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(Daily Mail)   'Frankenstein' meat could soon be for sale in Europe. Digging up dead cows, giving them life, and then sending them the slaughterhouse seems unusually cruel, even for Europeans   (dailymail.co.uk) divider line 79
    More: Scary, Frankenstein, genetically modified organism, Europe, European Food Safety Authority, IQ tests, dengue fever, Olympic Park, omega-3 fatty acids  
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10172 clicks; posted to Main » on 15 Jul 2012 at 10:25 PM (1 year ago)   |  Favorite    |   share:  Share on Twitter share via Email Share on Facebook   more»



79 Comments   (+0 »)
   
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2012-07-15 10:26:23 PM
Wouldn't this be more Chimera meat than Frankenstein meat?
 
2012-07-15 10:28:12 PM
Every steer deserves a second chance.
 
2012-07-15 10:30:21 PM
I'm waiting for Frankenswine. Mmmmm...bacon.
 
2012-07-15 10:31:05 PM
encrypted-tbn0.google.com

Loves Frankenstein meat
 
2012-07-15 10:31:26 PM
That's Froken-steer.
 
2012-07-15 10:33:37 PM
fark you Subby. Maybe they're made of the best parts of several different animals and maybe they're the best thing over. Glow in the dark, antibiotic resistant and flightless cows are the wave of the future.
 
2012-07-15 10:34:13 PM
What hump?
 
2012-07-15 10:39:25 PM
I was expecting something about "meat glue." Frankenstein's monster wasn't genetically modified, it was stitched together from parts of different bodies.
 
2012-07-15 10:40:40 PM
I challenge all opposed to stop eating any type of food source that has been altered by humans.
 
2012-07-15 10:45:27 PM

BarkingUnicorn: I was expecting something about "meat glue." Frankenstein's monster wasn't genetically modified, it was stitched together from parts of different bodies.


They have been calling GM food franken food for a while now. It's a bit more dramatic than saying GM. If you need support from morons -- you need dramatics.

BTW, would Elmers be considered meat glue? It's made out of horses, right?
 
2012-07-15 10:45:53 PM
I dunno, Frankenchicken kinda has a nice ring to it
 
2012-07-15 10:46:35 PM
Shouldn't 'Frankenstein' meat be more closely related to Soylent Green?
 
2012-07-15 10:47:31 PM
Oops...we've been doing this in the US for years....
 
2012-07-15 10:49:39 PM
www.7il.org

Feed My Me Frankenstein?
 
2012-07-15 10:49:54 PM

sandbar67: I dunno, Frankenchicken kinda has a nice ring to it


I prefer "Poultrygeist", myself
 
2012-07-15 10:50:13 PM
"Oxitec insists its GM insects will benefit the environment by replacing insecticides."


i.imgur.com
 
2012-07-15 10:50:44 PM

sandbar67: I dunno, Frankenchicken kinda has a nice ring to it


Frankenchick - Prequel to Bride of Frankenstein? College years?
 
2012-07-15 10:50:48 PM
"Frankenstein meat"

Oh, for Christ sake.
 
2012-07-15 10:51:48 PM
theconcertproject.files.wordpress.com
Approves
 
2012-07-15 10:55:26 PM
Kidney from a horse...Liver from a cat...filling up the sausages with this and that.
 
2012-07-15 10:55:34 PM
This is blasphemy! We aren't supposed to play God with genetics using advanced technology like cloning and gene transplantation! We're only supposed to play God with genetics using primitive technology like selective breeding and artificial insemination!
 
2012-07-15 10:56:36 PM

WorldCitizen: I challenge all opposed to stop eating any type of food source that has been altered by humans.


"altered by humans"

Your choice of words even eliminates the process of chewing.
 
2012-07-15 10:57:18 PM
oooh, time for a "Mommy joke"

little girl: Mommy, mommy, can I play with grandfather this afternoon?

Mommy: Shut up, you have dug him up 3 times already this week.
 
2012-07-15 10:59:31 PM
Zombeef.
 
2012-07-15 11:00:03 PM

BarkingUnicorn: I was expecting something about "meat glue." Frankenstein's monster wasn't genetically modified, it was stitched together from parts of different bodies.


ishadatar.files.wordpress.com
I'll take the beefchicken, please.

ideasinfood.typepad.com
And the vealshrimp.
 
2012-07-15 11:05:13 PM

WorldCitizen: I challenge all opposed to stop eating any type of food source that has been altered by humans.


True but not on target. There is a huge difference between selective breeding & genetic modification. Of course, if we want to induce panic, the description "unnatural selection" could replace "elective breeding." The same press release could also warn folks about the decades long conspiracy to keep us ignorant regarding the dangers of dihydrogen monoxide.
 
2012-07-15 11:05:25 PM
Does it taste like... Despair?
 
2012-07-15 11:07:08 PM
Well the people protesting this might as well stop eating food all together. Quite a bit of it is genetically modified. Not done in a lab but done over time by cross-breeding and cross-pollination.

Like bananas? Specifically bred over time to produce the fruit we currently consume.

Like milk? Cows selectively bred for milk producing qualities.

Like bread and cereals? Specifically bred over time to produce the grains we currently use.

Beef? Domesticated and selectively bred to produce the meat we all love to eat.

Unless you go out and hunt your food in the wild, what you are consuming has most likely been genetically modified over years of selective breeding.
 
2012-07-15 11:07:41 PM
Did someone say horse meat?

i.ytimg.com
 
2012-07-15 11:08:48 PM
They are selling hot dogs in Europe now?
 
2012-07-15 11:10:14 PM

uber humper: sandbar67: I dunno, Frankenchicken kinda has a nice ring to it

Frankenchick - Prequel to Bride of Frankenstein? College years?


No. That was "Frankenhooker."


/WANT A DATE!?
 
2012-07-15 11:10:30 PM

phrawgh: [theconcertproject.files.wordpress.com image 296x370]
Approves


nice
 
2012-07-15 11:17:57 PM

give me doughnuts: uber humper: sandbar67: I dunno, Frankenchicken kinda has a nice ring to it

Frankenchick - Prequel to Bride of Frankenstein? College years?

No. That was "Frankenhooker."


/WANT A DATE!?


Fuiekenstein? We might have a movie on our hands
 
2012-07-15 11:21:16 PM

silverjets: Well the people protesting this might as well stop eating food all together. Quite a bit of it is genetically modified. Not done in a lab but done over time by cross-breeding and cross-pollination.

Like bananas? Specifically bred over time to produce the fruit we currently consume.

Like milk? Cows selectively bred for milk producing qualities.

Like bread and cereals? Specifically bred over time to produce the grains we currently use.

Beef? Domesticated and selectively bred to produce the meat we all love to eat.

Unless you go out and hunt your food in the wild, what you are consuming has most likely been genetically modified over years of selective breeding.




Agreed.

Selectively breed it in factory farms, I'm in favor of ramping up production untill we can get decents meats down another buck a pound. Times are tough.
Hell, grind some whale byproducts and any leftover panda meat....and I'll make burgers with it
 
2012-07-15 11:21:39 PM
How long before we start making our sandwiches out of recycled sandwiches then?
 
2012-07-15 11:29:21 PM

fanuvtoons: The same press release could also warn folks about the decades long conspiracy to keep us ignorant regarding the dangers of dihydrogen monoxide.


Oh my god a woman I worked with had a 4 page pamphlet she printed off the internet talking about the dangers and poisonous nature of dihydrogen monoxide. She handed it to me and I just gave her the blankest look and yelled...

"It's WATER!"
"What?"
"Dihydrogen monoxide is the chemical name for water. It's JUST WATER!"
"Well how was I supposed to know that?"
"You obviously have access to the internet, google it!"
 
2012-07-15 11:29:23 PM
Well done, subby.
I mean, well done, waitress.
 
2012-07-15 11:29:24 PM
"This sandwich tastes funny. What's in it?"

"Baloney."

"What kind?"

"Abby...something." (begins singing) "My baloney has a first name, it's A-B-B-Y... My baloney has a second name, it's N-O-R-M-A-L..."

"Wait... You mean to tell me that you made my lunch with ABNORMAL meat?"
 
2012-07-15 11:31:42 PM
 
2012-07-15 11:36:00 PM
And it really hurts when you bite into a bolt.
 
2012-07-15 11:37:15 PM

Vlad_the_Inaner: WorldCitizen: I challenge all opposed to stop eating any type of food source that has been altered by humans.

"altered by humans"

Your choice of words even eliminates the process of chewing.


Or digestion.

www.crybabiez.com
 
2012-07-15 11:39:34 PM

silverjets: Unless you go out and hunt your food in the wild, what you are consuming has most likely been genetically modified over years of selective breeding.


Selective breeding is not the same as genetic modification. The genes already exist in that animal or plant, we simply breed out undesirable genes and reinforce desirable ones. There's no cutting and pasting genetic code from other sources or the outright re-write of genetic code within a species.

No amount of "selective breeding" will make a glow in the dark kitten, and yet they have made farking glow in the dark kittens. What...the...fark?

No one knows what this geneticly modified food will do to the human physiology or to other animals who consume it. It warrants some caution.
 
2012-07-15 11:40:03 PM

Premeditated_Road_Rage: "This sandwich tastes funny. What's in it?"

"Baloney."

"What kind?"

"Abby...something." (begins singing) "My baloney has a first name, it's A-B-B-Y... My baloney has a second name, it's N-O-R-M-A-L..."

"Wait... You mean to tell me that you made my lunch with ABNORMAL meat?"


Funny!


Reminds me: a guy I worked with told me he once bit into a tumor (on the tripe) when eating a bowl of menudo.

I had to ask, how did you know it was a tumor?

he looked me in the eyes with a thousand yard stare: "you know when you bite into a tumor..."
 
2012-07-15 11:44:04 PM

Ambivalence:
No amount of "selective breeding" will make a glow in the dark kitten, and yet they have made farking glow in the dark kittens. What...the...fark?


Changing color to something unnatural will help identify a modified animal should it accidentally get out into the wild. (From RTFA, it looks like that is exactly why they did that)

Now, here's the funny thing. You know how cats can see much better in low-light situations?

You think having a bell around their neck annoys them! Glowing in the dark has got to drive a cat insane!
 
2012-07-15 11:46:24 PM
As someone who just had sex with a gerbil, I wish they'ed hurry up and invent a horse with three assholes already.
 
2012-07-15 11:49:13 PM

Mister Peejay: Ambivalence:
No amount of "selective breeding" will make a glow in the dark kitten, and yet they have made farking glow in the dark kittens. What...the...fark?

Changing color to something unnatural will help identify a modified animal should it accidentally get out into the wild. (From RTFA, it looks like that is exactly why they did that)

Now, here's the funny thing. You know how cats can see much better in low-light situations?

You think having a bell around their neck annoys them! Glowing in the dark has got to drive a cat insane!


What I am saying is that adding monkey and jellyfish genes to an animal is not the same thing as "selective breeding". The former is in a completely different league than the latter. That being said, these geneticly modified animals should all be rendered sterile to prevent their genes from being passed into non modified animals. That should be a given. It's unfortunately a HELL of a lot more difficult to do that with plants.
 
2012-07-15 11:55:37 PM
Selective breeding and genetic modification are not the issue, in and of themselves. The issue stems from the fact that various animal tissues offer a widely varying nutritional composition. If you can't tell what you're getting, how can you know what it's worth? The people selling it to you certainly aren't going to admit to hawking glued-together offal.
 
2012-07-16 12:02:13 AM

OtherLittleGuy: That's Froken-steer.


Fronken-schteer would be more accurate.
 
2012-07-16 12:10:46 AM

silverjets: Well the people protesting this might as well stop eating food all together. Quite a bit of it is genetically modified. Not done in a lab but done over time by cross-breeding and cross-pollination.

Like bananas? Specifically bred over time to produce the fruit we currently consume.

Like milk? Cows selectively bred for milk producing qualities.

Like bread and cereals? Specifically bred over time to produce the grains we currently use.

Beef? Domesticated and selectively bred to produce the meat we all love to eat.

Unless you go out and hunt your food in the wild, what you are consuming has most likely been genetically modified over years of selective breeding.


I guarantee that if we were just now starting to introduce F1 Hybrids, people would be protesting.

I guarantee it because some of them ARE protesting hybridized seed.

As if all farmers are willing to sacrifice a portion of their crop for a fickle populace that will pass over a perfectly good but misshapen tomato.

//Which is a different issue altogether.
 
2012-07-16 12:11:03 AM

WorldCitizen: I challenge all opposed to stop eating any type of food source that has been altered by humans.


Ding ding ding, we have a winner.

There are some legitimate (non-IP related) issues with engineered plant crops, though. Jumping herbicide resistance genes spring to mind.
 
2012-07-16 12:16:48 AM

TofuTheAlmighty: WorldCitizen: I challenge all opposed to stop eating any type of food source that has been altered by humans.

Ding ding ding, we have a winner.

There are some legitimate (non-IP related) issues with engineered plant crops, though. Jumping herbicide resistance genes spring to mind.


As far as I know the only gene transfer of herbicide resistance was to a wild relative of rapeseed(canola). Those plants were out competed by their uncrossed neighbors. Research is never ending though, so something new may have popped up.

Our domesticated plants are really bad at surviving in the wild. It's why we don't see corn growing throughout the country side in ditches, but just in fields, or beans growing alongside the road.

Then we have natural selection in action because farmers are not doing what they are supposed to with crop rotation(thinking corn root worms with BT resistance because farmers did exactly what they were told not to do and planted BT corn in the same fields 5 years running.
 
2012-07-16 12:27:15 AM

Ambivalence: No one knows what this geneticly modified food will do to the human physiology or to other animals who consume it. It warrants some caution.


Like what? Just give an example. A single possible example. Noting that, oddly enough, the people who spend a lot of money on this sort of thing are probably going to test any finished product to make sure it isn't poisonous or non-digestible. One. One example of what you're 'concerned' about enough to 'just ask questions'.
 
2012-07-16 12:30:32 AM

TofuTheAlmighty: WorldCitizen: I challenge all opposed to stop eating any type of food source that has been altered by humans.

Ding ding ding, we have a winner.

There are some legitimate (non-IP related) issues with engineered plant crops, though. Jumping herbicide resistance genes spring to mind.


You better stop eating, then. Or go out into the wilderness and pick your own wild food. Because in case you hadn't noticed, ALL food sources have been altered by humans.

Cattle are meatier and dumber than wild ox; chickens are heavier and calmer than wild fowl; teosinte, the precursor of modern maize, had so few kernels the inch-long cobs were roasted and eaten whole. Everything you eat has been altered by humans, the only difference being how long the process took.
 
2012-07-16 12:44:08 AM
Has anyone ever been made ill by any GM food plant or animal that was meant for consumption ever?
 
2012-07-16 12:55:43 AM

LowbrowDeluxe: Like what? Just give an example. A single possible example. Noting that, oddly enough, the people who spend a lot of money on this sort of thing are probably going to test any finished product to make sure it isn't poisonous or non-digestible. One. One example of what you're 'concerned' about enough to 'just ask questions'.


Don't you be throwing quotes at me like I'm some kind of troll.

I used the "glow in the dark kitten" example. That was creating using a combination of monkey and jellyfish genes. Neither of which are eaten by people. What if a similar combination was used in sheep to create "glow in the dark" wool? Even grown sheep are slaughtered for human and animal consumption. What proteins and chemicals would be created to make wool glow in the dark and what affect would it have on human and animal physiology?

Recently there was an article on Fark about a protein that opossums make that renders them immune to almost all known natural poisons. Pig Thyroids are already used to make prescriptions to treat Hypothyroidism. So what if they geneticly altered pigs with Opossum genes to make them capable of creating the same poison neutralizing proteins found in opossums. It's not like they'll harvest those proteins and dump that meat. There are millions of pigs in the U.S and they are physiologically similar enough to humans to be used in tissue transplants (heart valves) and hormone therapies. they represent a huge base of pharmaceutical manufacturing. BUT how would those proteins affect human and animal physiology if consumed in the quantities the average american consumes pork?

Ducks and geese and chickens and turkeys are food animals but there is also a market for their feathers. Again, glow in the dark feathers? Wouldn't that be something?

if it were just a matter of creating larger, meatier, disease resistant animals, that's one thing. That's the whole point of selective breeding. But when you start introducing genetic material that is not natural to that animal, and exists in animals that are not commonly or never consumed by humans or domestic animals, that has the potential to create problems.

And that's just the animals. Plant crops are far less controlable. Pollen gets everywhere. How you make sure your genetic modifications don't contaminate native plant species? Do we really want to risk a kudzu plant that is resistant or immune to weed killer?
 
2012-07-16 12:56:14 AM
If they can do this for dairy cows would we also get rein-Carnation milk?
 
2012-07-16 01:02:57 AM

Bermuda59: If they can do this for dairy cows would we also get rein-Carnation milk?


*groan* +1
 
2012-07-16 01:15:51 AM
Stopped reading at "fish, insects and animals."
 
2012-07-16 01:38:40 AM
mmm.. frankenwieners
 
2012-07-16 01:40:27 AM
cdn1.gossipcenter.com
 
2012-07-16 02:00:15 AM
Anyone point out yet that splicing together different plants (i.e. "entirely different species") has been a staple of agriculture and especially vinology since long before we even knew how genes worked? Or that a spliced gene will do exactly the same thing in the new organism as in the one it came from because of how expression works?

And, thus, that anyone that says "we don't know what affect these new genes might have" is so incredibly stupid that we haven't even developed words to describe the sheer level of retardation involved?

Yes?

Good.
 
2012-07-16 02:01:15 AM
That's Frahnkensteer.

Also...

media.steampowered.com

Brooock baaaad!

/Prostituuuuuuu!!!
 
2012-07-16 02:02:47 AM
copperkitten.files.wordpress.com
 
2012-07-16 02:38:05 AM

Ambivalence: LowbrowDeluxe: Like what? Just give an example. A single possible example. Noting that, oddly enough, the people who spend a lot of money on this sort of thing are probably going to test any finished product to make sure it isn't poisonous or non-digestible. One. One example of what you're 'concerned' about enough to 'just ask questions'.

Don't you be throwing quotes at me like I'm some kind of troll.

I used the "glow in the dark kitten" example. That was creating using a combination of monkey and jellyfish genes. Neither of which are eaten by people. What if a similar combination was used in sheep to create "glow in the dark" wool? Even grown sheep are slaughtered for human and animal consumption. What proteins and chemicals would be created to make wool glow in the dark and what affect would it have on human and animal physiology?

Recently there was an article on Fark about a protein that opossums make that renders them immune to almost all known natural poisons. Pig Thyroids are already used to make prescriptions to treat Hypothyroidism. So what if they geneticly altered pigs with Opossum genes to make them capable of creating the same poison neutralizing proteins found in opossums. It's not like they'll harvest those proteins and dump that meat. There are millions of pigs in the U.S and they are physiologically similar enough to humans to be used in tissue transplants (heart valves) and hormone therapies. they represent a huge base of pharmaceutical manufacturing. BUT how would those proteins affect human and animal physiology if consumed in the quantities the average american consumes pork?

Ducks and geese and chickens and turkeys are food animals but there is also a market for their feathers. Again, glow in the dark feathers? Wouldn't that be something?

if it were just a matter of creating larger, meatier, disease resistant animals, that's one thing. That's the whole point of selective breeding. But when you start introducing genetic mater ...


People do eat jellyfish and monkeys btw.

And it's all about the protein intolerance in any species, and whether those proteins are processed, absorbed, or expunged. Basically if you asked that GM foods were fully protein sequenced to determine whether there are proteins that are potentially allergenic or toxic, the effort required would be so vast as to be incomprehensibly expensive.

You know how we did this tens of thousands of years ago, we tried eating something, depending on the taste & if you didn't die afterwards, we would decide to eat it again. I mean, heck, how else do you explain Fugu.

Please become more educated, and less easily swayed one way or another, both sides of the GM argument are to blame for poor research into the subject about which they wish to wax prolifically.
 
2012-07-16 04:43:05 AM
Horizontal Gene Transfer from GMOs Does Happen Link

GM Research: A gut feeling PDF

Spilling the Beans: Unintended GMO Health Risks Link
 
2012-07-16 05:08:03 AM

Jim_Callahan: Anyone point out yet that splicing together different plants (i.e. "entirely different species") has been a staple of agriculture and especially vinology since long before we even knew how genes worked? Or that a spliced gene will do exactly the same thing in the new organism as in the one it came from because of how expression works?


If you're talking about grafting, that's entirely different, you are just using the host plant as a growth/nutrient transport medium.

It's simply a way of speeding up flowering/fruiting, there is no gene transfer betwee the plants.
 
2012-07-16 05:20:19 AM
Wouldn't it be easier to send the cows to the slaughterhouse?
 
2012-07-16 06:30:26 AM

Pinko_Commie: If you're talking about grafting, that's entirely different, you are just using the host plant as a growth/nutrient transport medium..


I think he means stuff like wheat, which was created by the ancient Egyptians as a hybrid of two or more other grasses (cite).

i.e. It has DNA which was combined artificially (by man) from different plants. That makes it a Frankenfood by any hipster definition and I think they should stop eating it.

There's almost no food in the shops which can be described as "natural". eg. Carrots are orange because they used to grow in Holland and they wanted them to be the national color. There's very little natural about apples. Wild bananas are small and inedible*, etc.

(*) Which is a perfect reply to Creationists when they pull out their "banana" argument.
 
2012-07-16 06:32:52 AM

meat0918:
Then we have natural selection in action because farmers are not doing what they are supposed to with crop rotation(thinking corn root worms with BT resistance because farmers did exactly what they were told not to do and planted BT corn in the same fields 5 years running.


But, evolution doesn't happen and that corn was intelligently designed.
 
2012-07-16 07:11:01 AM
If they can make meat taste like meat again, and not the bland fairly flavorless stuff it is these days, then I'm all for it.

/tastes like chicken because chicken no longer tastes like chicken. Or much of anything, really.
//Frankenchicken!
 
2012-07-16 08:17:13 AM
ohh.. it's ok everyone, "male only" moths, incapable of having offspring.

No the DNA code isn't complete for them, but that's why we have frog DNA to fill in the gaps. What could possibly go wrong? They've spared no expense here to ensure our safety and comfort.

Jokes aside: It makes me wonder... if we came from primordial ooze, did mating pairs suddenly co-evolve from it together? for every animal, of every kind, on the planet?

It's the ONLY thing that gives me pause when dismissing creationism suggestions out-of-hand. It appeals to my Sci-Fi interests to suggest that we were a GM breeding experiment to someone.. whether it be God, or some aliens passing through trying to prove the validity of GM without getting in-trouble for doing it.

Or the Halo storyline. There, the entire universe is wiped clear of all life in an attempt to quell an out-of-control, space-faring, intelligent parasite; we reside as data in great big libraries, and upon the completion of the universe wipe-out, Artificial Intelligence constructs oversaw an operation designed to recreate us from the stored data (perhaps initially even raised on the "Garden of Eden" ring ships until we could form tribes of a sort to increase our odds for survival), and then seeded back onto the planets we'd initially been cataloged on. This included all the other animals that were cataloged as having also lived here.
 
2012-07-16 09:51:57 AM

Dead-Guy: Jokes aside: It makes me wonder... if we came from primordial ooze, did mating pairs suddenly co-evolve from it together? for every animal, of every kind, on the planet?


no. At some point, some asexually reproducing organism developed a mutation that caused allowed for sexual reproduction. This allowed for more gene transfer and created a selective advantage due to more genetic variance. That organism is the common ancestor of every sexually reproducing organism on the planet (or at least the vast majority of them).
 
2012-07-16 10:00:01 AM
"Unholy cow!"
 
2012-07-16 10:05:22 AM

uber humper: Premeditated_Road_Rage: "This sandwich tastes funny. What's in it?"

"Baloney."

"What kind?"

"Abby...something." (begins singing) "My baloney has a first name, it's A-B-B-Y... My baloney has a second name, it's N-O-R-M-A-L..."

"Wait... You mean to tell me that you made my lunch with ABNORMAL meat?"

Funny!


Reminds me: a guy I worked with told me he once bit into a tumor (on the tripe) when eating a bowl of menudo.

I had to ask, how did you know it was a tumor?

he looked me in the eyes with a thousand yard stare: "you know when you bite into a tumor..."


And like that, my desire to eat for today is gone.
 
2012-07-16 12:34:02 PM
Scare mongering. Mostly POLITICAL scare mongering. Genetic engineering is one of the few fields where the USA still leads the world. If you can't directly ban all products from the USA, just ban everything that might contain, or been fed a GMO product. The European ban on "Frankenfoods" is just politically inspired FUD.

It's funny though how in Europe higher levels of pesticide residue in foods is allowed. But they have to ban those e-v-i-l GMO foods..

http://www.science20.com/kevin_folta/food_fear_food_labels_and_my_two _ cents-92078
 
2012-07-16 01:07:23 PM

LowbrowDeluxe: Ambivalence: No one knows what this geneticly modified food will do to the human physiology or to other animals who consume it. It warrants some caution.

Like what? Just give an example. A single possible example. Noting that, oddly enough, the people who spend a lot of money on this sort of thing are probably going to test any finished product to make sure it isn't poisonous or non-digestible. One. One example of what you're 'concerned' about enough to 'just ask questions'.


OK. Splicing in rose genes to tomatoes to make the tomatoes hardier.

How many people in the world have a deadly allergy to roses? One? Ten? A million? You could go your whole life without eating a rose.: rose hips aren't that popular. You could test it on thousands of people, but that doesn't mean that folks won't start dropping dead when they eat a tomato or two. Even if only 1 person in 1000 is allergic, that's still millions of people.
 
2012-07-16 06:51:25 PM

BarkingUnicorn: Frankenstein's monster wasn't genetically modified, it was stitched together from parts of different bodies.


I'm not sure about that. The book certainly refers to Victor raiding cemeteries for material to study and charnel houses for the creature's bones, but I think that it implies that the flesh is manufactured. Frankenstein explicitly says that his method cannot bring life to dead flesh.

Also, while we're on the subject, although Victor marvels at the power of nature when he sees lightning and it says that the creature first comes to life during a thunderstorm, it doesn't say that the lightning was used to bring the creature to life, but that image turns up in every Frankenstein movie.

/Not exactly a thread-jack
 
2012-07-16 06:53:21 PM

The Jami Turman Fan Club: You could test it on thousands of people, but that doesn't mean that folks won't start dropping dead when they eat a tomato or two. Even if only 1 person in 1000 is allergic, that's still millions of people.


If 1 in a 1000 people were allergic to rose-tomatoes, you would certainly see the effects if you tested the tomatoes on thousands of people.
 
2012-07-18 08:51:14 PM

Dead-Guy:
No the DNA code isn't complete for them, but that's why we have frog DNA to fill in the gaps. What could possibly go wrong?


I suspect that the rate of ass-bumping while hopping will change dramatically.
 
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