
2012-07-16 09:39:22 PM
just say no, folks. encyclopedia brown led to sir arthur conan doyle. i popped those books like they were triscuits. then it was the hard stuff: chandler, wolfe, the m(a)cdonalds. before i knew what was happening, i was mainlining hammett.

just say no, kids.
just say no.
 
2012-07-16 09:47:01 PM

rynthetyn: Oh, anybody else read the "Soup" books?


Soup was awesome, as is the slightly more serious "A day no pigs would die". iirc Robert Newton Peck is a bit strange though, and for all his stories about growing up in VT I'm not sure he ever actually lived there.
 
2012-07-16 10:11:04 PM

Farker Soze: knbwhite: Because of him I never bought that coin that was minted in 500 BC.

dammit!


What's funny about our posts is that I kinda pulled 500 BC out of my ass. Was that really the date in the story?
 
2012-07-16 10:12:25 PM

OtherLittleGuy: Some of the solutions are anachronisms.

There's one which a guy said he found an elephant looking through his bedroom window on April Fools Day, then offered to buy it, but said the seller wouldn't cash the check later because it was Friday the 13th.

Encyclopedia called the buyer a liar because banks aren't open on Sundays.

This was before ATMs and before TD Bank.


I picked up one of 2-minute mysteries books earlier this year and in the answer to one of the puzzles, even Sobol admitted that it was a long time ago that phones didn't automatically drop the signal when one person hung up.
 
2012-07-16 10:30:11 PM
I had the movie taped off tv, used to watch it all the time as a kid.

/Turn my gaze to the rising sun
 
2012-07-16 10:32:19 PM
Encyclopedia knew that electric clocks don't tick!
 
2012-07-16 10:36:32 PM

Omahawg: how sad.

i read all those books. devoured them. chose a life of crime because of them. profited. thanks for the mammaries, mr. sobol!


Uh, so you turned to a life of crime which paid for your breast enhancement?
 
2012-07-16 10:37:41 PM
Wasn't there an anti-Sally that hung out with the Tigers? Or am I thinking of one of the knock-off series?
 
2012-07-16 10:43:38 PM

octopied: Omahawg: how sad.

i read all those books. devoured them. chose a life of crime because of them. profited. thanks for the mammaries, mr. sobol!

Uh, so you turned to a life of crime which paid for your breast enhancement?


wouldn't you?
 
2012-07-16 11:48:00 PM
I spent a lot of time as a child proving you could actually use the left pocket with the right hand.

Just not while running.
 
2012-07-17 12:00:59 AM

JosephFinn: findthefish: Loved me some Three Investigators Mysteries.

I wanted to visit their clubhouse in the junkyard so bad as a kid!


The phrase "clubhouse in a junkyard" just triggered a serious trip down memory lane for me. I haven't thought about this for over 20 years but HOLY SHIAT, YEAH! They had a PHONE in that motherfarker. And a LAB! And BOOKS! Eight-year old me thought that most have been the most incredible place in the world. I loved those books!

And I loved good ol' Encyclopedia Brown, too. I'm sad to hear about this, although to be perfectly honest I would have thought that the man died a long time ago. Those books seemed positively ancient even when I had them.
 
2012-07-17 12:04:18 AM
25.media.tumblr.com
 
2012-07-17 12:09:17 AM
It wasn't me, now excuse me as I put mustard on top of this sauerkraut laden hot dog.

/JASON ftw!
 
2012-07-17 12:33:20 AM

StoPPeRmobile: Found the books in 5th grade. Read all the library had. Then read Sword of Shannara which led to LoTR in 6th grade.

I read way too much.

When's the movie coming out?

/still do
//fort in a junkyard
///awesome


Sword of Shannara - wow. That's one of the very 1st fantasy books I ever read/owned. I should get another copy of it.

And Encyclopedia Brown was one of my childhood faves! I should re-read those as well.
 
2012-07-17 12:43:31 AM

Inaditch: Did any of you start your own detective agency as a kid? Mine lasted about a day and a half, and it was my brother who "broke the case..." he found mom's hairbrush or whatever it was. I think we each got a quarter.


the one my sisters and i started was called "spy city"

the theme song went a little something like this:

spyyy city! deh deh deh dehhh deh-deh
(repeat ad infinitum)

/hat tip to 3 investigators, choose your own adventure
//wrong side of 40
 
2012-07-17 01:00:32 AM

sabreWulf07: theorellior: Danny Dunn had some reeeeeeeealy sketchy science, even as a kid I was a little leery of those. Although the one with the VR dragonfly drone was pretty cool.

I remember the VR dragonfly! The control unit actually transmits pain for some damn reason. Also, freaking anti-gravity paint FTW.


VR dragonfly setting things on fire was awesome.

Okay, back-to-back CSBs to demonstrate how hopeless of a dweeb I was (am?) as a child. CSB #1:

We know the culprit was a man in drag because when a man and a woman dine at a restaurant, the woman always sits where she can see out and be seen whereas the man sits facing the wall. Unless he's a cad. Thanks for everything Sobol!

Because of that specific story, To.This.Day. I always sit facing into the wall at a restaurant, letting my gf get the more visible side. Because at the age of ten, I dreaded being thought of as a cad by women, and it stuck. I don't think she's noticed, and I sure as hell ain't gonna bring it up.

CSB #2:

I learned the word "stride" from one of the DD stories, but initially with the wrong meaning. I don't remember which one story it was, but I recall the exact phrase, The Professor took two strides and pulled the cord out of the wall. For years afterwards the word stride was tagged in my memory as "not sure, but might mean some kind of extended-rod thing like those plastic grabber sticks with a trigger on one end and goofy hands on the other; be prepared to discard this tentative definition."
 
2012-07-17 04:02:30 AM

Smelly McUgly:
I am determined to find The Great Brain Goes to the Academy, the last one that I need, in the wild. Tom catching the dude on the


I liked him copying the key with a bar of soap, then carving it out of wood. That was some genius shiat, in my mind
 
2012-07-17 04:22:27 AM

Former Lee Warmer: I liked him copying the key with a bar of soap, then carving it out of wood. That was some genius shiat, in my mind


That's also how the kids escaped in Flowers in the Attic.

What?
 
2012-07-17 06:26:53 AM

thebravetoast: rynthetyn: Oh, anybody else read the "Soup" books?

Soup was awesome, as is the slightly more serious "A day no pigs would die". iirc Robert Newton Peck is a bit strange though, and for all his stories about growing up in VT I'm not sure he ever actually lived there.


I could swear that I read "A Day No Pigs Would Die," but I have absolutely zero recollection of the story even having looked up the plot summary. My mom's the one who first checked Robert Newton Peck's books out of the library, based on someone's recommendation I think, so maybe she read it first and decided that it wasn't age appropriate--I was probably only 7 or 8 at the time.

Back to Encyclopedia Brown, I actually read large chunks of the encyclopedia when I was little. When my siblings and I would complain that we were bored, my mom would tell us to read a book, and when we'd complain that we'd read all the books we had she'd tell us to read the encyclopedia. And so, because I've always been a wuss who hates going outside in summer, I spent significant stretches of my summers growing up in Florida reading the encyclopedia when I'd read all of the books I'd gotten from the library.
 
2012-07-17 07:56:23 AM

LittleMissStubborn: Loved Encyclopedia Brown.

I remember very clearly a spelling bee in Grade 3 when I thought I had them all beat by spelling "encyclopedia", which I knew from reading the books.

Then, I was given the word "newspaper" and forgot the "s".
/sadface


libary

WRONG!!
L-I-B-A-R-Y
libary
 
2012-07-17 09:20:48 AM

mat catastrophe: I spent a lot of time as a child proving you could actually use the left pocket with the right hand.


Right after I read that story as a kid I moved my keys from my right pocket to my left. Decades have passed and I continue to keep my keys in my left pocket. I lead such a sad life.
 
2012-07-17 11:41:19 AM

Smelly McUgly: Sally used to throw down with the best of them, but she was also there to solve cases involving table manners or how women are supposed to sit at a table when Encyclopedia could not.

Good times.

/Also enjoyed Two-Minute Mysteries and that one Ashur Fine book I read which I think was supposed to be the start of a series.


I always thought it interesting when cases were solved based on people having good manners.

Why is Fano so sure? Turn to page 178 to find out.
 
2012-07-17 04:44:38 PM

Miss Stein: Former Lee Warmer: I liked him copying the key with a bar of soap, then carving it out of wood. That was some genius shiat, in my mind

That's also how the kids escaped in Flowers in the Attic.

What?


Oh yeah, that series was required reading for the girls in my junior high.
 
2012-07-17 10:01:19 PM
Fark: Just read a new book by a completely different author in which a very minor character was named Sally Kimball.
 
2012-07-18 04:00:59 AM

knbwhite: Farker Soze: knbwhite: Because of him I never bought that coin that was minted in 500 BC.

dammit!

What's funny about our posts is that I kinda pulled 500 BC out of my ass. Was that really the date in the story?


Not sure. I pulled 500 BC out of my ass also.
 
2012-07-18 04:43:16 AM
I was a big E.B. fan when I was a kid. One year in grade school, we were all supposed to come to class dressed like our favorite literary character. I dressed up as encyclopedia brown, and none of my friends believed me; they assumed I forgot.
 
2012-07-19 12:29:45 AM
RIP.

To see how Encyclopedia knew the author was dead, turn to pg 89.
 
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